Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
92,621 documents - page 1 of 500Result pages are truncated to 500.

African grey parrot, near Kingulube village, Congo (Democratic Republic)

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Congo (Democratic Republic)
Date:
1967
Scope and Contents:
The photograph depicts an African grey parrot, a medium-sized parrot of the genus Psittacus, native to Africa. As the name implies, they are predominantly grey, with accents of white. Some of their feathers are very dark grey and others are a lighter grey colour. They have red or maroon tails depending on the subspecies. They feed primarily on nuts and fruits, supplemented by leafy matter. There are two subspecies: Congo African Grey parrot, Psittacus erithacus erithacus - these are larger birds (about 12 inches/30cm long) with light grey feathers, cherry red tails and black beaks. Timneh African Grey parrot, Psittacus erithacus timneh - these are smaller in size, have a darker charcoal gray coloring, a darker maroon tail, and a light, horn colored upper mandible. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from early December 1966 to early February 1967.
Local Numbers:
V 3 PAR 2 EE 67
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Frame value is 31.
Slide No. V 3 PAR 2 EE 67
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Birds  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 22259
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Congo (Democratic Republic) / EECL / Kingulube Village, Congo (Democratic Republic)
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7d60b715e-3bca-4ecc-a1ab-63a01a0571c5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref14198

African grey parrot, near Kingulube village, Congo (Democratic Republic)

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Congo (Democratic Republic)
Date:
1967
Scope and Contents:
The photograph depicts an African grey parrot, a medium-sized parrot of the genus Psittacus, native to Africa. As the name implies, they are predominantly grey, with accents of white. Some of their feathers are very dark grey and others are a lighter grey colour. They have red or maroon tails depending on the subspecies. They feed primarily on nuts and fruits, supplemented by leafy matter. There are two subspecies: Congo African Grey parrot, Psittacus erithacus erithacus - these are larger birds (about 12 inches/30cm long) with light grey feathers, cherry red tails and black beaks. Timneh African Grey parrot, Psittacus erithacus timneh - these are smaller in size, have a darker charcoal gray coloring, a darker maroon tail, and a light, horn colored upper mandible. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from early December 1966 to early February 1967.
Local Numbers:
V 3 PAR 3 EE 67
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Frame value is 29.
Slide No. V 3 PAR 3 EE 67
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Birds  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 22260
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Congo (Democratic Republic) / EECL / Kingulube Village, Congo (Democratic Republic)
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo770c6f73e-d4f7-4f1a-a171-9395dc2f7f86
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref14199

Leopard resting underneath a tree, Congo (Democratic Republic)

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Congo (Democratic Republic)
Date:
1959
Scope and Contents:
The leopard (Panthera pardus) is known for its ability in climbing, and it has been observed resting on tree branches during the day and descending from trees headfirst. It is a powerful swimmer, although, not as strong as some other big cats, such as the tiger. The leopard is also very agile, and can run over sixty kilometers an hour, leap over six metres and jump up to three metres vertically. The leopard is primarily a nocturnal creature, and many of its operations are done by night. However, there have been recorded instances of leopards hunting during the light, especially when the sky is overcast. It spends much of its day resting and sleeping, up in the branches of trees, underneath rocks or in the grass. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Life magazine and traveled to Africa from August 18, 1959 to December 20, 1959.
Local Numbers:
V 3 MAM 460 EE 59
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
57938 98
Frame value is 12.
Slide No. V 3 MAM 460 EE 59
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Mammals  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 22913
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Congo (Democratic Republic) / EECL / Unidentified, Congo (Democratic Republic)
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7cc053e9b-bfc4-42ec-be7d-f8fe351759ae
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref14923

Leopard resting underneath a tree, Congo (Democratic Republic)

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Congo (Democratic Republic)
Date:
1959
Scope and Contents:
The leopard (Panthera pardus) is known for its ability in climbing, and it has been observed resting on tree branches during the day and descending from trees headfirst. It is a powerful swimmer, although, not as strong as some other big cats, such as the tiger. The leopard is also very agile, and can run over sixty kilometers an hour, leap over six metres and jump up to three metres vertically. The leopard is primarily a nocturnal creature, and many of its operations are done by night. However, there have been recorded instances of leopards hunting during the light, especially when the sky is overcast. It spends much of its day resting and sleeping, up in the branches of trees, underneath rocks or in the grass. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Life magazine and traveled to Africa from August 18, 1959 to December 20, 1959.
Local Numbers:
V 3 MAM 462 EE 59
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
57938 98
Frame value is 20.
Slide No. V 3 MAM 462 EE 59
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Mammals  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 22915
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Congo (Democratic Republic) / EECL / Unidentified, Congo (Democratic Republic)
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo70bee6634-7062-4ffc-ac34-7d12b4d864a6
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref14926

