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[Notebook A, 1960: Nyanumada]

Collection Creator:
O'Grady, G. N. (Geoffrey N.)  Search this
Container:
Box 2
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1960
Scope and Contents:
Index

1 -- Section system terms, probably Nyaŋumada. Then a note listing '[Languages] so far', using a new system of transcription: 'Nyaŋ[umada], Katatyari, Maŋala, Djiwaļiny, YulbaRitya, Waņman, Mandjildjara, Kațutyara, Puțityara, Nyamal, Ŋaļa.

2-3 -- A list of how people refer to each other using kin terms. Mention of Ken [Hale].

4 -- Notes on language, possibly Northwest Coast.

5 -- More kin terms, language not identified, possibly Ngulipartu.

6 -- Mention of Monty Hale.

7 -- Still on kinship nomeclature. Also: 'Yinta waRatya = (people of) one country, e.e. all Waņman.'

8 -- Placenames for Perth, Port Hedland, Roebourne and Nullagine.

9 -- Note to himself to get the Nyaŋumada terms for each finger from Ken Hale.

13 -- More on kinship terminology.

16-18 -- A switch to Queensland, Ka:ntyu language, recorded at Peter Creek 20/5/60. O'Grady is using a book of photographs called Family of Man to elicit commentary in Ka:ntyu, with references to the photographs, e.g. '136 top'. The commentary is glossed. He later uses this technique extensively.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Geoffrey N. O'Grady Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Geoffrey N. O'Grady Papers
Geoffrey N. O'Grady Papers / Series 1: Field Research
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3ad262fd5-2fb0-40c0-b50b-e5be63e36970
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2010-30-ref749

MS 4233 Notes on Choctaw, Pottawatomi, Seminole, Chippewa (articles by Peter P. Pitchlynn)

Collector:
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Creator:
Godbey, Allen Howard, 1864-1948  Search this
Gilliam, Charles Edgar  Search this
Klakring, Alfred  Search this
Lang, Andrew, 1844-1912  Search this
Pitchlynn, Peter Perkins, 1806-1881  Search this
Barnwell, John, approximately 1671-1724  Search this
Culture:
Tlingit  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Choctaw  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Oneida  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Maps
Place:
Arkansas
Georgia
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Also includes Cherokee history notes; Journal of John Barnwell, Virginia; Miami words from French Traveler of 1804 (this is only a bibliographic reference to Volney-View The Climate and Soil of the U. S. 1804). Ball game (Alonzo de Zurita (Zorita, Corita, etc.), Madrid, 1909; reference to Cherokee map drawn on deerskin (British Museum); Note on Mondongachate (Moneton Indians ?); Creek customs (Travels in North America, in 1827-8 by Captain Basil Hall, R.N.); memorandum re. "double axe question" and specimens from Georgia and North Carolina from Allen Godbey, Durham, North Carolina (1936); Appamatoc sites at Bermuda Hundred and Swift Creek, noted by Charles Edgar Gilliam, Petersburg, Virginia; note on the Arkansas from Narrative of Douey, in Shea, Discovery and Exploration of the Mississippi River; note on the Taensa villages, La Salle, etc., with excerpt from Tonti (Margry); excerpt from A Description of Carolana, by Col. Daniel Coxe (French Historical Collections, Louisiana, 1850, re. Arkansas Indians, and the Ouesperies; reference to Mississippi River tribes, from Tonti, in French Historical Collections, Louisiana, 1846.
A poem, in German, 17 stanzas, entitled "Makh-Piya-Luta" (Red Cloud), composed by a cousin of a friend named Alfred Klaking, once head draughtsman of Hydrographic Office. 2 pages. Letter from Andrew Lang, the author, dated February 6, (?), re. clans; mentions the Massim of New Guinea, the Tlingit, etc. (difficult to decipher). Excerpt from report ...of the Scots Society...who visited the Oneida and Mohekunuh Indians in 1796 (published in Collections Massachusetts Historical Society, 1st Series), re. plight of the educated Indian and his inability to adjust himself to either whites or to his own family and Indian environment. A map of "Environs du Fort D'Orleans", published by Missouri River Commission. (Pub. notice of "La Decouverte du Missouri et L'Histoire du Fort D'Orleans, by Baron Marc De Villers).
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4233
Other Title:
Makh-Piya-Luta
Red Cloud
Topic:
Diaries -- Barnwell, John  Search this
American Indian  Search this
Games and toys -- ball game  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Massim  Search this
Kinship -- clans  Search this
Oneida Indians  Search this
Education -- educated Indian, plight of  Search this
North Carolina  Search this
Genre/Form:
Maps
Citation:
Manuscript 4233, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4233
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d72084ad-fab2-497c-8a64-0c2fbdc849da
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4233

