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Oral history interview with Kay Sekimachi [Stocksdale], 2001 July 26-August 6

Interviewee:
Stocksdale, Kay Sekimachi, 1926-  Search this
Interviewer:
Baizerman, Suzanne  Search this
Subject:
Adamson, Glenn  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American fiber artists  Search this
Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11768
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)227771
AAA_collcode_sekima01
Theme:
Craft
Women
Asian American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_227771
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Mira Nakashima, 2010 March 11

Interviewee:
Nakashima, Mira, 1942-  Search this
Interviewer:
McElhinney, James, 1952-  Search this
Subject:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American woodworkers  Search this
Asian American furniture designers  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)15799
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)288894
AAA_collcode_nakash10
Theme:
Women
Asian American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_288894
Online Media:

Nanae Momiyama papers, 1928-circa 2000, bulk 1948-2000

Creator:
Momiyama, Nanae, 1924-2002  Search this
Subject:
Secor, Johanna  Search this
Kusama, Yayoi  Search this
Kenkeleba House  Search this
National Association of Women Artists (U.S.)  Search this
Bruce Museum  Search this
Type:
Sketchbooks
Scrapbooks
Sound recordings
Greeting cards
Interviews
Sketches
Drawings
Photographs
Place:
Japan
Topic:
Japanese American artists  Search this
Calligraphy, Japanese  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Asian American painters  Search this
Asian American educators  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)15751
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)287096
AAA_collcode_mominana
Theme:
Women
Asian American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_287096
Online Media:

Alice Kagawa Parrott papers, circa 1950-2009

Creator:
Parrott, Alice Kagawa, 1929-2009  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American fiber artists  Search this
Asian American ceramicists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)21722
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)398595
AAA_collcode_parralic
Theme:
Asian American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_398595

Alexandra S. Watkins papers relating to Miye Matsukata

Creator:
Watkins, Alexandra Solowij, 1933-  Search this
Names:
Matsukata, Miye, 1922-1981  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1969-1980
Scope and Contents:
Forty slides (1969-1979) taken by Watkins of jewelry and a bathroom frieze designed by Miye Matsukata, two press releases (1980), and three photocopies of clippings (1979) concerning Matsukata and her work, one is an obituary.
Biographical / Historical:
Watkins is a jeweler, goldsmith, Boston, Massachusetts who headed jeweler Miye Matsukata's workshop for many years and photographed pieces as they were returned for cleaning or repair. Miye Matsukata (1922-1981) was a Japanese American jewelry designer and metalsmith based in Boston, Massachusetts. She worked at her jewelry firm Janiye in Boston from 1950 to her death.
Provenance:
Donated 1985 by Alexandra Solowij Watkins.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Jewelers  Search this
Goldsmiths  Search this
Jewelers  Search this
Topic:
Jewelry  Search this
Jewelry making  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American jewelers  Search this
Asian American metal-workers  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.watkalex
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-watkalex

Oral history interview with Patti Warashina

Interviewee:
Warashina, Patti, 1940-  Search this
Interviewer:
Jeck, Doug, 1963-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
42 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2005 September 8
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Patti Warashina conducted 2005 September 8, by Doug Jeck, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at the artist's home and studio, in Seattle, Washington.
Warashina discusses her childhood in Spokane, Washington, as the youngest of three children of Japanese immigrants; her first experience with art, which was working on murals in elementary school; getting through school by doing visual art projects, including one on fashion design for a French class; her great-grandmother who sold pottery and rice off a cart in her native Japan; her working processes and moving from high-fire to low-fire glazes, as well as dealing with color and decoration in her work; making increasingly larger pieces and thus discovering more surfaces on which to paint; learning how to make hand-built pieces, and in general learning how to control her material; spending her early years working in a vacuum because she was busy raising a family during the day and working in the studio all night; the influence of Surrealism, the Funk movement, and the Chicago Hairy Who on her work; her love of clay as a medium because it presents challenges and technical variables that keep the work interesting; the status of clay as a valid artistic material, and how that has changed over the course of art history; her own personal definition of art as something that "raises your blood pressure," and what makes a "a good pot into a work of art instead of just a pot"; the difference between her early and later work, which she calls cumulative process; her move to the figure, which came naturally out of her earlier work and was in keeping with the Surrealist images to which she was so attracted; recent series of her work, including Mile Post Queens, and Sake Sets: The Drunken Power Series; the role of the figure in her work and the unique challenges they present; being a self-proclaimed "news junkie" and listening to jazz while she works; spending 30 years teaching and the influence it had on her career; her mother as a strong influence and role model in her life, as well as her mother's interest in crafts and gardening; and the influence of artists such as Hieronymous Bosch, René Magritte and Joan Miró on her work. Warashina recalls Robert Sperry, Fred Bauer, Peter Voulkos, Robert Arneson, Toshiko Takaezu, Henry Takemoto, Garth Clark, Howard Cotler, Matthew Kangas, Warren McKenzie, Nan McKinnell, Bernard Leach, Shoji Hamada, Soetsu Yanagi, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Patti Warashina is a Japanese American ceramicist and sculptor. She was born in 1940 as Masae Patricia Warashina in Spokane, Washington to third generation Japanese emigrants. She received her undergraduate degree from the University of Washington, Seattle, where she studied with sculptors Robert Sperry, Harold Myers, Rudy Autio, Shoji Hamada, Shinsaku Hamada, and Ruth Penington. She received her first solo exhibition in 1962 at the Phoenix Art Gallery in Seattle the same year she graduated with an M.F.A. from the University of Washington. Warashina later married fellow student Fred Bauer and from 1964 to 1970 exhibited as Patti Bauer.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 5 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 54 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Pottery -- Technique  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American sculptors  Search this
Asian American ceramicists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.warash05
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-warash05

