Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
59 documents - page 1 of 3

Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, 1904-1978, bulk 1913-1974

Creator:
Jacques Seligmann & Co.  Search this
Subject:
Hauke, Cesar M. de (Cesar Mange)  Search this
Glaenzer, Eugene  Search this
Haardt, Georges  Search this
Seligman, Germain  Search this
Seligmann, Arnold  Search this
Parker, Theresa D.  Search this
Waegen, Rolf Hans  Search this
Trevor, Clyfford  Search this
Seligmann, René  Search this
Seligmann, Jacques  Search this
De Hauke & Co., Inc.  Search this
Jacques Seligmann & Co  Search this
Eugene Glaenzer & Co.  Search this
Germain Seligmann & Co.  Search this
Gersel  Search this
Type:
Gallery records
Topic:
Mackay, Clarence Hungerford, 1874-1938 -- Art collections  Search this
Schiff, Mortimer L. -- Art collections  Search this
Arenberg, duc d' -- Art collections  Search this
Liechtenstein, House of -- Art collections  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- France -- Paris  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Art and the war  Search this
Art dealers -- France -- Paris  Search this
La Fresnaye, Roger de, 1885-1925  Search this
Art, Renaissance  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Art treasures in war  Search this
Art, European  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial -- France -- Paris  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9936
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212486
AAA_collcode_jacqself
Theme:
The Art Market
Art Gallery Records
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_212486
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, 1904-1978, bulk 1913-1974 digital asset number 1
Online Media:

Louis Lozowick papers

Creator:
Lozowick, Louis, 1892-1973  Search this
Names:
American Artists' Congress  Search this
John Reed Club  Search this
Extent:
5.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Writings
Sketches
Date:
1898-1974
Summary:
The Louis Lozowick Papers measure 5.9 linear feet and are dated 1898-1974. Correspondence, writings, business records, printed material and photographs document Lozowick's career. Also included are biographical documents, sketches, and records relating to organizations that interested him.
Scope and Content Note:
The Louis Lozowick Papers measure 5.9 linear feet and are dated 1898-1974. Correspondence, writings, business records, printed material and photographs document Lozowick's career. Also included are biographical documents, sketches, and records relating to organizations that interested him.

Correspondence with colleagues, commercial clients, organizations, museums and galleries, family and friends, concerns business and personal affairs. A small number of letters are in Russian, Yiddish, German, and French. Writings include manuscripts, drafts, and notes for articles, books, reviews, and talks on art related subjects and other topics. Among Lozowick's notes are seven notebooks relating to published and unpublished writings.

Business records consist of an extensive alphabetical file recording sales and consignments, loans for exhibitions, and other financial transactions, accompanied by related printed material. Originally housed in loose leaf notebooks, these files are arranged by name of gallery, museum, organization, or event. In addition, there are a small number of loose receipts.

Lozowick retained printed matter, unpublished notes and writings, and miscellaneous items relating to organizations and groups of interest to him. The American Artists' Congress and the John Reed Club files are of particular interest; because he served as an officer in these organizations, his papers include copies of minutes, reports, and official correspondence.

Printed material includes exhibition catalogs, invitations and announcements. Material by Lozowick consists of articles, reviews, illustrations and reproductions. In addition, there are articles and miscellaneous items about Lozowick including announcements of his lectures, a course syllabus, and brochure about a tour of the U.S.S.R. led by him. Miscellaneous printed material includes research materials collected by Lozowick for his writing; illustrations of artists at work, in their studios, galleries, etc., and a 1922 broadside in French and Russian announcing a lecture.

Photographs include images of Lozowick and his family. Of particular interest is a photograph of Lozowick at a 1934 demonstration sponsored by the John Reed Club and Artists' Union. Photographs of works of art include works by Lozowick, as well as by American, European, and Russian artists; many of these, including lantern slides, may have been used to illustrate his lectures and writings. Among the miscellaneous subjects are Lozowick's studio, the Soviet Pavilion at the 1939 World's Fair, and an unidentified Soviet exhibition installation.

Also included are small number of biographical documents and sketches in pen and ink.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 8 series. Glass plate negatives and lantern slides are housed separately and closed to researchers.

Series 1: Biographical Information, 1923-1973 (Box 1; 10 folders; Reel 5893)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1916-1974 (Boxes 1-2; 1.25 linear ft.; Reels 5893-5895)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1917-circa 1970 (Boxes 2-3; 1.5 linear ft.; Reels 5895-5897)

Series 4: Business Records, 1929-1973 (Box 3; 0.25 linear ft.; Reel 5897-5898)

Series 5: Organizations, 1930-1972 (Box 4; 0.4 linear ft.; Reel 5898)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1920-1974 (Boxes 4-5 and OV 7; 1.25 linear ft.; Reels 5898-5899)

Series 7: Sketches, n.d. (Box 5; 1 folder; Reel 5899)

Series 8: Photographs, 1898-1973 (Boxes 5-6, 8; 1.05 linear ft.; Reel 5899)
Biographical Note:
Louis Lozowick (1892-1973) is known for his lithographs of New York City, many in the Precisionist mode. As a very young boy in the Ukraine, Lozowick showed an aptitude for drawing. At age eleven, with an older brother, he moved from his rural hometown to Kiev, where he received training at the Kiev Art Institute. In 1906, Lozowick came to the United States, joining a brother in New Jersey. While in high school, and for several years afterwards, Lozowick studied at the National Academy of Design under Leon Kroll, George Willloughby Maynard, Ivan Olinsky, and Douglas Volk. He graduated from Ohio State University in 1918 with a degree in art.

After a year's stint in the medical corps of the U.S. Army, Lozowick headed to Paris in the fall of 1920, where he studied French at the Sorbonne. By early 1922, he had settled in Berlin and was enrolled at the Friedrick Wilhelms Universität. During this time, Lozowick began painting seriously, made his first lithographs, and established friendships with many Russian artists in Germany, including El Lissitsky; he also made a trip to Moscow, where he met a number of leading Russian artists. While living in Berlin, Lozowick had his first solo show at K. E. Twardy Book Shop in 1922, and a second at the Gallerie Alfred Heller in the following year.

Lozowick worked mainly as a graphic artist and supplemented his income with commercial work. In addition, he taught art history and lithography classes, lectured, and wrote about art. During the Depression he worked with the Public Works of Art Project, New York City, for a brief time in 1934. Between 1935 and 1940, he was employed by the Graphic Arts Division of the Works Progress Administration.

Lozowick taught art history at the Educational Alliance Art School, New York City, for a semester prior to going to Europe, and for extended periods afterwards. He was a lithography instructor at the John Reed Club School of Art and the American Artists School, and over the years taught a number of private pupils. In 1924, Lozowick delivered lectures on modern Russian art for the Société Anonyme, and lectured regularly on a variety of art topics to a many other groups. Eventually he was represented by a speakers' bureau that arranged several lecture tours.

Russian art, art and artists in the Soviet Union, and Jewish art were among the topics that particularly interested Lozowick. He wrote extensively on these subjects and others, publishing many articles and reviews. While living in Berlin, he wrote for Broom and contributed translations to that periodical. Two major manuscripts, a book about William Gropper and a memoir titled Survivor From a Dead Age, appeared posthumously. In addition, he was a founder of the New Masses, a contributing editor, and eventually its art editor.

One of the organizers of the John Reed Club in 1929 and a charter member, Lozowick became its Executive Secretary in 1931 and remained active throughout the club's five-year existence. In 1935, Lozowick participated in organizing the first American Artists' Congress, became the group's Executive Secretary, and for several years was an extremely active member of the New York chapter.

Throughout his long career, Louis Lozowick exhibited widely in local and national exhibitions. He won a number of awards and was invited to spend several summers in residence at the Yaddo artists' colony.
Provenance:
Gift of Louis and Adele Lozowick, 1966-1980. Various portions were microfilmed on reels D254-D254A, and 1333-1337. In 2004, all portions of the gift were merged, reprocessed, and remicrofilmed.
Restrictions:
The microfilm of this collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website. Use of material not microfilmed or digitized requires an appointment. Glass plate negatives and lantern slides are housed separately.
Rights:
The Louis Lozowick Papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Lithographers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Writings
Sketches
Citation:
Louis Lozowick Papers, 1898-1974. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.lozoloui
See more items in:
Louis Lozowick papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lozoloui
Online Media:

Konrad and Florence Ballin Cramer papers

Creator:
Cramer, Konrad, 1888-1963  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
Florence Gallery  Search this
Woodstock Artists Association (Woodstock, N.Y.)  Search this
Cramer, Florence Ballin, 1884-1962  Search this
Extent:
8.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Christmas cards
Diaries
Designs
Sketchbooks
Drawings
Photographs
Prints
Sketches
Date:
1897-1968
Summary:
The papers of painter, printmaker, and photographer Konrad Cramer and his wife, painter and printmaker Florence Ballin Cramer, measure 8.5 linear feet and date from 1897 to 1968. Papers document both artists' personal and professional lives and are especially rich in documentation of the art community of Woodstock, New York, where Florence Ballin first attended art classes in 1906, and where the couple settled in 1911. Records include biographical materials, correspondence, a Christmas card album, diaries, writings, business records, personal financial records, printed materials, photographs, and artwork.
Scope and Contents note:
The papers of painter, printmaker, and photographer Konrad Cramer and his wife, painter and printmaker Florence Ballin Cramer, measure 8.5 linear feet and date from 1897 to 1968. Papers document both artists' personal and professional lives and are especially rich in documentation of the art community of Woodstock, New York, from 1906, when Florence first attended art classes there, and where the couple resided until their deaths in the 1960s. Records include biographical materials, correspondence, a Christmas card album, business records, diaries, writings, personal financial records, printed materials, photographs, and artwork.

Correspondence is between the Cramers and other artists, curators, gallery staff, editors, writers, and personal friends and family. Many drafts and carbons of outgoing letters are also present. The Christmas card album brings together original cards made by their artist friends in the 1920s and early 1930s. Diaries are of both artists, mostly from 1949 onward, with notes and excerpts from earlier diaries present. Writings include technical and biographical essays by Konrad Cramer, and autobiographical and historical essays by Florence Ballin Cramer; notebooks and notes relate to art, travel, photography, and other subjects. Personal Business Records include price lists, receipts, and gallery correspondence with dealers and exhibitors; correspondence, accounting records, and writings related to Florence Ballin Cramer's Florence Gallery in New York City (1919-1920); records related to Woodstock arts and civic organizations in which the Cramers were involved; and personal financial records.