Edward C. Green papers

Creator:
Green, Edward C. (Edward Crocker), 1944-  Search this
Extent:
8.12 Linear feet (20 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Mozambique
Asia
Dominican Republic
Africa
Europe, Eastern
Suriname
South America
Swaziland
Middle East
Date:
circa 1970-2016
Summary:
The papers of Edward C. Green, circa 1970-2016, document his work as an applied medical anthropologist and research consultant focusing principally on the distribution and prevention of AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases in Africa and South America. Much of Green's research and policy focus lay in understanding indigenous health belief systems and instituting locally-designed approaches to major health concerns. The collection consists of correspondence, field diaries and typed research, sound recordings, photographs, and published reports and articles, including material from his dissertation research among the Matawai Maroons of Suriname.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Edward C. Green, circa 1970-2016, document his field research in Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and South America and his career as an applied medical anthropologist and research consultant focusing principally on the distribution and prevention of AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases. The collection consists of correspondence, field diaries and typed research, photographs, sound recordings, and published reports and articles.

The bulk of the material covers Green's field research undertaken predominantly in the Dominican Republic, Mozambique, Suriname, and Swaziland. Of note are sound recordings of interviews, songs, and rituals recorded in Suriname between 1971 and 1973. These recordings document the Matawai dialect of the Saramaccan language, an endagered creole dialect derived from Portuguese, English, and Afro-Caribbean sources. Correspondence in the collection dates from 1973 to 2015 and is a mix of personal and professional correspondence with colleagues and friends. Publications retained in the collection consist primarily of reports on healthcare policy and education, produced between 1978 and 2016 and written for state agencies and non-governmental organizations for which Green worked as a consultant. The bulk of the reports were produced with funding from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) or one of its subsidiary funds.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 3 series:

(1) Field notes, circa 1970-2016

(2) Publications, circa 1978-2016

(3) Correspondence, 1973-2015
Biographical Note:
Edward Crocker "Ted" Green is an applied medical anthropologist who has served as the director of the AIDS Prevention Research Project at the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies (2006-2010) and as the founder and president of the New Paradigm Fund (2010-). He was born in 1944 to the Hon. Marshall Green, a United States diplomat, and Lispenard "Lisa" Crocker Green. He earned his bachelor's degree in anthropology from George Washington University (1967), his master's in anthropology from Northwestern University (1968), and his PhD in anthropology from the Catholic University of America (1974). Green produced his dissertation on the Matawai Maroons of Suriname. He served as the National Institute of Mental Health Fellow at Vanderbilt University from 1978-1979 and as the Takemi Fellow at Harvard University from 2001-2002.

Green's career focused on healthcare education and international policy surrounding sexually transmitted diseases and AIDS in addition to family planning, maternal and child health, primary health care, children impacted by war, and water and sanitation. Much of Green's research and policy focus lay in understanding indigenous health belief systems and in instituting locally-designed approaches to major health concerns. He has served with the Department of Population and Reproductive Health at Johns Hopkins University and as the Senior Research Scientist for International Health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. He has also served on over a dozen advisory boards or boards of directors, including the UNAIDS Steering Committee, AIDS2031 (2008-2009); the Presidential Advisory Council for HIV/AIDS (2003-2007); the Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council, National Institutes of Health (2003-2006); and the Global Initiative for Traditional Systems of Health, Oxford University (2000-). Green has also worked as a consultant and as a public health advisor to the governments of Mozambique and Swaziland.

Sources Consulted:

George Washington University Department of Anthropology. Edward Green Curriculum Vitae. Accessed December 20, 2016. https://anthropology.columbian.gwu.edu/edward-c-green

MedAnth: Medical Anthropology Wiki. "Edward C. (Ted) Green." Accessed December 20, 2016. https://medanth.wikispaces.com/Edward+C.+(Ted)+Green.

