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Oral history interview with Raymond J. Horowitz

Interviewee:
Horowitz, Raymond J.  Search this
Interviewer:
Berman, Avis  Search this
Names:
Columbia University -- Students  Search this
Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
National Gallery of Art (U.S.)  Search this
Adler, A. M. (Abraham M), 1902-1985  Search this
Canaday, John, 1907-1985  Search this
Cikovsky, Nicolai, 1894-  Search this
Fraad, Daniel  Search this
Fraad, Rita  Search this
Gerdts, William H.  Search this
Hirshhorn, Joseph H.  Search this
Levine, Jack, 1915-2010  Search this
Magriel, Paul David, 1906-  Search this
McGoldrick, Joseph D. (Joseph Daniel), 1901-  Search this
Mellon, Paul  Search this
Mount, Charles Merrill  Search this
Spanierman, Ira  Search this
Spark, Victor D. (Victor David), 1898-1991  Search this
Stebbins, Theodore E.  Search this
Terra, Daniel J., 1911-1996  Search this
Extent:
3 Sound cassettes (Sound recording (4 hrs. 30 min.), analog)
56 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2004 Oct. 20-Nov. 5
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Raymond Horowitz conducted 2004 Oct.20-Nov. 5, by Avis Berman, for the Archives of American Art, in New York, N.Y.
Horowitz speaks of his privileged childhood in New York; the effects of the Depression on his family's finances; attending Columbia University for Law and the anti-Semitism he faced there; his ingratiation into art appreciation through Meyer Shapiro; employment under then-New York City comptroller Joseph McGoldrick; the formation of his law practice; and his marriage to his wife, Margaret Goldenberg. Horowitz also mentions his involvement in left-wing political movements; how he managed relationships with different dealers; his experiences with misattributed artworks and forgeries, particularly his luck in avoiding them; the hobbies of himself and his wife; how he avoids relationships with the artists of his works; sharing information with other collectors; the economics of donating artworks and the subsequent tax breaks; the importance of credit in art purchasing; how he and Margaret conferred on purchases; their affinity for Chase; his habits on lending to exhibitions; the differences between the management of the Metropolitan Museum and the National Gallery; his summer homes in East Hampton and Provincetown; the problems with contemporary art scholarship; and the importance of dealers in affirming the interest in American art. Horowitz spends most of the interview reflecting upon others in the art world whom he has met. He recalls Ira Spanierman, Dan and Rita Fraad, Charles Merill Mount, Victor Spark, Abraham Adler, Nicolai Cikovsky, Phillipe de Montebello, Theodore Stebbins, Jack Levine, Daniel Terra, Joseph Hirshhorn, Norman Hirschl, John Canaday, Doris and Harry Rubin, Paul Mellon, Bill Gerdts, Paul Magriel, Bernard Meyers, and many others.
Biographical / Historical:
Interviewee Raymond Horowitz (1916-2005) was a collector from New York, N.Y. Avis Berman is an art historian from New York, N.Y.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Lawyers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Art dealers  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Depressions -- 1929  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.horowi04
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9e03ce7be-26ab-4650-8e70-b186b080cd3b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-horowi04
Online Media:

Frank Kleinholz papers, 1910s-1980, bulk 1940s-1980

Creator:
Kleinholz Frank, 1901-1987  Search this
Subject:
McCausland, Elizabeth  Search this
Type:
Drawings
Interviews
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Frank Kleinholz papers, 1910s-1980, bulk 1940s-1980. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Modernism (Art)  Search this
Art, Mexican  Search this
Theme:
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9154
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211348
AAA_collcode_kleifran
Theme:
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211348

Gustave Harrow legal records relating to the Estate of Mark Rothko, 1957-1986

Creator:
Harrow, Gustave  Search this
Subject:
Annenberg, Walter H.  Search this
Rothko, Mark  Search this
New York (State). Attorney General's Office  Search this
Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Mark Rothko Foundation  Search this
Citation:
Gustave Harrow legal records relating to the Estate of Mark Rothko, 1957-1986. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Artists -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- United States  Search this
Transcripts  Search this
Decedents' estates -- New York (State)  Search this
Law and art -- United States  Search this
Theme:
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)6067
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)216127
AAA_collcode_harrgust2
Theme:
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_216127
Online Media:

Raymond and Margaret Horowitz papers, 1903-2007, bulk 1960-2007

Creator:
Horowitz, Raymond J.  Search this
Subject:
Horowitz, Margaret  Search this
Fraad, Daniel  Search this
Magriel, Paul David  Search this
Spark, Victor D. (Victor David)  Search this
Hirschl & Adler Galleries  Search this
Babcock Galleries  Search this
National Gallery of Art (U.S.)  Search this
Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Adelson Galleries  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Citation:
Raymond and Margaret Horowitz papers, 1903-2007, bulk 1960-2007. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Impressionism (Art)  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Theme:
Patronage  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)16223
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)369703
AAA_collcode_hororaym
Theme:
Patronage
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_369703
Online Media:

Jack Tworkov papers

Creator:
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Names:
Egan Gallery  Search this
Leo Castelli Gallery  Search this
Nancy Hoffman Gallery  Search this
Poindexter Gallery  Search this
Stable Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Ashbury, John  Search this
Ashton, Dore  Search this
Bartlett, Jennifer, 1941-  Search this
Blinken, Donald M., 1925-  Search this
Calfee, William H. (William Howard), 1909-1995  Search this
Cavallon, Giorgio, 1904-1989  Search this
Cézanne, Paul, 1839-1906  Search this
Demarco, Ricky  Search this
Dickinson, Edwin Walter, 1891-1978  Search this
Forge, Andrew  Search this
Hartigan, Grace  Search this
Herzbrun, Helene  Search this
Katz, Paul  Search this
Knaths, Karl, 1891-1971  Search this
Lindeberg, Linda, 1915-1973  Search this
Matter, Herbert, 1907-1984  Search this
Newman, Arnold, 1918-2006  Search this
Newman, Michael  Search this
Osborn, Robert Chesley, 1904-1994  Search this
Ponsold, Renate  Search this
Praeger, David A.  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Summerford, Joe  Search this
Thorne, Joan, 1943-  Search this
Westenberger, Theo  Search this
Wheeler, Dennis  Search this
Wise, Howard  Search this
Yunkers, Adja, 1900-1983  Search this
Extent:
9.7 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Video recordings
Interviews
Motion pictures (visual works)
Sound recordings
Sketches
Diaries
Date:
1926-1993
Summary:
The Jack Tworkov papers measure 9.7 linear feet and are dated 1926-1993. Tworkov's work as a painter and influential teacher, as well as his personal life, are documented by extensive journals and substantive correspondence that record his ideas about art and teaching, and illuminate his relationships with friends, colleagues, and students. Many sketchbooks, writings, interviews, photographs, and moving images are also included.
Scope and Content Note:
The Jack Tworkov papers measure 9.7 linear feet and are dated 1926-1993, with the bulk from the period 1931-1982. Tworkov's work as a painter and influential teacher, as well as his personal life, are documented by extensive journals and substantive correspondence that record his ideas about art and teaching, and illuminate his relationships with friends, colleagues, and students. Many sketchbooks, writings, interviews, photographs, and moving images are also included.

