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Jorge Prelorán films

Creator:
Preloran, Jorge, 1933-2009  Search this
Names:
University of California, Los Angeles  Search this
Extent:
50 Film reels (50 completed films and 1 film series; 110,600 feet of original film outtakes (51 hours); 412 hours of audiotape; 31 digital books)
22 Linear feet (Papers and photographs)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Film reels
Place:
Patagonia (Argentina and Chile)
Argentina
Date:
1954-circa 2008
Summary:
Documentary filmmaker Jorge Prelorán was best known for his intimate approach to ethnographic film, a style known as "ethnobiography." The majority of Prelorán's films were shot in rural areas of Argentina, particularly the Andean highlands and the Pampas (plains), often in communities of mixed Indian and Spanish heritage. Prelorán documented a wide range of subjects, including art, folk crafts, agriculture, ranching, markets, religious rituals and festivals, and social and cultural change. This collection contains edited films and videos, film outtakes, audio tapes, photographic prints and transparencies, digital books, correspondence, production files, scripts, project files, and press clippings spanning 1954-2008.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains edited films and videos, film outtakes, audio tapes, photographic prints and transparencies, digital books, correspondence, production files, scripts, project files, and press clippings spanning 1954-2008.

The majority of Prelorán's films were shot in rural areas of Argentina, particularly the Andean highlands and the Pampas (plains), often in communities of mixed Indian and Spanish heritage. Prelorán documented a wide range of subjects, including art, folk crafts, agriculture, ranching, markets, religious rituals and festivals, and social and cultural change. Several films focus on natural history and science. There are also a number of experimental and fiction films.

Prelorán formed close friendships with many of the subjects of his films and corresponded with them long after the films were completed. This is reflected in the paper records, as is Prelorán's wide circle of colleagues and collaborators, including anthropologists, musicians, animators, historians, painters, writers, photographers, current and former students at UCLA, and fellow filmmakers. The extensive collection of press clippings, screening notices, and festival catalogs documents Prelorán's influence in Argentina, Europe, and the United States.

In the series of digital books, Prelorán presents the personal stories of individuals involved in creative work. Some books feature subjects profiled in the films, updating or expanding on their stories.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 11 series: (1) Completed Films and Videos, 1954-circa 2008; (2) Film Outtakes, 1960s-1980s; (3) Audio, 1969-2008; (4) Correspondence, 1954-2005 (bulk 1967-1992); (5) Production Files, 1961-1998; (6) Project Files, 1967-1995; (7) UCLA, 1968-2005 (bulk 1980s); (8) Press Clippings, 1960-2005; (9) Photographs, 1961-2000; (10) Books, 1994-1998, undated; (11) Electronic Files, circa 2000-circa 2006
Biographical Note:
Documentary filmmaker Jorge Prelorán was best known for his intimate approach to ethnographic film, a style known as "ethnobiography." In films such as Hermógenes Cayo (Imaginero) (1970), Los Hijos de Zerda (Zerda's Children) (1974), and Zulay Frente al Siglo XXI (Zulay Facing the 21st Century) (1989), Prelorán's protagonists tell their personal stories, while also revealing the stories of their communities and cultures. Prelorán worked in Latin America and the United States, but primarily in his native country of Argentina. His career spanned from 1954 to 2008, including nearly twenty years as a film professor at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

Prelorán was born May 28, 1933 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. His father, an engineer, was Argentine and had studied at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he met his wife, an American. Prelorán grew up speaking both Spanish and English. Initially pursuing a career in architecture, he studied at the Universidad Nacional de Buenos Aires. He made his first film, Venganza, with neighborhood friends in Buenos Aires in 1954. The film won the Beginner's Festival of Cine Club Argentina that same year. Prelorán was accepted as an undergraduate at the University of California, Berkeley, and studied architecture there for one year. In 1956 he withdrew from UC Berkeley and was drafted into the US Army. Prelorán served in West Germany until 1958. Upon his return he changed educational plans and began formal study of filmmaking, receiving a Bachelor of Arts in Motion Pictures from UCLA in 1960.

Shortly before the end of his service in the US Army, Prelorán married Elsa Dondi, a former classmate from Buenos Aires. They lived together in Los Angeles until Elsa returned to Argentina for the birth of their daughter, Adriana, in 1961. The couple separated shortly thereafter.

Prelorán's professional career as a filmmaker began in 1961 with a commission from the Tinker Foundation of New York for a series of films on the Argentine gaucho. In the course of shooting for these films, Prelorán traveled extensively throughout Argentina, visiting many locations in Patagonia and in the northwest where he would later return to make many of his films. From 1963-1969, Prelorán was under contract at the Universidad Nacional de Tucumán to produce educational films; he also produced a series of short films on Argentine folklife with support from Fondo Nacional de las Artes and under the mentorship of folklorist Augusto Raúl Cortazar, Ph.D.

In the late 1960s, Prelorán became involved with UCLA's Ethnographic Film Program and in 1970 he returned to UCLA as a lecturer for two semesters. Later that year he was a fellow at Harvard University's Film Study Center, where he produced the English-language version of Imaginero (Hermógenes Cayo). Prelorán was the recipient of two Guggenheim Fellowships, in 1971 and 1975, and used those opportunities to produce quite a number of films, including Damacio Caitruz (Araucanians of Ruca Choroy).

Prelorán remarried in 1972. His wife, Mabel Freddi, became a collaborator on his films. She wrote the screenplay for Mi Tia Nora (My Aunt Nora) (1983) and co-directed Zulay Frente al Siglo XXI (Zulay Facing the 21st Century) (1989), among other credited and un-credited roles. After the Argentine military coup of March 1976 and the disappearances of fellow filmmaker Raymundo Gleyzer and Mabel's niece, Haydee, the Preloráns became fearful for their own safety. They fled to the United States, a move that would become permanent. Prelorán accepted a position as associate professor at UCLA's School of Theater, Film and Television. He later joined the faculty as a tenured professor.

During his time at UCLA, Prelorán was twice selected as a Fulbright Scholar, in 1987 and 1994. He continued to produce films, including the Academy Award-nominated documentary short Luther Metke at 94 (1980) and the 7-hour natural history television series Patagonia (1992). After retiring in 1994, Prelorán continued to mentor film students as Professor Emeritus; he also began work in a new medium, creating a series of digital books, "Nos = Otros" ("Sages Amongst Us") (unpublished), featuring individuals engaged in creative and educational pursuits.