Patti Warashina papers

Creator:
Warashina, Patti, 1940-  Search this
Names:
Lee Nordness Galleries  Search this
Currier, Anne, 1950-  Search this
Kottler, Howard, 1930-1989  Search this
Lipofsky, Marvin, 1938-2016  Search this
Lucero, Michael, 1953-  Search this
Sperry, Robert, 1927-1998  Search this
Extent:
4.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Photographs
Date:
circa 1900-1991
bulk 1970-1989
Summary:
The papers of ceramicist and sculptor Patti Warashina (b. 1940) date from circa 1900 and 1957 through 1991, bulk 1970-1989. The collection consists of 4.8 linear feet of correspondence and printed material reflecting the many ceramic and craft exhibitions and other projects Warashina participated in throughout the United States, and her associations with other ceramicists. Also included are biographical documents, writings, art works, several photographs, and a video.
Scope and Content Note:
The Patti Warashina papers measure 4.8 linear feet and date from circa 1900 and 1957 through 1991 (bulk 1970-1989). The collection documents the artistic and teaching career of Seattle-based sculptor and ceramicist Patti Warashina predominantly through correspondence and printed material reflecting the many ceramic and craft exhibitions and other projects Warashina participated in throughout the United States, and her associations with other ceramicists. Also included are biographical documents, writings, art works, several photographs, and a video.

Biographical material includes family trees, diplomas, awards, and documents relating to Warashina's family Japanese internment during WWII. Correspondence, 1968-1991, relating to exhibitions and other projects, is with galleries, museums, purchasers, publishers, and others, among them the Lee Nordness Gallery (N.Y.), Morgan Gallery (Kansas City), and Theo Portney Gallery (Seattle). Additional correspondence files contain letters received, 1977-1990, many addressed to Warashina and her husband Bob (Robert Sperry), from friends, colleagues, former students and family members, including Nancy Carmen, Anne Currier, Deborah Horrell, Matthew Kangas, Howard Kottler, Marvin Lipofsky, Michael Lucero, and others.

Ten photographs, circa 1900-1944, are portraits of Warashina's relatives and family, and several snapshots, circa 1970s, are of former students and works of art. Printed material, 1961-1990, includes newspaper and magazine clippings, programs, journals, newsletters, exhibition announcements, exhibition catalogs, and workshop announcements for Warashina's various sculpture and ceramic lectures. Writings include both published and unpublished works by Warashina, including an artist's statement for a possible lecture at the 1986 conference of the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts (NCECA). Also found here are handwritten notes on a panel discussion titled Cultural and Racial Heritage: Sources and Imagery in which Warashina was a participant along with artists Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson, María Brito Avellana, and Indira Johnson. Art work consists of blue line drawings for her sculpture "Red Earth," 1986 as well as a pen and ink sketch of Warashina by an unidentified artist. A videocassette, 1987, is of the television program "The Big A: Different Ways of Seeing", in which Warashina appears briefly.
Arrangement:
The Patti Warashina papers are arranged as seven series based primarily on type of material. The correspondence in Series 2 is arranged chronologically for exhibitions and projects and general letters received. Additional letters received are arranged by name of author.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1974-1991, undated (Box 1; 3 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1957, 1967-1991, undated (Boxes 1-3; 2.0 linear feet)

Series 3: Photographs, circa 1900- circa 1959, 1971, undated (Box 3; 3 folders)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1961-1990, undated (Boxes 3-6, OV 7; 2.0 linear feet)

Series 5: Writings and Notes, 1984, 1986, 1989, undated (Box 6; 4 folders)

Series 6: Artwork, 1986, undated (Box 6; 2 folders)

Series 7: Miscellany, 1987, undated (Box 6; 2 folders)
Biographical Note:
Patti Warashina is a Japanese American ceramicist and sculptor. She was born in 1940 as Masae Patricia Warashina in Spokane, Washington to third generation Japanese emigrants. She received her undergraduate degree from the University of Washington, Seattle, where she studied with sculptors Robert Sperry, Harold Myers, Rudy Autio, Shoji Hamada, Shinsaku Hamada, and Ruth Penington. She received her first solo exhibition in 1962 at the Phoenix Art Gallery in Seattle the same year she graduated with an M.F.A. from the University of Washington. Warashina later married fellow student Fred Bauer and from 1964 to 1970 exhibited as Patti Bauer.

Influences in Warashina's art include California funk and sculptural ceramics. Her work is best known for its whimsical themes expressed through low-fire highly colored figurative images. Together with fellow artists Robert Sperry, Howard Kottler and Fred Bauer, she brought national recognition to the department of ceramics at the University of Washington's School of Art beginning in the 1980s.

Patti Warashina is a recipient of several awards for achievements in the field of crafts, most recently the Twining Humber Award granted by Seattle's Artists Trust in 2002. She received the Governor's Award of Special Commendation for the Arts in 1980 in addition to grants from the National Endowment for the Arts in both 1975 and 1986. In 1978, Warashina was awarded a World Craft Council Travel Grant which allowed her to conduct research on the ceramic arts process in Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Thailand, Bali and the Philippines. Warashina's teaching career spans over 30 years and includes positions at the University of Wisconsin, Eastern Michigan University, and at her alma mater where she has taught for over 25 years. Her work is featured in several museum collections in both the U.S. and abroad including the American Craft Museum in New York, the Seattle Art Museum and Henry Art Gallery, the Smithsonian American Art Museum's Renwick Gallery (Washington, DC), the Art Gallery of Western Australia, and the Ichon World Ceramic Center in Korea. Since her marriage to ceramicist Robert Sperry in 1976, she has used Patti Warashina as her professional name. Patti Warashina is a resident of Seattle, Washington.
Provenance:
The Patti Warashina papers were donated by the artist to the Archives of American Art in 1991.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Japanese American families -- Photographs  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American sculptors  Search this
Asian American ceramicists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Patti Warashina papers, circa 1990-1991, bulk 1970-1989. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.warapatt
See more items in:
Patti Warashina papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-warapatt
Online Media:

School of Design in Chicago : refugees east and west / Beatrice Takeuchi

Creator:
Takeuchi, Beatrice, 1921-  Search this
Names:
Chicago School of Design  Search this
Aaron, David  Search this
Filipowski, Richard, 1923-2008  Search this
Giedion, S. (Sigfried), 1888-1968  Search this
Hayakawa, S. I.  Search this
Keck, George Fred  Search this
Kepes, Gyorgy, 1906-2001  Search this
Leckie, Hubert W., 1913-1993  Search this
Moholy-Nagy, László, 1895-1946  Search this
Richard, Edgar  Search this
Waldheim, Jack  Search this
Extent:
54 Pages
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
1998
Scope and Contents:
Beatrice Takeuchi memoir, 1998. Takeuchi begins with her recollections of the bombing of Pearl Harbor and her stay in a War Relocation camp and describes in detail her impressions of the faculty, staff, and students at School of Design in Chicago. Most notable recollections involve instructors Lazlo Moholy-Nagy, Jack Waldheim, George Fred Keck, Hubert Leckie, S.I. Hayakawa, and others. The memoir concludes with a summation of her career in the arts.
Biographical / Historical:
Beatrice Takeuchi (1921-2020) was a Japanese American educator based in Chicago, Illinois and Washington, D.C. Takeuchi was born in Seattle, Washington. After the bombing of Pearl Harber, she was sent to a War Relocation Center, Pallyup, Washington and Minidoka, Idaho in August 1942. In October of 1942 she was allowed to leave to pursue studies in industrial design and architecture at the Chicago School of Design (fd. 1937 as New Bauhaus). From 1945-54 she taught foundation and visual design and held various positions in architecture and design studios in Washington, D.C., moving to NYC in 1954 and working as a free lance architect until 1968. She lived and worked in Chicago from 1968-1993, when she retired to Michigan.
Provenance:
Donated 1998 by Beatrice Takeuchi.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Architects  Search this
Topic:
Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945 -- Diaries  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American architects  Search this
Asian American educators  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.takebeat
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-takebeat

Oral history interview with Toshiko Takaezu

Interviewee:
Takaezu, Toshiko  Search this
Interviewer:
Williams, Gerald, 1926-2014  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Cleveland Institute of Art -- Faculty  Search this
Cranbrook Academy of Art -- Students  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Princeton University -- Faculty  Search this
Grotell, Maija  Search this
Horan, Claude.  Search this
Extent:
33 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2003 June 16
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Toshiko Takaezu conducted 2003 June 16, by Gerry Williams, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Quakertown, N.J.
Takaezu describes growing up in Hawaii in a large family; her first work as a commercial potter; working with Claude Horan; how religion factors into her work; studying ceramics at Cranbrook Academy of Art with Maija Grotell; the role of universities and apprenticeships in the craft movement; teaching at Princeton and the Cleveland Institute of Art; visiting artists in Japan; setting up a studio in Clinton, N.J.; her teaching philosophy; the evolution of her work from functional to closed vessels; the inside of her large pots; the importance of color and glazes; her career highlights; the inspiration she finds in nature; her role in political and social activities; her relationship with galleries, including Perimeter and Charles Cowles Gallery; her exhibition history; and the changing face of the American craft movement. She also recalls Claude Horan, Maija Grotell, Otagaki Rengetsu, Kaneshige, Rosanjin, Jeff Schlanger, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Toshiko Takaezu (1922-2011) was a Japanese American ceramist of Quakertown, New Jersey. Gerry Williams (1926- ) is the co-founder and former editor of Studio Potter in Dunbarton, New Hampshire. Takaezu's birth date is also cited as 1929.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound cassette. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 38 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Ceramics -- Technique  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American ceramicists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.takaez03
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-takaez03

Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers

Source:
Stocksdale, Kay Sekimachi  Search this
Creator:
Stocksdale, Bob, 1913-2003  Search this
Names:
Central Utah Relocation Center  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Tanforan Assembly Center (San Bruno, Calif.)  Search this
War Relocation Authority  Search this
Anderson, Norman  Search this
Collingwood, Peter, 1922-2008  Search this
Larsen, Jack Lenor, 1927-2020  Search this
Maloof, Alfreda Ward  Search this
Maloof, Sam  Search this
Merrill, Forrest L.  Search this
Okubo, Miné, 1912-2001  Search this
Shawcroft, Barbara  Search this
Stocksdale, Bob, 1913-2003  Search this
Stocksdale, Kay Sekimachi  Search this
Turner, Tran  Search this
Uchida, Yoshiko  Search this
Former owner:
Stocksdale, Kay Sekimachi  Search this
Extent:
19.5 Linear feet
0.125 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Interviews
Sound recordings
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Watercolors
Photographs
Date:
circa 1900-2015
Summary:
The papers of woodturner Bob Stocksdale and fiber artist Kay Sekimachi measure 19.5 linear feet and 0.125 GB and date from circa 1900 to 2015. Found are biographical materials, correspondence, writings, professional files, exhibition files, project files, personal business records, printed and digital material, scrapbooks, photographic material, and artwork. Of note are records from Sekimachi's forced internment during World War II at Tanforan Assembly Center and Topaz War Relocation Center from 1942 to 1944.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of woodturner Bob Stocksdale and fiber artist Kay Sekimachi measure 19.5 linear feet and 0.125 GB and date from circa 1900 to 2015. Found are biographical materials, correspondence, writings, professional files, exhibition files, project files, personal business records, printed and digital material, scrapbooks, photographic material, and artwork. Of note are records from Sekimachi's forced internment during World War II at Tanforan Assembly Center and Topaz War Relocation Center from 1942 to 1944.

The bulk of biographical materials are from Kay Sekimachi with some originating from her time spent in forced internment at Topaz and Tanforan camps. These records include identification cards, War Relocation Authority printed materials, and school records. Also found are awards, resumes, and blank stationery. Some materials are from Stocksdale's 85th birthday and memorial service.

Letters and extensive greeting cards are from friends, family, and professional acquaintances. Correspondents include Norman Anderson, Peter Collingwood, Jack Lenor Larsen, Sam and Alfreda Maloof, Forrest L. Merrill, Miné Okubo, Barbara Shawcroft, and others.

Writings and notes are scattered and include two interviews with Kay Sekimachi, hanging instructions, and notes. Writings by others are by Jack Lenor Larsen, Tran Turner, and Yoshiko Uchida.