Printed Materials include publicity materials related to the Cramers' various endeavors and the activities of Woodstock arts and civic organizations, as well as dozens of books, little magazines, and journals by and about members of the Woodstock artist's colony. Photographs depict the Cramers and their friends, including early Art Students League Classes and the annual Maverick festival in the 1920s. Also found are a small number of photo-collages and experiments with color photography, and a series of early twentieth century photographs in the pictorialist style. Artwork includes early sketchbooks of both artists; loose sketches, drawings, and designs; textile designs by Konrad Cramer; and prints and printing blocks.
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged into 8 series:

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1898-1955 (3 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1900-1964 (2.2 linear feet; Boxes 1-3, 9)

Series 3: Christmas Card Album, 1921-1961 (0.8 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 4: Diaries, 1906-1962 (1 linear foot; Box 4)

Series 5: Writings, 1897-1962 (0.7 linear feet; Box 5, OV 11)

Series 6: Personal Business Records, 1918-1962 (0.3 linear feet; Box 5, OV 10)

Series 7: Printed Materials, 1906-1968 (1.5 linear feet; Boxes 6-7, 9, OV 11)

Series 8: Photographs, 1906-1960 (0.5 linear feet; Box 7)

Series 9: Artwork, 1897-1954 (1 linear foot; Boxes 8-9, OV 10-11)
Biographical/Historical note:
Konrad Cramer was born in Wurtzburg, Germany, in 1888, and studied at the Karlsruhe Academy of Fine Arts from 1906 to 1908 with Ludwig Schmidt-Reutte and Ernest Schurth. After a year in the German army, he returned to Karlsruhe to set up a studio, making frequent trips to Munich, where he was exposed to the experimental artists of the Blaue Reiter group, including Wassily Kandinsky and Franz Marc.

Florence Ballin was born in Brooklyn, NY, in 1884. She studied at the Woodstock, New York, summer school of the Art Students League beginning in 1906 under Birge Harrison along with fellow students John Carlson, Grace Mott Johnson, and Andrew Dasburg. She served as secretary for the League in 1906, and had a studio on 59th Street in Manhattan, where she held her first exhibition in 1909. In 1911, she traveled to Europe and met Konrad Cramer in Munich and joined him on visits to exhibitions and studios of the vanguard artists. The two married, moved to the United States, and settled permanently in Woodstock, New York.

Konrad Cramer is often credited as being an important link between German and American modernism in art, and his experimentations with abstraction and expressionism during his first years in Woodstock would seem to bear this out. In 1912 and 1913, he painted a series he called "Improvisations" (after Kandinsky) which was shown in a group exhibition at the MacDowell Club in 1913 along with Andrew Dasburg, Oliver Chaffee, and Paul Rohland. Cramer was photographed by Alfred Stieglitz and wrote an essay about the 291 Gallery for Stieglitz's magazine, Camera Work, in 1914.

The Cramers had two daughters, in 1914 and 1917, and Konrad Cramer became an American citizen in 1917. For income, he began designing textiles for department stores using stencils and batiks around 1918. In his painting, he turned from abstract experiments to the traditional subjects of landscape, still life, and figure in a more representational style that blended modern and regional influences. Florence Ballin Cramer opened a gallery on 57th Street in 1919, encouraged by the sculptor Elie Nadelman. The mission of the Florence Gallery, as it was called, was to exhibit and sell the work of living artists. Although it only survived the season, it was the first gallery to show work by Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Alexander Brook, Ernest Fiene, and Stefan Hirsch, and generated important sales for several young artists in her circle.

Konrad Cramer returned to Europe in 1920 on a Rockefeller grant to study educational methods for craftsmen in Germany and France, and on his return he taught at the Woodstock School of Painting and Allied Arts. Cramer also studied lithography with Bolton Brown in Woodstock around this time, and both Cramers took up printmaking and began publishing prints in local arts magazines. The Cramers were deeply immersed in Woodstock life, participating in the annual Maverick festivals, the Woodstock Artists Association, the Historical Society, and other organizations, hosting meetings and serving as officers of many committees and organizations that presented and supported artwork in their community. They enjoyed a rich social life there among fellow artists at frequent parties and festivals, where Konrad provided entertainment with his fiddle and both Cramers memorialized events in countless photographs.

Konrad Cramer exhibited at the Whitney Studio Club in 1924, and taught at the Children's University School (now the Dalton School), where he painted a mural in 1929. The 1930s were busy years in both Cramers' professional lives. Konrad's exhibitions included the Carnegie International (1929 and 1933), and a two-man show at the Dudensing Gallery (1930), where Cramer and Adolph Gottlieb had been selected the most deserving unknown American painters of the year. He was also included in the exhibit Abstract Painting in America at the Whitney Museum (1935). Florence Ballin Cramer exhibited at Marie Harriman Gallery (1931 and 1933), Macy Galleries (1933), the Pennsylvania Academy (1934 and 1936), and the Corcoran (1935 and 1937). Both Konrad and Florence Ballin Cramer were included in a traveling exhibition of Woodstock artists organized by the College Art Association (1931), the first and second Whitney Biennials (1933 and 1935), and the Wanamaker Regional Art Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting (1934).

In 1934, the Cramers traveled to Mexico, where they produced many paintings and drawings. Konrad Cramer joined the Federal Art Project briefly in 1935, administering the regional program in Woodstock with Judson Smith. It was around this time that he began to learn photography. He became a sort of community photographer, taking photographs of friends' artwork and commissioned portraits, as well as informal photographs of friends. Cramer experimented with photographic techniques such as solarization and collage, using prisms, panes of glass, or composite printing. He first exhibited photographs in 1936 at the Albany Institute, and established the Woodstock School of Miniature Photography (the "miniature" referring to the then-new format of 35mm film) in 1937. He also taught courses in photography at Bard College in the 1940s, and his photographs and articles about photography were published in national magazines.

For the remainder of his life, Cramer continued to teach, write, and produce photographs, occasionally returning to painting, drawing, and printmaking, creating gouaches, wax resist drawings, and stencils of landscapes and figures, with an increasing interest in abstract styles and automatic techniques. Three of his early paintings were included in the 1946 Whitney Museum exhibition Pioneers of Modern Art in America, and the same year, he exhibited abstract photographs at the Woodstock Artists Association. In the late 1940s, he built an automatic drawing machine which he called the sympalmagraph, which rendered precise, geometric forms. In the late 1950s, he collaborated on a traveling exhibition and book of abstract photographs with Manuel Komroff and Nathan Resnik called The Third Eye.

Florence Ballin Cramer held her last exhibitions at the Woodstock Town House gallery (1953) and at Long Island University (1957). She died in 1962. Konrad Cramer died the following year. Both were memorialized in an exhibition at the Woodstock Artists Association Gallery in 1968.
Separated Materials note:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent for microfilming (reels 1027, D170, and D171) including photographs, diaries, and sketches. Loaned materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
A portion of the papers in this collection were loaned to the Archives of American Art for microfilming in 1964 by Aileen Cramer and Margot Cramer Taylor, daughters of Florence and Konrad Cramer. While selected diaries, sketches, and photographs were returned to the donors, some, but not all, of the original loan was subsequently donated with additional materials, in 1975.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Konrad and Florence Ballin Cramer papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Photographers -- New York (State)  Search this
Color photography  Search this
Art -- New York (State) -- Woodstock  Search this
Printmakers -- New York (State) -- Woodstock  Search this
Photocollage  Search this
Artist colonies -- New York (State) -- Woodstock  Search this
Festivals  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- Woodstock  Search this
Genre/Form:
Christmas cards
Diaries
Designs
Sketchbooks
Drawings
Photographs
Prints
Sketches
Citation:
Konrad and Florence Ballin Cramer papers, 1897-1964. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.cramkonr
See more items in:
Konrad and Florence Ballin Cramer papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cramkonr
Online Media:

George Sugarman papers

Creator:
Sugarman, George, 1912-1999  Search this
Names:
Honegger, Gottfried, 1917-  Search this
Jaffe, Shirley, 1923-  Search this
Kushner, Robert, 1949-  Search this
Extent:
12.22 Linear feet
21.83 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Drawings
Interviews
Photographs
Sound recordings
Date:
1912-2001
Summary:
The papers of painter and sculptor George Sugarman measure 12.22 linear feet and 21.83 GB and date from 1912 to 2001, with the bulk of the material dating from 1959 to 1999. The collection documents Sugarman's career as a sculptor primarily through correspondence, project files, exhibition files, writings, and photographs. The collection also includes address and appointment books, business and financial records, and printed material. A partially processed addition consisting of audio (3 sound cassettes) and video recordings (1 video reel, 1/2", 11 videocassettes, 7 U-matic and 4 VHS), and one Super 8 mm motion picture film, as well as digital copies of the film and video recordings, includes lectures by Sugarman, documentaries about Sugarman and his sculptures, and radio and television appearances by Sugarman.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of painter and sculptor George Sugarman measure 12.22 linear feet and 21.83 GB and date from 1912 to 2001, with the bulk of the material dating from 1959 to 1999. The collection documents Sugarman's career as a sculptor primarily through correspondence, project files, exhibition files, writings, and photographs. The collection also includes address and appointment books, business and financial records, and printed material. A partially processed addition consisting of audio (3 sound cassettes) and video recordings (1 video reel, 1/2", 11 videocassettes, 7 U-matic and 4 VHS), and one Super 8 mm motion picture film, as well as digital copies of the film and video recordings, includes lectures by Sugarman, documentaries about Sugarman and his sculptures, and radio and television appearances by Sugarman.

The bulk of the collection consists of correspondence with family members, friends, artists, and scholars, reflecting Sugarman's diverse influences and interests. The project files and exhibition files illustrate Sugarman's prolific career as an artist and document Sugarman's numerous projects and exhibitions abroad, particularly in Japan.

The writings by Sugarman are noteworthy as they reveal the integral relationship between Sugarman's philosophical theories about art and his actual works of art. The business and financial records mainly document expenses incurred while working on various projects and exhibitions and while traveling. Maps, clippings, and brochures from Sugarman's many travels are included as well as exhibition catalogs and announcements for Sugarman and others. The collection also contains photographs of George Sugarman and his artwork, dating mostly from the 1970s.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into ten series. Series are arranged by type of material; materials within series are arranged alphabetically by name or by type of material and then chronologically. Series 10 is unprocessed.