Prelorán died at his home in Culver City, CA at the age of 75 on March 28, 2009.

Sources Consulted

UCLA, School of Theater, Film and Television. "Jorge Prelorán 1933 - 2009." Obituary. Last modified March 31, 2009. Accessed April 1, 2009. http://tft.ucla.edu/news/obituary

Jorge Prelorán Collection. Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

Rivera, Fermín. Huellas Y Memoria de Jorge Prelorán. Documentary film. 2010.

Woo, Elaine."Jorge Prelorán dies at 75; Argentine filmmaker and former UCLA professor." Los Angeles Times, April 5, 2009. Web. 29 Apr 2009.

1933 -- Born May 28 in Buenos Aires, Argentina

1952-1954 -- Studies at the College of Architecture, Universidad Nacional de Buenos Aires, Argentina

1954 -- Completes first film, Venganza, a fictional short

1955 -- Studies at the College of Architecture, University of California at Berkeley

1956-1958 -- Drafted into United States Army, stationed in Schwetzingen, West Germany

1959-1960 -- Earns Bachelor of Arts in Motion Pictures from UCLA

1961-1963 -- Produces films on the Argentine gaucho for the Tinker Foundation, New York

1963-1969 -- Produces films at the Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, Argentina

1968 -- Attends the First International Colloquium on Ethnographic Film at UCLA

1969 -- Shoots film for The Warao People in Venezuela, under a grant from the Ford Foundation to the Ethnographic Film Program at UCLA

1970 -- Lecturer at UCLA School of Theater, Film, and Television Fellow at the Film Study Center, Harvard University

1971 -- Receives first Guggenheim Fellowship; completes several film projects in Argentina

1975 -- Receives second Guggenheim Fellowship; continues filming in Argentina

1976 -- Moves to United States Associate professor at UCLA School of Theater, Film, and Television

1978 -- Guest of Honor at the 2nd Margaret Mead Ethnographic Film Festival at the American Museum of Natural History, New York

1980 -- Academy Award nominee for Luther Metke at 94

1985 -- Guest at the White House for a State Dinner in honor of Argentine President Raul Alfonsin

1986 -- Naturalized as a United States citizen

1987 -- First selection as Fulbright Scholar; begins production of the series Patagonia, en Busca de su Remoto Pasado

1994 -- Second selection as Fulbright Scholar; completes pre-production for the narrative feature film "Vairoletto: The Last Gaucho Outlaw" Retires from UCLA as professor emeritus

2009 -- Dies on March 28 in Culver City, California
Related Materials:
The Human Studies Film Archives holds a copy of Fermín Rivera's edited biographical documentary film, Huellas y Memoria de Jorge Prelorán (HSFA 2015.1.27), as well as transcripts of interviews conducted with Jorge and Mabel Prelorán for the film (in Spanish).

The Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin, holds the original film for four titles Prelorán produced for the Tinker Foundation (New York, NY). These are: The Llanero; The Gaucho of Corrientes; The Gaucho of the Pampas; and The Gaucho of Salta. The Ransom Center has both English and Spanish versions of these titles. These four films were preserved in 2010 and 2011 with funding from the Tinker Foundation. HSFA holds high quality video masters of all four titles. A fifth film produced for the Tinker Foundation, El Gaucho Argentino, Hoy (The Argentine Gaucho, Today), is held at the HSFA in its Spanish version only.

The Arthur Hall Collection at Temple University, Phildadelphia, Pennsylvania and Ile Ife Films in Belfast, Maine hold a copy of The Unvictorious One that differs from the two versions held at the HSFA.
Provenance:
This collection was donated to the Human Studies Film Archives in two accessions. The first accession, 2007-10, contains the edited films, outtakes, audio recordings, papers, and photographs and was donated by Jorge Prelorán. Materials had been stored at Prelorán's home office and home editing suite before they were packed by the processing archivist and sent to the HSFA. The second accession, 2011-07, contains the digital books and some additional photographs. This accession was donated by Mabel Prelorán. These materials had also been stored at Prelorán's home office and were sent to the HSFA by Mabel Prelorán.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.

Various copyrights and restrictions on commercial use apply to the reproduction or publication of film, video, audio, photographs, and the digital books.

Access to the Jorge Prelorán collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Documentary films  Search this
Biography  Search this
Citation:
The Jorge Prelorán films, Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
HSFA.2007-10
See more items in:
Jorge Prelorán films
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-hsfa-2007-10
Online Media:

This Is U.C.L.A.

Collection Creator:
Preloran, Jorge, 1933-2009  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents:
Experimental film introduces the University of California, Los Angeles, (UCLA) from the perspectives of students from different disciplines, including architecture, philosophy, and animation. Film was shot and edited while Prelorán was a student at UCLA. The HSFA holds two versions of this film.
Series Restrictions:
Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
The Jorge Prelorán films, Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Jorge Prelorán films
Jorge Prelorán films / Series 1: Completed Films and Videos / 1.1: Films directed by Prelorán
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-hsfa-2007-10-ref13

Juanjo

Collection Creator:
Preloran, Jorge, 1933-2009  Search this
Container:
Box 2
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1984
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence with Juan Rose Rossi, President of Fundación Intercambio regarding the California Spanish Language Data Base and other projects.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.

Various copyrights and restrictions on commercial use apply to the reproduction or publication of film, video, audio, photographs, and the digital books.

Access to the Jorge Prelorán collection requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
The Jorge Prelorán films, Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Jorge Prelorán films
Jorge Prelorán films / Series 6: Project Files
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-hsfa-2007-10-ref487

UCLA

Collection Creator:
Preloran, Jorge, 1933-2009  Search this
Extent:
0.8 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1968-2005
bulk 1980s
Scope and Contents:
This series contains files relating to Prelorán's teaching and other work at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), including annual reviews, performance appraisals, course syllabi, teaching evaluations, screenings, press clippings for student films, and project proposals. These files were separated out from Series 6: Project Files to create a separate series.
Arrangement:
The series has been organized alphabetically according to folder title.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.

Various copyrights and restrictions on commercial use apply to the reproduction or publication of film, video, audio, photographs, and the digital books.