Sekimachi's and Stocksdale's professional activities are documented through files relating to their participation at conferences, awards ceremonies, and lectures. Also found are fiber samples, order forms for materials and equipment, and notes on techniques and design by Kay Sekimachi. Exhibition records include extensive documentation on Marriage in Form, In the Realm of Nature, and Loom and Lathe as well as files for various solo and group exhibitions for both Sekimachi and Stocksdale. Gallery and institution files include material on multiple or unnamed exhibitions. Exhibiton documentation may include correspondence, writings, proposals, printed material, financial and loan records, condition reports, and photographs. Project files contain material for proposed book projects, a retrospective, and portfolio, by and about Sekimachi and Stocksdale. Also found are three commissions files for works by Sekimachi. A proposed retrospective on the work of Bob Stocksdale by Kay Sekimachi includes a digital sound recording of recollections.

Personal business records include sales books, purchase records for works of art by others, appraisals, contracts, consignment receipts, and insurance records.

Published books, clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs, magazines, and newsletters are found within printed materials. Of note is a publication by the San Francisco Chronicle entitled "This World" which features illustrations by Miné Okubo.

Four scrapbooks compiled by Kay Sekimachi date from 1937 to 1944. Most of the scrapbooks contain printed material from magazines and other sources with images such as children, valentines, food, birds, clothing, and may include scattered sketches and notes by Sekimachi. One scrapbook dates from the end of Sekimachi's internment at Topaz and relocation to Cincinnati, Ohio. This scrapbook includes sketches and printed materials concerning local and global events. Loose material found in this series was likely meant to be pasted into a new or the forth scrapbook. These materials include relocation information, Japanese-American publications, maps, clippings, sketches, and printed programs.

The bulk of photographic materials consist of slides of various vacation locations and homes and date from the 1960s to the 1980s. Also found are scattered portraits of Kay Sekimachi and Bob Stocksdale, as well as a photo of Miné Okubo with Roy Leeper and Cecil Thompson. Artworks are largely by Kay Sekimachi and include watercolor and pencil sketches as well as designs for fabrics and a weaving portfolio. Watercolor and pencil sketches are of Tanforan Assembly Center and date from circa 1942.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1920-2003 (1.5 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1943-2014 (7.6 linear feet; Box 2-10)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1960s-2008 (0.2 linear feet; Box 10)

Series 4: Professional Files, 1950s-2011 (1.1 linear feet; Box 10-11, 22)

Series 5: Exhibition Files, 1951-2015 (2.9 linear feet; Box 11-14, ER01; 0.125 GB)

Series 6: Project Files, circa 1900-2004 (0.3 linear feet; Box 14)

Series 7: Personal Business Records, 1970s-2010 (0.7 linear feet; Box 14-15)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1943-2011 (2.3 linear feet; Box 15-17, 22)

Series 9: Scrapbooks, 1937-1946 (0.9 linear feet; Box 17, 21)

Series 10: Photographic Material, circa 1950-2001 (0.9 linear feet; Box 18)

Series 11: Artwork, 1942-circa 1970 (1.1 linear feet; Box 18-20, 22-23)
Biographical / Historical:
Bob Stocksdale (1913-2003) was a woodturner active in California. He was known for bowls he formed from rare types of wood. Kay Sekimachi (1926- ) is a Japanese-American fiber artist and educator also active in California. She began her career in weaving on and off the loom and was part of the New Basketry movement.

Born in Indiana, Bob Stocksdale began his interest in carving by whittling with a pocket knife. Later, he created his own lathe with a washing machine motor and turned items such as baseball bats. During World War II, he was a conscientious objector and worked at various camps performing forestry work. It was in one of the camps that he turned his first bowl on a lathe.

After the war, Stocksdale settled in the Bay Area of California where he established his own woodturning shop in his basement. He concentrated on making bowls out of rare woods. His work has been recognized throughout the world and in 1998, he received the American Association of Woodturners Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2003, he received the James Renwick Alliance Masters of the Medium Award.

Kay Sekimachi was born in San Francisco, California in 1926. As a high school student, she was forcibly interned through Executive Order 9066 issued by President Franklin D. Roosevelt which incarcerated approximately 120,000 Japanese and Japanese-American citizens during World War II. Along with her mother and siblings, Kay lived at Tanforan Assembly Center and later moved to Topaz War Relocation Center in Utah. She continued her schooling at Topaz and after 1944, was resettled in Cincinnati, Ohio.

After graduating from high school, Kay Sekimachi enrolled at the California College of Arts and Crafts and the Haystack Mountain School of Crafts where she learned the craft of weaving under Trude Guermonprez and Jack Lenor Larsen. Her early works were tapestries and garments. She later used her weaving techniques as part of the New Basketry movement to create baskets and boxes out of fibers. Also an educator, Kay taught weaving at San Francisco Community College. She received the American Craft Council Gold Medal for Consummate Craftsmanship in 2002.

After the dissolution of his first marriage through which he had two children, son Kim and daughter Joy Stocksdale, Bob married Kay Sekimachi in 1972. The two had been acquainted for many years as they were both craft artists living in the Bay Area. Although they married later in life, Kay and Bob travelled the world and exhibited their art together in many exhibitions including Marriage in Form and Loom and Lathe.

Bob Stocksdale died in Oakland, California in 2003. Kay Sekimachi continues to exhibit her work and lives in Berkeley, California.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are an oral history interview of Bob Stocksdale conducted February 16-March 21, 2001, by Signe Mayfield and an oral history interview of Kay Sekimachi [Stocksdale] conducted July 26-August 6, 2001, by Suzanne Baizerman. Both interviews were conducted in Berkeley, California, during the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America.
Provenance:
The Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers were donated in 2003, 2004, and 2015 by Kay Sekimachi Stocksdale as part of the Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Use of original audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Concentration camps -- United States  Search this
Textile design  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Fiberwork -- Technique  Search this
Woodwork -- Study and teaching  Search this
Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
Textile crafts -- Study and teaching  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American fiber artists  Search this
Asian American educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Watercolors
Photographs
Citation:
Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers, circa 1900-2015. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.stockbob
See more items in:
Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-stockbob