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1912-2000, n.d. (Box 1; 9 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1959-2001, n.d. (Boxes 1-3, OV 8; 2.9 linear feet)

Series 3: Project Files, 1968-1997, n.d. (Boxes 3-4; 1 linear foot)

Series 4: : Exhibition Files, 1965-1993, n.d. (Boxes 4-5, OV 8; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 5: Writings, 1951-1992, n.d. (Box 5; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 6: Address and Appointment Books, 1972-1997, n.d. (Boxes 5-6; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 7: Business and Financial Records, 1962-1998, n.d. (Box 6; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1954-1999, n.d. (Boxes 6-7, OV 8; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 9: Photographs, 1966-1981, n.d. (Box 7; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 10: Sound and Moving Image Material, 1972-1990 (Box 9, FC 10; 1.2 linear feet, ER01-ER13; 21.83 GB)
Biographical Note:
George Sugarman was a painter and sculptor who disliked labels because he believed they oversimplified the complexity of art, and Sugarman's artwork, like the artist himself, resists classification and oversimplification. Although he was influenced by Surrealist imagery, Cubist ideas of space, Baroque sculpture, and Abstract Expressionism, Sugarman's sculptures also display a musical quality, reflecting his interest in jazz music and improvisation. Sugarman was a pioneer in the use of color in sculpture and is probably best known for his large, polychrome aluminum sculptures.

Sugarman made the decision to become an artist relatively late in life. Born in New York on May 11, 1912, he studied at City College in New York and graduated with a B.A. in 1934. After serving in the United States Navy from 1941 until 1945, he attended evening classes at Museum of Modern Art. At the age of 39, George Sugarman traveled to Paris to study painting under the GI Bill of Rights. While in Paris, he decided to study sculpture with Ossip Zadkine and began creating wood carvings and terra-cotta sculptures. Over the next few years, Sugarman traveled to Italy and Spain, studying Baroque sculpture and architecture. He was particularly attracted to the work of Bernini and to Bernini's use of space.

Sugarman returned to New York in 1955 and began working with laminated wood. In order to support himself, he accepted a job teaching carpentry at a private school. He joined the Brata Gallery in 1957 and helped found the New Sculpture Group. A few years later, Sugarman received major recognition of his work by winning second prize in sculpture at the Pittsburgh International Exhibition. Sugarman went on to win a Longview Foundation Grant, a Ford Foundation Grant for his work at the Tamarind Lithography Workshop, and a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

In the 1960s, Sugarman began working on large painted-aluminum sculptures and completed his first outdoor sculpture at the Xerox Building in El Segundo, Calif. in 1969. Many of Sugarman's outdoor sculptures generated intense controversy, particularly his sculpture for the Edward A. Garmatz Federal Building and Courthouse in Baltimore, but he was devoted to his belief in the social as well as aesthetic importance of public art. Sugarman saw public sculpture as a "metaphor for the human condition" and as a way to transcend what he called the "indoor eye," the eye which views art in isolation from its physical and social environment.

Sugarman taught at the Graduate School of Hunter College in New York City from 1960 until 1970 and served as visiting Associate Professor at the Yale University Graduate School of Art from 1967 to 1968. Sugarman was a prolific artist, participating in numerous one-man shows, group exhibitions, and competitions all over the world, yet recognition of his talent came almost a decade later in the United States than in Europe. His works are in major collections including the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Art Institute of Chicago. George Sugarman died on August 25, 1999.
Related Material:
The transcript and audiotapes of an interview with George Sugarman conducted by Paul Cummings in 1974 for the Archives of American Art's Oral History Program is available at the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds materials lent for microfilming. Reel N70-50 and N70-51 includes biographical material, an essay about George Sugarman, exhibition catalogs and announcements dating from 1954 to 1960, a certificate, writings by Sugarman, and correspondence dating 1953-1970. The originals of most of these materials were included in later donations. Reel N70-50 also contains a substantial number of photographs of Sugarman's natural wood sculptures from the late 1950s, his early works in wood, clay, and plaster dating from 1951 to 1958, his drawings and paintings from the late 1960s, installations and works in progress from 1960 to 1970, and photographs of Sugarman working in the studio in the 1960s. There are also twelve sketchbooks and loose pages dating from 1943 to 1958, which document Sugarman's travels to the South Pacific, New York City, France, Spain, and North Africa. Lent material not included in later gifts remain with the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
In 1970, George Sugarman lent material to the Archives of American Art for microfilming. In 1980 and 1983, George Sugarman donated portions of the material previously lent, along with additional materials. Additional materials were donated by Sugarman's niece, Arden Sugarman Eilopolous, in 1999 and 2000. In 2006, the Sugarman Foundation via Arden Sugarman donated the audio and video recordings.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Microfilmed portion must be consulted on microfilm. Use of unmicrofilmed portion requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Rights:
The George Sugarman papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Interviews
Photographs
Sound recordings
Citation:
George Sugarman papers, 1912-2001. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.sugageor
See more items in:
George Sugarman papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-sugageor
Online Media:

Frank Stella papers

Creator:
Stella, Frank  Search this
Names:
Harvard University -- Faculty  Search this
Princeton University -- Students  Search this
Leider, Philip, 1929-  Search this
Extent:
12.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Interviews
Sketchbooks
Date:
1941-1993
bulk 1978-1989
Summary:
The Frank Stella papers measure 12.4 linear feet and date from 1941 to 1993, with the bulk of the records spanning the period 1978 to 1989. The collection documents the professional and personal life of abstract artist, Frank Stella. Among the papers are correspondence, a small cache of records from his years as an undergraduate at Princeton University, writings by and about Stella, interview transcripts, sketchbooks, registers and inventories, financial records, printed matter, and photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
The Frank Stella papers, 12.4 linear feet, document the artist's professional and personal life. Papers date from 1941-1993, with the bulk spanning the period 1978-1989. Among the papers are correspondence, a small cache of records from his years as an undergraduate at Princeton University, writings by and about Stella, interview transcripts, sketchbooks, registers and inventories, financial records, printed matter, and photographs.

Correspondence, 1966-1989 and undated (Series 1), consists mainly of incoming letters, many annotated with brief notes indicating Stella's reply, and carbon copies of a small number of replies. Correspondence is with individuals, dealers, institutions and organizations and concerns professionals and personal business matters including awards and prizes, exhibitions, art loans and sales, fan mail; requests for autographs, interviews, studio tours, donations, jury service, exhibitions, critiques, information, lectures, and for Stella's participation in programs or events; legal matters, and political fund raising activities.

Princeton University records, 1954-1958 (Series 2), contain course materials, papers examinations, notes, and Stella's thesis, "Art in Wester Christendom." Correspondence regards university and personal business, including Stella's Selective Service student deferment. Also included are letters from Stella's parents and friends, pencil drawings and sketches, photographs of student work by Stella, and printed matter.

Writings, 1968-1993 and undated (Series 3), consist of articles, talks and lectures by Stella, his Norton Lectures delivered at Harvard published as Working Space, and miscellaneous notes. Writings about Stella are drafts of exhibition catalogs and manuscripts of articles. Interview Transcripts, 1964-1993 and undated (Series 4), include 13 published and unpublished interviews with Frank Stella conducted for publication as magazine articles or as research for exhibition catalogs, and a transcript of an interview with Philip Leider.

Sketchbooks, 1956-1968 and undated (Series 5), 10 volumes, contain sketches in pencil, ink, and colored markers. One includes notes on new paintings, color, and shape; another contains a list of artists and notes on abstract composition. Registers and Inventories, 1959-1983 and undated (Series 6), were compiled for various purposes and record paintings, works in mixed media, drawings, series, inventories prepared by dealers, and miscellaneous notes and lists compiled or collected by Stella.

Financial Records, 1972-1986 (Series 7), document both personal and professional expenses. They consist of banking records, paid bills, payroll, petty cash slips and receipts, and records of race horse expenses.

Printed Matter, 1957-1993 and undated (Series 8), includes articles by Stella and his book Working Space. Articles about Stella include feature stories and interviews, exhibition reviews, reviews of his book, and other articles that mention him briefly and/or include a reproduction of his work. Also included are catalogs, invitations and announcements for solo and group shows, and exhibitions juried by Stella. Other printed matter consists of announcements of limited edition prints, printed matter from events in which Stella participated, and miscellaneous items.

Photographs, 1941-1989 and undated (Series 9), are of people, exhibitions, works of art, places, and miscellaneous subjects. Photographs of Stella include an image of him as a young child, Stella with his wife Dr. Harriet McGurk, with his infant son, and with others. Exhibition photographs are of the opening of "Frank Stella: Neue Werke" at Galerie Würthle, 1984, and installation views of his 1989 show at Knoedler & Co., "Frank Stella: New Work." Photographs of works of art include prints, 35 mm color slides, and color transparencies of works by Stella. Places pictured are views of the Gemini G.E.L. studio, and miscellaneous subjects are horses and a banner at the Metropolitan Museum of art mimicking a black painting (not created or authorized by Stella).
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into nine series:

Series 1: Correspondence, 1966-1989, undated (Boxes 1-4; 3.25 linear feet)

Series 2: Princeton University, 1954-1958, undated (Box 4; 0.25 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, 1968-1993, undated (Boxes 4-7; 2.3 linear feet)

Series 4: Interview Transcripts, 1964-1993, undated (Box 7; 0.25 linear feet)

Series 5: Sketchbooks, 1956-1968, undated (Box 8; 0.25 linear feet)

Series 6: Registers and Inventories, 1959-1983, undated (Box 8; 0.25 linear feet)

Series 7: Financial Records, 1972-1986 (Boxes 8-11; 4.0 linear feet)

Series 8: Printed Matter, 1957-1993, undated (Boxes 12-13 and ov fldr 14; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 9: Photographs, 1941-1989, undated (Box 13; 0.25 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Frank Stella (b. 1936) achieved professional recognition at a young age and soon became internationally prominent and influential. Known for his amazing productivity and energy, for more than forty years this abstract artist has made paintings, prints, and sculpture in a variety of styles that have been described as ranging from minimalist to "maximalist."

While a student at Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., Stella enrolled in an art appreciation course with a studio component held at the school's Addison Gallery of American Art. He then immersed himself in a studio program and became friendly with the instructor, abstract painter Patrick Morgan. Frank Stella, Carl Andre, and other students were often invited to Morgan's home where he and his wife Maude, also an artist, showed their collection of contemporary American art and discussed art seen at New York galleries. At Princeton University Stella decided to major in history, and continued to paint on his own. Studio art courses were not yet a part of the curriculum, but he soon learned that art history instructor and abstract painter William Seitz had started a not-for-credit painting studio that met at night in one of the architectural drawing studios. In this informal group Stella met Darby Bannard, a serious painter who was to become a close friend; he also developed a friendship with fellow student Michael Fried during their years at Princeton. Following Seitz's recommendation, Stella began visiting New York galleries. With the 1956 appointment of Stephen Greene as its first artist-in-residence, Princeton began offering studio courses which Stella took full advantage of. His work was influenced by what he had seen at the galleries on his many trips to New York - de Kooning and Frankenthaler, and later Rothko and Gottlieb - and his junior year essay about Hiberno-Saxon illuminated manuscripts, "Art in Western Christendom," made reference to Jackson Pollock.