Leopard resting underneath a tree, Congo (Democratic Republic)

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Congo (Democratic Republic)
Date:
1959
Scope and Contents:
The leopard (Panthera pardus) is known for its ability in climbing, and it has been observed resting on tree branches during the day and descending from trees headfirst. It is a powerful swimmer, although, not as strong as some other big cats, such as the tiger. The leopard is also very agile, and can run over sixty kilometers an hour, leap over six metres and jump up to three metres vertically. The leopard is primarily a nocturnal creature, and many of its operations are done by night. However, there have been recorded instances of leopards hunting during the light, especially when the sky is overcast. It spends much of its day resting and sleeping, up in the branches of trees, underneath rocks or in the grass. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Life magazine and traveled to Africa from August 18, 1959 to December 20, 1959.
Local Numbers:
V 3 MAM 465 EE 59
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
57938 98
Frame value is 29.
Slide No. V 3 MAM 465 EE 59
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Mammals  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 22918
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Congo (Democratic Republic) / EECL / Unidentified, Congo (Democratic Republic)
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo757c4f7f4-12bb-4d3e-976c-f9b40556339a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref14929

Leopard resting underneath a tree, Congo (Democratic Republic)

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Congo (Democratic Republic)
Date:
1959
Scope and Contents:
The leopard (Panthera pardus) is known for its ability in climbing, and it has been observed resting on tree branches during the day and descending from trees headfirst. It is a powerful swimmer, although, not as strong as some other big cats, such as the tiger. The leopard is also very agile, and can run over sixty kilometers an hour, leap over six metres and jump up to three metres vertically. The leopard is primarily a nocturnal creature, and many of its operations are done by night. However, there have been recorded instances of leopards hunting during the light, especially when the sky is overcast. It spends much of its day resting and sleeping, up in the branches of trees, underneath rocks or in the grass. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Life magazine and traveled to Africa from August 18, 1959 to December 20, 1959.
Local Numbers:
V 3 MAM 466 EE 59
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
57938 97
Frame value is 31.
Slide No. V 3 MAM 466 EE 59
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Mammals  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 22919
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Congo (Democratic Republic) / EECL / Unidentified, Congo (Democratic Republic)
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo74e42cca3-dcf4-41d5-ae7d-ddf3378ff72b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref14930

Leopard resting underneath a tree, Congo (Democratic Republic)

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Congo (Democratic Republic)
Date:
1959
Scope and Contents:
The leopard (Panthera pardus) is known for its ability in climbing, and it has been observed resting on tree branches during the day and descending from trees headfirst. It is a powerful swimmer, although, not as strong as some other big cats, such as the tiger. The leopard is also very agile, and can run over sixty kilometers an hour, leap over six metres and jump up to three metres vertically. The leopard is primarily a nocturnal creature, and many of its operations are done by night. However, there have been recorded instances of leopards hunting during the light, especially when the sky is overcast. It spends much of its day resting and sleeping, up in the branches of trees, underneath rocks or in the grass. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Life magazine and traveled to Africa from August 18, 1959 to December 20, 1959.
Local Numbers:
V 3 MAM 469 EE 59
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Frame value is 0.
Slide No. V 3 MAM 469 EE 59
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Mammals  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 22922
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Congo (Democratic Republic) / EECL / Unidentified, Congo (Democratic Republic)
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7a96c43ab-1686-407a-ae8f-2b02543c04e1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref14934

Leopard resting underneath a tree, Congo (Democratic Republic)