New Paradigm Fund. "Edward C. Green Bio." Accessed December 20, 2016. http://newparadigmfundorg.startlogic.com/about/leadership/dr-edward-c-green-bio/.

Chronology

1944 -- Born to the Hon. Marshall Green and Lispenard Crocker Green in Washington, D.C.

1967 -- B.A. George Washington University (Anthropology)

1968 -- M.A. Northwestern University (Anthropology)

1971-1973 -- Ethnographic field research among the Matawai Maroons of Suriname

1974 -- Ph.D. The Catholic University of America (Anthropology)

1976 -- Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Kentucky Department of Anthropology

1976-1978 -- Visiting Assistant Professor, West Virginia University Department of Anthropology and Sociology

1978-1979 -- National Institute of Mental Health Fellow, Vanderbilt University

1981-1983 -- Social Scientist, Swaziland Ministry of Health and the Academy for Educational Development

1984-1985 -- Personal Services Contractor, U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), Swaziland

1986-1989 -- USAID SOMARC (Social Marketing for Change) Project Senior Staff, with John Short and Associates and The Futures Group

1991-1993 -- Advisor for Family Health International (FHI) and AIDS Control and Prevention Project (AIDSCAP) in South Africa and Tanzania

1994-1995 -- Advisor to the Mozambique Ministry of Health, under sponsorship of the Swiss Development Cooperation

1996-2001 -- Board Member, World Population Society

1997-1998 -- Advisor for AIDSCAP and USAID in Southeast Asia

2000- -- Advisory Board Member, Global Initiative for Traditional Systems of Health, Oxford University

2001-2002 -- Takemi Fellow, Harvard School of Public Health

2002-2006 -- Senior Research Scientist, International Health, Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies

2003-2006 -- Member, Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council, National Institutes of Health

2003-2007 -- Member, Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS

2004-2009 -- Behavior Change and Evaluation Specialist, President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) in Uganda, Rwanda, and Ethiopia

2006- -- Senior Consultant for W.K. Kellogg Foundation programs in southern Africa

2006-2010 -- Director, AIDS Prevention Project, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

2008-2009 -- Member, UNAIDS Steering Committee, AIDS2031

2009- -- Consultant for World Bank programs in southern Africa

2010- -- Director, New Paradigm Fund, Washington DC

2011 -- Elizabeth Eddy Visiting Professor of Anthropology, University of Florida

2011-2014 -- Research Associate, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health

2014- -- Research Professor, George Washington University Department of Anthropology
Separated Materials:
1 VHS and 1 DVD ("What Happened in Uganda?"), and 1 DVD ("Miss HIV: Botswana Education Version") were tranferred to the Human Studies Film Archives (HSFA).
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Edward C. Green in 2016. Additional digital material was donated by Edward Green in 2018.
Restrictions:
The Edward C. Green papers are open for research. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Digital media (including 1 computer disc of photographic slides, 1 DVD, and 3 USB flash drives) are restricted for preservation reasons.

Access to the Edward C. Green papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Maroons -- Suriname  Search this
HIV infections -- Prevention  Search this
Saramaccan language  Search this
AIDS (Disease) -- Prevention  Search this
Public health  Search this
Medical policy  Search this
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Medical anthropology  Search this
Applied anthropology  Search this
Sexually transmitted diseases  Search this
Traditional medicine  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Edward C. Green papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2016-31
See more items in:
Edward C. Green papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw321ff4f5e-7bcb-4ee9-a2a5-f2dcdc611af7
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2016-31
Online Media:

William C. Sturtevant papers

Topic:
Handbook of North American Indians
Creator:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Names:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.)  Search this
Six Nations  Search this
Extent:
220 Linear feet (The total extent of the collection is 191.41 linear feet (consisting of 473 document boxes and 2 record boxes) plus 254 sound recordings, 94 computer disks, 42 card file boxes, 85 oversize folders, 9 rolled items, 18 binder boxes, and 3 oversize boxes. Of the total extent, 4.79 linear feet (14 boxes) are restricted.)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Realia
Research
Notes
Office files
Theses
Slides (photographs)
Sound recordings
Exhibition catalogs
Field notes
Clippings
Correspondence
Photographs
Microfilms
Newsletters
Manuscripts
Memorandums
Articles
Card files
Books
Artifacts
Negatives
Date:
1952-2007
Summary:
This collection contains the professional papers of William Curtis Sturtevant and documents his activities as Curator of North American Ethnology at the National Museum of Natural History, his work as the editor-in-chief of the Handbook of North American Indians, his research among the Seminole and Iroquois people, and other professional activities. The collection is comprised of books, sound recordings, research and field notes, realia, artifacts, clippings, microfilm, negatives, slides, photographs, manuscripts, correspondence, memorandums, card files, exhibition catalogs, articles, and bibliographies.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains the professional papers of William Curtis Sturtevant and documents his activities as Curator of North American Ethnology at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, his work as the editor-in-chief of the Handbook of North American Indians, his research among the Seminole and Iroquois people, and his involvement in various professional activities. The collection is comprised of research and field notes, sound recordings, realia, clippings, negatives, slides, prints, published and unpublished writings, correspondence, memorandums, conference papers and meeting notes, card files, exhibition catalogs, articles, bibliographies, student files such as class notes and papers from Sturtevant's years as an anthropology student, teaching materials including lecture notes and exams, daily planners, passports, military records, artwork including prints and lithographs, maps, and computer files.

The materials in this collection document Sturtevant's career as a preeminent North American ethnologist, museum curator, university professor, his role as General Editor of the Handbook of North American Indians, and his contributions to the field of Anthropology. From his early work with the Seminole Indians of Florida to his forays into Burma, and his decades-long study of how Native Americans have been depicted in artistic and popular culture, Sturtevant's diverse intellectual interests are represented in his research files. A copious note taker, Sturtevant captured his observations and opinions of everything from meetings with colleagues to museum exhibits. Sturtevant's commitment to the anthropological profession can be found in the notes and programs of the many conferences, symposiums, and lecture series he attended and at which he presented. He also held numerous leadership positions in various professional associations and sat on the board of directors/trustees for several cultural organizations including Survival International and the Museum of the American Indian-Heye Foundation. Sturtevant was respected for his vast knowledge of indigenous peoples and he received a voluminous amount of correspondence from colleagues who often included copies of their papers and grant proposals. He kept many of these works, which, it appears he used as reference material. Sturtevant's own work is reflected in his writings; he published over 200 scholarly papers, articles, and books.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
This collection is organized in 14 series: 1. Correspondence, 1951-2008; 2. Research Files, 1851, 1860s, 1880s, 1890, 1939-2006; 3. Writings, 1952-2006; 4. Professional Activities, 1952-2006; 5. Smithsonian, 1954-2008; 6. Handbook of North American Indians, 1971-2007; 7. Biographical Files, 1933-2007; 8. Student Files, 1944-1985; 9. Subject Files, 1902-2002; 10. Photographs, 1927-2004; 11. Artwork, 1699-1998; 12. Maps, 1949-1975; 13. Sound Recordings, 1950-2000; 14. Computer Files, 1987-2006.
Biographical/Historical note:
William C. Sturtevant (1926-2007), preeminent North American ethnologist, museum curator, and university professor, was best known for his contributions to Seminole ethnology, as curator of North American Ethnology in the Department of Anthropology at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, and for his work as the general editor of the Handbook of North American Indians.

Sturtevant's passion for studying Native peoples began at a young age. In third grade "after a class on American Indians, he asked his father what kind of people study Indians, and his father replied, 'Anthropologists.' Sturtevant decided then that he would make anthropology his career" (Merrill 11). After graduating with honors from the University of California at Berkeley in 1949, Sturtevant went on to Yale University to complete his graduate work in anthropology. When it came time to decide on what area of North America he should focus his research, one of his faculty members at Yale, Irving Rouse, "suggested he consider the Seminoles of south Florida. By the end of his first fieldwork season, Sturtevant was convinced that the dearth of ethnographic information about these Seminoles and their status as one of the least acculturated of all North American Indian societies justified ethnographic research among them and offered the possibility of making an important contribution to North American ethnology" (Merrill 13). Sturtevant spent the summers of 1950 and 1951 conducting preliminary fieldwork among the Mikasuki-speaking Seminole and in 1952 he took up temporary residence at Big Cypress Reservation to undertake research for his dissertation, "The Mikasuki Seminole: Medical Beliefs and Practices." This work focused on Seminole medicine, but also included Sturtevant's analysis of Seminole worldview, religion, history, inter-ethnic relations, material culture, economy, kinship, language, and social organization.