Norie Sato papers

Creator:
Sato, Norie, 1949-  Search this
Names:
Center for Contemporary Art (Seattle, Wash.)  Search this
Seattle Arts Commission  Search this
Soho Television  Search this
Dolan, Margo  Search this
Extent:
0.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1974-1991
Scope and Contents:
Project files, exhibition files, teaching/workshop files, correspondence, and printed material relating to Sato's career as a video artist and printmaker and her involvement in professional video and artist organizations mainly in the Seattle, Washington area.
Project files contain letters, reports, notes and printed material concerning Sato's Comprehensive Employment Training Act award, a National Endowment for the Arts media grant, the Seattle Art Commission, Soho Television, the Center for Contemporary Art Talk, the Seattle Bumbershoot Arts Festival, the King County Arts Commission, the U.S. Film and Video Festival, the Focal Point Media Center, and others. Exhibition files contain printed material, notes and letters regarding Sato's exhibitions at various institutions, among them the Philadelphia Print Club, the Brooklyn Museum, and the Guggenheim Museum; a file of catalogs and announcements, 1974-1990; and a file of exhibition entries with acceptance/rejection cards.
Lecture/workshop files relate to Sato's position as a lecturer for the Seattle Printmakers Services Association and the Centrum Foundation. Correspondence, 1975-1980, 1990-1991 (20 items) is mainly regarding sales and exhibitions of work, and includes a group of letters from Margo Dolan, director of the Associated American Artists. The collection also includes a few writings by Sato, printed material, and Sato's annotated resume.
Biographical / Historical:
Norie Sato (1949- ) is a Japanese American video artist and printmaker in Seattle, Washington. Sato was born in Japan, and is the founder of the Center for Contemporary Art (COCA) in Seattle and member of the Seattle Arts Commission.
Provenance:
Donated 1991 by Norie Sato.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Video art  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Prints -- 20th century  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American printmakers  Search this
Asian American video artists  Search this
Function:
Film festivals
Identifier:
AAA.satonori
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-satonori

Oral history interview with Mira Nakashima

Interviewee:
Nakashima, Mira  Search this
Interviewer:
McElhinney, James Lancel, 1952-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
4 Items (wav files (2 hr., 57 min.), digital)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2010 March 11
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Mira Nakashima conducted 2010 March 11, by James McElhinney, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Nakashima's reception house, in New Hope, Pennsylvania.
Biographical / Historical:
Mira Nakashima (1942- ) is a Japanese American woodworker based in New Hope, Pennsylvania. Nakashima is the daughter of fellow woodworker, George Nakashima.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 57 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American woodworkers  Search this
Asian American furniture designers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.nakash10
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-nakash10

Oral history interview with Eugene and Hiroko Sato Pijanowski

Interviewee:
Pijanowski, Eugene, 1938-  Search this
Pijanowski, Hiroko Sato, 1942-  Search this
Interviewer:
Fisch, Arline M.  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
102 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2003 May 15-16
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Eugene and Hiroko Sato Pijanowski conducted 2003 May 15-16, by Arline M. Fisch, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Honolulu, Hawaii.
The Pijanowskis speak of their unique relationship in life and work; their early years in Japan; the lack of art schools in Japan; their collaborative process; Gene's tendency to deviate from standard styles; Hiroko's work on Japanese metalwork; they comment on their interest in fabric, Japanese paper cord [mizuhiki], fish skin, and ColorCore (a surfacing material with integral solid color throughout its thickness); their series Gentle Solitude, Amaryllis, and Maple Leaves; student labor; their separate careers as teachers; the presence of Japanese and American cultures in their life; their interest in Dutch design; the significance of their international marriage while living in Michigan and Hawaii; they recall various symposia and workshops; they discuss how their travels have effected their works; Hiroko's enjoyment of scuba diving and inspiration from nature; they comment on the difficulties of working together at the same university; other artist couples they know; retiring to Hawaii; Hiroko's interest in haiku poetry; and her responsibilities in Japan of running her uncle's company and helping her elderly mother. The Pijanowskis also recall Kim Cridler, David Watkins, Wendy Ramshaw, Emmy van Leersum and Gijs Bakker, Takahiko Mizuno, Francis Pickens, Mike Capitan, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Eugene (1938- ) and Hiroko Sato (1942- ) Pijanowski are metalsmiths living in Honolulu, Hawaii. Arline M. Fisch is a jeweler and writer.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 9 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hr., 12 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Japanese American women -- Interviews  Search this
Jewelry making -- Study and teaching  Search this
Metal-work -- Study and teaching  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American metal-workers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.pijanoeh03
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-pijanoeh03

Oral history interview with Hiroko Sato Pijanowski

Interviewee:
Pijanowski, Hiroko Sato, 1942-  Search this
Interviewer:
Fisch, Arline M.  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Cranbrook Academy of Art -- Students  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
University of Michigan -- Faculty  Search this
Pijanowski, Eugene, 1938-  Search this
Extent:
123 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2003 May 13-15
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Hiroko Sato Pijanowski conducted 2003 May 13-15, by Arline F. Fisch, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Honolulu, Hawaii.
Pijanowski speaks of her American/Japanese identity; childhood in Japan and her small family; the Christian schools she attended; Geidai University; learning Japanese jewelry design in the U.S.; attending Cranbrook Academy of Art; her thesis on line-inlay, a Japanese technique; meeting Eugene (Gene) Pijanowski, her future husband, at Cranbrook; life in Japan with Gene; moving back to the U.S.; her teaching philosophy; teaching at the University of Michigan; computers and other technological advances that have changed the way metals are taught; her presentation at a 1999 SNAG conference, "A Look Into the Future: The Implementation of Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing for Metalsmiths"; the importance of sharing information; her creative work and its relation to teaching; working with Japanese paper cord [mizuhiki]; Zen philosophy; her reoccurring childhood dreams; her line of jewelry "Hiroko Sato Pijanowski"; and the different types of molds she has made in wax, silicon, and rubber. Pijanowski also discusses jewelry tradeshows; her series Gentle Solitude; Issey Miyake's approach to design and his influence; her haiku club; orchids as inspiration; scuba diving experiences; the World Crafts Conference in Kyoto in 1978; the importance of exhibitions, such as "International Jewelry" in Vienna and "Poetry of the Physical" at the American Craft Museum, New York; galleries such as Helen Drutt in Philadelphia and Yaw Gallery in Michigan; the custom of "renting a gallery space" in Japan; and she concludes the interview with a discussion of the effects of of her depression. Pijanowski also recalls Ruth Taubman, Jim Hopfensperger, Leslie Leupp, Michael Rodemer; Stanley Lechtzin, Herman Junger, Albert Paley, David Watkins, Bob Ebendorf, Otto Kunzli, Michael Rowe, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Hiroko Sato Pijasnowski (1942- ) is a Japanese American metalsmith from Honolulu, Hawaii. Arline M. Fisch is a jeweler.
General:
Originally recorded on 6 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 11 digital wav files. Duration is 5 hr., 42 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Jewelry making -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Jewelry making -- Study and teaching  Search this
Jewelry making -- Technique  Search this
Metal-work -- Study and teaching  Search this
Metal-work -- Technique  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American metal-workers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.pijanoh03
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-pijanoh03