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Congo (Democratic Republic)
Date:
1959
Scope and Contents:
The leopard (Panthera pardus) is known for its ability in climbing, and it has been observed resting on tree branches during the day and descending from trees headfirst. It is a powerful swimmer, although, not as strong as some other big cats, such as the tiger. The leopard is also very agile, and can run over sixty kilometers an hour, leap over six metres and jump up to three metres vertically. The leopard is primarily a nocturnal creature, and many of its operations are done by night. However, there have been recorded instances of leopards hunting during the light, especially when the sky is overcast. It spends much of its day resting and sleeping, up in the branches of trees, underneath rocks or in the grass. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Life magazine and traveled to Africa from August 18, 1959 to December 20, 1959.
Local Numbers:
V 3 MAM 470 EE 59
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
57938 98
Frame value is 30.
Slide No. V 3 MAM 470 EE 59
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Mammals  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 22923
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Congo (Democratic Republic) / EECL / Unidentified, Congo (Democratic Republic)
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7ea641996-d2d3-46fc-98a1-1164916a949d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref14935

Egyptian vulture near Lake Lgarya, southeastern corner of Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
The Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) is a small Old World vulture, the only member of the genus Neophron. Egyptian Vultures are scavengers, mainly feeding off carrion, but they also prey on small mammals and eggs. The adult Egyptian Vulture usually measures 85 cm from the point of the beak to the extremity of the tail and 1.7m between the tips of the wings. It weighs about 2.1 kilograms. The adult's plumage is black and white. Its facial skin is yellow (it turns orange during nesting periods) and devoid of feathers. The tail is wedged and diamond shaped, so it is easily distinguished in flight. The nestlings are dark brown and gradually go light until they reach adulthood at the age of 5. Egyptian Vultures are quite widely distributed and can be found in India, south west Asia, the Iberian Peninsula, and central and north Africa. They are partial migrants, depending on the local climate. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 BIR 466 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
42
Frame value is 24.
Slide No. V 4 BIR 466 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Birds  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24071
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo751d13eae-1b60-4d42-b480-492e849b55b8
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16207

Egyptian vulture near Lake Lgarya, southeastern corner of Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
The Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) is a small Old World vulture, the only member of the genus Neophron. Egyptian Vultures are scavengers, mainly feeding off carrion, but they also prey on small mammals and eggs. The adult Egyptian Vulture usually measures 85 cm from the point of the beak to the extremity of the tail and 1.7m between the tips of the wings. It weighs about 2.1 kilograms. The adult's plumage is black and white. Its facial skin is yellow (it turns orange during nesting periods) and devoid of feathers. The tail is wedged and diamond shaped, so it is easily distinguished in flight. The nestlings are dark brown and gradually go light until they reach adulthood at the age of 5. Egyptian Vultures are quite widely distributed and can be found in India, south west Asia, the Iberian Peninsula, and central and north Africa. They are partial migrants, depending on the local climate. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 BIR 467 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
42
Frame value is 27.
Slide No. V 4 BIR 467 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Birds  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24072
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo724662e1e-bead-4a9b-a58a-7e291130ea49
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16209

Egyptian vulture near Lake Lgarya, southeastern corner of Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
The Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) is a small Old World vulture, the only member of the genus Neophron. Egyptian Vultures are scavengers, mainly feeding off carrion, but they also prey on small mammals and eggs. The adult Egyptian Vulture usually measures 85 cm from the point of the beak to the extremity of the tail and 1.7m between the tips of the wings. It weighs about 2.1 kilograms. The adult's plumage is black and white. Its facial skin is yellow (it turns orange during nesting periods) and devoid of feathers. The tail is wedged and diamond shaped, so it is easily distinguished in flight. The nestlings are dark brown and gradually go light until they reach adulthood at the age of 5. Egyptian Vultures are quite widely distributed and can be found in India, south west Asia, the Iberian Peninsula, and central and north Africa. They are partial migrants, depending on the local climate. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 BIR 468 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
42
Frame value is 30.
Slide No. V 4 BIR 468 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Birds  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24073
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo75d61072c-3385-4273-92a0-0806e0888e01
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16210