Biographical material includes Tworkov's citizenship certificate, awards, diplomas, a copy of Jack Tworkov: Video Portrait, produced by Electronic Arts Intermix, and a motion picture film, USA Artists: Jack Tworkov, produced by National Education Television.

Correspondence consists largely of incoming letters. It is both professional and personal in nature and often combines both spheres. Correspondents include artists Jennifer Bartlett, William H. Calfee, Giorgio Cavallon and Linda Lindeberg, Grace Hartigan, Helene Herzbrun (also named Helene McKinsey), Karl Knaths, Joe Summerford, Joan Thorne, and Adja Yunkers; cartoonist Robert C. Osborn; collectors Donald M. Blinken and David A. Praeger (who was also Tworkov's lawyer); illustrator Roger Dovoisin; critics Dore Ashton and Andrew Forge; critic and poet John Ashbury; galleries that represented Tworkov: Egan Gallery, Leo Castelli, Nancy Hoffman Gallery, Poindexter Gallery, Stable Gallery and Zabriskie Gallery; and many museums, arts organizations, colleges and universities.

Interviews with Tworkov include one with Ricky Demarco videotaped in 1979 and two conducted on video by Twokov's daughter Helen in 1975. The remaining interviews are sound recordings, one conducted by Grace Alexander for the show Artists in New York in 1967, one conducted by Michael Newman in 1980, and the remainder by unidentified interviewers. None have transcripts.

All writings are by Tworkov and include poems, an artist's statement, and documentation for two children's books by Tworkov illustrated by Roger Duvoisin. Two additional notebooks contain miscellaneous notes, teaching notes, and some specific to identified courses. Lectures exist as untranscribed sound recordings.

Tworkov's journals (33 volumes) span a period of 35 years, from 1947 until 1982, with the final entry dated a few weeks before his death. They record his reflections on painting, his challenges as a painter, aesthetics, the role of the artist in society, Jewish identity, painters he admired (especially Cézanne and Edwin Dickinson), politics, and teaching. They also recount everyday life: the comings and goings of friends and family members, social engagements, professional activities, illness, and travel.

The lone subject file concerns Mark Rothko and includes a photograph of Rothko and the guest list for the dedication of the Rothko Chapel in Houston.

Artwork consists of a small number of sketches by Tworkov in pencil and ink. Tworkov's sketchbooks (28 volumes) contain sketches and some finished drawings. Most are in pencil, but scattered throughout are a few pencil sketches embellished with colored marker or pastel, and a small number in ink.

Photographs are of people, places and events. Most photographs are of Tworkov alone and with others including Giogio Cavallon, though most friends and students are unidentified. Of note are views of Tworkov producing a series of prints at Tamarind Institute. Also found is an informal portrait of Wally Tworkov. Events recorded include the jurying of "Exhibition Momentum" in Chicago, 1956. Among the places shown are Tworkov's studios at Black Mountain College and in Provincetown. When known, photographers are noted; among them are Paul Katz, Herbert Matter, Arnold Newman, Renate Ponsold, Theo Westenberger, Dennis Wheeler, and Howard Wise.

A separate series of audiovisual recordings was established for those recordings that could not be readily identified to be arranged in other series. They consist of three videocassettes (2 VHS and 1 miniDV).
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1933-1981 (Boxes 1, 9, 11, FC 13; 0.7 linear ft.)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1926-1993 (Boxes 1-5; 3.8 linear ft.)

Series 3: Interviews, 1978-1982 (Boxes 5, 9-10; 1 linear ft.)

Series 4: Writings, Notes, and Lectures, 1955-1982 (Boxes 5, 9; 0.5 linear ft.)

Series 5: Journals, 1947-1982 (Boxes 5-7; 2.0 linear ft.)

Series 6: Subject File, 1961-1977 (Box 7; 1 folder)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1952-1981 (Box 7, OV 12; 0.1 linear ft.)

Series 8: Artwork, circa 1950s-1960s (Box 7: 3 folders)

Series 9: Sketchbooks, circa 1950s-1960s (Boxes 7-8, 11; 1.0 linear ft.)

Series 10: Photographic Materials, 1941-1981 (Boxes 8-9; 0.5 linear ft.)

Series 11: Audiovisual Recordings, 1961-1975 (Box 9; 0.1 linear ft.)
Biographical Note:
New York School painter Jack Tworkov (1900-1982), best known for his Abstract Expressionist paintings and as a highly regarded teacher, lived and worked in New York City and Provincetown, MA.

At age 13, Tworkov (born Yakov Tworkovsky) emigrated from Poland with his mother and sister to join his father already in the United States. In America, they chose to use the name of distant relatives, the Bernsteins, who were their sponsors. Eventually, Jack and his sister, Janice, reclaimed and shortened their name to Tworkov; later, she adopted the name of their hometown in Poland and became the painter Janice Biala.

As a high school student in New York City, Tworkov attended drawing classes. After graduating from Columbia University, where he had been an English major and considered becoming a writer, Tworkov instead turned to art. He studied with Ivan Olinsky at the National Academy of Design between 1923 and 1925, and from 1925 to 1926 attended painting classes taught by Guy Péne Du Bois and Boardman Robinson at the Art Students League. During his college years, Tworkov began visiting museums and became a great admirer of Cézanne. Tworkov's early paintings - still life, landscapes, and portraits - showed the influence of European modernism and Cézanne.

Tworkov spent his first summer in Provincetown while still a student and subsequently returned to study with Ross Moffet. In Provincetown he met and was greatly influenced by Karl Knaths and developed a lifelong friendship with Edwin Dickinson. By 1929, Tworkov was painting there year round. Over the years, Tworkov and his family continued to return for long stretches, and in 1958 he purchased a house in Provincetown.

During the Great Depression, Tworkov participated in the Treasury Department's Public Works of Art Project until 1934, and then moved to the easel division of the WPA Federal Art Project. He felt uncomfortable with the growing ideological and political influences on art and found it depressing to paint for the WPA rather than for himself, so he left the WPA in 1941. Tworkov, who had studied mechanical drawing while in high school, spent most of the War years employed as a tool designer and draftsman at an engineering firm with government contracts.

By the 1940s, Tworkov was painting in the Abstract Expressionist style. Between 1948 and 1953, he leased a studio on Fourth Avenue that adjoined that of his friend Willem de Kooning. During this time, they mutually influenced each other as they developed into mature Abstract Expressionists. At Yale in the 1960s, Tworkov became close friends with fellow student Josef Albers. Alber's influence on Tworkov resulted in a turn to geometric compositions of small, systematic, and repetitive strokes defined by a grid. He experimented with diagonal compositions, and later geometric work that featured large areas of color and soft texture.

Tworkov's first teaching experience was during 1930-1931 when he served as a part-time painting instructor at the Ethical Culture Fieldston School. His teaching career began in earnest when he joined the faculties of Queens College, 1948-1955, and Pratt Institute, 1955-1958. During the summers he taught at various schools, most notably Black Mountain College's 1952 summer session. Tworkov was a visiting artist at the Yale University School of Art and Architecture, 1961-1963, and became chairman of its Art Department from 1963 until his retirement in 1969. In retirement he lived in Provincetown and was a visiting artist for both short and extended periods at various universities and art schools.