Access to the Jorge Prelorán collection requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
The Jorge Prelorán films, Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
HSFA.2007-10, Series 7
See more items in:
Jorge Prelorán films
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-hsfa-2007-10-ref500

The Complicated Relationship Between Latinos and the Los Angeles Dodgers

Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Thu, 22 Oct 2020 18:53:00 +0000
Topic:
Custom RSS  Search this
See more posts:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_cf1b3979bf2c0c59571b276046aeafab

Leonard Nadel Photographs and Scrapbooks

Photographer:
Nadel, Leonard, 1916-1990  Search this
Author:
Galarza, Ernesto  Search this
Extent:
3 Cubic feet (10 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Photographs
Black-and-white photographs
Scrapbooks
Place:
Mexico
Texas -- 20th century
Texas
California
Date:
1950-2006
bulk 1956-1960
Summary:
Photographer Leonard Nadel's supplemental material relating to and photographs of the Mexican braceros (manual laborers). They were photographed in California, Texas, and Mexico for the Ford Foundation's Fund for the Republic during the late 1950s and early 1960s in support of a report entitled Strangers in Our Fields by Dr. Ernesto Galarza.
Scope and Contents:
The collection is divided into three series. Each series is arranged chronologically.

Series 1: Scrapbooks, 1950-1968, contains scrapbooks of clippings of magazine articles and newspaper stories written by Nadel and others as well as magazines and newspaper articles making use of his photographs. The material is from a variety of specialty and mainstream publications and varies in subject matter. The scrapbooks are not only focused on Nadel's work for the Ford Foundation's Fund for the Republic but also offer a broad sampling of his work throughout the 1950s and 1960s. Material in the scrapbooks are arranged in rough chronological order. There is also a sample custom cover from one of the scrapbooks.

Series 2: Photographs, 1956-1960, undated, contains photographs printed from his negatives of the braceros. This series also contains a complete run of 8" x 10" contact sheets from his negatives of the bracero. The negatives themselves are in this series but not available for research per donor request. There are photographs ranging in size from 8" x 10" to large format photographs (10 1/2" x 13 1/2") that are keyed to frames on the contact sheets for easy reference. Negatives are arranged chronologically and captions are keyed to the negative numbers. These images have been digitized and may be found by searching "Nadel" on the collections section of the National Museum of American History website or by contacting the Archives Center.

Series 3: Publications and Supplemental Materials, 1956-2006, undated, contains correspondence, copies of Strangers in Our Fields, the publication making use of Nadel's bracero photographs, and other publications citing Nadel's work or based on it. This series also contains correspondence and written material from Evelyn De Wolfe Nadel, wife of Leonard Nadel; material relating to Nadel's photographic archive and captions for a selection of the bracero photographs. There is a selection of assorted loose news clippings.
Arrangement:
This collection is divided into three series:

Series 1: Scrapbooks, 1950-1968

Series 2: Photographs, 1956-1960, undated

Series 3: Publications and Supplemental Materials, 1956-2006, undated
Biographical / Historical:
Primarily known as a freelance photographer and photojournalist, Leonard Nadel (1916-1990) was born in Harlem, New York to Austro-Hungarian immigrant parents. He attended the City College of New York. Entering the Army during World War II, he trained at the Army Signal Corps Photographic Center. During the war he served in Australia, New Guinea, and the Philippines. After the war he returned to New York and received his master's degree in education from Teachers College, Columbia University. He moved to Los Angeles, California and studied at the Art Center College of Design.

In Los Angeles, Nadel photographed both the Pueblo del Rio and Aliso Village housing projects. He was also hired by the Housing Authority of the City of Los Angeles (HACLA) to document living conditions in the city's slums and their new post-World War II housing projects. Nadel continued his employment with HACLA until 1953, when he resigned because his HACLA colleague, Frank Wilkinson, was blacklisted by the House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC) and forced to resign.

Between 1953 and 1980 Nadel worked as a freelance photographer for such publications as the Los Angeles Times, Harvester News, Life, Business Week, and other major publications. His work with the Ford Foundation's Fund for the Republic resulted in his work documenting the bracero program. These photographs were taken by Leonard Nadel in connection with a survey of braceros done by Ernesto Galarza for the Fund for the Republic in 1956 in support of the publication, Strangers in Our Fields. During World War II, the United States and Mexico entered an agreement to alleviate the US labor shortage created by the war by importing Mexican workers. This arrangement outlasted the end of the war and by the time of Nadel's photographs nearly half a million Mexican contract workers, in the common vernacular of the time known as "drybacks," were legally imported to the United States annually working on short term labor contracts predominately in agriculture. These workers were also known as braceros, in Spanish translated as "manual laborer".

Nadel wrote of his work with the braceros, "I covered 5,000 miles during a circuit that took me from California to Mexico to Texas. It would have been easy enough just to turn over to the Fund the finished collection of photographs from the 2,000 images I took in attempting to accurately document the story of Strangers in Our Fields. But the conditions I had witnessed stirred me deeply. I felt that it was as much my responsibility to help 'sell' the picture story."

Nadel's photographs were the subject of the National Museum of American History (NMAH) exhibition, "Bittersweet Harvest: The Bracero Program, 1942-1964" in 2009-2010. Nadel's photographs are featured in NMAH's "America on the Move" exhibit. This quote from the "America on the Move" exhibition website gives the history of the photographs as well as the bracero program.

"In 1956, Leonard Nadel was hired by the Fund for the Republic, an anti-McCarthy liberal spin off of the Ford Foundation, to document the Bracero Program. In the 1990s, the Smithsonian Institution acquired the Nadel images. The collection contains 64 captioned photographic prints and 1730 original 35mm negatives (with corresponding contact sheets). The images document life in Mexico, men's experiences of crossing the border, and work and life in the US.

"The Bracero Program came into existence in 1942. Growers argued that labor shortages in the United States resulting from World War II required the recruitment of Mexican nationals. Mexico saw the program as a contribution to the war effort. Although the program began as a temporary war measure, it became a fixture of agricultural work landscape until it was finally terminated in 1964.

"Over the course of its lifetime, the Bracero Program became the largest and most significant U.S. labor guest worker program of the 20th century. In all, over 4.5 million contracts were awarded through the twenty-two years of the program. Despite the well-intentioned contracts, the program did not escape controversy. Some point out the widespread abuses of many of the contract's protective provisions and the violation of the legal rights and civil liberties of the braceros while others describe the program as an opportunity for Mexican nationals to make a living and improve the conditions of their families. Regardless of one's opinion of the program, it had a profound effect on Mexican American settlement patterns in the U.S. and numerous Latino families have ancestors who were involved in the Bracero Program."