Egyptian vulture near Lake Lgarya, southeastern corner of Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
The Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) is a small Old World vulture, the only member of the genus Neophron. Egyptian Vultures are scavengers, mainly feeding off carrion, but they also prey on small mammals and eggs. The adult Egyptian Vulture usually measures 85 cm from the point of the beak to the extremity of the tail and 1.7m between the tips of the wings. It weighs about 2.1 kilograms. The adult's plumage is black and white. Its facial skin is yellow (it turns orange during nesting periods) and devoid of feathers. The tail is wedged and diamond shaped, so it is easily distinguished in flight. The nestlings are dark brown and gradually go light until they reach adulthood at the age of 5. Egyptian Vultures are quite widely distributed and can be found in India, south west Asia, the Iberian Peninsula, and central and north Africa. They are partial migrants, depending on the local climate. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 BIR 469 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
42
Frame value is 31.
Slide No. V 4 BIR 469 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Birds  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24074
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7c29b117d-808b-4f06-a06a-8d31012f79d1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16211

Egyptian vulture near Lake Lgarya, southeastern corner of Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
The Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) is a small Old World vulture, the only member of the genus Neophron. Egyptian Vultures are scavengers, mainly feeding off carrion, but they also prey on small mammals and eggs. The adult Egyptian Vulture usually measures 85 cm from the point of the beak to the extremity of the tail and 1.7m between the tips of the wings. It weighs about 2.1 kilograms. The adult's plumage is black and white. Its facial skin is yellow (it turns orange during nesting periods) and devoid of feathers. The tail is wedged and diamond shaped, so it is easily distinguished in flight. The nestlings are dark brown and gradually go light until they reach adulthood at the age of 5. Egyptian Vultures are quite widely distributed and can be found in India, south west Asia, the Iberian Peninsula, and central and north Africa. They are partial migrants, depending on the local climate. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 BIR 470 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
42
Frame value is 32.
Slide No. V 4 BIR 470 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Birds  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24075
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo72c46593d-6d76-4a75-a794-cccedcaee639
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16212

Egyptian vulture near Lake Lgarya, southeastern corner of Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
The Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) is a small Old World vulture, the only member of the genus Neophron. Egyptian Vultures are scavengers, mainly feeding off carrion, but they also prey on small mammals and eggs. The adult Egyptian Vulture usually measures 85 cm from the point of the beak to the extremity of the tail and 1.7m between the tips of the wings. It weighs about 2.1 kilograms. The adult's plumage is black and white. Its facial skin is yellow (it turns orange during nesting periods) and devoid of feathers. The tail is wedged and diamond shaped, so it is easily distinguished in flight. The nestlings are dark brown and gradually go light until they reach adulthood at the age of 5. Egyptian Vultures are quite widely distributed and can be found in India, south west Asia, the Iberian Peninsula, and central and north Africa. They are partial migrants, depending on the local climate. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 BIR 472 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
43
Frame value is 29.
Slide No. V 4 BIR 472 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Birds  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24077
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7a79a1bf2-d633-4dcc-bf86-64e966abe9d7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16214

Egyptian vulture near Lake Lgarya, southeastern corner of Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
The Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) is a small Old World vulture, the only member of the genus Neophron. Egyptian Vultures are scavengers, mainly feeding off carrion, but they also prey on small mammals and eggs. The adult Egyptian Vulture usually measures 85 cm from the point of the beak to the extremity of the tail and 1.7m between the tips of the wings. It weighs about 2.1 kilograms. The adult's plumage is black and white. Its facial skin is yellow (it turns orange during nesting periods) and devoid of feathers. The tail is wedged and diamond shaped, so it is easily distinguished in flight. The nestlings are dark brown and gradually go light until they reach adulthood at the age of 5. Egyptian Vultures are quite widely distributed and can be found in India, south west Asia, the Iberian Peninsula, and central and north Africa. They are partial migrants, depending on the local climate. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 BIR 473 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
43
Frame value is 33.
Slide No. V 4 BIR 473 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Birds  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24078
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo74f602724-b23f-4f8c-9815-4b6fe074e1c4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16215

Egyptian vulture near Lake Lgarya, southeastern corner of Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
The Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) is a small Old World vulture, the only member of the genus Neophron. Egyptian Vultures are scavengers, mainly feeding off carrion, but they also prey on small mammals and eggs. The adult Egyptian Vulture usually measures 85 cm from the point of the beak to the extremity of the tail and 1.7m between the tips of the wings. It weighs about 2.1 kilograms. The adult's plumage is black and white. Its facial skin is yellow (it turns orange during nesting periods) and devoid of feathers. The tail is wedged and diamond shaped, so it is easily distinguished in flight. The nestlings are dark brown and gradually go light until they reach adulthood at the age of 5. Egyptian Vultures are quite widely distributed and can be found in India, south west Asia, the Iberian Peninsula, and central and north Africa. They are partial migrants, depending on the local climate. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 BIR 475 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
45
Frame value is 11.
Slide No. V 4 BIR 475 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Birds  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24080
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7e41ce0db-72ac-4a8b-bebb-dcfebb494f00
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16217