An avid reader of literature and poetry, Tworkov also wrote poems and essays. He published essays in It Is, Art Digest, and Art In America; his most notable piece, "The Wandering Soutine," appeared in Art News, November 1950. Tworkov also kept a journal for 35 years (1947-1982) that recorded his thoughts on a wide range of subjects concerning professional, personal, and philosophical issues, as well as details of everyday life.

Tworkov was among the founders of the Artists' Club or The Club in 1949, and for a decade actively participated in the stimulating discussions for which the group was known. In 1968 he helped to establish the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. Its residency program enabled younger artists and writers to advance their careers and kept Provincetown's historic artists' colony active year round.

He was the recipient of the William A. Clark Award and Corcoran Gold Medal from the Corcoran Gallery of Art, 1963; Skowhegan School of Art's Painter of the Year Award, 1974; and Distinguished Teaching of Art Award from College Art Association, 1976. Tworkov was appointed to serve on the Massachusetts Art Commission, 1970-1971, and in 1981 was named a Fellow of The Cleveland Museum of Art and of the Rhode Island School of Design.

Following his second divorce in 1935, Rachel (Wally) Wolodarsky became Tworkov's third wife and their marriage endured. They had two daughters. Hermine Ford (b. 1939) is an artist married to fellow painter Robert Moskowitz. Helen Tworkov (b. 1943) is the founder of Tricycle: The Buddhist Review and the author of a book about yoga.

Tworkov remained physically and intellectually active after a diagnosis of bone cancer around 1980, and continued to paint until shortly before his death in Provincetown on September 4, 1982.
Related Material:
Among the holdings of the Archives of American Art are two oral history interviews with Jack Tworkov, one conducted by Dorothy Seckler, Aug. 17, 1962, and another by Gerald Silk, May 22, 1981. There is also a small collection of three letters written by Jack Tworkov to friend Troy-Jjohn Bramberger.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reel N70-38 and 62) including writings by Tworkov, notebooks, notes for teaching and talks, notes on art and miscellaneous subjects, poems, artist's statements, biographical data, the transcript of a 1970 interview with Tworkov conducted by Phyllis Tuchman, and a few letters and drafts of letters, 1950-1963. Loaned materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Jack Tworkov lent the Archives of American Art papers for microfilming in 1970-1971. Jack Tworkov's daughters, Hermine Ford and Helen Tworkov, donated the rest of the collection in 2009, which included some of the material from the original loan.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
Reels N70-38 and 62: Authorization to publish, quote, or reproduce requires written permission from Helen Tworkov or Hermine Ford. Contact Reference Services for more information.
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts  Search this
Topic:
Painting -- New York (State)  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Video recordings
Interviews
Motion pictures (visual works)
Sound recordings
Sketches
Diaries
Citation:
Jack Tworkov papers, 1926-1993. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.tworjack2
See more items in:
Jack Tworkov papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9345f5838-057f-4572-8063-0df7b8d00ad0
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-tworjack2
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Raymond J. Horowitz, 1973 Jan. 17

Interviewee:
Horowitz, Raymond J.  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul, 1933-1997  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Raymond J. Horowitz, 1973 Jan. 17. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13313
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212480
AAA_collcode_horowi73
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_212480
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Ralph F. Colin, 1969 August 15

Interviewee:
Colin, Ralph F., 1900-1985  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul, 1933-1997  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Ralph F. Colin, 1969 August 15. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12526
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212596
AAA_collcode_colin69
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_212596

Oral history interview with Raymond J. Horowitz, 2004 Oct. 20-Nov. 5

Interviewee:
Horowitz, Raymond J.  Search this
Interviewer:
Berman, Avis, 1949-  Search this
Subject:
Spark, Victor D. (Victor David)  Search this
Mellon, Paul  Search this
Adler, A. M. (Abraham M)  Search this
Fraad, Daniel  Search this
Fraad, Rita  Search this
Spanierman, Ira  Search this
McGoldrick, Joseph D. (Joseph Daniel)  Search this
Terra, Daniel J.  Search this
Mount, Charles Merrill  Search this
Gerdts, William H.  Search this
Stebbins, Theodore E.  Search this
Hirshhorn, Joseph H.  Search this
Canaday, John  Search this
Magriel, Paul David  Search this
Cikovsky, Nicolai  Search this
Levine, Jack  Search this
Columbia University  Search this
National Gallery of Art (U.S.)  Search this
Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Raymond J. Horowitz, 2004 Oct. 20-Nov. 5. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Depressions -- 1929  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11835
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)249390
AAA_collcode_horowi04
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_249390
Online Media:

Oral history interview with David M. Solinger, 1977 May 6

Interviewee:
Solinger, David M., 1906-1996  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul, 1933-1997  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with David M. Solinger, 1977 May 6. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art patronage -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art patrons -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13131
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213105
AAA_collcode_soling77
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213105
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Ralph F. Colin, 1965 March 12

Interviewee:
Colin, Ralph F., 1900-1985  Search this
Interviewer:
Phillips, Harlan B. (Harlan Buddington),, 1920-  Search this
Subject:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Ralph F. Colin, 1965 March 12. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Theme:
New Deal  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12982
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213359
AAA_collcode_colin65
Theme:
New Deal
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213359

Oral history interview with Robert Noel Blair, 1994 November 30-1995 August 27

Interviewee:
Blair, Robert N. (Robert Noel), 1912-2003  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F  Search this
Subject:
Burchfield, Charles Ephraim  Search this
Albright Art School (Buffalo, N.Y.)  Search this
Arts Institute of Buffalo  Search this
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. School  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Robert Noel Blair, 1994 November 30-1995 August 27. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Painting, American  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- New York (State) -- Buffalo  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Art and the war  Search this
Printmakers -- New York (State) -- Buffalo -- Interviews  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- Buffalo -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12605
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)215790
AAA_collcode_blair94
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_215790
Online Media:

Oral history interview with George S. Abrams, 2018 Jan. 25- Oct. 25

Interviewee:
Abrams, George S., 1932-  Search this
Interviewer:
Ruby, Louisa Wood, 1959-  Search this
Subject:
Art Collectors: A Project in Partnership with the Center for the History of Collecting in America at The Frick Collection  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with George S. Abrams, 2018 Jan. 25- Oct. 25. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)17538
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)392270
AAA_collcode_abrams18
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_392270
Online Media:

Katherine Schmidt papers

Creator:
Schmidt, Katherine, 1898-1978  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
circa 1921-1971
Summary:
The papers of painter and arts advocate Katherine Schmidt measure 0.2 linear feet and date from circa 1921 to 1971. Scattered correspondence, speeches, proposals, meeting minutes, and notes focus primarily on Schmidt's advocacy for federal and state government support of the arts. Printed materials includes exhibition catalogs, clippings, press releases documenting Schmidt's painting career and arts advocacy work. Photographs include portrait photos of Schmidt and photographs of Schmidt's drawings. There are two photographs taken by her first husband Yasuo Kuniyoshi of Schmidt with friends at a party.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of painter and arts advocate Katherine Schmidt measure 0.2 linear feet and date from circa 1921 to 1971. Scattered correspondence, speeches, proposals, meeting minutes, and notes focus primarily on Schmidt's advocacy for federal and state government support of the arts. Printed materials includes exhibition catalogs, clippings, press releases documenting Schmidt's painting career and arts advocacy work. Photographs include portrait photos of Schmidt and photographs of Schmidt's drawings. There are two photographs taken by her first husband Yasuo Kuniyoshi of Schmidt with friends at a party. The papers contain little documentation of Kuniyoshi or their marriage.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 4 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Correspondence, 1939-1951, 1961 (Box 1; 3 folders)

Series 2: Business Records and Writings, 1940-1950 (Box 1; 7 folders)

Series 3: Printed Material, 1925-1971 (Box 1; 4 folders)

Series 4: Photographs, circa 1921-1930 (Box 1; 3 folders)
Biographical Note:
Katherine Schmidt (1898-1978) was born in Xenia, Ohio. She moved with her family to New York City, and around the age of 13 began attending Saturday classes at the Art Students League. She continued her art classes after high school and was taught by F. Luis Mora, Kenneth Miller, and John Sloan. While attending the Art Students League, Schmidt made many friends who would later become prominent members of the New York art community, including Peggy Bacon, Alexander Brook, Reginald Marsh, and Lloyd Goodrich. In 1919 she married fellow art student, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, in Ogunquit, Maine. They lived in Maine during the summers, but settled in Brooklyn, New York. Schmidt began working for Juliana Force at the Whitney Studio Club in 1923, where she also periodically exhibited her artwork. She taught sketching classes for the club and also did various other jobs for Force and Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney until around 1930. Her work during this period consisted of drawings and paintings of landscapes, still lifes, and the homeless and unemployed.

In 1925 Schmidt and Kuniyoshi took their first trip to Europe, spending a year in Paris and Italy and visiting the studios of their American expatriate friends. After another brief trip to Europe in 1928, she and Kuniyoshi bought a house in Woodstock, New York, where they would spend several summers as part of a very active artists' community. In the late 1920s she exhibited and was represented by the Daniel Gallery in New York. In the early 1930s, she became affliated with Downtown Gallery where she became good friends with owner Edith Halpert. She and Kuniyoshi divorced in 1932 and a year later she married lawyer Irvine Shubert. In the 1930s Schmidt became dissatisfied with her artwork and had her last show at the Downtown Gallery in 1939, taking a hiatus from exhibiting for over twenty years.

During the 1930s and 1940s Schmidt became very active in promoting federal and state government support of the arts. She worked with Juliana Force and others on a New York State art bill in the early 1930s, and in 1941 testified for federal appropriations for the arts in Washington D. C. as part of the Citizens Committee for Government Arts Projects. She was also active in the Artists Equity Association.

Schmidt spent many years experimenting with different painting techniques and subjects, and in the late 1950s found a new motif that she pursued for the rest of her life: still lifes of discarded paper and dead leaves. Schmidt died in Sarasota, Florida in 1978 at the age of 79.
Related Material:
Also found at the Archives of American Art is an Oral History Interview with Katherine Schmidt, December 8-15, 1969, by Paul Karlstrom which includes a transcript available via the Archives of American Art's website.
Separated Material:
Also found at the Archives of American Art are materials lent for microfilming (reel 89) including correspondence concerning exhibitions, a scrapbook containing clippings, exhibition catalogs and announcements. Lent materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Katherine Schmidt lent material to the Archives of American Art for microfilming in 1971. The papers were donated in 1982 by Irvine J. Shubert, Schmidt's widower.
Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art and state  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Katherine Schmidt papers, circa 1922-1971. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.schmkath
See more items in:
Katherine Schmidt papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9e912c0fa-47ab-4d1b-9c52-801e7d3e5e77
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-schmkath
Online Media:

Eyre de Lanux papers

Creator:
Lanux, Eyre de  Search this
Names:
Aragon, Louis, 1897-1982  Search this
Barney, Natalie Clifford  Search this
Casagrande, Paolo  Search this
Eyre, Paul  Search this
Eyre, Wilson, 1858-1944  Search this
Fahlman, Betsy  Search this
Ford, Consuelo  Search this
Lanux, Pierre de Combret, 1887-1955  Search this
Lear, Tobias, 1762-1816  Search this
Lee, Ann  Search this
Lenard, Alexander  Search this
Strong, Anne  Search this
Wyld, Evelyn  Search this
Extent:
10.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Photographs
Diaries
Sketches
Sound recordings
Date:
1865-1995
Summary:
The papers of portrait painter, writer, and designer, Eyre de Lanux (1894-1996) measure 10.6 linear feet and date from 1865 to 1995. The papers include biographical materials, personal business records, sixty-four diaries dating from 1922 through 1988, writings and notes, research files, printed materials, artwork, and photographs of Eyre de Lanux, her family, and friends. There is extensive correspondence with her husband Pierre de Lanux and her long-time lover Paolo Casagrande, as well as with other friends and family.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of portrait painter, writer, and furnishings designer, Eyre de Lanux (1894-1996) measure 10.6 linear feet and date from 1865 to 1995. The papers reflect Eyre's personal life in Paris with her husband, Pierre de Lanux and her travels with longtime lover Paolo Casagrande. The bulk of the collection consists of diaries spanning 1922 to 1988 and correspondence. Also found are de Lanux's sketches and drawings, some of which depict Parisian scenes and portraits of her lovers and friends. Other materials found include biographical information, personal business records, writings and notes including short stories, research files on Tobias Lear and Wilson Eyre, printed materials, and scattered photographs.

Biographical records include various membership certificates, medical records, travel papers and tickets, and a transcript of a psychic reading. Also found is a sound recording concerning Pierre de Lanux.

Personal business records consist of addresses, a personal calendar, consignment and loan agreements concerning the sale of Eyre's art collection, miscellaneous receipts, rental and lodging forms, stocks, and a copy of a will.

Correspondence spans the years 1922 until 1995 and includes an extensive exchange between Eyre and her husband Pierre, her lover Paolo Casagrande, and her daughter Anne Strong (Bikou.) Other notable correspondents include Louis Aragon, Natalie Barney, Betsy Fahlman, Consuelo Ford, Alexander Lenard, and Evelyn Wyld. Much of the correspondence is personal in nature, however a folder of correspondence between Eyre and her literary editors is found at the end of the series.

The papers include sixty-four diaries dating from 1922 through 1988; there are no diaries for the period 1927 to 1947 with the exception of two small notebooks dated 1938 and 1945. The diaries resume in 1948, with Eyre's arrival in Rome, and continue, with multiple volumes for most years, until the late 1980s when her eyes failed. The handwriting is difficult to read, and moves from one language to another within entries, employing English, French, and Italian. Eyre de Lanux used her diaries to record her impressions of the world rather than to enumerate daily activities.

Writings include drafts, copies, and notes for de Lanux's short stories from the 1920s until the 1980s. There are also annotated entries and drafts of her magazine column, "Letters to Elizabeth", poems, a note written to Paris, and notes concerning interior decoration. Writings by others include poems by Ann Lee, travel journals by Paolo Casagrande and Paul Eyre, and a draft of Pierre de Lanux's "Memoires-Jours de Notre Vivre."