Stella headed for New York City after his 1958 graduation from Princeton, where his family expect he would study law at Columbia or New York University. Instead, he rented a storefront studio on the Lower East Side and began his "transitional" paintings, earning a living by painting houses a few days a week. Before long he moved to a loft, and by winter had begun the Black series. Once settled in New York, Stella was introduced to critic Clement Greenberg and began meeting artists such as Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg. He first exhibited professionally at the Tibor de Nagy Gallery in the spring of 1959 when one of his Black paintings, Club Onyx, was included in a group show. By the end of that summer the artist was represented by the Leo Castelli Gallery which soon sold a Black painting, Clinton Plaza, the first to be acquired by someone outside his immediate circle of friends. Stella's former teacher, William Seitz, recommended that Stella be included in an exhibition of emerging talent at the Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College; he also urged Museum of Modern Art curator Dorothy Miller to look at Stella's painting at the Tibor de Nagy Gallery, which resulted in an invitation participate in her exhibition, Sixteen Americans. The Museum of Modern Art purchased The Marriage of Reason and Squalor from the exhibition. Opportunities to show in group and solo exhibitions continued at a steady pace, and in1961 Stella had his first one-man show in Europe. He is one of the very few artists honored by The Museum of Modern Art with two retrospective exhibitions (1970 and 1987).

Frank Stella's work is characterized by changing styles. Abstract expressionist paintings of his student days gave way to minimalist work that soon incorporated shaped canvases and eventually stressed color and curved motifs. By the 1980s his minimalist aesthetic had been replaced by dynamic mixed media pieces. Shaped paintings developed into wall constructions with large, projecting, multiple components and lively brush stroke patterns. By the 1990s, much of Stella's work was fully three-dimensional.

The University of California at Irvine invited Stella to be its artist in residence in 1967; Barbara Rose (Stella's wife from 1961-1969), who was in the process of writing American Art Since 1960, was asked to lecture on contemporary art. With their young daughter and infant son, they moved to California. Upon arrival they were asked to sign a loyalty oath required of all state employees; Barbara signed, but Frank refused. While she lectured and wrote, he played lots of tennis. Soon master printer Ken Tyler persuaded Stella, who had never seriously pursued printmaking, to work with lithography. His first prints were Star of Persia I and Star of Persia II (designs from the Notched V series of 1964-65 not previously executed) and the entire edition sold by the end of the year. He has continued making prints, working in series as he does with his paintings; many of his print series are based on painting series of the same name. Stella's prints often rival paintings in their scale and bold color. Since 1967 Stella has produced prints with Ken Tyler, first in Los Angeles at Gemini G.E.L., and later in Bedford, N.Y. where Tyler Graphics Ltd. was established in 1974. Their close working relationship has resulted a large number of remarkable prints employing practically every graphic technique - sometimes in startling combinations - using a wide range of materials, and prompting innovative solutions to technical challenges. By 1972, Stella was also producing prints with Petersburg Press, Ltd. of London and New York; three years later, Petersburg installed a commercial lithography press on the first floor of Stella's home in New York City.

Throughout his career, Frank Stella has been sought after as a speaker, teacher, visiting critic, and artist in residence. Most noteworthy among these activities was his appointment as the Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry at Harvard for the academic year 1983-84. Stella, Accompanied by his wife Harriet and their two small boys, Stella spent much of the preceding year at the American Academy in Rome looking at Italian art, particularly Caravaggio, planning and researching the lectures he would deliver at Harvard. His six Norton Lectures, which presented a nontraditional evaluation the work of Caravaggio, Rubens, Carracci, Picasso, Pollock, and others, related abstract painting of the twentieth century to the art of the past. These well-received lectures were published in 1986 as book titled Working Space.

In recent years Stella was commissioned to produce several large works for public spaces including several outdoor sculptures, a large decorative relief frieze and the interior dome of the Princess of Wales Theater in Toronto, and his first completed architectural project, a bandshell for the City of Miami.

1936 -- Born May 12, Malden, Mass.

1950-1954 -- Student at Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass.; studies painting with Patrick Morgan; meets Carl Andre and Hollis Frampton, fellow students.

1954-1958 -- Student at Princeton University; paints in William Seitz's non-credit open studio; Darby Bannard is a fellow student; begins visiting New York galleries to see contemporary art studies with Stephen Greene, 1956, artist-in-residence; meets Michael Fried, also a Princeton undergraduate; writes thesis on Hiberno-Saxon illuminated manuscripts.

1958 -- Moves to New York City, rents a storefront on the Lower East Side to use as a studio during the summer and works part-time as a house painter; in the fall moves to a loft on West Broadway; Darby Bannard introduces him to critic Clement Greenberg.

1959 -- Black series painting included in a group show at the Tibor de Nagy Gallery, Stella's first professional exhibition included in "Sixteen Americans" exhibition, Museum of Modern Art; joins Castelli Gallery; The Marriage of Reason and Squalor purchased by Museum of Modern Art; Carl Andre introduces him to Barbara Rose, a Columbia University graduate student in art history; resumes friendships with Carl Andre and Hollis Frampton.

1960 -- Paints first shaped canvases; first solo exhibition at the Leo Castelli Gallery.

1961 -- Applies for Fulbright Grant to study in Japan; first trip to Europe; first solo exhibition at Galerie Lawrence, Paris; marriage to Barbara Rose.

1962 -- Birth of daughter Rachel.

1963 -- Artist in Residence, Dartmouth College; travels in Iran.

1964 -- Included in U.S. section, XXXII Venice Biennale.

1965 -- Travels to Brazil.

1966 -- Performs in "Open Score," a game of tennis with racquets that transmitted sound and light composed by Robert Rauschenberg; birth of son Michael.

1967 -- Appointment as Artist in Residence, University of California, Irvine but refuses to sign the required loyalty oath and does not teach; makes first prints at Gemini G.E.L.; teaches advanced summer workshop, University of Saskatchewan; designs sets and costumes for "Scramble," Merce Cunningham's performance at Connecticut College Dance Festival.

1969 -- Divorce from Barbara Rose; teaches beginning painting to undergraduates at Brandeis University, spring semester.

1970 -- Retrospective exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art.

1973 -- Travels to Brazil, Paris, London.

1974 -- Honorary degree, Minneapolis College of Art and Design.

1975 -- Birth of daughter Laura to Shirley De Lemos Wyse.

1976 -- Car painted with design Stella created for BMW races at Le Mans.

1977 -- Travels to India, London, and Germany; meets race drivers Ronnie Peterson and Peter Gregg.

1978 -- Marries Dr. Harriet McGurk

1979 -- Receives Claude Moore Fuss Award for "distinguished contribution to public service," Phillips Academy; creates design for Peter Gregg's race car.

1980 -- Survives auto crash with Peter Gregg en route to Le Mans.

1981 -- Awarded Honorary Fellowship, Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design, Jerusalem; travels in Egypt and Venice; awarded Medal for Painting, Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture.

1982 -- Mayor's Award of Honor for Arts and Culture; birth of son Peter; Residency in Painting, American Academy in Rome (Nov.-Dec. and Spring 1983), where he begins researching and writing the lectures he will present at Harvard during the coming academic year.

1983-1984 -- Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry, Harvard University; delivers a series of six lectures titled "Working Space" (Oct.-April)

1984 -- Honorary degree, Princeton University; birth of son Patrick.

1985 -- Honorary degree, Dartmouth College; Award of American Art, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.

1986 -- Honorary degree, Brandeis University; travels to England; publication of Working Space.

1987 -- Second retrospective exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art.

1988 -- First architectural project, a proposal for a footbridge over the Seine River, in collaboration with engineer Peter Rice.

1990 -- The Symphony commissioned by Art In Embassies Program, U. S. State Department.

1991 -- The Leaves, a work created in collaboration with Peter Rice, Alexander, Cott, Earl Childress, and Bob Kahn for the New Groninger Museum, The Netherlands.

1992 -- Designs decorative relief frieze and interior dome, commissioned by David Mirvish, for the Princess of Wales Theatre, Toronto.
Provenance:
The collection was a gift of Frank and Harriet Stella in 1993.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Frank Stella papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Printmakers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art, Abstract  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Interviews
Sketchbooks
Citation:
Frank Stella papers, 1941-1993, bulk 1978-1989. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.stelfran
See more items in:
Frank Stella papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-stelfran
Online Media:

Yasuo Kuniyoshi papers

Creator:
Kuniyoshi, Yasuo, 1889-1953  Search this
Extent:
14.3 Linear feet
2.84 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Date:
1906-2016
bulk 1920-1990
Summary:
The papers of artist Yasuo Kuniyoshi measure 14.3 linear feet and 2.84 gigabytes and date from 1906-2016, bulk 1920-1990. The collection documents his career as a painter, graphic artist, and photographer, as well as his involvement in political, social, and art organizations, especially during World War II. Included are biographical material; correspondence; writings and lectures by Kuniyoshi and others; organization records primarily on his participation in various associations and groups he was a member of; professional and gallery records regarding business dealings with American and Japanese galleries, museums, and dealers; exhibition files; printed material; four scrapbooks; artwork; photographs of Kuniyoshi and others in various locations and at events; and artwork records which mostly consist of photographs and provenance information. The collection also contains materials on Kuniyoshi's career and artwork obtained after his death by his widow Sara Mazo Kuniyoshi.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of artist Yasuo Kuniyoshi measure 14.3 linear feet and 2.84 gigabytes and date from 1906-2013, bulk 1920-1990. The collection documents his career as a painter, graphic artist, and photographer, as well as his involvement in political, social, and art organizations, especially during World War II. Included are biographical material; correspondence; writings and lectures by Kuniyoshi and others; organization records primarily on his participation in various associations and groups he was a member of; professional and gallery records regarding business dealings with American and Japanese galleries, museums, and dealers; exhibition files; printed material; four scrapbooks; artwork; photographs of Kuniyoshi and others in various locations and at events; and artwork records which mostly consist of photographs and provenance information. The collection also contains materials on Kuniyoshi's career and artwork obtained after his death by his widow Sara Mazo Kuniyoshi.