Nadel married Los Angeles Times staff writer Evelyn De Wolfe in August 1961. She was Brazilian by birth and after their marriage she resigned from the Times and collaborated with Nadel on many projects that covered both national and international subjects. Nadel died in 1990.
Related Materials:
Materials in Other Organizations

The collections of the Los Angeles Public Library and the Southern California Library for Social Studies and Research each contain photographic images made by Leonard Nadel during the time he worked for The Housing Authority of the City of Los Angeles (HACLA). The Photo Collection of the Los Angeles Public Library contains approximately 290 copy negatives and corresponding black-and-white copy prints made from original materials held by HACLA. The Housing Authority of the City of Los Angeles Photograph Collection, held at the Southern California Library for Social Studies and Research, contains 225 black-and-white photographs produced by HACLA, forty-two of which were taken by Nadel.

The Getty Research Institute, Special Collections, Los Angeles, California, contain 8.75 linear feet (14 boxes) of Leonard Nadel photographs and other material relating to housing and urban redevelopment in Los Angeles, 1947-1998. The collection is described as, "Consisting primarily of photographic material by Leonard Nadel from 1947 to 1957, the collection records early efforts by the Housing Authority of the City of Los Angeles (HACLA) to promote integrated public housing for the city's growing multi-ethnic population, and also documents several areas of the city that the Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) had targeted for commercial revitalization. Nadel's black-and-white negatives, contact prints and two unpublished photographic books form the bulk of the collection, supplemented by handwritten notes and related documents."
Provenance:
The collection was purchased with funds from the Jackson Fund in 2000. All rights were transferred to the National Museum of American History in 2000-2001.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research use. Photographic negatives are not available for research at the donor's request, but contact sheets of the negatives are available in the collection. Some images are restricted for publication, but may be viewed in the Archives Center's reading room.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs, negatives, and slides.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Farmers -- Mexico  Search this
Agriculture -- Research  Search this
Agriculture -- Photographs -- 20th century  Search this
Labor  Search this
Agricultural laborers  Search this
Labor and laboring classes -- Photographs  Search this
Documentary photography -- United States  Search this
Photographers -- 1950-1980  Search this
Bracero Program  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Photographs -- 1950-1960 -- Black-and-white photoprints -- Silver gelatin
Photographs -- 1950-2000
Black-and-white photographs
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Citation:
Leonard Nadel Photographs and Scrapbooks, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1313
See more items in:
Leonard Nadel Photographs and Scrapbooks
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1313
Online Media:

DC Cowboys Dance Company Records

Creator:
DC Cowboys Dance Company  Search this
Extent:
7.5 Cubic feet (22 boxes, 3 oversize folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Articles
Photographs
Correspondence
Press releases
Business records
Dvds
Financial records
Compact discs
Date:
undated
1994-2012
Summary:
The records of the DC Cowboys Dance Company, an all-male, gay, non-profit dance company based in Washington, DC. that was active from 1994-2012. They peformed nationally and internationally live and on television, "celebrating diversity through dance."
Scope and Contents:
The DC Cowboys Dance Company Records contain the business and financial papers of the company, such as memoranda and correspondence; choreography routines; printed materials such as press releases and articles; fundraising materials; photographs; audiovisual materials; and the pre-recorded music used for their various dance routines. The records are arranged chronologically in three series.

Series 1: Company Files, 1994-2013, undated, is arranged chronologically by year and maintains the original order received from the donor. The files cover the entire life of the company and its peformances within the United States as well as internationally. The files contain correspondence, contracts, dance routines, fundraising initiatives, event information and advertising materials, travel and lodging arrangements, tourist information, and photographs.

Series 2: Financial, 1996-2011, undated, is arranged chronologically. The files contain receipts, money receipt books, financial statements, balance sheets and those materials related to the financial aspect of running the company.

Series 3: Audiovisual, 1994-2012, undated, contains compact discs (189) of pre-recorded music used for the company's various dance routines. The music was prepared for each booking and most often identified with the title of the booking and the date. Much of the music on these discs is under copyright since they are recordings done by original artists or professional covers of songs that were contemporary with the company's performance during any given year. There are also DVDs (five) detailing the production of varous fund raising DC Cowboys calendars and one audio cassette tape.
Arrangement:
This collection is divided into three series.

Series 1: Company Files, 1994-2013, undated

Series 2: Financial, 1996-2011, undated

Series 3: Audiovisual, 1994-2012, undated
Biographical / Historical:
"History of the DC Cowboys Dance Company - Celebrating diversity through dance"

The DC Cowboys Dance Company, an all-male, gay dance company, entertained audiences around the world from 1994 to 2012. Internationally acclaimed, the DC Cowboys specialized in providing exciting, high-energy, jazz-style, dance entertainment which spanned all musical genres, from contemporary country to club dance party, pop, to classic Broadway numbers for all types of occasions. Shows were customized to the venue—both gay-specific and mainstream events—and featured anywhere from one song to multiple sets of three to four songs each. Combining a little traditional country-western with jazz, musical theater and a masculine sex appeal, the DC Cowboys' high-energy choreography made the company one of the most-sought after gay dance groups in the world.

Founder and Artistic Director Kevin Platte started the dance company in August 1994 after seeing a similar gay, country-western dance group in California. Platte recruited 11 dancers—mostly friends—from a Washington, D.C., gay, country-western bar named Remington's. He approached the best dancers based on watching them two-step and line-dance at the bar. The dancers formed the troupe for the sole purpose of performing at the Atlantic States Gay Rodeo Association's (ASGRA) annual rodeo in Washington, D.C., in September 1994.

Platte thought the performance would be a one-time event. But based on an overwhelming reception, the dancers decided to continue the group. This required weekly rehearsals, the creation of a dance "repertoire" and a larger commitment from the dancers. Of the original 12 members, only six were up to the task. These six original members then had to find more dancers and identify other performance venues. Mainstay venues soon included the Capital Pride Festival every June and the Atlantic Stampede Gay Rodeo event every September.