Research files consist of Eyre de Lanux's notes, drafts, photographs, published works, and research correspondence relating to her biography on Tobias Lear, the personal secretary of George Washington and a proposal for a work entitled Illusions of Identity. Other materials include copies of Betsy Fahlman's research on architect Wilson Eyre, de Lanux's uncle.

Printed material is scattered and includes periodicals with copies of writings by Pierre and Eyre de Lanux, one exibition announcement, printed reproductions of works of art, blank postcards, and souvenirs gathered from de Lanux's many trips abroad.

Photographs are of Eyre in her studio and of her family and friends including Louis Aragon, Natalie Barney, Paolo Casagrande and family, Alice Delmar, Paul Eyre, Consuelo Ford, Pierre de Lanux, Anne Strong, and Evelyn Wyld. There is a photo of Natalie Barney's 20 Rue Jacob Temple d'Amitie. Other photos are of buildings, travel, interiors, and works of art. Among the photographs of works of art include two portraits, one of Eyre de Lanux by Romaine Brooks and one of Romaine Brooks by Eyre de Lanux.

Artwork include sketches, drawings, prints, and paintings by Eyre de Lanux probably dating from the 1920s to the 1940s. There is a painted sketch of interior decoration from circa 1949. Sketches are of Parisian street scenes, portraits of friends, a design for a perfume advertisement for the fashion house Lucien Lelong, illustrated notes for Consuelo Ford, and miscellaneous subjects.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 9 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Information, 1965-1966 (Box 1; 10 folders)

Series 2: Personal Business Records , 1933-1989 (Box 1; 10 folders)

Series 3: Correspondence, 1924-1992 (Boxes 1-4; 3.0 linear feet)

Series 4: Diaries, 1922-1988 (Boxes 4-7; 3.5 linear feet)

Series 5: Writings and Notes, 1917-1995 (Boxes 7-8; 1.3 linear feet)

Series 6: Research Files, circa 1900-1980s (Boxes 8-9; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 7: Printed Material, circa 1910-1987 (Boxes 9, 11; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1870-1973 (Box 10, OVs 18-20; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 9: Artwork, circa 1920-circa 1949 (Boxes 10-11, OVs 12-17; 0.8 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Eyre de Lanux (1894-1996) spent much of her life traveling between Paris, Italy, and New York. In addition to portrait and frescoe painting, de Lanux designed furnishings and was a prolific writer.

Elizabeth Eyre de Lanux was born on March 20, 1894, the eldest daughter of Richard Derby Eyre (1869-1955) and Elizabeth Krieger Eyre (d. 1938). As Elizabeth's mother suffered from depression, the responsibilities of parenthood fell largely to Richard Eyre, a successful patent lawyer.

Elizabeth attended Miss Hazen's School in Pelham Manor, Westchester County, New York and enrolled in classes at the Art Students League in 1912 and during 1914-15. Her teachers were George Bridgman and John C. Johansen. At this time, she resided at 47 Washington Square but soon moved to 15 W. 67th Street. She exhibited two paintings, "L'Arlesienne," and "Allegro," in the first annual exhibition of the Society of Independent Artists in 1917.

In early 1918, while working for the Foreign Press Bureau of the Committee on Public Information, Elizabeth met writer Pierre Combret de Lanux (1887-1955.) They married in New York in a civil ceremony on October 9, 1918. Immediately after the Armistice, they sailed for Paris, settling at Number 19 Rue Jacob. Their daughter, Anne-Françoise, nicknamed "Bikou," was born December 19, 1925.

Possibly from the beginning of their marriage, but certainly from the early 1920s, Eyre and Pierre accorded one another the freedom to take other lovers. From 1923 to 1933, Pierre de Lanux was based mainly in Geneva, where he worked for the League of Nations as director of the Paris Office. The marriage endured until Pierre's death in March 1955.

In Paris, from 1919-20, Elizabeth continued her painting and drawing studies. At this time, she began signing her sketches "Eyre de Lanux." Café society at Le Boeuf sur le Toit was an inexhaustible source for portrait subjects, as were socialite Natalie Clifford Barney's Friday salons. A series of "Outlines of Women," line drawings touched with wash, were exhibited in May 1921 at New York's Kingore Galleries. On view was Eyre's portrait of Barney, identified as "Amazone" in the exhibit leaflet, and those of various high-society figures, including Marion Tiffany, actress Eva Le Gallienne, and tennis champion Julie Lentilhon.

Eyre and Pierre resided in the United States from September 1920 to April 1922, and lived at the Chelsea Hotel during the spring of 1921. While Pierre traveled, Eyre completed work on a pair of oak doors painted in tempera, vermillion, and gold with the 13th century legend of Sainte Marie l'Égyptienne. The doors went on exhibit in March 1922 at Knoedler Galleries and received a favorable review in The Sun. Eyre would not exhibit again in New York until 1943, when her fresco, "Persiennes, Persiennes" was included in "The Art of 31 Women Show" at Art of This Century Gallery.

Eyre began the study of frescoe painting in the late 1920s with Constantin Brancusi. Exhibits of her later frescoes were held in 1952 at Alexander Iolas in New York and in Paris at Le Sillon in 1960.

During her years in Paris, Eyre was associated with members of the Parisian arts and literary circles. Ezra Pound made corrections to her 1923 poem "Rue Montorgueil." Eyre met Surrealist poet Louis Aragon, who may have fell in love with her. Aragon's 1919 poem, "Isabelle," dedicated cryptically to one "Madame I.R." on its 1926 publication, tells of his love for "une herbe blanche." Their one-year liaison began in earnest in March 1925, soon after Eyre's relationship with Natalie Barney had ended. An affair with political writer Pierre Drieu La Rochelle, initiated in early 1923 and carried on intermittently, also ended at this time.

In 1933 Eyre and Pierre purchased a number of works of contemporary art. These included a Picasso watercolor and drawing from his Cubist period, a Braque, a Berman, two Picabia drawings, an Yves Tanguy, a large Mirà, and two paintings by de Chirico. In future years, gallery-owner Betty Parsons 1900-82), whom Eyre doubtless knew in Paris, would assist her in selling paintings from her collection. Many would be sold at a great loss to meet expenses.

From 1927 to 1933, Eyre collaborated with British carpet designer Evelyn Wyld (1882-1973), creating modernist furniture in glass, cowhide, wood, and lacquer for private clients. Eyre met Wyld while interviewing her for her monthly column, "Letters of Elizabeth," which ran for two years in Town and Country magazine. Eyre and Wyld exhibited their interiors in the 1928 and 1929 annual showings of the Artistes-Décorateurs and in 1930 at the first exhibit of the Société Union des Artistes Modernes. In 1932, the two women opened Décor, a furniture gallery in Cannes. The business, hurt by a decline in demand following the 1929 stock market crash, closed in 1933.

Eyre returned to Paris in 1945 There she met a young Italian writer, Paolo Casagrande. Eyre was 54 years old and he roughly half her age. With his encouragement, she rented a studio at 53 Via Margutta and beganworking on large frescoes and fresco portraits. One of her sitters was Tennessee Williams.