Biographical material consists of a wide range of records such as an address book, resumes, biographical summaries, vital records, citizenship applications, identification documents, travel records, and documentation regarding Kuniyoshi's death. There is some limited biographical material on the artist's widow, Sara Mazo Kuniyoshi, plus interviews with her talking about Kuniyoshi.

Correspondence is divided into correspondence with Yasuo Kuniyoshi and the correspondence with his second wife, Sara Mazo Kuniyoshi. The Yasuo Kuniyoshi correspondence discusses various topics including exhibits and his status as a Japanese American during World War II. The bulk of the series consists of correspondence with Sara after Yasuo's death and usually relates to exhibitions of his work, and reproduction requests for the inclusion of his work in publications. Of note is her correspondence with Alexander Brook, Ritsuko Ozawa, Tom Wolf, and the Yasuo Kuniyoshi Museum in Japan.

Writings and lectures include Kuniyoshi's writings and speeches about other artists, art and the art profession, lithography, and World War II. Also found are statements on his own work and extensive notes for his autobiography. There are two sound recordings of lectures by Kuniyoshi at art schools as well as writings by others, including Sara Mazo Kuniyoshi, about Yasuo Kuniyoshi.

Organization records document Kuniyoshi's involvement in social, political, and art organizations, including the East West Association and the Artists Equity Association. These records include correspondence, speeches, printed material and notes.

Gallery and professional records include material on Kuniyoshi's career and the sales of his work at galleries. Found herein are correspondence, printed material and notes. There are files on projects and commissions, transcripts of the radio broadcast "Japan Against Japan," appraisals of artwork, authentications of artwork, art inventories of his work at various galleries as well as private collections, and records of his participation in the Woodstock Art Conference. Also noteworthy are the records of Sara Mazo Kuniyoshi's dealings with the Downtown Gallery and Zabriskie Galleries.

Exhibition files include a few files on exhibitions while Yasuo Kuniyoshi was alive, but most of the series consists of files created by Sara Mazo Kuniyoshi about exhibitions of Kuniyoshi's works after his death in 1953. Files may include exhibition checklists and planning documents, loan agreements, correspondence, photographs of the exhibition, and press materials.

Printed material consists of books, newspaper, and magazine clippings about Kuniyoshi and about World War II. There are numerous exhibition catalogs and announcements and some magazines, posters, brochures, and bulletins.

There are four scrapbooks of printed material related to Kuniyoshi and his artwork. The scrapbooks contain press clippings, exhibition announcements, checklists, and a few catalogs.

Artwork consists of etchings, numerous sketches and drawings in graphite and ink, sketches painted onto clear acetate which Kuniyoshi used for catalogs, two zinc lithographic plates and their corresponding prints, and a sketchbook. Drawings that Yasuo Kuniyoshi created for the Office of War Information during World War II are in this series. There is one folder of pencil sketches by unidentified artists.

Photographic material are mostly photographs of Kuniyoshi in his studio, at various events and parties, teaching at Mills College and with his wife Sara Mazo Kuniyoshi. Also found are photographs of artists, including Francis Criss, Julian Levi, Doris and Russell Lee, and others, taken by Yasuo Kuniyoshi. Especially noteworthy, are photographs of the Artists Equity Testimonial Dinner held in honor of Kuniyoshi's 1948 retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art. There are some slides and snapshots of Sara Mazo Kuniyoshi's travels abroad and a the house in Woodstock she shared with Yasuo, along with other locations.

Artwork photograph records were created by Sara Mazo Kuniyoshi to document works of art created by her husband. Files mostly include photographs of artwork with annotations regarding title, date, sale, and provenance. Some files also include correspondence, notes by Sara Kuniyoshi, exhibition history, and published reproductions. There are also miscellaneous photographs and slides of artwork which mostly consist of duplicates of artwork that can be found in the rest of the series.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 11 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1906-1998 (Box 1, ER01; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1931-2007 (Boxes 1-2; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings and Lectures, 1939-2003 (Box 2; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 4: Organization Records, 1939-2003 (Box 3; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 5: Gallery and Professional Records, circa 1924-2009 (Boxes 3-5, OV 19; 2.1 linear feet)

Series 6: Exhibition Files, 1948-2004 (Boxes 5-6, OVs 19-20; 1.1 linear feet)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1921-2013 (Boxes 6-8, 14, OV 20 ; 2.1 linear feet)

Series 8: Scrapbooks, 1919-1978 (Boxes 8, 13, 15; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 9: Artwork, 1925-1991 (Boxes 8, 14, 16, OV 21-23; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 10: Photographic Material, circa 1920-2005 (Boxes 8-9, 16-17; 1.4 linear feet)

Series 11: Artwork Photograph Records, circa 1920s-2016 (Boxes 9-12, 17-18, OV 22; 3.8 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Yasuo Kuniyoshi (1889-1953) was a Japanese-American painter, printmaker and photographer in New York, N.Y.

Kuniyoshi was born in Okayama, Japan. In 1906 he came to the United States and a year later began studying at the Los Angeles School of Art and Design. In 1910 he moved to New York and took courses at the National Academy of Design, the Independent School of Art, and the Art Students League, where he studied with Kenneth Hayes Miller. He was married to fellow artist Katherine Schmidt from 1919 to 1932. After traveling throughout Europe, they moved to the Woodstock, New York, in 1927 and took part in the Woodstock Art Colony. Kuniyoshi studied and later taught at the Art Students League summer school there.

By 1930 Kuniyoshi had established himself as an internationally known painter and graphic artist. In 1935, he received a Guggenheim fellowship and married Sara Mazo. In New York City he taught at the Art Students League, the New School for Social Research, and served as the first president of the Artists Equity Association from 1947 to 1950. Kuniyoshi was active in social organizations, especially Japanese American organizations, such as the Japanese American Committee for Democracy. Although Kuniyoshi was barred from becoming a citizen due to American immgration laws at the time, he viewed himself as American and took an active role in the war effort during World War II, even working with the U.S. Office of War Information department to design posters.

The Whitney Museum of American Art held a retrospective for Kuniyoshi in 1948, making him the first living artist to be honored in such a fashion at the museum. Yasuo Kuniyoshi died of cancer in 1953 and was survived by his second wife Sara Mazo Kuniyoshi who preserved the legacy of his work.
Related Materials:
Also found at the Archives of American Art are the Yasuo Kuniyoshi photographs of artwork, a 1948 letter from Kuniyoshi to E. P. Richardson, and checklists of Yasuo Kuniyoshi prints.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in installments, from 1969 to 1995, by Sara Mazo Kuniyoshi, Yasuo Kuniyoshi's widow. Additional papers were donated in 2014 and 2018 by Stephen Diamond, Sara Mazo Kuniyoshi's nephew.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The zinc lithographic plates and corresponding prints are for study purposes only. No reproduction or publication allowed.

The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Political clubs  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Japanese Americans  Search this
Photographers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Printmakers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Yasuo Kuniyoshi papers, 1906-2016, bulk 1920-1990. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.kuniyasu
See more items in:
Yasuo Kuniyoshi papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kuniyasu
Online Media:

Harold and May Tabak Rosenberg papers

Creator:
Rosenberg, Harold, 1906-1978  Search this
Names:
Tamarind Lithography Workshop  Search this
Rosenberg, May Tabek, 1910-1993  Search this
Wayne, June, 1918-2011  Search this
Extent:
4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
circa 1880-1985
bulk 1940s-1970s
Summary:
The papers of New York author, art critic, and teacher Harold Rosenberg, and writer May Tabak Rosenberg, measure 4.0 linear feet and date from circa 1880-1985, with the bulk of the collection dating from the 1940s to the late 1970s. Records primarily document May Rosenberg's writing career and, to a lesser degree, her husband's career, through address books and calendars, letters, writings and notes, scattered business records, printed material, and photographs. Harold Rosenberg is documented most fully in the photographs, which include individual and family portraits, photographs of the Rosenbergs with family and friends, including artists and writers, and photographs taken in Springs, New York, where the Rosenbergs were part of the summer art colony in East Hampton.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York author, art critic, and teacher Harold Rosenberg, and writer May Tabak Rosenberg, measure 4.0 linear feet and date from circa 1880-1985, with the bulk of the collection dating from the 1940s to the late 1970s. Records primarily document May Rosenberg's writing career and, to a lesser degree, her husband's career, through address books and calendars, letters, writings and notes, scattered business records, printed material, and photographs. Harold Rosenberg is documented most fully in the photographs, which include individual and family portraits, photographs of the Rosenbergs with family and friends, including artists and writers, and photographs taken in Springs, New York, where the Rosenbergs were part of the summer art colony in East Hampton.

The papers include biographical material consisting of address books, and letters written primarily to May Tabak Rosenberg regarding writing submitted to publishing companies including Russell & Volkening, Inc., MacMillan Publishing Company, and Mc-Graw Hill Book Company. Letters also document Rosenberg's friendship with June Wayne and her involvement, through Wayne, in the Tamarind Lithography Workshop.

Writings and notes consist primarily of manuscript drafts, notes, and published copies of work by May Rosenberg, including articles for Craft Horizons, a 1960 novel But Not For Love, her 1959 children's book A Fish Is Not A Pet, and many other stories, fragments and literary sketches of ideas. The collection also includes a small number of writings by Harold Rosenberg, including seven notebooks and two published articles.

Personal business records are scattered and routine but include a few invoices and records of royalties for both May and Harold Rosenberg, and a will, handwritten by May Rosenberg.

Printed material includes one article each on Harold and May Rosenberg, news clippings on feminism presumably collected by May Rosenberg, and a map of East Hampton which shows the location of the house purchased by the Rosenbergs in Springs, New York, in 1944.

Photographs include multiple portraits of Harold, May, and Patia Rosenberg which date from circa 1930s to the 1980s, many of which were taken by Maurice Berezov. There are also photographs of the Rosenbergs with family and friends including Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner at their home in Springs, and artists Perle Fine, Francoise Gilot, Barnett Newman, Elaine and Willem de Kooning, Milton Resnick, and others. There are photos of May Rosenberg and June Wayne in June Wayne's studio, and photos of Louise Nevelson working on lithography at the Tamarind Lithography Workshop in 1968.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as six series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1930s-circa 1980s (0.4 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Letters, 1936-1985 (0.4 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, circa 1940s-1984 (1.6 linear feet; Boxes 1-3)

Series 4: Personal Business Records, circa 1950-1984 (0.25 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1918-1982 (0.35 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1880s-circa 1981 (1 linear foot; Box 4)
Biographical / Historical:
Author, critic, and teacher, Harold Rosenberg (1906-1978), was one of the leading New York art intellectuals, and one of the most influential art critics of his generation. Author May Tabak Rosenberg (1910-1993) wrote books, articles, and short stories about artists, writers, and musicians.

