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Seminole Kinship System & Clan Interaction-LL Belmont

Collection Creator:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Container:
Box 103
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Collection Restrictions:
Files containing Sturtevant's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. Restricted files were separated and placed at the end of their respective series in boxes 87, 264, 322, 389-394, 435-436, 448, 468, and 483. For preservation reasons, his computer files are also restricted. Seminole sound recordings are restricted. Access to the William C. Sturtevant Papers requires an apointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
William C. Sturtevant papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
William C. Sturtevant papers
William C. Sturtevant papers / Series 2: Research Files / 2.1: Seminole
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw31ab24a30-df6d-46d2-8d5a-03b76db2d0c5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2008-24-ref4001

Mohave

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Henderson, Junius, 1865-1937  Search this
Robbins, Wilfred William, 1884-1952  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
33 Boxes
Culture:
Hualapai -- language  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Chemehuevi  Search this
Cocopa  Search this
Havasupai (Coconino)  Search this
Hualapai (Walapai)  Search this
Piipaash (Maricopa)  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Date:
1907-circa 1914, 1946-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Mohave.

Harrington organized his early linguistic and ethnographic notes into more than eighty categories, covering a broad spectrum of Mohave culture from daily practices to mythological and religious beliefs. The variety of content and order of arrangement are encyclopedic. Most of the material is original data from numerous native speakers. Animal and plant notes are also filed in this section. Notes on these topics stem from the Mohave Valley Expedition made with Henderson and Robbins. A typescript of Henderson's report precedes the botanical notes and one by Robbins precedes the zoological notes.

The semantic slipfile consists of data from the original field notes rewritten on slips and arranged in thirteen semantic divisions. Some new information provided by Irving and Wagner was inserted. Material relative to other Yuman tribes is included and almost all categories contain some inextricably interwoven Chemehuevi data which were originally provided by Chemehuevi speakers Jack Jones, John Pete, William Johnson, and Patty Smith. In most instances, the Chemehuevi equivalences are clearly marked. Information on kinship is relatively substantial.

Two Mohave notebooks are also present. One contains vocabulary and texts credited to "Mr. Edgar, Needles, Cal." The other is a packet of loose pages evidently removed from a notebook covering random linguistic and ethnographic data.

Another section consists of a small set of grammar notes arranged under such headings as language, phonology, and morphology. Some notes apparently were taken as early as 1907 and were transferred to slips in 1910 and 1911.

The section of miscellaneous notes on Yuman languages contains Yuma, Cocopa, and Walapai field notebooks. They are principally ethnographic and are difficult to read. Unrelated small groups of notes include Mohave, Yuma, Maricopa, Havasupai, and Walapai ethnographic data, probably provided by Joe Homer. There are lecture notes and students' papers probably from one of the courses which Harrington gave at the University of Colorado. Three small groups of slips include a list of Yuman clan names and a series of excerpts from a Yuman notebook which has not been located. The third is a copy of some Yavapai terms supplied by Barbara Freire-Marreco.

Late linguistic and ethnographic notes contain what appears to be the first draft of a manuscript on Mohave culture. Such subjects as sociology, religion and mythology, physical and mental characteristics, the Mohave universe, warfare, and design are covered. A variety of notes on historical events and on the geographic, political, and economic life of the Needles area was compiled from published sources and correspondence with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and with Indian Agency superintendents. The focus is on Mohave with some general Yuman references. The material has evidently undergone several reorganizations and notes from informants of the earlier period are interfiled. New linguistic and ethnographic information was supplied principally by Hal Davidson, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lewis, and Russell. Comparative terms appear in Yuma, Maricopa, Chemehuevi, and Paiute. Kroeber apparently lent Harrington some of his personal manuscripts, and information from this source is introduced as "Kr. notes." Correspondence with Charles Battye and excerpts from his scrapbooks in the possession of the Needles Public Library are also contained among these notes.

Another section consists of notes and drafts on material culture. They are arranged alphabetically and predominantly ethnographic. Notes came from the earlier period and such 1946 informants as Davidson and the Lewises. George Turner contributed numerous placenames.