The relationship with Casagrande endured until the end of Eyre's life. Although Casagrande married in 1950 and eventually had children, he and Eyre maintained an almost continuous, passionate correspondence. They traveled for long periods in southern Italy, Sicily, Greece, and Morocco. During their Moroccan sojourn in 1951 and 1952, Eyre began making notes for short stories. "La Place de La Destruction" was published in 1955 in La Nouvelle Revue Française, and "The House in the Medina" appeared in Harper's Bazaar in November 1963. Her sketchbooks, watercolors, and frescoes from this period reveal her fascination with the North African landscape.

In March, 1961, possibly in order to pull away from Casagrande, Eyre left Paris and returned to New York permanently, taking a studio apartment at The Picasso on East 58th Street. In a diary entry made shortly before moving day, she wrote, "Write to Paolo every day, and mail it only occasionally." Her last visit to Paris occurred in 1978. Until legal blindness overtook her, Eyre pursued various research and writing projects.

She began work on a biography of Tobias Lear, a secretary to George Washington and a distant maternal ancestor. She also gathered photographs for "Illusions of Identity," a book of associations between the physical and metaphysical worlds with a preface by Ray Bradbury; the book was never published. In 1980, she supplied paintings to illustrate Overheard in a Bubble Chamber (1981), a book of science poems for children written by her close friend Lillian Morrison. The New Yorker magazine published three of her short stories: "Montegufoni" (1966), "Cot Number Eleven" (1968), and "Putu" (1972). Plans to bring together twelve stories in one volume were never realized.

Eyre de Lanux died in August 1996 at the age of 102.
Provenance:
The Eyre de Lanux papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by de Lanux's daughter Anne de Lanux Strong and grandson Paul Eyre in 1996.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Authors -- France -- Paris  Search this
Furniture designers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Portrait painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Portrait painters -- France -- Paris  Search this
Modernism (Art)  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women designers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Photographs
Diaries
Sketches
Sound recordings
Citation:
Eyre de Lanux papers, 1865-1995. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.lanueyre
See more items in:
Eyre de Lanux papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw93be3228e-6a54-4aa8-a122-a46448a5815b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lanueyre
Online Media:

Emmy Lou Packard Papers

Creator:
Packard, Emmy Lou, 1914-1998  Search this
Names:
American Civil Liberties Union  Search this
Public Works of Art Project  Search this
Covarrubias, Miguel, 1904-1957  Search this
Edmunds, John, 1913-  Search this
Kahlo, Frida  Search this
Lange, Dorothea  Search this
O'Gorman, Juan, 1905-  Search this
O'Higgins, Pablo, 1904-  Search this
Refregier, Anton, 1905-  Search this
Reynolds, Malvina  Search this
Rivera, Diego, 1886-1957  Search this
Extent:
9.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Sketches
Photographs
Interviews
Diaries
Date:
1900-1990
Summary:
The Emmy Lou Packard papers measure 9.4 linear feet and date from 1900 to 1990, and focus on the career of painter, printmaker, muralist, and sculptor Emmy Lou Packard. Also found are extensive materials relating to Packard's personal and professional relationship with muralist Diego Rivera and painter Frida Kahlo, with whom Packard lived for one year in Mexico. Papers include correspondence, financial records, notes, writings, exhibition files, photographs, and printed material.
Scope and Contents note:
The Emmy Lou Packard papers measure 9.4 linear feet and date from 1900 to 1990, and focus on the career of painter, printmaker, muralist, and sculptor Emmy Lou Packard. Also found are extensive materials relating to Packard's personal and professional relationship with muralist Diego Rivera and painter Frida Kahlo, with whom Packard lived for one year in Mexico. Papers include correspondence, financial records, notes, writings, exhibition files, photographs, and printed material.

Biographical materials include resumes, personal forms, and certificates. Correspondence is with family, friends, and colleagues, including muralist Anton Refregier, songwriter Malvina Reynolds, and composer John Edmunds. There is one letter from Dorothea Lange. Also found is correspondence with various political and arts organizations, such as the American Civil Liberties Union and the Russian magazine Soviet Woman. Much of the correspondence discusses personal relationships and political and art-related activities. Additional correspondence with and concerning Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo is arranged in Series 6.

Personal business records found within the papers include studio real estate and rent records, insurance records, price lists for artwork, consignment records, and miscellaneous receipts. There is one interview transcript of an interview with Packard for the Radical Elders Oral History Project. The papers include a series of notebooks/diaries, address lists, and other notes.

Packard's reference files and personal papers documenting her professional and close personal relationship with Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo are arranged into a separate series. They include her research files for a planned book on the two artists, personal letters between Packard and the couple, as well as several interesting photographs. Also found in this series are notes, writings, and printed materials relating to Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, and other Mexican artists, such as Covarrubius, Juan O'Gorman, and Pablo O'Higgins.

The collection also includes typescripts and additional writings by Packard and others. Artwork consists of orginal drawings and prints by Packard and others not directly associated with projects. Exhibition and project files for many of Packard's commissioned projects are also found within the collection, including her files for the restoration of Anton Refregier's Rincon Annex Post Office mural in San Francisco and the Coit Tower murals in San Francisco. Many of the project files contain correspondence, reports, contracts, printed material, photographs, and artwork.

The papers also include photographs of Packard, her family, residences, artwork, friends, and colleagues, including Cesar Chavez, Juan O'Gorman, Malvina Reynolds, Charles Safford, Ralph Stackpole, and Tennessee Williams. Two scrapbooks are found, as well as additional printed materials such as clippings and exhibition announcements and catalogs. There are also two artifact items, a vinyl record of Malvina Reynolds and a political campaign button.
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged into fifteen series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1942-1985 (Box 1; 1 folder)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1919-1990 (Box 1-3; 2.6 linear feet)

Series 3: Personal Business Records, 1945-1985 (Box 3; 21 folders)

Series 4: Interview Transcript, 1979 (Box 3; 1 folder)

Series 5: Notes, 1900-1985 (Box 3-4, 10; 1.1 linear feet)

Series 6: Reference Files on Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, 1929-1986 (Box 5, 10, OV 11; 0.9 linear feet)

Series 7: Writings by Packard, 1953-1984 (Box 6; 17 folders)

Series 8: Writings by Others, 1955-1984 (Box 6; 19 folders)

Series 9: Artwork, 1921-1976 (Box 6; 10 folders)

Series 10: Exhibition Files, 1950-1964 (Box 6, OV 11; 5 folders)

Series 11: Project Files, 1953-1985 (Box 6-7, 10, OV 11; 1.8 linear feet)

Series 12: Photographs, 1914-1982 (Box 8, 10; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 13: Scrapbooks, 1947-1950 (Box 8, 10; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 14: Printed Material, 1936-1988 (Box 8-9, 10; 1 linear foot)

Series 15: Artifacts, 1984 (Box 9-10, OV 11; 2 folders)
Biographical/Historical note:
Emmy Lou Packard was born in Imperial Valley, California on April 15, 1914, to Walter and Emma Leonard Packard. In the late 1920s she lived with her family in Mexico City where she became acquainted with Diego Rivera, from whom she received regular art criticism and encouragement. She graduated from the University of California, Berkeley and completed courses in fresco and sculpture at the California School of Fine Arts in 1940. That year and the next, Packard worked as a full-time painting assistant to Rivera on his 1,650 square-foot fresco at the World's Fair in San Francisco. During this project, Packard became very close to Rivera and Frida Kahlo and returned to Mexico with them and spent a year living with the couple.