May Tabak Rosenberg was born in Manhattan and educated at the University of Chicago. She married Harold Rosenberg in 1932, and the couple had a daughter, Patia, in 1943. In 1944, the Rosenbergs became the first people associated with the New York art scene to purchase property in the East Hampton area of Long Island which grew to become a summer art colony in the years after World War II. Friends Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock bought a house close by to the Rosenberg's Neck Path summer home in Springs, New York, in 1945. May Tabak Rosenberg chose to discontinue her writing after her daughter was born, but she returned to writing short stories and novels in the 1950s. The Long Island artist community provided rich source material for her writing, and her 1960 novel, But Not For Love, is thought to include surrogates for Jackson Pollock, Peggy Guggenheim, and Willem and Elaine de Kooning, among others.

May Tabak Rosenberg wrote several articles for the Tamarind Lithography Workshop established by June Wayne in 1960. She was invited to cover Louise Nevelson's fellowship there in 1968.

During the 1950s Harold Rosenberg was influential in bringing attention to the work of the New York Abstract Expressionists including Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Barnett Newman, and Arshile Gorky. He was credited with coining the term "Action Painting" to describe their work, stating that what they created was "not a picture but an event." Rosenberg was an art critic for the New Yorker from 1966 until his death, commenting on the contemporary art scene. His later criticism revealed his distaste for Pop Art and other art movements of the time.

Harold Rosenberg wrote many books including The Anxious Object: Art Today and Its Audience (1964), Artworks and Packages (1969), The De-Definition of Art: Action to Pop and Earthworks (1972), Discovering the Present: Three Decades in Art, Culture, and Politics (1973), and De Kooning (1974). In addition to authoring books and articles, Rosenberg lectured at the School for Social Research from 1953 to 1954, and taught at the University of Chicago from 1966 until his death in 1978.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Harold Rosenberg, conducted by Paul Cummings in 1970-1973.

The Getty Research Institute is the primary repository of Harold Rosenberg's papers.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in 1999 via the Ridgway Public Library in Ridgway, Colorado. The collection had come to the library from one of its trustees, an acquaintance of the Rosenbergs.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Rights:
The Harold and May Tabak Rosenberg papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Abstract expressionism -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Harold and May Tabak Rosenberg papers, circa 1880-1985, bulk 1940s-1970s. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.roseharo
See more items in:
Harold and May Tabak Rosenberg papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-roseharo
Online Media:

Harriet Endicott Waite research material relating to Currier & Ives

Creator:
Waite, Harriet Endicott  Search this
Names:
Currier & Ives  Search this
Extent:
4.2 Linear feet ((partially microfilmed on 2 reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1923-1956
Scope and Contents:
Letters, writings and notes, business records, sketches, printed material, and photographs.
REELS 681-682: Correspondence with dealers, and with Harry T. Peters, who used the data in his books on Currier & Ives; notes, many of them in shorthand; typed lists of prints and a card file of prints; dealers' price lists and catalogs; typed summary of Waite's findings on Currier & Ives; and data on pertinent lithographers and dealers, including James E. Butterworth, George Henry Durrie, Eastman Johnson, Louis Maurer, William Edward Norton, Frances Flora Palmer, Charles Parsons, Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait, Charles Currier, Edward West Currier, Nathaniel Currier, James M. Hart, James Merritt Ives, Napoleon Sarony, and Max Williams.
UNMICROFILMIED 6 letters to Waite, and a copy of a letter sent; receipts; notes; printed material; miscellany; four engravings; glass negatives; and ca. 250 photographs of Currier and Ives, their shop, other artists, and works of art.
Biographical / Historical:
Art historian, art dealer; New York N.Y.
Provenance:
Donated 1956 by Harriet Endicott Wade.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Art dealers  Search this
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Lithographers -- United States  Search this
Topic:
Graphic arts -- United States  Search this
Lithography, American  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.waitharr
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-waitharr

Harold and May Tabak Rosenberg papers, circa 1880-1985, bulk 1940s-1970s

Creator:
Rosenberg, Harold, 1906-1978  Search this
Rosenberg, May Tabak, 1910-1993  Search this
Subject:
Rosenberg, May Tabek  Search this
Wayne, June  Search this
Tamarind Lithography Workshop  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Topic:
Abstract expressionism -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)6266
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)216605
AAA_collcode_roseharo
Theme:
Art Movements and Schools
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_216605
Online Media:

Bolton Coit Brown papers, 1882-1987, bulk 1882-1936

Creator:
Brown, Bolton, 1864-1936  Search this
Subject:
Coit, Martha Day  Search this
Lankes, Julius J.  Search this
Elliott, Ellen Coit  Search this
Type:
Sketches
Photographs
Illustrated letters
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Lithographers -- New York (State)  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Lithography  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)10758
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)214369
AAA_collcode_browbolt
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_214369
Online Media:

Hughie Lee-Smith papers

Creator:
Lee-Smith, Hughie  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Faculty  Search this
Audubon Artists (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Ira Aldridge Society  Search this
National Academy of Design (U.S.)  Search this
Bearden, Romare, 1911-1988  Search this
Goreleigh, Rex, 1902-  Search this
Correspondent:
Carter, Clarence Holbrook, 1904-2000  Search this
Gammon, Reginald, 1921-2005  Search this
Hirsch, Joseph, 1910-1981  Search this
Wald, Carol  Search this
Wessel, Sophie  Search this
Woodruff, Hale, 1900-1980  Search this
Extent:
33.7 Linear feet
0.381 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Scrapbooks
Interviews
Photographs
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Drawings
Date:
circa 1890-2007
bulk 1931-1999
Summary:
The papers of painter and educator Hughie Lee-Smith measure 33.7 linear feet and 0.381 GB and date from circa 1890 to 2007, with the bulk of the material dating from 1931 to 1999. The collection documents Lee-Smith's career through biographical material, personal and professional correspondence, writings by Lee-Smith and others, personal business records, exhibition files, organization records, printed material, scrapbooks, photographs, a small amount of artwork, numerous interviews, and recordings for a documentary film on Lee-Smith. Also found are the papers of artist Rex Goreleigh, a friend of Lee-Smith.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter and educator Hughie Lee-Smith measure 33.7 linear feet and 0.381 GB and date from circa 1890 to 2007, with the bulk of the material dating from 1931 to 1999. The collection documents Lee-Smith's career through biographical material, personal and professional correspondence, writings by Lee-Smith and others, personal business records, exhibition files, organization records, printed material, scrapbooks, photographs, a small amount of artwork, numerous interviews, and recordings for a documentary film on Lee-Smith. Also found are the papers of artist Rex Goreleigh, a friend of Lee-Smith.

Biographical material includes records of Hughie Lee-Smith's schooling, military service, and awards, as well as resumes, bibliographies, and biographical summaries. Also found are family records, including the papers of his mother, Alice Carroll.

Lee-Smith's correspondence is with family, students, arts and cultural organizations, as well as schools, galleries, and museums, primarily regarding his participation in events and exhibitions. He also corresponded with fellow artists, such as Clarence Holbrook Carter, Reginald Gammon, Joseph Hirsch, Carol Wald, and Hale Woodruff, among many others. He maintained extensive correspondence with artist Sophie Wessel.

Lee-Smith's writings include artist statements and personal writings on his history and early influences, as well as many draft lectures and speeches, school writings, notes, and untitled writing fragments. Writings by others primarily include student essays and articles on the topic of Lee-Smith's work. Personal business records include scattered financial documents, including artwork sales records, and contracts and agreements with various art galleries and other organizations. Also found are files regarding his art commissions, gifts, professional activities, and records of his employment at the Art Students League. Exhibition files document select exhibitions in which Hughie Lee-Smith participated, primarily during the 1980s and 1990s. Organization records were maintained by Lee-Smith to document his participation in various groups, such as the National Academy of Design, Ira Aldridge Society, and Audubon Artists.

Printed material consists primarily of exhibition announcements and invitations for exhibitions of Lee-Smith's work, as well as news clippings, magazines, press releases, and publications from various art organizations and schools. One scrapbook contains exhibition announcements additional loose scrapbook pages document his early career. Photographs include many portraits of Hughie Lee-Smith, Lee-Smith in his studio, at events, and with friends and family. Additionally there are many photographs, slides, and transparencies of Lee-Smith's artwork. Also found are five photograph albums. A small amount of original artwork includes drawings by Lee-Smith and two sketchbooks belonging to his wife Patricia.

The collection includes numerous interviews of Hughie Lee-Smith, recorded on 37 sound cassettes, one sound tape reel, and four video cassettes. One audio interview is in digital format. Also found are planning documents, research material, and video footage for a documentary about the life and work of Hughie Lee-Smith, produced by New Deal Films, Inc, but never completed. Footage includes interviews with artists and art historians regarding Lee-Smith, gallery events, and images of his paintings.

The papers of artist Rex Goreleigh primarily documents his later life and includes a letters, biographical documents, printed material, estate records, and photographs and slides depicting Goreleigh, his studio, and artwork. Hughie Lee-Smith was close friends with Goreleigh and served as executor of his estate.

Also of note is a scrapbook put together for Goreleigh's 70th birthday in 1972. Of note is one scrapbook which contains photographs, notes, and artwork by fellow artists and students, including drawings by Romare Bearden and Hughie Lee-Smith.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 13 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1890-2001 (1.7 linear feet; Box 1-2, 35, RD 38)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1931-2006 (6.1 linear feet; Box 2-8, 0.006 GB; ER01)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1934-1998 (0.8 linear feet; Box 8-9)

Series 4: Personal Business Records, 1934-2001 (1.6 linear feet; Box 9-11, 35)

Series 5: Exhibition Files, circa 1973-2001 (1.2 linear feet; Box 11-12)

Series 6: Organization Records, 1941-2005 (2.1 linear feet; Box 12-14)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1919, 1930-2007 (8.5 linear feet; Box 14-22, 34)

Series 8: Scrapbooks, circa 1938-1990s (0.2 linear feet; Box 22, 35)

Series 9: Photographs, circa 1890-2003 (4.4 linear feet; Box 22-26, 35, OV 37)

Series 10: Artwork, circa 1940s-1980s (0.2 linear feet; Box 26)

Series 11: Interviews, 1973-1998 (2.1 linear feet; Box 26-28, 0.375 GB; ER02)

Series 12: Documentary Film Materials, 1985-2004 (3.5 linear feet; Box 28-32)

Series 13: Rex Goreleigh Papers, 1935-1994 (0.9 linear feet; 32-33, 36)
Biographical / Historical:
Hughie Lee-Smith (1915-1999) was a painter and educator in Ohio, Michigan, and New York. Born in Eustis, Florida, he lived for a period of time with family in Atlanta before joining his mother in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1925. In 1934 he received a scholarship to attend the Art School of the Detroit Society of Arts and Crafts, and in 1935 returned to Cleveland to attend the Cleveland School of Art. While in school he began exhibiting his paintings and teaching part-time at Karamu House. From 1938 to 1940 Lee-Smith completed lithography commissions for the Ohio WPA. In 1941 he moved to Detroit, married his first wife Mabel Louise Everett, and worked at a Ford automobile factory. He was then drafted into the U.S. Navy as a mural artist. After the war he briefly returned to factory work before enrolling at Wayne State University, earning a degree in Art Education in 1953. From 1953 to 1965 he taught summer art classes at the Grosse-Point War Memorial in Detroit.