In 1954, while he was finishing his dissertation, Sturtevant made the transition from student of anthropology to professional anthropologist. He was hired as an instructor in Yale's Anthropology Department and began his career in museum work as an assistant curator of anthropology at the Yale Peabody Museum. After receiving his PhD from Yale in 1955, Sturtevant moved on to the Smithsonian Institution, where he accepted a position as a research anthropologist at the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). This position afforded Sturtevant the chance to continue to explore his many research interests in ways that a full time professorship or museum curatorship could not. Over the next ten years he studied the Catawba in South Carolina; the Seneca and Cayuga nations of the Iroquois League in New York, Oklahoma, and Ontario; continued his work with the Seminole; visited European museums to examine early ethnographic examples and possible European prototypes of eastern North American Indian material culture; and spent a year in Burma. In 1963, Sturtevant and his wife, Theda Maw, the daughter of a prominent Burmese family, took their three young children to Burma so that they could visit with Maw's family. Sturtevant took this as an opportunity to branch out from his Native American research and spent the year visiting neighborhoods in Rangoon and villages in the surrounding countryside, examining archival materials, studying the Burmese language, learning about Burmese clothing and other aspects of the culture, and taking photographs. He also collected 386 items of clothing and other objects for the Smithsonian.

When Sturtevant returned from Burma, he found the BAE had been dissolved. In 1965, he was transferred from the now-defunct BAE to the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), where he became curator of North American Ethnology, a position he held for the next forty-two years. During his tenure at NMNH Sturtevant oversaw all the North American ethnology collections, planned exhibitions, served on committees, and sponsored interns and fellows. One of Sturtevant's primary duties at NMNH was serving as the General Editor of the Handbook of North American Indians, "a major multi-volume reference work summarizing anthropological, linguistic, and historical knowledge about native peoples north of Mexico" (Jackson). Each volume was designed to represent a geographic or topical area of Americanist study. As General Editor, Sturtevant selected volume editors, chapter authors, oversaw office staff, and proofread manuscripts over the course of production.

Besides focusing on the Handbook, much of Sturtevant's time was taken up by responsibilities he held outside the Institution. Sturtevant was extremely involved in professional anthropological associations and held many leadership positions. Fresh out of graduate school, he began a three-year term on the Board of Governors of the Anthropological Society of Washington in 1957. He later became a member of the executive committee of the Florida Anthropological Society, served as book-review editor and associate editor of the American Anthropologist from 1962-1968, was a member of the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Anthropological Research in Museums and was both vice president and president of the committee once it became the Council for Museum Anthropology, was on the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Archives, served three terms on the Board of Trustees of the Museum of the American Indian-Heye Foundation from 1976-1982 and was appointed to a fourth term between 1984 and 1986, and sat on the Board of Directors of Survival International from 1982-1988. He was President of the American Society for Ethnohistory, the American Ethnological Society, the American Anthropological Association, and the Anthropological Society of Washington. Sturtevant also taught classes at Johns Hopkins University as an adjunct professor in the Department of Anthropology, served as a consultant on exhibits at other museums, and reviewed manuscripts for scholarly publications.

Sturtevant remained active in the profession throughout his later years. After divorcing Theda Maw in 1986, he married Sally McLendon, a fellow anthropologist, in 1990 and they undertook several research projects together. Sturtevant was recognized for his dedication and contributions to the field of anthropology in 1996 when he was awarded an honorary doctorate in humane letters by Brown University, and in 2002 when his colleagues published a festschrift in his honor, Anthropology, History, and American Indians: Essays in Honor of William Curtis Sturtevant.

Sturtevant died on March 2, 2007 at the Collingswood Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Rockville, MD after suffering from emphysema.

Sources Consulted

Estrada, Louie. 2007. William C. Sturtevant; Expert on Indians. Washington Post, March 17. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/03/16/AR2007031602273.html, accessed August 31, 2012.

Jackson, Jason Baird. 2007. William C. Sturtevant (1926-2007). http://museumanthropology.blogspot.com/2007/03/william-c-sturtevant-1926-2007.html, accessed August 31, 2012.