In September 1995, Metro Weekly placed them on the cover of their magazine, giving them greater exposure and more clout. The Cowboys used this coverage as a catalyst to build the brand and identity. All the while, the DC Cowboys remained volunteers and amateurs, performing solely for the love of it. Each dancer maintained a "day job," and the group only rehearsed in the evenings once or twice a week. As the warmer months seemed to be their busiest, the dancers would use the colder months to build up the repertoire and practice. Every year, rehearsals would cease for the months of November and December for the existing dancers. However new recruits that were successful in the annual auditions attended "bootcamp" rehearsals during those months to learn some of the existing repertoire. In January, the existing and new members started rehearsing together as the new season began.

During the early years, the dancers paid for all expenses out of their own pockets, and monthly dues were collected to pay for group expenses. The group would often pay for the opportunity to perform. To supplement these expenses, the group began fundraising through a monthly bar night at different gay nightclubs. Once their reputation grew, venues and events began to pay for the company's entertainment services and patron club members donated funds to support the organization and their mission. These funds allowed the organization to pay for all of their expenses including dancer costuming. In addition, the group sold merchandise which included T-shirts, performance DVDs as well as their sexy DC Cowboys calendars. Three of the more popular calendars featured the dancers without clothes in artistic poses and included the "making of the calendar" DVD.

In 1996, Platte added a charitable element to the organization. He created a mission statement which said the company would provide free entertainment to any HIV/AIDS charitable organization. Over the years, the company also directly raised funds for HIV/AIDS organizations by sharing the profits of their calendar sales. The DC Cowboys raised millions of dollars through performances for national and local non-profit organizations such as: Washington, D.C. AIDS Ride; Washington, D.C. AIDS Walk; Chase Brexton Clinic of Baltimore, Maryland; Northern Virginia AIDS Ministry; Human Rights Campaign; Whitman Walker Clinic of Washington, D.C.; Food and Friends of Washington, D.C.; Mautner Project; Gay Latino Benefits in Metro D.C.; Harford County AIDS/Cancer Benefit, Maryland; NYFD Benefit for the New York City Fire Department.

In 1996, the company received a grant from the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts, honoring the company for its valued contribution to the Washington, D.C. arts community. The company always maintained a tax-deductible status as a 501c3 non-profit organization with a small board of directors.

During their 18-year tenure, the DC Cowboys provided an outlet for gay artists and performers in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. The company included 85 dancers, eight choreographers and three stage-managers. The company performed at 458 events in five countries. The DC Cowboys' crowd-pleasing, sexy dance style had been described as "Will Rogers Follies meets Bob Fosse." The group famously described themselves on America's Got Talent in 2008 as "Think Brokeback meets Broadway," which became a popular line echoed around the world. Their growth and popularity were attributed to their unique and high quality entertainment which was often copied in other cities but never equalled. In addition the dancers were talented, good-looking men who were friendly and approachable to their many fans. Their farewell season tour in 2012 visited all of their favorite performance venues and locations around the world and was dedicated to their fans who were instrumental to their success.

Typical performance venues included Pride Festivals in New York City, Washington, D.C., Baltimore, and Charlotte, North Carolina; Headliners on the Gay Rodeo circuit in Washington, D.C., Las Vegas, San Diego, Atlanta, Chicago, Calgary, and Texas; Halloween in New Orleans; Mr. Gay All-American Finals; Gay Men's Chorus of Washington, Washington, D.C., concerts and events; Whitman Walker Volunteer Appreciation at Constitution Hall, Washington, D.C.; PFLAG's Gala Dinner, Washington, D.C.; HRC (Human Rights Campaign) Leadership Dinner cruise aboard the Spirit of Washington, Washington, D.C.; Human Rights Campaign National Dinner, Washington, D.C. - special reception for major donors; Annual Chef's Best Dinner & Auction for Food and Friends, Washington, D.C..

Performance highlights included America's Got Talent television show, season 3, NBC, semifinalists (2008); Closing Ceremonies of the Gay Games VII at Wrigley Field in Chicago (2006); RSVP's Caribbean Fantasy gay cruise (2005); Arts grant recipient from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts (1996);The Sziget Festival in Budapest, Hungary (2009--012); Dales' Great Getaway television show, ITV London, England (2012); The Podge and Rodge television show, RTE, Dublin, Ireland (2010)."

Source

This history of the DC Cowboys Dance Company was supplied by its founder, Kevin Platte.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Kevin P. Platte, founder and Artistic and Executive Director of DC Cowboys Dance Company in 2013.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research use. Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs, negatives, and slides.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions. Fees for commercial reproduction.
Topic:
Gays  Search this
Gay business enterprises  Search this
Homosexuality  Search this
Cowboys  Search this
Dance companies  Search this
Dance  Search this
Genre/Form:
Articles -- 1990-2000
Photographs -- 21st century
Correspondence -- 1990-2000
Press releases -- 1990-2000
Business records -- 1990-2000
Articles -- 21st century
DVDs
Photographs -- 1990-2000
Financial records -- 21st century
Financial records -- 1990-2000
Correspondence -- 21st century
Compact discs
Press releases -- 21st century
Business records -- 21st century
Citation:
DC Cowboys Dance Company Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1312
See more items in:
DC Cowboys Dance Company Records
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1312
Online Media:

El Popo

Referenced:
Raza Unida Party  Search this
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
black; red; white (overall color)
printed (overall production method/technique)
4 pages (overall page count)
Measurements:
overall: 17 in x 11 1/2 in; 43.18 cm x 29.21 cm
Object Name:
newspaper, latino
Place made:
United States: California, Los Angeles, Northridge
Date made:
1971 circa
Subject:
Students and Student Life  Search this
Voting  Search this
Political Parties  Search this
Chicano movement  Search this
Mexican-Americans and/or Chicanos  Search this
Latino  Search this
Hispanic  Search this
Newspaper  Search this
Reform Movements  Search this
Student protest  Search this
Spanish  Search this
ID Number:
PL.319022.50
Accession number:
319022
Catalog number:
319022.50
See more items in:
Political and Military History: Political History, General History Collection
Government, Politics, and Reform
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746b4-b171-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1159702

