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Oral history interview with Isamu Noguchi

Interviewee:
Noguchi, Isamu, 1904-1988  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul  Search this
Names:
Artists' Union (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Bollingen Foundation  Search this
Brummer Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Japanese American Citizens' League  Search this
Japanese American Citizens' League  Search this
Leonardo da Vinci Art School  Search this
Skidmore, Owings & Merrill  Search this
UNESCO  Search this
Barnard, George Grey, 1863-1938  Search this
Becker, John Bruere, 1915-  Search this
Borglum, Gutzon, 1867-1941  Search this
Brancusi, Constantin, 1876-1957  Search this
Breton, André, 1896-1966  Search this
Brummer, Joseph  Search this
Cahill, Holger, 1887-1960  Search this
Calder, Alexander Stirling, 1870-1945  Search this
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Collier, John, Jr., 1913-1992  Search this
Covarrubias, Miguel, 1904-1957  Search this
Davis, Stuart, 1892-1964  Search this
De Kooning, Willem, 1904-1997  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Egan, Charles, 1911-  Search this
Fraser, James Earle, 1876-1953  Search this
Fuller, R. Buckminster (Richard Buckminster), 1895-1983  Search this
Gorky, Arshile, 1904-1948  Search this
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Graham, Martha  Search this
Gregory, Peter Ronald, 1947-  Search this
Guston, Philip, 1913-1980  Search this
Hare, David, 1917-1992  Search this
Hasegawa, Saburō, 1906-1957  Search this
Hopkins, Harry Lloyd, 1890-1946  Search this
Itō, Michio, 1893-1961  Search this
Kahn, Louis I., 1901-1974  Search this
Kantor, Morris, 1896-1974  Search this
Kline, Franz, 1910-1962  Search this
Knoll, Hans  Search this
Levy, Julien  Search this
Léger, Fernand, 1881-1955  Search this
McMahon, Audrey, 1900?-1981  Search this
Moore, Henry, 1898-1986  Search this
Neumann, J. B. (Jsrael Ber)  Search this
Price, Edison A., d. 1997  Search this
Raymond, Antonin, 1888-  Search this
Reynal, Jeanne, 1903-  Search this
Rivera, Diego, 1886-1957  Search this
Ruellan, Andrée, 1905-2006  Search this
Ruotolo, Onorio, 1888-1966  Search this
Schoen, Eugene, 1880-1957  Search this
Shoji, Sadao, 1937-  Search this
Stieglitz, Alfred, 1864-1946  Search this
Taniguchi, Yoshirō, 1904-  Search this
Ward, Eleanor, 1912-1984  Search this
Zorach, William, 1887-1966  Search this
Extent:
148 Pages (Transcript)
1 Item (Audio excerpt: 1 sound file (5 min. 29 sec.), digital)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Japan -- Description and Travel
Italy -- description and travel
Egypt -- description and travel
India -- description and travel
Date:
1973 Nov. 7-Dec. 26
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Isamu Noguchi conducted 1973 Nov. 7-Dec. 26, by Paul Cummings, for the Archives of American Art.
NOVEMBER 7, 1973 session: Noguchi discusses his family background; growing up in Japan; returning to the United States in 1917; his identity as an artist; Gutzon Borglum; Columbia University and studying pre-med; attending Leonardo da Vinci Art School; apprenticing to Onorio Ruotolo; quitting Columbia to become a sculptor; Guggenheim Fellowship in 1927; J.B. Neumann; Alfred Stieglitz; George Grey Barnard; James Earle Fraser; Brummer and the Brummer Gallery; studying at Chaumiere and Collarosi; working with Brancusi; meeting Sandy Calder in Paris; Stuart Davis; Morris Kantor; Andrée Ruellan; his work, "Sphere"; reacting against Brancusi; Eugene Schoen's; his Carnegie Hall studio; Michio Ito; Martha Graham; Buckminster Fuller; traveling in China and Japan; meeting Chi Pai Shi; John Becker; his works, "Play Mountain," "Monument to the Plow," "Monument to Ben Franklin," and "Orpheus" for Balanchine; designing for the stage; Audrey McMahon; Harry Hopkins; Holger Cahill; Mexico; Diego Rivera; Miguel Covarrubias; and the Artists Union.
DECEMBER 10, 1973 Session: His reaction to the Spanish Civil War- avoided direct involvement; Stuart Davis; Gorky; Andre Breton; David Hare; Marcel Duchamp; John Graham; Julien Levy; his artist friends dying at the peak of their success; Leger; Stirling Calder; associating himself with the laboring class; Buckminster Fuller; being American; expanding the possibilities of sculpture; his Associated Press Building project in Rockefeller Center, it being done in stainless steel instead of bronze; John Collier; Japanese-American Citizens League; organizing Nisei Artists and Writers Mobilization for Democracy; Jeanne Reynal; going to Poston, Ariz. to assist with American Indian Service camp under John Collier and becoming an internee there; returning to New York in 1942; Bollingen Foundation; trip around the world in 1949; and Philip Guston.
DECEMBER 18, 1973 session: Best work in studio; reaction against expressionism; artists protesting against the Establishment; his objection to the WPA, influenced by William Zorach; exhibiting in group show called, "Fourteen Americans at the Museum of Modern Art"; show at Egan Gallery in 1949; accepting art in its most aesthetically pure form without reference to social issues; movement in Japan since war to get away from refinement of Japan; Yoshiro Hiro responsible for Gutai and the happenings; his work, "Monument to Heroes," using bones; his work takes years to do; materials used in his work; his work, "Cronos"; doing theater stage sets for the Library of Congress including, "Appalachian Spring" and "Herodiade"; wants a given space which he can call his own and do something with it, has to be a work of art.
DECEMBER 26, 1973 Session: Show with Charles Egan in 1948 arranged by de Kooning; applying to the Bollingen Foundation to write a book on leisure, which was never written; traveling to Italy, Egypt, and India for two years; being removed from the New York scene with Franz Kline and de Kooning; his light objects; sculpture as environment; respect for material; Mondrian and his art deriving from nature; his time in Japan in 1931; visiting Japan in 1951; working in stone; projects in Japan; Taniguchi; Antonin Raymond; designing Japanese gardens; discovery of Zen; Hasegawa Saburo; Skidmore; Hans Knoll; Edison Price; Italy in the 1960s; Peter Gregory; Henry Moore; Louis Kahn; UNESCO; Noguchi Foundation and Plaza Company; Shoji; Eleanor Ward; and his autobiography, "A Sculptor's World."
Biographical / Historical:
Isamu Noguchi (1904-1988) was a Japanese American sculptor based in Long Island City, New York.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound tape reels. Reformatted in 2010 as 7 digital wav files. Duration is 6 hrs., 25 min.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Sculpture, American  Search this
Gardens, Japanese  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Asian American sculptors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.noguch73
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-noguch73