The subseries also contains notes and drafts of tribenames. They represent an attempt to identify ethnic names applied to Yuman and some neighboring non-Yuman tribes. Some of the Mohave names may have been given by bilingual Chemehuevi speakers in July 1946, when Harrington and Murl Emery traveled the Colorado River-Mohave Valley area. A brief typescript follows the notes.

The section of semantically arranged notes consists of small amounts of data on minerals, pigments, fire, plants, animals, hunting, food, and medicine.

The section of late grammatical notes is also small. The notes originated mainly from Russell, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis, and Warren McCord. He based some hearings on Kroeber's (1911) "Phonetic Elements of the Mohave Language" and Sapir's (1930) "Southern Paiute Language." He also drew on A. M. Halpern's (1946 and 1947) six monographs on Yuma grammar published in the International Journal of American Linguistics. In the mid-1950s he again turned to Halpern and produced a small section of comparative Yuman terms.

The final section of the subseries consists of miscellaneus notes, including drafts of a paper on Mohave history and culture and another on the Kuchan vocabulary of George H. Thomas.
Biographical / Historical:
As a teacher of modern languages at Santa Ana High School in California (1906-1909), John P. Harrington spent his vacations studying Mohave and Yuma in Needles and Yuma, California. Working with a young Mohave woman in Needles in 1907, Mohave was the first Indian language that he ever recorded.

From 1909 until 1915, when he joined the Bureau of American Ethnology, Harrington held various positions with the Museum of the University of New Mexico and the School of American Archaeology, based mainly in Santa Fe. Along with work in other indigenous languages and cultures, he pursued his Mohave studies in Lincolnia, Cottonia, Needles, and Fort Mohave. The focus was on Mohave with ethnographic references to Yuma, Maricopa, Cocopa, Havasupai, and Walapai.

Under the auspices of the Bureau of American Ethnology, the School of American Archaeology, and the University of Colorado, he was ethnologist for a Mohave Valley expedition undertaken in March and April 1911, in conjunction with Junius Henderson and W. W. Robbins. Henderson identified the botanical life of the Mohave Valley and Robbins the zoological.

According to field notes and reports, the years 1910 and 1911 were the most productive ones for this first period of accumulation of Mohave data. Harrington worked with a number of people who spoke Mohave and Chemehuevi, resulting in numerous comparative references. Among the many Mohave speakers, Lee Irving (abbreviated L. I.), Mr. Edgar (Rev. Edgar), Ferd Wagner (Mr. Ferd), and Peter Dean (Peter) contributed substantially. Harrington primarily worked with Wagner in 1907. Edward H. Davis accompanied him on various placename trips and apparently advised him on the collection of artifacts. Financial records indicate that he spent about six weeks in Needles in late spring, 1914, collecting objects for the Panama-California Exposition.

A second period of endeavor commenced in 1946 with new recordings from Hal Davidson (Hal), Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lewis, George Turner, and Russell. Returning from the field to Washington, D.C., in 1947, Harrington compiled a variety of notes on historical events and interfiled some of his earlier material. The physical arrangement indicates an interest in drafting a paper on Mohave culture, more ethnographic than linguistic.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Mohave language  Search this
Yuma language  Search this
Chemehuevi language  Search this
Cocopa language  Search this
Havasupai language  Search this
Maricopa language  Search this
Yuman languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Grammar, Comparative and general  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Zoology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 3.11
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw39e2556eb-1c2d-43d3-85a3-fdeca5f835b0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14386

Taos

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Stevenson, Matilda Coxe, 1850-1915  Search this
Stevenson, James, Colonel  Search this
Grant, Blanche C. (Blanche Chloe), 1874-1948  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
22 Boxes
Culture:
Taos Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Narratives
Date:
1909-circa 1944
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southwest series contains Harrington's Taos research. The materials consist of field notes, grammatical and semantic slipfile, grammar, dictionary, linguistic notes, ethnographic and historical notes, and texts.

Among his field notes are slips prepared for semantic arrangement (former B.A.E. MS 2309 and 2290pt.). Many of the terms were used in the draft of an unpublished grammar, with some orthographic variations. The use of "q" for "kw" suggests an early date, possibly 1909-1910 . An early vocabulary is comprised of Harrington's comparative Taos terms used in his article "Notes on the Piro Language" (1909a).