In 1957 Lee-Smith moved to the East Village in New York City, signed with the Janet Nassler Gallery (Petite Gallery), exhibited his work extensively, and joined several art organizations. He also taught art at schools in Princeton, New Jersey. In 1967 he became the second African-American member of the National Academy of Design. He was visiting instructor and artist-in-residence at several art programs, including Howard University, and taught at the Art Students League from 1972 to 1988. In 1978 he married his third wife, Patricia. The New Jersey State Museum organized an extensive retrospective of Lee-Smith's work in 1988 which travelled nationally. Despite ill-health in the mid-1990s, he continued to create new paintings and exhibit his work. In 1997 he moved with his wife to Albuquerque, New Mexico, where he lived until his death in 1999.
Related Materials:
Also found at the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Hughie Lee-Smith conducted by Carroll Greene in 1968.
Provenance:
A small amount of material was donated 1969-1981 by Hughie Lee-Smith. Additional papers were donated in 2011 by Patricia Lee-Smith, widow of Hughie Lee-Smith.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Hughie Lee-Smith papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws. Authorization to publish requires written permission from Robert Panzer, VAGA.
Occupation:
Painters -- Michigan -- Detroit  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- Ohio -- Cleveland  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- Michigan -- Detroit  Search this
Topic:
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Interviews
Photographs
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Drawings
Citation:
Hughie Lee-Smith papers, circa 1890-2007, bulk 1931-1999. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.leeshugh
See more items in:
Hughie Lee-Smith papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-leeshugh

Jerome and Mary Jo Viola papers

Creator:
Viola, Jerome  Search this
Viola, Mary Jo  Search this
Names:
New York University. Institute of Fine Arts -- Students  Search this
Pearlstein, Philip, 1924-  Search this
Wengenroth, Stow, 1906-1978  Search this
Extent:
2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1931-1997(?)
Scope and Contents:
Jerome Viola's lecture and research notes kept while a student at New York University Institute of Fine Arts (1955-68) and research materials and mss. draft of the book, The Painting and Teaching of Philip Pearlstein (N.Y. : Watson-Guptill, 1982), correspondence includes letters from Philip Pearlstein (an original, 1982; and an facsimile, 1997(?)); and various printed material. Exhibition files kept by Mary Jo Viola for "The Lithographic Art of Stow Wengenroth," 1988; also included are photographs of Stow Wengenroth's lithographs; audio recording of an interview with Harriet Wengenroth and of Stow Wengenroth playing the mandolin.
Biographical / Historical:
Art historians; Brooklyn, NY.
Provenance:
Donated 1996 by the widow, Mary Jo Viola.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Lithography -- Exhibitions  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.violjero
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-violjero

Dorothy Lubell Feigin papers, 1924-1969

Creator:
Feigin, Dorothy Dee Lubell, 1902-1969  Search this
Subject:
Peirce, Waldo  Search this
Silvermine Guild Center for the Arts  Search this
Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors  Search this
Type:
Scrapbooks
Topic:
Painting, American -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Women painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Lithography -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Societies, etc.  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)8903
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211088
AAA_collcode_feigdoro
Theme:
Women
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211088

Dorothy Lubell Feigin papers

Creator:
Feigin, Dorothy Dee Lubell, 1902-1969  Search this
Names:
Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors  Search this
Silvermine Guild Center for the Arts  Search this
Peirce, Waldo, 1884-1970  Search this
Extent:
0.6 Linear feet ((partially microfilmed on 1 reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Date:
1924-1969
Scope and Contents:
Illustrated envelopes; organizational records; correspondence; photographs; a scrapbook; and printed material.
UNMICROFILMED: 13 illustrated envelopes from Waldo Peirce to Feigin.
REEL N69-128: Correspondence, including letters from the National Academy of Design, the Society of Modern Etchers, the Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors, and the National Association of Women Artists, and the National Association of Women Painters and Sculptors; clippings; exhibition catalogs; a scrapbook; and photographs of her work.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, etcher, lithographer, graphic artist, teacher; New York, N.Y.
Provenance:
Material on reel N69-128 donated 1971 by Dr. Simeon Feigin, Feigin's son. Unfilmed material donated 1974 by Edith Bry, a close friend of Feigin, a colleague and fellow member of the Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Lithographers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Painting, American -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Women painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Lithography -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Societies, etc.  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Identifier:
AAA.feigdoro
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-feigdoro

Alexander Dobkin papers

Creator:
Dobkin, Alexander, 1908-  Search this
Names:
Evergood, Philip, 1901-1973  Search this
Gross, Chaim, 1904-1991  Search this
Levine, Jack, 1915-2010  Search this
Soyer, Raphael, 1899-1987  Search this
Extent:
0.62 Linear feet ((partially microfilmed on 4 reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1940-1974
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence; photographs; books; lithographs; sketchbooks with notes; exhibition catalogs and clippings.
REELS N68-99-100 & N69-2: Sketchbooks with notes, 1943-1966.
REEL N69-23: Correspondence; an exhibition catalog; and lithographs.
UNMICROFILMED: Correspondence with family members, Philip Evergood, Jack Levine, Raphael Soyer, Chaim Gross, and others; 4 illustrated letters from Dobkin to his wife, 1954; photographs of Dobkin and his work; 2 books illustrated by Dobkin; and exhibition catalogs and clippings.
Biographical / Historical:
Lithographer, illustrator; New York, N.Y. Died 1975.
Provenance:
Sketchbooks on reels N68-99-100 and N69-2 lent for microfilming 1969 by Dobkin. Material on reel N69-23 donated except for lithographs which were returned after microfilming. Unmicrofilmed material donated 1968 and 1976 by Alexander Dobkin and Kathy Dobkin.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Illustrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Lithographers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Lithography -- 20th century -- New York(N.Y.)  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.dobkalex
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-dobkalex

Henry Pearson papers

Creator:
Pearson, Henry, 1914-2006  Search this
Names:
Tamarind Lithography Workshop  Search this
Barnet, Will, 1911-2012  Search this
Bloom, Miriam  Search this
Fisher, Ethel, 1923-  Search this
Seligmann, Kurt, 1900-1962  Search this
Extent:
1.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Date:
1937-2001
Scope and Contents:
Biographical material, correspondence, writings, photographs, business records, artwork, and printed material documenting the career of painter, Henry Pearson.
Correspondence; sketches; exhibition catalogs and announcements; a writing by Pearson, "Dissertation on Whether I Have A Philosophy on Painting or Even on Art in General" October 14, 1969; clippings; several sketches of Pearson by Kurt Seligmann; Christmas cards; and memorabilia; press releases; photographs; and material and correspondence about the Tamarind Workshop.
Six letters to Pearson, 1962-1965; clippings, 1963-1966; exhibition announcements and catalogs, 1961-1966; a photograph of Pearson with one of his paintings in his studio, 1964.
Pearson's military records; personal and professional correspondence with galleries, museums and letters from colleagues including Will Barnet, Miriam Bloom, Ethel Fisher Kott and others; a photograph album and loose photographs of Pearson at events, with friends and in the military; a sketchbook of Pearson's drawings; and exhibition announcements and reviews of Pearson's work.
Biographical / Historical:
Henry Charles Pearson (1914-2006) was a painter and educator in New York, New York and Kingston, North Carolina. Pearson studied University of North Carolina and Yale.
Related Materials:
Also in the Archives is material lent for microfilming on reels 31 and 95 and includes letters from Pearson to his family during his travels and military service and correspondence with artists and friends; photographs; clippings; a brief autobiography to 1930; sales reports from the Stephen Radich Gallery and Martha Jackson Gallery; exhibit and price lists; and clippings.
Additional Henry Pearson papers also located at: University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Wilson Library Southern Historical Collection.
Provenance:
Materials on reels 31 and 95 lent for microfilming in 1970 by Henry Pearson. Pearson donated the material on reel 145 in 1971, and additional material in 1989. Material on reel 3890 received 1984 from Syracuse University. Additional material received 2016 from Helene Shuter, Pearson's daughter.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Occupation:
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- North Carolina  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- North Carolina  Search this
Topic:
Art, Abstract -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Philosophy  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Identifier:
AAA.pearhenry
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-pearhenry

John C. Menihan papers

Creator:
Menihan, John C.  Search this
Names:
Print Club of Rochester  Search this
Extent:
2.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Scrapbooks
Date:
1912-1992
Scope and Contents:
Papers, ca. 1912-1992, including awards and citations; a videotape, "John Menihan"; a tape-recorded interview with Menihan conducted by Ron Netsky, 1984; a tape-recording, "John's Talk on Lithography and John's Banjo," compiled by Paul Swiatek, 1988; photographs of Menihan, his family, works of art, studios, and colleagues; printed material including exhibition catalogs, programs, and magazine and newspaper clippings; price lists and an incomplete inventory of works of art; programs and greeting cards designed by Menihan, including personal Christmas cards and cards made for family and friends; two scrapbooks, 1924-1940 and 1940-1969; announcements for the Print Club of Rochester (some designed by Menihan); preliminary sketches and studies; samples of wallpaper designed and printed by Menihan; architectural drawings by Menihan for his home at 208 Alpine Drive, Rochester, N.Y.; and miscellany.
Biographical / Historical:
Printmaker; Rochester, N.Y.
Provenance:
Donated 2000 by Mary M. Barrette, Menihan's daughter.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Printmakers -- New York (State) -- Rochester  Search this
Topic:
Greeting cards  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Scrapbooks
Identifier:
AAA.menijohn
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-menijohn

Bolton Coit Brown papers (microfilm)