Alice Kagawa Parrott papers

Creator:
Parrott, Alice Kagawa, 1929-2009  Search this
Extent:
8.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1950-2009
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Japanese American fiber artist and ceramicist, Alice Kagawa Parrott, measure 8.3 linear feet and date from circa 1950-2009. The collection mainly documents Parrott's work as a fiber artist. Included are biographical material; personal and profesional correspondence with colleagues, loom manufacturers and family; notes for lectures and weaving notes; fabric dye recipes; project files; business records including fabric sales and financial reports; photographs of Parrott, her studio and dyeing process; printed material; and artwork including garment patterns, pencil sketches of wall hangings, yarn samples, annotated dye studies and samples, sketches, and studies and color stories.
Biographical / Historical:
Alice Kagawa Parrott (1929-2009) was a Japanese American fiber artist and ceramicist based in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in 2019 by Paul Kagawa and Diane Leavitt, trustees, Alice Kagawa Parrott Family Trust.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American fiber artists  Search this
Asian American ceramicists  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.parralic
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-parralic

Oral history interview with Alice Kagawa Parrott

Interviewee:
Parrott, Alice Kagawa, 1929-2009  Search this
Interviewer:
Smith, Paul J.  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
32 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2005 July 10
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Alice Kagawa Parrott conducted 2005 July 10, by Paul J. Smith, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Santa Fe, N.M.
Parrott speaks of her childhood in Hawaii; her extended family's fate in the atomic bombing at Hiroshima; her education at the University of Hawaii, The Cranbrook Academy of Art, and at the studio of Marguerite Wildenhain, at Pond Farm, in Guerneville, California; her teaching years at the University of New Mexico and on the island of Maui; her marriage to Alan Parrott in 1956; her travels in Mexico, Guatemala, and India; and her various exhibitions across the U.S. and abroad. She recalls Claude Horan, Hester Robinson, Ernestine Murai, Anna Kang Burgess, Toshiko Takaezu, Marianne Strengell, Maija Grotell, Jack Lenor Larsen, Rufino Tamayo, Isamu Noguchi, George Nakashima, Joan Mondale, and Aileen Osborne Webb, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Alice Kagawa Parrott (1929-2009) was a Japanese American fiber artist from Santa Fe, New Mexico. Paul J. Smith is the Director Emeritus, American Craft Museum, New York City, New York.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 27 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American fiber artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.parrot05
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-parrot05

Sarepta Pierpont Ostrum papers relating to Miye Matsukata jewelry

Creator:
Ostrum, Sarepta Pierpont, 1922-  Search this
Names:
Matsukata, Miye, 1922-1981  Search this
Extent:
7 Items
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1979-1982
Scope and Contents:
Five slides of jewelry designed and made by Miye Matsukata; a letter from Matsukata to Ostrum; and a clipping about her work.
Biographical / Historical:
Ostrum is a collector; Califon, New Jersey. Miye Matsukata (1922-1981) was a Japanese American jewelry designer and metalsmith based in Boston, Massachusetts. She worked at her jewelry firm Janiye in Boston from 1950 to her death.
Provenance:
Donated 1984 by Sarepta Pierpont Ostrum.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Jewelry  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American jewelers  Search this
Asian American metal-workers  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.ostrsare
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-ostrsare

Nanae Momiyama papers

Creator:
Momiyama, Nanae, 1924-2002  Search this
Names:
Bruce Museum  Search this
Kenkeleba House  Search this
National Association of Women Artists (U.S.)  Search this
Kusama, Yayoi, 1929-  Search this
Secor, Johanna  Search this
Extent:
3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Scrapbooks
Sound recordings
Greeting cards
Interviews
Sketches
Drawings
Photographs
Place:
Japan
Date:
1928-circa 2000
bulk 1948-2000
Summary:
The papers of New York painter, calligrapher, and educator, Nanae Momiyama measure 3.0 linear feet and date from 1928-circa 2000, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1948-1990s. The collection traces Momiyama's career as a first wave post-World War II Japanese-American artist through biographical material, correspondence, writings and notes, business records, printed material, scrapbooks, sketches and sketchbooks, and photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of New York painter, calligrapher, and educator, Nanae Momiyama measure 3.0 linear feet and date from 1928-circa 2000, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1948-1990s. The collection traces Momiyama's career as a first wave post-World War II Japanese-American artist through biographical material, correspondence, writings and notes, business records, printed material, scrapbooks, sketches and sketchbooks, and photographs.

Biographical material includes resumes, a graduation certificate, passports, artist's statements, a calendar of lectures, address books, miscellaneous biographical material, and a 1972 WGCH radio interview with Nanae Momiyama.

Correspondence is mostly professional and consists of incoming and outgoing letters with arts organizations, museums, and galleries, such as the Bruce Museum, the Japanese Artists'Association, Kenkeleba House, and the National Association of Women Artists. There is some personal correspondence from family and friends, including Yayoi Kusama and Johanna Secor.