From former B.A.E. manuscripts 2290pt., 2292pt., and 2296 come several categories of miscellaneous field notes. Included are a vocabulary elicited in 1910, typed and annotated notes which collate much of the information written on slips, and miscellaneous slips some dated 1920, some probably earlier-which contain brief Picuris comparisons. Data encompass placenames, tribenames, ethnogeographic terms, and some grammatical elaborations.

Another group of field notes appears to be Taos with Isleta comparisons. This is a tentative identification still subject to the scrutiny of linguists, who are not presently in complete agreement. The physical condition and type of paper used indicate that these notes may have been recorded during the period 1909 to 1911.

A set of slips, formerly cataloged as B.A.E. MS 2318 and 2295pt., fills four boxes. Field notes and reports suggest that this comprehensive body of material may have been accumulated, annotated, and rearranged over a period of time ranging from 1909 to 1928. The largest section of the file was arranged by Harrington according to grammatical categories and is especially substantial on verb and pronoun usage. Another group of slips is semantically arranged; some phonetic, ethnographic, and historical material is interjected.

The grammar section includes tabulations in English of pronoun prefix material which give an excellent indication of Harrington's methodology for accumulating slipfiles. Taos slips deal with pronoun usage, verb paradigms, and sentence structure. These are early notes, probably dating from 1909 to 1911. Mondragon was the principal source of information. The section also includes three drafts of manuscripts on Taos grammar, only of which one was published. "Ambiguity in the Taos Personal Pronoun" (1916) (former B.A.E. MS 2293pt. and 4682pt.) was condensed from another draft of an unpublished, more comprehensive grammar (former B.A.E. MS 4682pt.). A draft of a paper on numerals is filed with some of the original field notes from which it evolved (former B.A.E. MS 4681). Another major subsection consists of a draft of over 500 typed pages of a comprehensive grammar by Carobeth Laird, Harrington's wife at the time. The manuscript (former B.A.E. MS 2307 and 4680), titled "Grammatical Analysis of the Taos Language," is dated 1920. The fieldwork for the paper was done in Taos during July and August of 1918 with Taos speakers Lujan and Mondragon. A partial and preliminary draft and notes reveal some annotations by Harrington, who also was in Taos at the same time working with the same speakers.

This subseries also contains Harrington's Taos dictionary. The Taos-English section is in alphabetical order according to the first sound of the base. Although the English-Taos section gives the English word first, it follows the alphabetical order of the Taos term according to Harrington's list of initial symbols. Some entries in the dictionary are followed by the notes from which they evolved. There is also a file of Taos bird names, apparently intended for incorporation into the dictionary, as well as a small group of plant names. These also are in Taos-English and English-Taos. Filed with this material is a list of the scientific names for Taos birds; annotations were supplied by Florence Merriam Bailey and Vernon Bailey. (See "Studying the Mission Indians of California and the Taos of New Mexico" [1929].)

Harrington's linguistic notes (former B.A.E. MS 2292pt. and 2295pt.) include grammar, vocabulary, and textual material, apparently accumulated in July and August of 1918 from his work with Lujan and Mondragon. At least a portion of the material was collected with the assistance of his wife Carobeth, and a number of pages are in her hand. The pagination evidently underwent several reorganizations and is therefore somewhat chaotic. His other notes consist of comments on George L. Trager's "The Kinship and Status Terms of the Tiwa Languages" (1943) and on Elsie Clews Parsons' Taos Pueblo (1936). Relationship terms, age and sex nouns, personal names, rank nouns, and tribenames are mentioned.

Among his ethnographic and historical notes is his unfinished manuscript, "The Taos Indians" (former B.A.E. MS 3073). He relied heavily on Matilda Coxe Stevenson's field notes for his manuscript; her contribution is mainly ethnographic while a few pages are the work of her husband, James. Taos speaker Tony Romero is the source for the clan names. Harrington also incorporated his notes from 1908, 1909, 1911, 1918, and 1919. For historical data, Harrington relied on published sources, especially early Spanish documents for which he supplied original translations and throughout which some Picuris history is interwoven. The bibliographic information for the historical sources is interspersed throughout the notes.