Hijas Cuathetmoc

Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
black; white (overall color)
printed (overall production method/technique)
6 pages (overall page count)
Measurements:
overall: 17 in x 11 1/2 in; 43.18 cm x 29.21 cm
Object Name:
newspaper, latino
Place made:
United States: California, Long Beach
Date made:
1971
Subject:
Mesoamerican  Search this
Education  Search this
Women's History  Search this
Chicano movement  Search this
Mexican-Americans and/or Chicanos  Search this
Latino  Search this
Hispanic  Search this
Newspaper  Search this
Reform Movements  Search this
Bilingual  Search this
Spanish  Search this
ID Number:
PL.319022.57
Accession number:
319022
Catalog number:
319022.57
See more items in:
Political and Military History: Political History, General History Collection
Government, Politics, and Reform
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746b4-b173-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1159710

Garry Garber DC Dept. of Recreation Collection

Creator:
District of Columbia. Department of Recreation  Search this
Extent:
3.58 Linear feet (2 boxes and 1 oversize photograph)
Culture:
Hispanic Americans -- Washington, D.C. -- Social conditions  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Clippings
Newspaper clippings
Grant proposals
Brochures
Newsletters
Press releases
Photographic prints
Date:
1955-1998; 2006
Scope and Contents:
This collection documents the activities of Garry Garber, a founder and 35-year member of the Roving Leaders Program of the DC Department of Parks and Recreation in Washington, DC. Materials include correspondence, brochures, reports, newsletters, financial records, meeting minutes, and the personal daily work diaries of Mr. Garber. It also contains meeting minutes from the 1965 Community Conference of Northwest Washington and the District of Columbia Commissioners' Youth Council from the years: 1957, 1958, and 1959.
Biographical / Historical:
Garry Garber, a Mexican American and California native, was a founding member of the Roving Leaders Program of Washington, DC's Department of Parks & Recreation. The program embedded mentors in underserved neighborhoods to cultivate leadership, civic engagement, and a sense of purpose among young residents. Serving in that role from 1956 to 1991, Mr. Garber mentored generations of Washingtonians and played a vital role in the city's early efforts to serve its Latino immigrant communities by advocating for resources, social services, and support from the local government. Largely prior to (but sometimes simultaneously with) his employment with the DC Department of Parks & Recreation, Mr. Garber was a collegiate, semi-professional, and professional boxer, having won the NCAA boxing championship in 1954, the Second Army Championship in 1948, 1949, and 1950, the Worldwide All Army Championship in 1950, the 1967 North American Bantamweight Championship, and was the only American to win a title and gold medal at Israel's 1965 Maccabiah Games. He is a member of both the District of Columbia and Maryland Boxing Hall of Fame.
Provenance:
Donated by Leslie Garber in 2017 August. Additional materials donated by Leslie Garber 2019 June.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at ACMarchives@si.edu
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Youth -- Recreation  Search this
Neighborhoods -- Washington, D.C. -- History  Search this
Community life -- Washington, D.C.  Search this
Genre/Form:
Clippings -- 20th century
Newspaper clippings
Grant Proposals
Brochures
Newsletters
Press releases
Photographic prints
Citation:
Gary Garber D.C. Department of Recreation Collection,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of the Garber Family.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-098
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-098
Online Media:

Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material

Creator:
Ybarra-Frausto, Tomás, 1938-  Search this
Names:
Mexican Museum  Search this
Royal Chicano Air Force  Search this
Studio 24 (San Francisco, Calif.)  Search this
Goldman, Shifra M., 1926-2011  Search this
Lomas Garza, Carmen  Search this
Mesa-Bains, Amalia  Search this
Extent:
33.1 Linear feet
1.27 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Photographs
Slides (photographs)
Interviews
Place:
Mexico -- Religious life and customs
Date:
1965-2004
Summary:
The research material of Tomás Ybarra-Frausto, measures 33.1 linear feet and 1.27 GB and dates from 1965-2004. The collection, amassed throughout Ybarra-Frausto's long and distinguished career as a scholar of the arts and humanities, documents the development of Chicano art in the United States and chronicles Ybarra-Frausto's role as a community leader and scholar in the political and artistic Chicano movement from its inception in the 1960s to the present day.
Scope and Content Note:
The research material of Tomás Ybarra-Frausto, amassed throughout his long and distinguished career as a scholar of the arts and humanities, documents the development of Chicano art in the United States. As community leader and scholar, Ybarra-Frausto played dual roles of active participant and historian in the Chicano movement, chronicling this unique political and artistic movement from its inception in the 1960s to the present day.

Deeply rooted in American history, "El Movimiento," the Chicano movement, evolved from Mexican-Americans' struggle for self-determination during the civil rights era of the 1960s. It began as a grassroots community effort that enlisted the arts in the creation of a united political and cultural constituency. Chicano artists, intellectuals, and political activists were instrumental in mobilizing the Mexican-American community for the cause of social justice, and the movement was shaped by the affirmation of a cultural identity that embraced a shared heritage with Mexico and the United States.

Just as "El Movimiento" aimed to instruct and inspire through the recollection and conservation of culture, Ybarra-Frausto's own career as scholar and historian helped to shape the intellectual discourse of the Chicano art. As a leading historian and theoretician in the field of Chicano Studies, he has written extensively on the subject, and has been instrumental in defining the canons of Chicano art. His papers are accordingly rich and varied, and they will be of great use to future scholars.

His research material, dating from 1965 to 1996, are arranged in subject files containing original writings, notes, bibliographies compiled by Ybarra-Frausto and others, exhibition catalogues, announcements, newspaper clippings and other printed material, as well as slides and photographs. Many of these files also include interview transcripts and correspondence with prominent figures in the movement. While this research collection contextualizes Chicano art within the larger framework of Latino and Latin-American culture, the bulk of the files relates specifically to Chicano visual culture. The collection also contains pertinent documentation of the Chicano civil rights movement, material on Chicano poets and writers, and research files on the wider Hispanic community, but these also appear within the context of Chicano culture in general.

Prominent among the bibliographies are the many notes and drafts related to the publication of A Comprehensive Annotated Bibliography of Chicano Art, 1965-1981 (University of California, Berkeley, 1985), which Ybarra-Frausto co-authored with Shifra Goldman. Ybarra-Frausto's files on Goldman, like other files in the collection, document his close associations and collaborations with scholars.