Writings and notes contain writings and notes by Nanae Momiyama and others. Writings and notes mostly consist of drafts of lectures and press releases relating to Momiyama's class demonstrations on Sumi-e painting.

Business records include annotated painting lists, consignments, a loan agreement, a contract, and scattered receipts. Painting lists and sales receipts provide a detailed record of works sold by Nanae Momiyama from 1974-1987.

Nanae Momiyama's activities as an artist are well-documented through printed materials, including press releases, clippings, periodicals, exhibition invitations, announcements, and catalogs, periodicals, annotated checklists, and brochures. Also found is Momiyama's monograph on Sumi-e painting.

Five scrapbooks contain exhibition-related material, such as announcements, invitations, brochures, reviews, installation shots, and artwork. One scrapbook is of a more personal nature and includes notes, handmade holiday cards by the artist, and photographs of Momiyama's children.

Artwork comprises sketches, drawings, and graphic designs. Sketches are mostly studies for Nanae Momiyama's paintings. Also included are five sketchbooks; one sketchbook is devoted to Momiyama's calligraphy.

Photographs are of Nanae Momiyama and others, exhibition installations and artwork, miscellaneous photographs, and slides of artwork. Also found are six photograph albums of images of Nanae Momiyama with family, friends, and colleagues. Of interest, are two photograph albums depicting Nanae Momiyama's school life and social activities in Japan from 1928-1940s.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 9 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1948-1995 (Box 1: 0.4 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1953, 1970s-1993 (Box 1; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, circa 1950s-1995 (Box 1; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 4: Business Records, 1962-1987 (Box 1; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 5: Printed Material, circa 1950s-1995 (Box 1; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 6: Scrapbooks, 1948-1978 (Box 2; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 7: Sketches and Drawings, circa 1950s-1970s (Box 2; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 8: Sketchbooks, circa 1975-1997 (Box 2; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 9: Photographs, 1928-circa 2000 (Box 3; 1.0 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Nanae Momiyama (1924-2002) was a Japanese American painter, calligrapher, and educator based in New York City, New York and Greenwich, Connecticut.

In 1924, Nanae Momiyama was born in Tokyo, Japan. In 1944, she graduated from Bunka Gakuin College in Tokyo, where she later taught painting and drawing. In 1954, under the sponsorship of the Japanese government, Nanae Moimiyama attended the Art Students' League in New York City, where she was mentored by the painter, Morris Kantor. During this period, Momiyama participated in exhibitions organized by the cooperative galleries on East Tenth Street in New York City that were promoting the works of Abstract Expressionist artists.

Nanae Momiyama's artistic interests extended to the teaching of Japanese calligraphy and Sumi-e paintings at colleges, universities, and art institutions, including the National Teacher's Convention for Asian Studies at Brooklyn College, Columbia University, and Japan Society. During her career, Momiyama received commissions to design posters for movies, plays, and concerts and to illustrate books and magazines. In addition, she wrote Sumi-e, An Introduction to Ink Painting that became a standard text on the subject.

Nanae Momiyama participated in many solo and group exhibitions in the United States and abroad: Brata Gallery, the Bruce Museum, Gima Gallery, Ligoa Duncan Gallery, and Seibu Galleries, among others.

Nanae Momiyama was a long time resident of Greenwich, Connecticut. She died in 2002.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Haniwa Gottlieb, Nanae Momiyama's daughter, in 2009.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.

Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Calligraphers  Search this
Topic:
Japanese American artists  Search this
Calligraphy, Japanese  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Asian American painters  Search this
Asian American educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Scrapbooks
Sound recordings
Greeting cards
Interviews
Sketches
Drawings
Photographs
Citation:
Nanae Momiyama papers, 1928-circa 2000, bulk 1948-1990s. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.mominana
See more items in:
Nanae Momiyama papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mominana

Miye Matsukata papers

Creator:
Matsukata, Miye, 1922-1981  Search this
Names:
Art Asia Gallery  Search this
Fitchburg Art Museum  Search this
Haystack Mountain School of Crafts -- Students  Search this
Janiye (Firm)  Search this
Principia College -- Students  Search this
Hickey, Judy  Search this
Hubbard, James C.  Search this
Oka, Takashi, 1924-  Search this
Extent:
13.45 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Diaries
Interviews
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Sound recordings
Date:
circa 1900-1982
bulk 1964-1981
Summary:
The papers of jewelry designer and metalsmith Miye Matsukata measure 13.45 linear feet and date from circa 1900 to 1982, with the bulk of the material dating from 1964 to 1981.The papers include correspondence, interviews, journals, writings and lectures, exhibition files, Janiye business records, printed materials, scrapbooks, artwork, sketchbooks, and photographic materials that document Matsukata's work as a jeweler and owner of Janiye, an atelier located in Boston, Massachusetts.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of jewelry designer and metalsmith Miye Matsukata measure 13.45 linear feet and date from circa 1900 to 1982, with the bulk of the material dating from 1964 to 1981.The papers include correspondence, interviews, journals, writings and lectures, exhibition files, Janiye business records, printed materials, scrapbooks, artwork, sketchbooks, and photographic materials that document Matsukata's work as a jeweler and owner of Janiye, an atelier located in Boston, Massachusetts.

Correspondence is with family, James Hubbard, various customers, galleries, and colleagues. Interviews include recordings of Matsukata and Takashi Oka, Judy Hickey and Miyo, and two interviews from 1968.

Eleven journals contain Matsukata's writings about her work, travel experiences, impressions of Mikimoto, and include some sketches. Writings and lectures consists of five appointment books; biographical statements and resumes; essays; lecture recordings, manuscripts, and slides; twelve memo books; notes; two travel itinerary books; and writings by James Hubbard that include an essay about Matsukata.

Exhibition files consist of correspondence, price and invitations lists, loan forms, and drafts for jewelry shows at the Art Asia Gallery, Fitchburg Art Museum, Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, Principia College, and other galleries. Business files for Janiye include donations, financial and legal material, inventory books, publicity files, and sales records; and client and vendor files containing invoices, correspondence, and special order details for works produced by Matsukata and other jewelers at Janiye.