There are also notes and excerpts from Blanche C. Grant's publications and miscellaneous notes on dances (former B.A.E. MS 2292pt.). A few random ethnographic notes on slips are written in English.

Contained in a series of texts are stories of Wolf and Deer and two versions of the Lord's Prayer with grammatical notes. Also included is the Tanoan linguistic diagram (former B.A.E. MS 2292 pt.) used in Harrington's "An Introductory Paper on the Tiwa Language, Dialect of Taos, New Mexico" (191 Oc). Jose Lopez and Santiago Mirabel provided the Taos terms used in this publication.
Biographical / Historical:
The first indication of John P. Harrington's work among the Taos Indians comes from his financial records of September 20, 1909, to January 15, 1910, when he was based in Santa Fe and doing fieldwork in various languages of the Southwest. Peak periods of in-depth work on Taos, sometimes in the field and sometimes in Washington, D.C., appear to be 1909-1911, 1918-1922, 1926-1930, and 1944-1945. He worked primarily with Joe Lujan (abbreviated "L.") and Manuel Mondragon ("M."), with Mondragon helping from 1910 to 1927. There are references to a trip which Harrington made with Margaret Tschirgi and F. E. Betts to the ruins east of Taos on September 30, 1928, but there are no further explanatory notes.

Mutual professional respect had arisen between Harrington and Matilda Coxe Stevenson of the Bureau of American Ethnology, at whose ranch he spent six weeks in the autumn of 1908. He was in possession of a large body of her original notes on south western Indians at the time of her death in 1915 and planned to arrange, annotate, and publish them. Her material on Taos appears in an unpublished historical and ethnographic manuscript titled "The Taos Indians."
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Tiwa language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Dance  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Narratives
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 4.10
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw312afc488-7d19-481b-9b9b-2beaf8561249
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14679

MS 4233 Notes on Choctaw, Pottawatomi, Seminole, Chippewa (articles by Peter P. Pitchlynn)

Collector:
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Creator:
Godbey, Allen Howard, 1864-1948  Search this
Gilliam, Charles Edgar  Search this
Klakring, Alfred  Search this
Lang, Andrew, 1844-1912  Search this
Pitchlynn, Peter Perkins, 1806-1881  Search this
Barnwell, John, approximately 1671-1724  Search this
Culture:
Tlingit  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Choctaw  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Oneida  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Maps
Place:
Arkansas
Georgia
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Also includes Cherokee history notes; Journal of John Barnwell, Virginia; Miami words from French Traveler of 1804 (this is only a bibliographic reference to Volney-View The Climate and Soil of the U. S. 1804). Ball game (Alonzo de Zurita (Zorita, Corita, etc.), Madrid, 1909; reference to Cherokee map drawn on deerskin (British Museum); Note on Mondongachate (Moneton Indians ?); Creek customs (Travels in North America, in 1827-8 by Captain Basil Hall, R.N.); memorandum re. "double axe question" and specimens from Georgia and North Carolina from Allen Godbey, Durham, North Carolina (1936); Appamatoc sites at Bermuda Hundred and Swift Creek, noted by Charles Edgar Gilliam, Petersburg, Virginia; note on the Arkansas from Narrative of Douey, in Shea, Discovery and Exploration of the Mississippi River; note on the Taensa villages, La Salle, etc., with excerpt from Tonti (Margry); excerpt from A Description of Carolana, by Col. Daniel Coxe (French Historical Collections, Louisiana, 1850, re. Arkansas Indians, and the Ouesperies; reference to Mississippi River tribes, from Tonti, in French Historical Collections, Louisiana, 1846.
A poem, in German, 17 stanzas, entitled "Makh-Piya-Luta" (Red Cloud), composed by a cousin of a friend named Alfred Klaking, once head draughtsman of Hydrographic Office. 2 pages. Letter from Andrew Lang, the author, dated February 6, (?), re. clans; mentions the Massim of New Guinea, the Tlingit, etc. (difficult to decipher). Excerpt from report ...of the Scots Society...who visited the Oneida and Mohekunuh Indians in 1796 (published in Collections Massachusetts Historical Society, 1st Series), re. plight of the educated Indian and his inability to adjust himself to either whites or to his own family and Indian environment. A map of "Environs du Fort D'Orleans", published by Missouri River Commission. (Pub. notice of "La Decouverte du Missouri et L'Histoire du Fort D'Orleans, by Baron Marc De Villers).
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4233
Other Title:
Makh-Piya-Luta
Red Cloud
Topic:
Diaries -- Barnwell, John  Search this
American Indian  Search this
Games and toys -- ball game  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Massim  Search this
Kinship -- clans  Search this
Oneida Indians  Search this
Education -- educated Indian, plight of  Search this
North Carolina  Search this
Genre/Form:
Maps
Citation:
Manuscript 4233, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4233
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d72084ad-fab2-497c-8a64-0c2fbdc849da
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4233