Art historians have traditionally found the categorization of Chicano art a difficult task. Unsure whether to classify the work as "American" or "Latin American," critics often ignored the work altogether. An outgrowth of this dilemma was the proliferation of artists, curators, and critics within the Chicano community, and the papers contain many original writings by Chicano artists about Chicano art, found in extensive files on artists that will be of particular significance to researchers. These often contain exhibition essays, dissertation proposals, and course outlines authored by the artists, along with the standard biographies, exhibition records, and reviews. Some of the files contain rare interviews conducted and transcribed by Ybarra-Frausto. Highlights include conversations with Carmen Lomas Garza, Amalia Mesa-Bains, and members of the Royal Chicano Air Force artist cooperative.

As a member of several Chicano art organizations and institutions, Ybarra-Frausto kept active records of their operation. The extensive files on the Mexican Museum and Galerie de la Raza/Studio 24, both in San Francisco, not only chronicle the history of Chicano art through the records of exhibitions and programming, but also offer case studies on the development of non-profit art institutions. The files on artist cooperatives, organizations, and exhibition spaces cover several regions of the United States, but focus on California, Texas and New York.

Two notable events in the development of Chicano art were the 1982 Califas: Chicano Art and Culture in California seminar at the University of California at Santa Cruz, and the 1990 traveling exhibition Chicano Art: Resistance and Affirmation, 1965-1985 (CARA), of which Ybarra-Frausto served as organizer and catalogue essayist. His records document the planning and development of these seminal events. Ybarra-Frausto's files on folk art, altars, posters, murals, performance art, border art, Chicana feminist art, and Southwestern and Mexican imagery (both urban and rural expressions) mirror the diverse forms and subject matter of Chicano art.

Spanning almost four decades of American culture from a Chicano perspective, these files have a unique historical value. The legacy of Chicano art and its contribution to the cultural landscape of this country, kept alive in Ybarra-Frausto's files, attests to the richness and diversity of American art.

Henry C. Estrada

Research Fellow, 1997.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as a single series of subject files. The general contents of each folder have been listed. The subject files are arranged in alphabetical order. While no two files are alike, they may contain résumés, printed and digital material, letters, draft writings, and photographs. Unless otherwise noted, each listing represents one file folder. The abbreviation TYF was used to refer to the name Tomá Ybarra-Frausto throughtout the Series Description.
Autobiographical Note:
Papelitos (little bits of paper), whether rent receipts, paid bills, or piles of personal letters, can become layered bundles of personal history. I have always been a pepenador (a scavenger) and saver of paper scraps. Diary notes, scribbled annotations, and first drafts are often useful indicators of ideas and gestation. Papelitos are the fragments of every-day life that gain expanded meaning integrated into the larger historical events of a period.

In the decade of the 1960s, I started saving ephemeral material--exhibition announcements, clippings of individual artists and of organizations fomenting a Chicano art movement. The social scenarios of the period such as marches, strikes, sit-ins, and mobilizations for social justice all spawned manifestos, posters, leaflets, and other forms of printed material. I somehow managed to assemble and protect the evanescent printed information that recorded the birth and development of Chicano art.

As I started to research and write about Chicano art and artists of the period, I continued to clip, photocopy, and preserve material given me by Mexican-American artists from throughout the nation. My idea was to form an archive that would be comprehensive rather than selective. I knew that it was the offbeat, singular piece of paper with a missing link of information that would attract the scholar.

Today, several decades after the flowering of Chicano art, there is still a lamentable paucity of research and information about this significant component of American art.

It is my fervent hope that this compendium of information will function as a resonant print and image bank for investigators of Chicano culture. Perhaps contained within the archive are the facts that will inspire new visions or revisions of Chicano art and culture--this is my fondest dream.

Dr. Tomás Ybarra-Frausto

New York City, 1998
Related Materials:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto Papers are located at University of Texas Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin.
Provenance:
The collection was donated to the Archives of American Art by Tomás Ybarra-Frausto in 1997, and in 2004.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Rights:
The Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material is owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Santos (Art)  Search this
Hispanic American art -- Sources  Search this
Mexican American artists -- Sources  Search this
Hispanic American artists -- Sources  Search this
Household shrines -- Mexico  Search this
Mexican American arts -- Sources  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Slides (photographs)
Interviews
Citation:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material, 1965-2004. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.ybartoma
See more items in:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-ybartoma
Online Media:

David S. Rubin papers

Creator:
Rubin, David S., 1949-  Search this
Names:
Alf, Martha, 1930-  Search this
Baziotes, William, 1912-1963  Search this
Lloyd, Gary, 1943-  Search this
Mesches, Arnold, 1923-  Search this
Thiebaud, Wayne  Search this
Extent:
23 Linear feet
57.68 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Interviews
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Date:
1960-2017
Summary:
The papers of curator and art critic David S. Rubin measure 23 linear feet and 57.68 gigabytes and date from 1960 to 2017. The papers are comprised of biographical materials, interviews, correspondence, writing projects and notes, artists' files, exhibition files, professional files, subject and research files, printed materials, and photographic materials documenting Rubin's work in California, Arizona, and other locations throughout the United States.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of curator and art critic David S. Rubin measure 23 linear feet and 57.68 gigabytes and date from 1960 to 2017. The papers are comprised of biographical materials, interviews, correspondence, writing projects and notes, artists' files, exhibition files, professional files, subject and research files, printed materials, and photographic materials documenting Rubin's work in California, Arizona, and other locations throughout the United States.

Biographical materials include 16 appointment books, 2 guest books, identification cards, curriculum vitae, and student records from UCLA. Interviews are with Rubin regarding William Baziotes, Rubin with Gary Lloyd and Wayne Thiebaud, and an interview about the exhibition Chelsea Rising. Mixed personal and professional correspondence is with curators, colleagues, and friends regarding exhibitions, symposiums and panels, and Rubin's job searches.

Writing projects and notes consist of student work including Rubin's unfinished Ph.D. dissertation, class notes, and student papers; articles and essays; a book project; lists; and lectures. Artist files contain printed materials relating to the artists' careers, and notes regarding exhibitions and artist biographical information. Files for exhibitions contain records for It's Only Rock and Roll: Rock and Roll Currents in Contemporary Art (1995) and other major exhibitions curated by Rubin. Professional files consist of records for employment, committees, consulting, and other professional activities. Subject and research files contain research material and notes on topics of interest and exhibition themes.