Creator:
Brown, Bolton, 1864-1936  Search this
Names:
James McNeill Whistler, 1834-1903  Search this
Pennell, Joseph, 1857-1926  Search this
Extent:
2 microfilm reels
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microfilm reels
Date:
circa 1907-1933
Scope and Contents:
12 volumes of journals (1915-1933), documenting the technical aspects of his artistic career including drawing, printing, and lithography. They include accounts of experiments and work for other artists, including George Bellows, as well as definitions and excerpts of the writings of others.
A typescript of the manuscript, "Lithography Since Whistler," (1935) includes a history of lithography and a chapter on Joseph Pennell.
Two etching notebooks (1917-1918) contain sketches and notes on prints. Another notebook (1907-1910) contains sketches and notes on painting and pigments.
Also included are correspondence with some biographical information, a catalog of Brown's lithographs (1908), and loose lithographs.
Biographical / Historical:
Lithographer, writer, inventor and explorer; Woodstock, N.Y.
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming 1990 by Bryn Mawr College, as part of AAA's Philadelphia Arts Documentation Project.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Printmakers -- New York -- Woodstock  Search this
Topic:
Lithography  Search this
Prints -- Materials  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Prints, American -- New York (State) -- Woodstock  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.browbolt2
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-browbolt2

Bolton Coit Brown papers

Creator:
Brown, Bolton, 1864-1936  Search this
Names:
Coit, Martha Day, 1840-1920  Search this
Elliott, Ellen Coit  Search this
Lankes, Julius J., 1884-1960  Search this
Extent:
1.7 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketches
Photographs
Illustrated letters
Date:
1882-1987
bulk 1882-1936
Summary:
The papers of lithographer, educator, and author Bolton Coit Brown measure 1.7 linear feet and date from 1882 to 1987 with the bulk of the material dating from 1882 to 1936. Found within the papers are biographical material; extensive personal correspondence with family members and friends; writings, including drafts of Art of Art Study and Lithography Since Whistler; and printed material.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of lithographer, educator, and author Bolton Coit Brown measure 1.7 linear feet and date from 1882 to 1987 with the bulk of the material dating from 1882 to 1936. Found within the papers are biographical material; extensive personal correspondence with family members and friends; writings, including drafts of Art of Art Study and Lithography Since Whistler; and printed material.

Biographical information consists of a curriculum vitae, job application, list of artworks, and a photograph of Bolton Coit Brown.

Correspondence is primarily with Brown's immediate and extended family and with friends. The series includes extensive correspondence to his mother, Martha C. Brown, his sister, Ellen Coit Elliott, and letter drafts to his wife Lucy Fletcher Brown. Letters to Brown's family dating from 1887 to 1888 document his travels to Europe as an art student and include pen and ink and color washes of historical sites, art deco details, and illustrative scenes.

Writings include essays on lithography and the artist J.J. Lankes; typescripts of Art of Art Study and Lithography Since Whistler; and miscellaneous notes and writings on lithography. There is also a copy of a short play by Brown titled Spoiled Meat.

Printed material includes articles by and on Bolton Coit Brown, clippings, exhibition catalogs, and periodicals.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 4 series.

Series 1: Biographical materials, circa 1914-1936 (4 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1882-1949 (0.9 linear feet; Box 1, 3)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1914-1933 (0.4 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1882-1987 (0.3 linear feet; Box 2)
Biographical / Historical:
Lithographer, educator, and author Bolton Coit Brown (1864-1936) lived and worked in Woodstock and New York City, New York, and Stanford, California. He is known for his extensive writings on lithography technique, and for his interest in tonalism effects in painting and printmaking.

Brown was born in Dresden, New York to Edmund Woodward Brown, a minster of the Presbyterian church, and his wife Martha Coit Brown. His early aptitude in art was supported by his family and he received a Bachelor's and Master's degree in painting from Syracuse University. Upon graduation, Brown taught art at Cornell University, became principal of the Toronto Government Art School, and was invited to head the newly formed art department at Stanford University from 1891 to 1902. During his tenure at Stanford, his proximity to the Sierra Nevada ranges inspired him to climb the mountains and he published several articles, line drawings, and maps that document his explorations in the Sierra Club Bulletin.

In 1901, Ralph Radcliffe Whitehead, an aristocrat and progressive idealist, approached Brown with the idea of developing an arts and crafts colony based on the utopian ideals of John Ruskin. Brown agreed to the project and worked with Whitehead and Hervey White to establish Byrdcliffe Colony near the village of Woodstock, New York. After a break from Whitehead over management of the Colony, Brown focused his energies on landscape paintings and worked out of studios located in Woodstock and New York City.

Many of his paintings experimented with tonalism, and interest in this style led him to the explore the gradational effects and mechanics of lithography. In 1915, he traveled to England and spent a year studying with the lithographer F. Ernest Jackson. When he returned home, he continued to document his experiments and technical findings in detailed journals. Many of these discoveries were published in several books and essays on the topic, including Lithography Since Whistler. He printed over 400 of his own lithographs and printed the artworks of George Bellows, John Sloan, and Rockwell Kent, among others. Brown died in Woodstock , New York in 1936.
Related Materials:
The Archives borrowed Bolton Coit Brown papers held by Bryn Mawr College Library, Special Collections in 1990 and microfilmed them on reels 3654-3655 as part of the Archives' Philadelphia Arts Documentation Project.
Provenance:
The Bolton Coit Brown papers were donated in 1987 and 1991 by Brown's granddaughter, Marian Sweeney. Brown's great granddaughter, Barbara Bandy, donated additional materials in 1989.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Bolton Coit Brown papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Lithographers -- New York (State)  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Lithography  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketches
Photographs
Illustrated letters
Citation:
Bolton Coit Brown papers, 1882-1987, bulk 1882-1936. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.browbolt
See more items in:
Bolton Coit Brown papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-browbolt

Frank Kleinholz papers

Creator:
Frank Kleinholz, 1901-1987  Search this
Names:
McCausland, Elizabeth, 1899-1965  Search this
Extent:
7.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Interviews
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Date:
1910s-1980
bulk 1940s-1980
Summary:
The papers of painter Frank Kleinholz measure 6.3 linear feet and date from 1910s to 1980, with the bulk of the records dating from 1940s to 1980. The records document his career through correspondence, writing, exhibition and gallery records, financial files, audiovisual material, printed material, photographs, and artwork.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter Frank Kleinholz measure 6.3 linear feet and date from 1910s to 1980, with the bulk of the records dating from 1940s to 1980. The records document his career through correspondence, writing, exhibition and gallery records, financial files, audiovisual material, printed material, photographs, and artwork. Files pertain to exhibitions, books and other writings, the sale of artwork, collection inventories, and recorded interviews. Correspondents include family, friends and colleagues, galleries, and collectors. The collection also contains books, catalogs, clippings, announcements, and other ephemera; several paintings and illustrations, most of which were given to family members or kept private; and photographs of Kleinholz, his artwork, family and friends, and other artists.

Also included are 26 phonograph records of interviews, 1944-1945, which Kleinholz conducted for the "Art in New York" program, Station WNYC. Persons interviewed include Philip Evergood, Philip Reisman, Ralph Mayer, Elizabeth McCausland, Lily Harmon, Abraham Walkowitz, John Groth, and Ladislas Segy; and 2 7" tapes (untranscribed) of interviews, one containing a brief interview with Holger Cahill and a more lengthy interview with McCausland discussing Picassco and the 1944-1945 art season; the other an interview with Evergood.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 6 series.

Series 1: Professional Files, 1940-1979, undated (Box 1, 9-11; 1.9 linear foot)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1920s, bulk 1940s-1980 (Box 2; 10 folders)

Series 3: Writings, 1920s, bulk 1940s-1970s (Box 2-3; .5 linear feet)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1940s-1980s (Box 3-4, OV 8; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 5: Artwork, 1940s-1970s, undated (Box 4; 5 folders)

Series 6: Photographs, 1910s, 1930s, bulk 1940s-1970s (Box 4-6, OV 8; 2 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Frank Kleinholz (1901-1987) was an painter and art educator in New York. Kleinholz was born in Brooklyn, New York. He received a bachelor's degree from Colby College in Maine, and in 1923, he graduated from Fordham University Law School and passed the New York State Bar examination. He then married Leah Schwartz in 1928; they had no children. Until the late 1930s, Frank Kleinholz was a lawyer in New York who, occasionally, submitted poems to newspapers for publication.

In 1939, Kleinholz was awarded a scholarship to study for one year at the American Artists School in New York, and the following summer he studied and painted in Mexico. After Mexico, his art career took off, establishing notoriety for his modernist paintings of the people and scenes in the world around him. By 1945, his work had been selected for exhibitions held by the Carnegie Institute, Phillips Memorial Gallery in Washington, D.C., and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. In an unfortunate turn of events, Leah died of cancer in November of 1945. Frank then married Lidia Brestovan in 1946. They had two girls, Lisa and Anna, and one boy, Marco.

Kleinholz held one-man exhibitions at the Associated American Artists Gallery in New York, Park Gallery in Detroit, ACA Gallery in New York and Rome, and had retrospectives at Nassau Community College, Colby College, and the Lowe Art Museum at the University of Miami. He participated in group exhibitions at the Chicago Art Institute, Metropolitan Museum of Art, and Brooklyn Museum. He wrote the books Frank Kleinholz: A Self Portrait in 1964 and Ile de Brehat, The Flowering Rock in 1971; and books written about him include Frank Kleinholz: The Outsider, by August L. Freundlichn in 1969, and Kleinholz Graphics: Catalogue Raisonne, 1940-1975 by Sylvan Cole, Jr. and Ralph G. Martin in 1976. In addition to those mentioned above, his work is found in the permanent collections of the Moscow Museum of Fine Art, Newark Museum, University of Oklahoma, Marquette University, Akron Art Institute, and private collectors. Although most widely known for his paintings, Kleinholz worked with lithography, etching, and prints as well.

Contemporaneous with his career as an artist, Kleinholz was an art educator and talk-show contributor. He started the "Art in New York" interview program on radio station WNYC, New York City, circa 1940s, and was an art commentator for radio station WIOD, Miami, Florida in the 1960s. Kleinholz was an instructor at Hofstra University, Uniondale, New York, and lectured on contemporary art and art history at Smith College, Brandeis University, and the Park Synagogue in Akron, Ohio.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Frank Kleinholz from 1961-1982.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment, and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Modernism (Art) -- United States  Search this
Art, Mexican  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Interviews
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Frank Kleinholz papers, 1910s-1980. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.kleifran
See more items in:
Frank Kleinholz papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kleifran

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By