Egyptian vulture near Lake Lgarya, southeastern corner of Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
The Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) is a small Old World vulture, the only member of the genus Neophron. Egyptian Vultures are scavengers, mainly feeding off carrion, but they also prey on small mammals and eggs. The adult Egyptian Vulture usually measures 85 cm from the point of the beak to the extremity of the tail and 1.7m between the tips of the wings. It weighs about 2.1 kilograms. The adult's plumage is black and white. Its facial skin is yellow (it turns orange during nesting periods) and devoid of feathers. The tail is wedged and diamond shaped, so it is easily distinguished in flight. The nestlings are dark brown and gradually go light until they reach adulthood at the age of 5. Egyptian Vultures are quite widely distributed and can be found in India, south west Asia, the Iberian Peninsula, and central and north Africa. They are partial migrants, depending on the local climate. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 BIR 478 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
45
Frame value is 13.
Slide No. V 4 BIR 478 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Birds  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24083
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7c9839d39-74fd-4fc8-a167-5f11318383a2
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16221

Grant's gazelles, Lake Manyara National Park, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Grant's gazelles resemble Thomson's gazelles, but are noticeably larger and easily distinguished by the broad white patch on the rump that extends upward onto the back. The white patch on the Thomson's gazelle stops at the tail. Some varieties of Grant's have a black stripe on each side of the body like the Thomson's; in others the stripe is very light or absent. A black stripe runs down the thigh. Grant's gazelle's lyre-shaped horns are stout at the base, clearly ringed and measuring 18 to 32 inches long. On the females black skin surrounds the teats, with white hair on the udder. This probably helps the young recognize the source of milk. When a fawn is older and moving about with its mother, the dark stripe on the white background may serve as a beacon for it to follow. Grant's gazelles are especially fond of open grass plains, and although they frequent bushy savannas, they avoid areas of high grass. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 MAM 2.0 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
4
Frame value is 6.
Slide No. V 4 MAM 2.0 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Mammals  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24218
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo76b98138a-5646-4ed3-b490-a05f7ea9f61a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16372

Grant's gazelles, near Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Grant's gazelles resemble Thomson's gazelles, but are noticeably larger and easily distinguished by the broad white patch on the rump that extends upward onto the back. The white patch on the Thomson's gazelle stops at the tail. Some varieties of Grant's have a black stripe on each side of the body like the Thomson's; in others the stripe is very light or absent. A black stripe runs down the thigh. Grant's gazelle's lyre-shaped horns are stout at the base, clearly ringed and measuring 18 to 32 inches long. On the females black skin surrounds the teats, with white hair on the udder. This probably helps the young recognize the source of milk. When a fawn is older and moving about with its mother, the dark stripe on the white background may serve as a beacon for it to follow. Grant's gazelles are especially fond of open grass plains, and although they frequent bushy savannas, they avoid areas of high grass. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 MAM 2.1 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
38
Frame value is 1.
Slide No. V 4 MAM 2.1 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Mammals  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24219
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7b125d469-c55d-4c8b-bf62-4aa5d554309c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16373

Thomson's gazelle, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
One of the most common gazelles in East Africa, the graceful Thomson's Gazelle is distinguished from the similarly colored Grant's Gazelle by the dark stripe that runs from the shoulder to the flank and the white patch on the rump, as well as its smaller size. Male tommies are larger than females and have strongly ridged horns that curve backwards, with the tips curving forward. Female tommies have short, smooth, pencil-slim horns, or none at all. The face is accented by a black stripe running down from the eye, a dark marking on the nose and a light patch on the forehead. Although more reliant on water than Grant's gazelle, the Thomson's Gazelle has adapted to the open plains and grasslands of southern Kenya and northern Tanzania. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 MAM 3.0 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
50
Frame value is 30.
Slide No. V 4 MAM 3.0 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Mammals  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24221
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo70a5b12e8-5bd6-46b2-ad92-0e70aca7f1f5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16375

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By