Printed materials include booklets, clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs, an invitation, press releases, and Janiye sales catalogs. Two scrapbooks feature clippings and sketches of dinnerware, and early brochures and photographs of Janiye.

Artwork consists of sketches of jewelry, dinnerware, mountains, and landscapes. Additionally, 47 sketchbooks of travel, jewelry, and dinnerware are found in the collection. Photographic materials include photographs, negatives, slides, and several glass slides depicting Matsukata, her family, Janiye, jewelry and dinnerware, and travel.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series.

Series 1: Correspondence, 1957-1981 (0.4 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Interviews, 1968-1978 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 3: Journals, 1966-1981 (0.7 linear feet; Boxes 1-2)

Series 4: Writings and Lectures, 1962-1982 (1.0 linear feet; Boxes 2-3)

Series 5: Exhibition Files, 1964-1980 (0.3 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 6: Janiye Business Records, 1948-1982 (7.1 linear feet; Boxes 3-10, 17)

Series 7: Printed Material, circa 1965-1982 (0.2 linear feet; Box 10)

Series 8: Scrapbooks, circa 1945-1980 (0.2 linear feet; Box 15)

Series 9: Artwork, 1946-1981 (0.5 linear feet; Boxes 10, 15)

Series 10: Sketchbooks, circa 1950-1981 (1.0 linear feet; Boxes 10-11, 15)

Series 11: Photographic Material, circa 1900-1982 (2.3 linear feet; Boxes 11-14, 16)
Biographical / Historical:
Miye Matsukata (1922-1981) was a Japanese American jewelry designer and metalsmith based in Boston, Massachusetts. She worked at her jewelry firm Janiye in Boston from 1950 to her death.

Matsukata was born in Japan to Shokuma and Miyo Matsukata and had four sisters named Haru, Naka, Taneko "Tane," and Mari. After coming to the United States in 1940, Matsukata attended Principia College in Elsah, Illinois, graduating in 1944. Afterwards, she attended The Museum School in Boston. In 1950 she established Janiye, a jewelry atelier, with former classmates Naomi Katz Harris and Janice Whipple Williams. The name Janiye is a combination of the three co-owners' names. By 1958, Matsukata became the sole owner of the company with James Hubbard, a stone cutter, serving as business manager and agent. Nancy Michel, Alexandra Watkins, and Yoshiko Yamamoto became the leading team of jewelers to execute Matsukata's designs.

Matsukata traveled extensively to Egypt, Greece, Turkey, Peru, India, western and central Europe, and to Scandinavia after winning a scholarship in 1950. She also spent a substantial amount of time in Japan, especially during her collaboration with the Japanese pearl company Mikimoto. Her work was inspired by the places she visited and she often documented the sources of her inspiration through her writings and sketches.

Matsukata died in 1981 in Boston. Janiye remained open after her death with Michel and Watkins as the new owners.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds several collections related to Miye Matsukata, including Photographs of Miye Matsukata, Slides of jewelry designed by Miye Matsukata, Alexandra S. Watkins papers concerning Miye Matsukata, Miye Matsukata note with sketch to Mrs. Bartlett, Jane England Chandler papers regarding Miye Matsukata necklace, and Photographs of Miye Matsukata jewelry.
Provenance:
The Miye Matsukata papers were donated in 1984 by Mrs. Edwin O. Reischauer, Matsukata's sister and in 2008 and 2017 by Ann Hubbard Gaddis, the sister of Matsukata's business partner and heir, James Hubbard.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings and born-digital records with no duplicate copies requires advance notice.
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Jewelry making  Search this
Jewelry  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American jewelers  Search this
Asian American metal-workers  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diaries
Interviews
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Sound recordings
Citation:
Miye Matsukata papers, circa 1900-1982, bulk 1964-1981. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.matsmiye
See more items in:
Miye Matsukata papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-matsmiye

Oral History interview with Miyoko Ito

Interviewee:
Ito, Miyoko, 1918-1983  Search this
Interviewer:
Barrie, Dennis  Search this
Names:
Art Institute of Chicago  Search this
Ox-Bow Summer School of Painting  Search this
Smith College  Search this
Baum, Don, 1922-  Search this
Berdich, Vera, 1915-2003  Search this
Chapin, Francis, 1899-1965  Search this
Cohen, George, 1913-1980  Search this
Edmondson, Leonard, 1916-  Search this
Haley, John, 1905-1991  Search this
Hofmann, Hans, 1880-1966  Search this
Johnston, Ynez, 1920-  Search this
Kahn, Max, 1903-2005  Search this
Lanyon, Ellen  Search this
Loran, Erle, 1905-1999  Search this
Mitchell, Joan, 1926-1992  Search this
Moholy-Nagy, László, 1895-1946  Search this
Ryder, Worth, 1884-1960  Search this
Venturi, Lionello, 1885-1961  Search this
Extent:
2 Items (Sound recording: 2 sound files, digital, wav file)
41 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1978 July 20
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Miyoko Ito conducted 1978 July 20, by Dennis Barrie, for the Archives of American Art.
Ito discusses her family background; being in Japan at an early age, attending school and learning calligraphy; returning to California in 1928; excelling in drawing and painting; attending Berkeley High School; studying watercolor at Berkeley School of Water Color; studying under Erle Loran, Worth Ryder, John Haley; the influence of Hans Hofmann; being in internment camp (Camp Rann); attending Smith College, Northampton to study painting under instructor George Cohen; attending the Art Institue of Chicago and meeting Francis Chapin and Joan Mitchell; being influenced by Bonnard; moving into lithography at Oxbow; studying under Max Kahn; doing printmaking and etching; and participating in the Momentum Shows. Ito mentions Ynez Johnston, Leonard Edmondson, Lionel Venturi, Ellen Lanyon, Don Baum, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, and Vera Berdich.
Biographical / Historical:
Miyoko Ito (1918-1983) was a Japanese American painter based in Chicago, Illinois.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 tape reel (5 in.).
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Japanese American painting  Search this
Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
Asian American painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.ito78
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-ito78

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