Printed materials include clippings, flyers, exhibition announcements and catalogs, and other material relating to Rubin and exhibitions. Photographic materials consist of photographs and slides of Rubin by Martha Alf, Arnold Mesches, and Bruce Houston; photographs by Rubin of Alf and other artists; events; friends; and works of art.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 10 series.

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1969-2011 (Box 1; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 2: Interviews, 1982-circa 2001 (Boxes 1-2; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 3: Correspondence, 1971-2017 (Boxes 2-5, OV 28; 3.0 linear feet)

Series 4: Writing Projects and Notes, 1970-2010 (Boxes 5-6, 27; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 5: Artist Files, 1960-2015 (Boxes 6-20, 27, OV 28; 15.0 linear feet)

Series 6: Exhibition Files, 1980-2008 (Boxes 21-23, 27; 2.5 linear feet)

Series 7: Professional Files, 1976-2009 (Boxes 23-24; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 8: Subject and Research Files, 1980-2002 (Boxes 24-25; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 9: Printed Materials, circa 1975-circa 2008 (Boxes 25, 27; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 10: Photographic Materials, 1979-2010 (Boxes 25-26; 1.0 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
David S. Rubin (1949- ) is a curator and art critic in Los Angeles, California. Rubin has curated exhibitions throughout the United States, primarily in Southern California, New Orleans, Louisiana, Cleveland, Ohio, and San Antonio, Texas.

Rubin received his Bachelor of Arts degree in philosophy in 1972 from the University of California in Los Angeles. He went on to earn a Master of Arts in art history from Harvard University. He began researching automatism in New York for a doctorate degree at Harvard but did not complete his dissertation. Rubin also attended the Museum Management Institute in 1989. He has been a curator at the San Francisco Art Institute, Albright College's Freedman Gallery, Museum of Contemporary Art in Cleveland, Phoenix Art Museum, Contemporary Arts Center in New Orleans, and the San Antonio Museum of Art. He has curated exhibitions, including It's Only Rock and Roll: Rock and Roll Currents in Contemporary Art (1995) and the controversial Old Glory: The American Flag in Contemporary Art (1994), throughout the United States, primarily in California. Rubin is also a prolific essayist on contemporary art.
Provenance:
The papers were donated by David S. Rubin in 2016 and 2017.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings and born-digital records with no duplicate copies requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no Processing Manual Archives of American Art representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information
Occupation:
Art museum curators -- California  Search this
Art critics -- California  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
David S. Rubin papers, 1960-2017. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.rubidavi
See more items in:
David S. Rubin papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rubidavi
Online Media:

33c Cinco de Mayo single

Title:
Scott Catalogue USA 3309
Medium:
paper; ink / photogravure; adhesive
Dimensions:
Height x Width: 1 3/16 × 1 in. (3.02 × 2.54 cm)
Type:
Postage Stamps
Place:
United States of America
Date:
April 27, 1999
Topic:
Hispanic Heritage  Search this
Holidays & Celebrations  Search this
U.S. Stamps  Search this
Credit line:
Copyright United States Postal Service. All rights reserved.
Object number:
2000.2020.822
See more items in:
National Postal Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Postal Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/hm84f124243-cc04-4b01-baa0-478dba9cbdeb
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npm_2000.2020.822

Essential and expendable: The rise of agricultural labor and the United Farm Workers

Creator:
National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Mon, 12 Oct 2020 20:13:37 +0000
Topic:
American History  Search this
See more posts:
Blog Feed
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_39c7fa15502c1010d2a6bb0527e5139c

The artistry behind a baseball bat

Creator:
National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Tue, 13 Oct 2020 22:03:41 +0000
Topic:
American History  Search this
See more posts:
Blog Feed
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_1c2b094a312f1ef123a1be18e93034d9

Oral history interview with Yolanda M. López

Interviewee:
López, Yolanda M.  Search this
Interviewer:
González, Jennifer, 1965-  Search this
Extent:
10 Items (sound files (7 hrs., 45 min.) Audio, digital, wav)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2019 Dec.7-2020 Mar. 24
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Yolanda M. López conducted 2019 December 7- 2020 March 24, by Jennifer González, at López's home in San Francisco, California.
Biographical / Historical:
Interviewee Yolanda M. López (1942- ) is a political activist and artist in San Francisco, Calif. She is a prominent artist in the Chicano art movement. Interviewer Jennifer González (1965- ) is a professor of History of Art and Visual Culture at the University of California Santa Cruz.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
For information on how to access this interview contact Reference Services.
Occupation:
Political activists -- California -- San Francisco -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Chicano movement  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.lopez20
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lopez20

Oral history interview with Yolanda M. López, 2019 Dec.7-2020 Mar. 24

Interviewee:
López, Yolanda M., 1942-0  Search this
Interviewer:
González, Jennifer, 1965-0  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Chicano movement  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)21931
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)399156
AAA_collcode_lopez20
Theme:
Latino and Latin American
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_399156

The Latino Museum of History Art and Culture, Los Angeles, California

Collection Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Office of the Secretary. Counselor to the Secretary for Community Affairs and Special Projects  Search this
Container:
Box 3 of 8
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 02-131, Smithsonian Institution, Office of the Secretary, Counselor to the Secretary for Community Affairs and Special Projects, Program Records
See more items in:
Program Records
Program Records / Box 3
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa02-131-refidd1e1280

The Outsized Role of the President in Race Relations

Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Interviews
Blog posts
Published Date:
Thu, 08 Oct 2020 17:19:03 +0000
Topic:
Custom RSS  Search this
See more posts:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_68754a93549d622752cbbe1ccc8ed68f

37c Cesar E. Chavez single

Title:
Scott Catalogue USA 3781
Printer:
Banknote Corporation of America  Search this
Depicts:
Cesar E. Chavez, Mexican American, 1927 - 1993  Search this
Medium:
paper; ink (multicolor); self-adhesive
Dimensions:
Height x Width: 7 5/16 × 5 7/8 in. (18.57 × 14.92 cm)
Type:
Postage Stamps
Place:
United States of America
Date:
April 23, 2003
Topic:
Contemporary (1990-present)  Search this
Hispanic Heritage  Search this
Political Figures  Search this
U.S. Stamps  Search this
Credit line:
Copyright United States Postal Service. All rights reserved.
Object number:
2003.2016.108
See more items in:
National Postal Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Postal Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/hm8a9d0c9d3-39de-4cfa-bf9d-d58fc5ab64ee
EDAN-URL:
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