Merrill, William L. 2002. William Curtis Sturtevant, Anthropologist. In Anthropology, History, and American Indians: Essays in Honor of William Curtis Sturtevant. William L. Merrill and Ives Goddard, eds. Pp. 11-36. Washington D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press.

1926 -- Born July 26 in Morristown, NJ

1944 -- Entered the University of California at Berkeley as a second-semester freshman

1944 -- Attended summer school at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico in Mexico City where he took courses on Mexican archaeology and South American ethnology

1945 -- Drafted into the United States Navy

1946 -- Received an honorable discharge from the Navy with the rank of pharmacist's mate third class and returned to UC Berkeley

1947 -- Attended the University of New Mexico's summer field school in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico

1949 -- January: Received his Bachelor's degree with honors in anthropology from UC Berkeley

1949 -- Began graduate studies at Yale University

1950-1951 -- Spent the summers of 1950 and 1951 in Florida conducting fieldwork among the Mikasuki-speaking Seminole

1951 -- Conducted his first research study of the Iroquois, a classification of Seneca musical instruments, their construction and use, with Harold Conklin

1952 -- May: Moved to Big Cypress Reservation in Florida to conduct research for his dissertation. He focused on Seminole medicine, but also collected physical anthropological data such as blood-type frequencies, handedness, and color blindness

1952 -- July 26: Married Theda Maw

1954 -- Hired by Yale University as an instructor in the Department of Anthropology and as an assistant curator of anthropology in the Yale Peabody Museum

1955 -- Received PhD in anthropology from Yale University

1956 -- Joined the staff of the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) as a research anthropologist

1957 -- Began a three-year term on the Board of Governors of the Anthropological Society of Washington

1957 -- Traveled to Rock Hill, South Carolina to collect linguistic data from Sam Blue, the last member of the Catawba tribe to have maintained some proficiency in the Catawba language. While there, he made a small collection of Catawba pottery for the United States National Museum

1957-1958 -- Spent seven weeks continuing his research among the New York Seneca

1959 -- Returned to Florida to study Seminole ethnobotany. He also collected ethnographic materials, especially objects made for the tourist market, which he deposited in the United States National Museum

1959-1960 -- Member of the executive committee of the Florida Anthropological Society

1960 -- July and August: Visited 17 European museums to examine early ethnographic examples and possible European prototypes of eastern North American Indian material culture

1961-1962 -- Spent the summers of these years conducting ethnographic fieldwork among the Seneca-Cayuga in Oklahoma

1962 -- October: Visited the Six Nations Reserve in Ontario, Canada to conduct fieldwork among the Seneca and Cayuga there

1962-1968 -- Book-review editor and associate editor of the American Anthropologist

1963 -- October: Spent the year in Burma; visited neighborhoods in Rangoon and villages in the surrounding countryside, examined photographs in several archives, studied the Burmese language, and read extensively about the country's history and culture. Assembled notes on Burmese clothing and other aspects of the culture, took hundreds of photographs, and made a collection of 386 items of clothing and other objects for the Smithsonian

1964 -- Visited Inle Lake in the Southern Shan States southeast of Mandalay, where he examined local approaches to artificial island agriculture

1964-1981 -- Became a member of the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Anthropological Research in Museums, which became the Council for Museum Anthropology in 1974. Sturtevant was the Council's first vice president, serving two terms between 1974 and 1978, and was its president from 1978 to 1981

1965 -- Became curator of North American Ethnology in the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History after the dissolution of the BAE

1965-1966 -- President of the American Society for Ethnohistory

1966 -- Named the editor of the Handbook of North American Indians

1967-1968 -- Fulbright scholar and lecturer at Oxford University's Institute of Social Anthropology

1969 -- Began serving on the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Archives

1974-1989 -- Adjunct Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Johns Hopkins University

1976-1982 -- Served three terms on the Board of Trustees of the Museum of the American Indian-Heye Foundation and was appointed to a fourth term between 1984 and 1986

1977 -- President of the American Ethnological Society

1980-1981 -- President of the American Anthropological Association

1981 -- Spent part of the spring semester at the University of California Berkeley as a Regents Lecturer