Taram, a Minangkabau Village

Extent:
1 Film reel (color sound; 790 feet, 16mm)
Type:
Archival materials
Film reels
Date:
1974
Scope and Contents:
Edited film, by Film Australia, is set in the village of Taram in southern Sumatra. Film depicts daily life in a matrilineal society where clan inheritance is passed from mother to daughter. Featured is Datuk Panjan, a man of high rank, and a cermony in which hereditary clan leaders are raised to the position of datuk.

Legacy Keywords: Agricultural practices rice Sumatra ; Religion Islam Sumatra ; Political authority datuks Sumatra ; Kinship matrilineal Minangkabau ; Garb Minangkabau ; Ceremony clan leaders Minangkabau

Credits: Morris, John ; Hannant, Brian
General:
Local Numbers: HSFA 1991.8.11
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Penn State educational films, Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Penn State educational films
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc9c514d684-c57a-4079-a9bb-042b31d18dcd
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-hsfa-1991-08-ref13

In the Lunda countryside Village's chief and his clan

Photographer:
Gorlia, Emile E.O.  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Gorlia, Emile E.O.  Search this
Extent:
1 Lantern slide (b&w, 8.5 x 10 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Lantern slides
Place:
Africa
Congo (Democratic Republic)
Date:
circa December 1909-January 1912
Scope and Contents:
Judge E. Gorlia's first journey in the Belgian Congo from December 1909 to January 1912.
In 1911, on his first tour of inspection, Judge Gorlia travelled by foot from Lusambo to Dilolo. Until 1912, the Luba, the Songye, the Kanioka, the Lunda and the Chokwe territories extending southward to Dilolo, were administered as part of the Congo-Kasai district with headquarters at Lusambo.
In the Lunda and Chokwe territories trials were brought on account of hostilities between the native tribes, contrabant was rampant, taxes reportedly never been paid, and also because of unscrupulous and abusive behavior of European agents.
Lunda villages are usually small and settlements are often not more than a few miles apart. The village headman formerly had a considerable amount of local autonomy and acted as leader in the ancestral rites. Kinship ties, however, remain and the settlements are united by the worship of a common ancestor.
General:
Title source: Archives staff; title not provided by photographer.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection digitized and available online. Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Transportation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Lantern slides
Collection Citation:
Emile Gorlia Photographs, EEPA 1977-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
EEPA.1977-001, Item EEPA 1977-0001-223-01
See more items in:
Emile Gorlia photographs
Emile Gorlia photographs / First Trip to Congo
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo74a3a1874-43bd-440f-a977-c301852ad43a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1977-001-ref982

In the Lunda countryside Village's chief and his clan

Photographer:
Gorlia, Emile E.O.  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Gorlia, Emile E.O.  Search this
Extent:
1 Stereograph (b&w, 6 x 13 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Stereographs
Place:
Africa
Congo (Democratic Republic)
Date:
circa December 1909-January 1912
Scope and Contents:
Judge E. Gorlia's first journey in the Belgian Congo from December 1909 to January 1912.
In 1911, on his first tour of inspection, Judge Gorlia travelled by foot from Lusambo to Dilolo. Until 1912, the Luba, the Songye, the Kanioka, the Lunda and the Chokwe territories extending southward to Dilolo, were administered as part of the Congo-Kasai district with headquarters at Lusambo.
In the Lunda and Chokwe territories trials were brought on account of hostilities between the native tribes, contrabant was rampant, taxes reportedly never been paid, and also because of unscrupulous and abusive behavior of European agents.
Lunda villages are usually small and settlements are often not more than a few miles apart. The village headman formerly had a considerable amount of local autonomy and acted as leader in the ancestral rites. Kinship ties, however, remain and the settlements are united by the worship of a common ancestor.
General:
Title source: Archives staff; title not provided by photographer.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection digitized and available online. Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Transportation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Stereographs
Collection Citation:
Emile Gorlia Photographs, EEPA 1977-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
EEPA.1977-001, Item EEPA 1977-0001-223-02
See more items in:
Emile Gorlia photographs
Emile Gorlia photographs / First Trip to Congo
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo702f2e75f-a258-4509-b233-4ece84a23ed9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1977-001-ref983