From then on, except for in 1944-1945 working for a defense plant, Packard worked and grew in various aspects of her art. In addition to her work in fresco, Packard is known for her work in watercolor, oil, mosaic, laminated plastic, concrete, and printmaking, both in linocuts and woodblocks. She received numerous commissions that included installations for ships, hotels, and private homes for which she executed large woodcuts and mural panels. During the 1950s and 1960s, Packard was hired to restore several historic murals, most notably the Rincon Annex Post Office mural by Anton Refregier and the Coit Tower murals in San Francisco.

Between 1966 and 1967 she was commissioned by architects to design and execute a number of concrete and mosaic pieces, one of which went to the Mirabeau Restaurant in Kaiser Center, Oakland. She also designed and executed a mural for the Fresno Convention Center Theater during that same period. In 1973-1974, she designed and supervised a glazed brick mural for a public library in Pinole, California.

Packard had one-woman shows at the San Francisco Museum of Art, Raymond and Raymond Gallery (San Francisco), Addison Gallery of American Art (Andover, Mass.), Connecticut Academy of Fine Arts, Pushkin Museum (Moscow), and March Gallery (Chicago). Emmy Lou Packard died in 1998.
Related Archival Materials note:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Emmy Lou Packard conducted by Mary Fuller McChesney in 1964.
Provenance:
Emmy Lou Packard donated her papers to the Archives of American Art from 1984-1988.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Sculptors -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Muralists -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Topic:
Printmakers -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Mural painting and decoration, American  Search this
Mural painting and decoration, Mexican  Search this
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women muralists  Search this
Women printmakers  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Sketches
Photographs
Interviews
Diaries
Citation:
Emmy Lou Packard papers, 1900-1990. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.packemmy
See more items in:
Emmy Lou Packard Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9db9feb7f-b0e9-4a2b-9d8c-9940b1d933d2
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-packemmy
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Online Media:

Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Saarinen, Aline B. (Aline Bernstein), 1914-1972  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1936-1970
Scope and Contents note:
Subseries consists of correspondence between Aline and Eero Saarinen, general and family correspondence received by Aline Saarinen, and some miscellaneous correspondence received by Eero Saarinen. Also found are some personal letters of Eero Saarinen detailing the demise of his marriage to his first wife (Lily Swann Saarinen) which seem to have been written as part of undergoing psychotherapy and are addressed to his psychiatrist, "Dr. B", as well as a letter ending his relationship to a woman named Sampe, which may be a draft or a copy, though it is unclear whether the letter was ever actually sent.

Correspondence between Aline and Eero Saarinen primarily dates from 1953, the year they met and married. Their correspondence documents the evolution of their relationship from time they met when Aline interviewed Eero for an article for The New York Times to Eero's divorce and their subsequent remarriage to each other. Also included are homemade birthday cards from Aline to Eero (of particular note is the one from 1953 which details the history of their romance). In addition to relationship matters, their correspondence typically concerns Aline's article on Eero, Eero's architectural projects (or as he puts it, "what goes on in my mind about work"), a forthcoming speech of his in Cleveland on which Aline assisted him, Aline's articles, Eero's divorce proceedings, their future plans, and sculpture for one of Eero's buildings. By and large, their correspondence from 1953 is undated according to month or day. Therefore, letters from that year are only arranged in rough chronological order.

Aline Saarinen's general correspondence includes letters from friends, editors, her literary agent, lawyers, architects and designers, writers, government and university departments, political figures, and television producers, concerning articles, book ideas, dedication of Saarinen buildings, patents for Saarinen furniture designs, television shows, and committee work, among other matters. Correspondents include: Meyer Schapiro, Charles Eames, Louise Mendelsohn, Wayne Andrews, Hoke Norris, Hiram Haydn, Donald S. Klopfer, Bernice Cozzens, Lincoln Kirstein, The New York Times, James Gould Cozzens, J. Irwin Miller, Dwight D. Eisenhower (?), McCall's, Henry Dreyfuss, Lyndon B. Johnson, New York State Department, Russell Sage College, U.S. Department of Interior, Lady Bird Johnson, Nelson Rockefeller, and Wolf Von Eckhardt. General correspondence is typically arranged in chronological order. More extensive correspondence from Clifford Odets (which includes some drawings by Odets) and Frank Lloyd Wright (which concerns the Guggenheim Museum) is arranged into files according to correspondent.

Eero Saarinen's miscellaneous correspondence includes copy of a letter to Huntington Hartford concerning the relationship between architecture and nature, and letters to and from S. Giedion regarding a plan for an International Exhibition of Modern Architecture, in addition to other scattered letters and the personal letters detailing his relationships with Lily and Sampe. Some or all of these letters may have been ones that Eero shared with Aline, which may be how they came to be amongst her papers.

Family correspondence is comprised mainly of letters from Aline Saarinen's first husband, Joseph Louchheim, when he was working in Liberia for two months in 1949, and from her two sons from her first marriage, Donald and Hal Louchheim. Also found are individual letters from Eero's son from his first message, Eric and from their son, Eames.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website. Use of material not digitized requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
NBC TV scripts or film prepared for television: Authorization to publish, quote or reproduce requires written permission from NBC Studios. Contact Reference Services for more information.
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Aline and Eero Saarinen Papers, 1906-1977. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.saaralin, Subseries 1.2
See more items in:
Aline and Eero Saarinen papers
Aline and Eero Saarinen papers / Series 1: Aline and Eero Saarinen Personal Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw985887299-4fbc-469c-b9e1-17969ff7da6e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-saaralin-ref49