1982-1988 -- Board of Directors of Survival International

1986 -- Divorced Theda Maw

1986-1987 -- Smithsonian Fellow at Oxford University's Worcester College

1990 -- Married Sally McLendon

1992 -- President of the Anthropological Society of Washington

1996 -- Awarded an honorary doctorate in humane letters at Brown University

2007 -- Died March 2 in Rockville, MD
Related Materials:
Other materials relating to William C. Sturtevant at the National Anthropological Archives are included in the following collections:

Manuscript 4504

Manuscript 4595

Manuscript 4806

Manuscript 4821

Manuscript 4972

Manuscript 7045

Photo Lot 59

Photo Lot 79-51

Photo Lot 80-3

Photo Lot 81R

Photo Lot 86-68 (6)

Photo Lot 86-68 (7)

American Society for Ethnohistory records

Committee on Anthropological Research in Museum Records

Handbook of North American Indians records

Records of the Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History

Gordon Davis Gibson Papers, Sound Recordings

SPC Se Powhatan Confederacy Mattapony BAE No # 01790700

DOE Oceania:Amer Poly:Hi:Hawaiian Helmet:Sturtevant 04913800

DOE Oceania:Amer Poly:Hi:Hawaiian Helmet:Sturtevant 04913900

DOE Oceania:Amer Poly:Hi:Hawaiian Helmet:Sturtevant 04914000

Negative MNH 1530

Negative MNH 1530 B

Sturtevant is listed as a correspondent in the following NAA collections:

Administrative file, 1949-1965, Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology

John Lawrence Angel Papers

James Henri Howard Papers

Donald Jayne Lehmer Papers

John Victor Murra Papers

Records of the Society for American Archaeology

Albert Clanton Spaulding Papers

Waldo Rudolph Wedel and Mildred Mott Wedel Papers

Copies of sound recordings made by William C. Sturtevant can be found at The California Language Archive at UC Berkeley in two collections, The William Sturtevant collection of Creek/Seminole sound recordings, which includes 31 minutes of Northern Muskogean linguistic field recordings from 1951, and The William Sturtevant collection of Mikasuki sound recordings, which includes 33 minutes of Mikasuki linguistic field recordings from 1951. Two sound tape reels of Seminole music Sturtevant recorded in Florida in 1951 can be found at Wesleyan University's World Music Archives. Folk songs on these recordings include "Scalping Sickness," "Bear Sickness with blowing," "Bear sickness without blowing," "Lullaby," "Feather Dance," "Snake Dance," and "Crazy Dance." Performers include Josie Billie, Lee Cypress, Harvey Jumper, Boy Jim, Charlie (Johnny?) Cypress, Little Tiger Tail, Billy Ossiola, and Charlie Billy Boy.
Separated Materials:
One video tape, "Seminole History and Tradition", was transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives. Series 2.2, Tukabahchee Plate: Glass negative of spectrogram from FBI (Box 135), removed for storage with other glass plate negatives.
Provenance:
These papers were transferred to the National Anthropological Archives by the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History.
Restrictions:
Files containing Sturtevant's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. Restricted files were separated and placed at the end of their respective series in boxes 87, 264, 322, 389-394, 435-436, 448, 468, and 483. For preservation reasons, his computer files are also restricted. Seminole sound recordings are restricted. Access to the William C. Sturtevant Papers requires an apointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Botany  Search this
Anthropology  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
History  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Realia
Research
Notes
Office files
Theses
Slides (photographs)
Sound recordings
Exhibition catalogs
Field notes
Clippings
Correspondence
Photographs
Microfilms
Newsletters
Manuscripts
Memorandums
Articles
Card files
Books
Artifacts
Negatives
Citation:
William C. Sturtevant papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2008-24
See more items in:
William C. Sturtevant papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b2223e72-e872-41c5-ae7b-abd0b27eaf6a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2008-24
Online Media:

MS 603 Comparison of kinship terms of Wyandotte, Seneca, Assiniboine, Choctaw and Creek

Creator:
ANONYMOUS  Search this
Extent:
5 Pages
Culture:
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Wendat (Huron)  Search this
Choctaw  Search this
Seneca  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Wyandot  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
In copy of Schedule of John Wesley Powell's Introduction to the Study of Indian Language 1871. The comparison is in terms of numbers, apparently referring to relationship charts in Lewis Henry Morgan, Systems of Consanguinity and Affinity of the Human Family, SCK 17, Washington, D. C., 1871. This Manuscript gives no native terms.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 603
Local Note:
manuscript document
Topic:
Social structure  Search this
Seneca Indians  Search this
Assiniboine Indians  Search this
Creek Indians  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Assiniboin  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 603, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS603
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw38af2edc9-2cbb-4bd2-8441-150b088a25ff
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms603