A black civilization a social study of an Australian tribe

Author:
Warner, W. Lloyd (William Lloyd) 1898-1970  Search this
Physical description:
xx, 618 pages illustrations 22 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Australia
Australie
Date:
1958
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Aboriginal Australians  Search this
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander  Search this
Murngin (Peuple d'Australie)  Search this
Australiens (Aborigènes)  Search this
Ethnologie  Search this
73.06 ethnography  Search this
Yolngu (Australian people)  Search this
Aborigines  Search this
Société primitive  Search this
Call number:
GN667.A7 W3 1958
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_565739

The elementary structures of kinship = (Les structures élémentaires de la parenté) Claude Lévi-Strauss ; translated from the French by James Harle Bell, John Richard von Sturmer, and Rodney Needham, editor

Author:
Lévi-Strauss, Claude  Search this
Translator:
Von Sturmer, John Richard  Search this
Bell, James Harle  Search this
Needham, Rodney  Search this
Physical description:
xlii, 541 pages illustrations 23 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1969
Topic:
Marriage  Search this
Kinship  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Family  Search this
Anthropology, Cultural  Search this
Mariage  Search this
Parenté  Search this
Familles  Search this
Ethnologie  Search this
kinship  Search this
Familia (Sociologia)  Search this
gezinnen  Search this
families  Search this
gezinsleven  Search this
family life  Search this
gezinsstructuur  Search this
family structure  Search this
verwantschap  Search this
matriarchaat  Search this
matriarchy  Search this
sociologie  Search this
sociology  Search this
patriarchaat  Search this
Patriarchy  Search this
social structure  Search this
sociale structuur  Search this
Call number:
GN480 .L66 E1966
GN480.L66 E1966
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_78

5.4 Clans, Kinship

Collection Creator:
Reining, Priscilla  Search this
Container:
Box 144 Mold Damage
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
The Priscilla Reining papers are open for research.

Some materials from the East African Medical Survey and Ethnography of Reproduction project contain personal medical history and are thus restricted. Grant applications sent to Reining to review are also restricted as well as her students' grades, and recommendation letters Reining wrote for her students. Electronic records are also restricted.

A small portion of the materials relating to Reining's Haya research, Ethnography of Reproduction project, and IBRD ujamaa research suffered severe mold damage. These materials have been cleaned and may be accessed. The legibility of some of the documents, however, is limited due to water and mold stains. Mold odor is also still present.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Priscilla Reining Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Priscilla Reining papers
Priscilla Reining papers / Series 2: Research / 2.2: Haya
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw39c8e673d-28f4-42a2-a8b7-f6ed1cab8da0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2009-25-ref420