Oral history interview with Robert Noel Blair

Interviewee:
Blair, Robert N. (Robert Noel), 1912-2003  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Albright Art School (Buffalo, N.Y.)  Search this
Arts Institute of Buffalo  Search this
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. School  Search this
Burchfield, Charles Ephraim, 1893-1967  Search this
Extent:
2 Items (sound cassettes (2 hrs.), analog.)
66 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
1994 November 30-1995 August 27
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Robert Blair conducted 1994 November 30-1995 August 27, by Robert Brown, for the Archives of American Art.
Blair talks about his father, a Vermonter, who went to Harvard Law School and became a corporation lawyer in Buffalo, and his mother, a Rochester, New York native, who went to Cornell and taught Greek and Latin in New York State schools before marriage; being an indifferent student until he went to the Albright Art School in Buffalo, although instruction there was perfunctory; attending the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (1931-1934), recalling especially his two British drawing teachers, Guthrie and Burns, and Frederick Allen who taught sculpture, and fellow student, Carl Johnson, summers with his family in Vermont and the pleasant primitive farm life; his first teaching job -- Saturday children's classes at the Buffalo Museum of Science and his first exhibitions in Buffalo and New York City, including a show at the Morton Gallery, New York (1940) from which the Metropolitan Museum purchased a large watercolor; his love of using unusual implements to paint with; his service in World War II, in which he was assigned to design training aids and to paint war scenes.
Blair continues discussion of his service as an airborne soldier and artist in Belgium and Germany during World War II; returning from the War to direct the Arts Institute of Buffalo and his long friendship with Charles Burchfield; Philip Elliott, painter and teacher at the rival Albright Art School in Buffalo; traveling throughout the US and Mexico, painting wherever he camped; his work and proficiency in watercolor; and the value of figure studies, which he does regularly with other artists.
Biographical / Historical:
Robert Blair (1912-2003) is a painter, printmaker, and instructor of Buffalo, New York.
General:
Originally recorded 2 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 8 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 30 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
This transcript is open for research. Access to the entire audio recording is restricted. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- New York (State) -- Buffalo -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Painting, American  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- New York (State) -- Buffalo  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Art and the war  Search this
Printmakers -- New York (State) -- Buffalo -- Interviews  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- Buffalo -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.blair94
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw998228c8c-dfd5-481d-8c6a-d7a3990335cf
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-blair94
Online Media:

Frank Kleinholz papers

Creator:
Frank Kleinholz, 1901-1987  Search this
Names:
McCausland, Elizabeth, 1899-1965  Search this
Extent:
7.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Interviews
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Date:
1910s-1980
bulk 1940s-1980
Summary:
The papers of painter Frank Kleinholz measure 6.3 linear feet and date from 1910s to 1980, with the bulk of the records dating from 1940s to 1980. The records document his career through correspondence, writing, exhibition and gallery records, financial files, audiovisual material, printed material, photographs, and artwork.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter Frank Kleinholz measure 6.3 linear feet and date from 1910s to 1980, with the bulk of the records dating from 1940s to 1980. The records document his career through correspondence, writing, exhibition and gallery records, financial files, audiovisual material, printed material, photographs, and artwork. Files pertain to exhibitions, books and other writings, the sale of artwork, collection inventories, and recorded interviews. Correspondents include family, friends and colleagues, galleries, and collectors. The collection also contains books, catalogs, clippings, announcements, and other ephemera; several paintings and illustrations, most of which were given to family members or kept private; and photographs of Kleinholz, his artwork, family and friends, and other artists.

Also included are 26 phonograph records of interviews, 1944-1945, which Kleinholz conducted for the "Art in New York" program, Station WNYC. Persons interviewed include Philip Evergood, Philip Reisman, Ralph Mayer, Elizabeth McCausland, Lily Harmon, Abraham Walkowitz, John Groth, and Ladislas Segy; and 2 7" tapes (untranscribed) of interviews, one containing a brief interview with Holger Cahill and a more lengthy interview with McCausland discussing Picassco and the 1944-1945 art season; the other an interview with Evergood.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 6 series.

Series 1: Professional Files, 1940-1979, undated (Box 1, 9-11; 1.9 linear foot)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1920s, bulk 1940s-1980 (Box 2; 10 folders)

Series 3: Writings, 1920s, bulk 1940s-1970s (Box 2-3; .5 linear feet)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1940s-1980s (Box 3-4, OV 8; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 5: Artwork, 1940s-1970s, undated (Box 4; 5 folders)

Series 6: Photographs, 1910s, 1930s, bulk 1940s-1970s (Box 4-6, OV 8; 2 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Frank Kleinholz (1901-1987) was an painter and art educator in New York. Kleinholz was born in Brooklyn, New York. He received a bachelor's degree from Colby College in Maine, and in 1923, he graduated from Fordham University Law School and passed the New York State Bar examination. He then married Leah Schwartz in 1928; they had no children. Until the late 1930s, Frank Kleinholz was a lawyer in New York who, occasionally, submitted poems to newspapers for publication.

In 1939, Kleinholz was awarded a scholarship to study for one year at the American Artists School in New York, and the following summer he studied and painted in Mexico. After Mexico, his art career took off, establishing notoriety for his modernist paintings of the people and scenes in the world around him. By 1945, his work had been selected for exhibitions held by the Carnegie Institute, Phillips Memorial Gallery in Washington, D.C., and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. In an unfortunate turn of events, Leah died of cancer in November of 1945. Frank then married Lidia Brestovan in 1946. They had two girls, Lisa and Anna, and one boy, Marco.

Kleinholz held one-man exhibitions at the Associated American Artists Gallery in New York, Park Gallery in Detroit, ACA Gallery in New York and Rome, and had retrospectives at Nassau Community College, Colby College, and the Lowe Art Museum at the University of Miami. He participated in group exhibitions at the Chicago Art Institute, Metropolitan Museum of Art, and Brooklyn Museum. He wrote the books Frank Kleinholz: A Self Portrait in 1964 and Ile de Brehat, The Flowering Rock in 1971; and books written about him include Frank Kleinholz: The Outsider, by August L. Freundlichn in 1969, and Kleinholz Graphics: Catalogue Raisonne, 1940-1975 by Sylvan Cole, Jr. and Ralph G. Martin in 1976. In addition to those mentioned above, his work is found in the permanent collections of the Moscow Museum of Fine Art, Newark Museum, University of Oklahoma, Marquette University, Akron Art Institute, and private collectors. Although most widely known for his paintings, Kleinholz worked with lithography, etching, and prints as well.

Contemporaneous with his career as an artist, Kleinholz was an art educator and talk-show contributor. He started the "Art in New York" interview program on radio station WNYC, New York City, circa 1940s, and was an art commentator for radio station WIOD, Miami, Florida in the 1960s. Kleinholz was an instructor at Hofstra University, Uniondale, New York, and lectured on contemporary art and art history at Smith College, Brandeis University, and the Park Synagogue in Akron, Ohio.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Frank Kleinholz from 1961-1982.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment, and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Modernism (Art)  Search this
Art, Mexican  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Interviews
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Frank Kleinholz papers, 1910s-1980. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.kleifran
See more items in:
Frank Kleinholz papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9b08bb8fe-c415-46a6-aabc-1c12b8e6b55f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kleifran

Oral history interview with Joshua Binion Cahn, Richard A. Florsheim, and John Kearney

Interviewee:
Cahn, Joshua Binion, 1915-  Search this
Florsheim, Richard A., 1916-1979  Search this
Kearney, John, 1924-  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Walker, Hudson D. (Hudson Dean), 1907-1976  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound tape reel (5 in.)
26 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1971 July 20
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Joshua Binion Cahn, Richard A. Florsheim, and John Kearney conducted 1971 July 20, by Robert Brown and Hudson Walker, for the Archives of American Art.
Biographical / Historical:
Joshua Binion Cahn (1915-1995) was a lawyer from New York, New York. Richard A. Florsheim (1916-1979) was a painter and printmaker from Chicago, Illinois. John Kearney (1924-) is a sculptor active in Chicago, Illinois.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 1 digital wav file. Duration is 1 hr., 1 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Occupation:
Lawyers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.cahn71
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9f204c11d-48ca-4c91-a922-8f85b7860467
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cahn71
Online Media:

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