MS 4931 Creek kinship terms from Legus Perryman

Creator:
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Informant:
Perryman, L. C. (Legus Choteau), 1838-  Search this
Extent:
2 Pages
Culture:
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Biographical / Historical:
Bureau of American Ethnology-AR 42, page 331 states that Legus Perryman of Okmulgee was a Creek Head Chief.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4931
Local Note:
Kinship terms are probably Creek.
Typescript document
Citation:
Manuscript 4931, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4931
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw35b745506-ccb7-4e00-a281-e4273fda1e5c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4931

MS 4237 List of Creek and Muskoku clans

Creator:
ANONYMOUS  Search this
Extent:
41 Items (slips )
Culture:
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4237
Local Note:
Not Dorsey Manuscript: RMD /67. Try Gatschet; not his writing but a copy of a vocabulary of his ? Note spelling: "Muskoki" MCB
Topic:
Kinship -- Creek  Search this
Creek language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 4237, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4237
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b66e9594-c3d4-4af1-8101-59051c6dddce
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4237
Online Media:

"Where Two Waters Come Together": The Confluence of Black and Indigenous History at Bdote

Creator:
National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Tue, 25 Aug 2020 20:25:01 +0000
Topic:
American History  Search this
See more posts:
Blog Feed
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_cedbddc9f71bf94899f378d144fabd50

The 'Clotilda,' the Last Known Slave Ship to Arrive in the U.S., Is Found

Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Interviews
Blog posts
Published Date:
Wed, 22 May 2019 21:35:43 +0000
Topic:
Custom RSS  Search this
See more posts:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_0962546308b542bcc05f307431ccf16d

Ethnology of the southeastern Indians : a source book / edited with an introduction by Charles M. Hudson

Author:
Hudson, Charles M  Search this
Physical description:
1 volume (various pagings) : illustrations ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Southern States
Date:
1985
Call number:
E78.S65E87 1985X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_261358

Indians in the family : adoption and the politics of antebellum expansion / Dawn Peterson

Author:
Peterson, Dawn 1977-  Search this
Physical description:
421 pages : illustrations, map ; 25 cm
Type:
Books
History
Place:
Southern States
United States
Date:
2017
19th century
1775-1865
Topic:
Indians of North America--Cultural assimilation--History  Search this
Indians, Treatment of--History  Search this
Indians of North America--Politics and government  Search this
Adoption--History  Search this
Imperialism  Search this
Slaveholders--History  Search this
Politics and government  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1078711

New studies in the history of American slavery / edited by Edward E. Baptist and Stephanie M.H. Camp

Author:
Baptist, Edward E  Search this
Camp, Stephanie M. H  Search this
Physical description:
viii, 306 p. : ill ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
America
Date:
2006
C2006
Topic:
Slavery--History  Search this
Slavery--Historiography  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_822567

"Wrought with careful hand" : ties of kinship on Delaware samplers / Lynne Anderson, Gloria Seaman Allen ; foreword by Susan P. Schoelwer ; introduction by Ryan D. Grover ; with contributions from Cynthia Steinhoff, Susi B. Slocum, Barbara Hutson, and Barbara K. Randau

Author:
Anderson, Lynne 1947-  Search this
Allen, Gloria Seaman  Search this
Author:
Sewell C. Biggs Museum of American Art  Search this
Physical description:
pages cm
Type:
Exhibitions
Exhibition catalogs
History
Place:
Delaware
Date:
2014
Topic:
Samplers  Search this
Kinship--History  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1042615

Coastal encounters : the transformation of the Gulf South in the eighteenth century / edited and with an introduction by Richmond F. Brown

Author:
Brown, Richmond F (Richmond Forrest) 1961-  Search this
Physical description:
xiii, 313 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Gulf Coast (U.S.)
Gulf States
Date:
2007
C2007
18th century
Topic:
Social change--History  Search this
Intercultural communication--History  Search this
History  Search this
African Americans--History  Search this
European Americans--History  Search this
Economic conditions  Search this
Social conditions  Search this
Ethnic relations  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_902816

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