MS 1335 Kickapoo notes and texts from Joseph Murdock

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Informant:
Murdock, Joseph  Search this
Extent:
185 Items (ca. 185 pages)
Culture:
Kickapoo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Narratives
Field notes
Manuscripts
Folklore
Date:
1929
Scope and Contents:
Truman Michelson conducted research among the Kickapoo in 1929 in Shawnee, Oklahoma. During this time, he worked with Joseph Murdock, a Mexican Kickapoo and former student at Carlisle Indian Industrial School. This collection contains an assortment of Kickapoo lingustic notes, ethnographic notes, and stories that Michelson obtained from Murdock. Topics include sin and social crimes, clan organization, childbirth, puberty, ceremonies and rituals, and daughter and father-in-law taboos. Among the stories is an English translation of the rabbit cycle legend (see MS 1203 for Kickapoo text), Murdock's experiences as a boy, and stories illustrating bashfulness before mothers-in-law.
The following is a list of other stories, which are in Kickapoo without English translations: Exchanging tooth with a garter snake; How corn came to be on this earth; Wisakea and the mallard duck; Wisakea and the skunk; Legend of witches; Why people began to kill each other; Why it is that some people can understand children before they talk and why they understand dogs; Woman and dog; The maiden and the man who frightened her; A thunderer is captured and made prisoner; Wisakea bungling host stories; Boy told by the giant to feed the lion straw and the horse meat; Skunk and opossum; Garter snake tooth; The one who was left behind.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1335
Local Note:
See MS 1203 for rabbit cycle legend in Kickapoo.
Topic:
Kickapoo language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Kickapoo Indians -- Kinship  Search this
Genre/Form:
Narratives
Field notes
Manuscripts
Folklore
Citation:
Manuscript 1335, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1335
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw381707812-7fbb-4d7c-b735-2a5c0e347c7b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1335
Online Media:

MS 3462 Cherokee drawings of plants

Collector:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Extent:
2 Sheets (8 x 12 1/2 inches)
1 Item (notebook (49 pages , 4 x 8 inches)
Culture:
Choctaw  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sheets
Drawings
Field notes
Date:
1899
Scope and Contents:
Two sheets with pencil drawings of 35 plants, each accompanied by a legend in the Cherokee syllabary. Also small black notebook containing miscellaneous notes on Cherokee, etc, and a list of Choctaw clans. Pages 1-4 are headed, "Hawanitaʹs Plant Pictures" with 35 plant names, probably corresponding to the drawings. The remainder of the notebook covers: miscellaneous notes, including stories by Cherokee informants (6 pages); vocabulary and notes relating to disease (17 pages); circular burial diagram and notes (1 page); "Cherokee Nation Index," which gives page references to some other publication or manuscript. Papers of Chas. Buttrick, Jr. (3 pages); "Adair", notes (2 pages); transcripts of letters, in Mooneyʹs shorthand (3 pages); miscellaneous notes (1 page); "Chey (?) Race Story" (2 pages); "Locations Cherokee" (2 pages); names and addresses of informants; notes on Choctaw and adjacent tribes, including list of Choctaw Clans (7 pages); and Cherokee informants (1 page).
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3462
Local Note:
The notebook was digitized to reflect the order of the writing in the original notebook. It is currently displayed in that same order. It starts from front cover towards middle, then back cover towards middle. This ordering will facilitate in the reading of the manuscript. Listed before the notebook are two loose drawings of plants.
Topic:
Ethnobotany -- Cherokee  Search this
Kinship -- Choctaw  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Medicine  Search this
Burial  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Field notes
Citation:
Manuscript 3462, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3462
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw36092f0be-8c0a-458e-b191-079050ffc3a9
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3462
Online Media:

Possession and ownership / edited by Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald and R.M.W. Dixon

Author:
Aĭkhenvalʹd, A. IU (Aleksandra IUrʹevna)  Search this
Dixon, Robert M. W. 1939-  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
Date:
2012
Topic:
Grammar, Comparative and general--Possessives  Search this
LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES--Grammar & Punctuation  Search this
LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES--Linguistics--Syntax  Search this
Call number:
P299.P67
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1148969

MS 68 A.S. Gatschet Notebook with vocabularies, texts, notes

Collector:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Informant:
Bottineau, Jno. B. (John B.)  Search this
Toposh, A. J. (Chippewa)  Search this
Bluejacket, Charles, 1817-1897  Search this
Names:
Pokagon, Simon, 1830-1899  Search this
Extent:
54 Pages
Culture:
Shawnee  Search this
Natchez  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Narragansett  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
mainly 1878-1879
Scope and Contents:
Contents:

Shawnee, 48 pages. (3-19; 48-62, even pages only; 72-93). Includes texts with interlinear translation: Story of the fox and the wolf, pages 3-6; story about the end of the world, page 18; Waputhua (great rabbit) story, pages 18-19. Vocabulary includes Shawnee names for other tribes, pages 76-79; Shawnee clans, page 80. Informant for part of data, Blue Jacket, Vinita, I. T.

Chippewa, 22 pages. (23-65, odd pages only). Mainly vocabulary from Jean Baptiste Bottineau, Pembina Band; includes clans of Pembina Band, page 59.

Pottawatomi, 7 pages (22-32a, odd pages only). Mainly vocabulary, from A. J. Toposh, Dowagiac, Michigan. Obituary of Simon Pokagon, Pottawatomi chief (died January 27, 1899), page 30.

Narragansett notes, 4 pages. (94-97).

Natchez word, page 97.

Miscellaneous Algonquian vocabulary notes, 1 page (back cover).
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 68
Other Title:
Story of the fox and the wolf
Story about the end of the world
Waputhua story
Great rabbit story
Topic:
Eschatology  Search this
Shawnee language  Search this
Chippewa language  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Potawatomi language  Search this
Natchez language  Search this
Narragansett language  Search this
Folklore -- Shawnee  Search this
Kinship -- Shawnee  Search this
Kinship -- Chippewa  Search this
Names, tribal -- Shawnee  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 68, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS68
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3cdfc902a-5e5d-4dda-ac5f-0205f9307e1f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms68
Online Media:

MS 3598 Notes on Social Organization- The Family, the gens, the clan

Collector:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Extent:
65 Pages
Culture:
Iroquois  Search this
Seneca  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1896, 1914, 1916
Scope and Contents:
Also Ohwachira; notes on suffrage, succession and function of clans; Akianer (Cuoq's List); Seneca clans, kinship terms.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3598
Local Note:
See Number 1634.
Topic:
Kinship -- Iroquois  Search this
Social organization -- Iroquois  Search this
Family -- Iroquois  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 3598, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3598
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw39a3f550a-d3fb-496c-901e-2b444410cb44
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3598
Online Media:

MS 3962 Mark of Etawa Caume, a Mahican sachem who visited England in 1710

Creator:
ANONYMOUS  Search this
Names:
Etawa Caume  Search this
Culture:
Mahican  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
This is a drawing of his clan symbol, the turtle, not a representation of his name.- MCB.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3962
Local Note:
Schuylers Colonial Hist. N.Y. 11.33.
Topic:
Kinship -- Mahican  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Citation:
Manuscript 3962, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3962
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d86ba8f3-0315-464d-bcfb-252118d94c47
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3962

Newspaper Articles

Collection Creator:
Scott, Blanche Stuart, 1889-1970  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 5
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1956 - 1969
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
Blanche Stuart Scott Collection, Acc. NASM.XXXX.0062, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Blanche Stuart Scott Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg277ac1d41-2e15-40fa-810e-cb559c975fe6
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-xxxx-0062-ref14
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MS 895 Notes on Zuni clans

Creator:
Cushing, Frank Hamilton, 1857-1900  Search this
Annotator:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Informant:
We'wha, 1849-1896  Search this
Extent:
24 Pages
Culture:
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Also a list of clans obtained by A.S. Gatschet from Wewa, June 20, 1886; 2 pages typed transcript from Gatschet's Zuni notebook (Bureau of American Ethnology Number 1550), with added notations in hand of Gatschet and Cushing.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 895
Local Note:
Of the 24 pages of notes on clans, 8 are in Cushing's hand, and the rest are in the same handwriting as Bureau of American Ethnology Numbers 1013 and 3917, presumably that of a clerk.
Topic:
Kinship -- Zuni  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 895, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS895
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b853ebef-b2a9-49a5-bf85-0c3d815e0324
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms895

MS 3484 Mohawk vocabularies, list of clans, etc

Collector:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Extent:
12 Pages
Culture:
Mohawk  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3484
Topic:
Kinship -- Iroquois -- Mohawk  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 3484, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3484
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw32c4c94f3-a0b7-4e9b-90b8-c4dd2b2de6e8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3484

MS 3498 Current notes and translations

Collector:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Extent:
85 Pages
Culture:
Iroquois  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Miscellaneous vocabularies, clan lists, etc. in Mohawk, Cayuga, etc.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3498
Topic:
Kinship -- Iroquois  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 3498, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3498
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw38c3bfdcf-615a-448e-986c-2539c081a443
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3498
Online Media:

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