Lynn Schmidt interviews with Isamu Noguchi and Tom Nakashima

Interviewer:
Schmidt, Lynn, 1949-  Search this
Interviewee:
Noguchi, Isamu, 1904-1988  Search this
Nakashima, Tom, 1941-  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1980-1990
Scope and Contents:
Tape-recorded interviews on 13 cassettes and duplicates on 25 CDs with Isamu Noguchi conducted 9 July and 5 Aug. 1980, in his studio, (now the Noguchi Museum) in Long Island City, N.Y., and Tom Nakashima, conducted 31 July 1989 to 10 Mar. 1990. Also included is a radio interview of Nakashima on WPFW, Federal Communications Commission, Washington, D.C., 25 Sept. 1990. Schmidt, a former employee of the United States Information Agency, was assigned to interview Noguchi and write an article about him for the agency. The interviews of Tom Nakashima were completed as part of an exhibition in conjunction with the Washington Project for the Arts, which Schmidt curated.
Biographical / Historical:
Lynn Schmidt (1949- ) is an artist, author, and curator based in Washington, D.C. Schmidt was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Isamu Noguchi (1904-1988) was a Japanese American sculptor based in Long Island City, New York. Tom Nakashima (1941- ) is a Japanese American artist based in Washington, D.C.
Provenance:
Donated 2006 by Lynn Schmidt.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Landscape architects  Search this
Topic:
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Asian American sculptors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.schmlynn
See more items in:
Lynn Schmidt interviews with Isamu Noguchi and Tom Nakashima
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-schmlynn

Oral history interview with Isamu Noguchi

Interviewee:
Noguchi, Isamu, 1904-1988  Search this
Interviewer:
Francis, Arlene  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound tape (Sound recording: 1 sound tape, 7 in.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tapes
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1968 Apr. 22
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Isamu Noguchi conducted by Arlene Francis for radio station WOR, New York City, on the occasion of "Noguchi, A Sculptor's World," an exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art.
Biographical / Historical:
Isamu Noguchi (1904-1988) was a Japanese American sculptor based in Long Island City, New York.
Provenance:
Donated 1970 by Station WOR, New York, N.Y.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Sculpture -- Exhibitions  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Asian American sculptors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.noguisam
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-noguisam

Ray Yoshida papers

Creator:
Yoshida, Ray  Search this
Names:
Art Institute of Chicago. School -- Faculty  Search this
Phyllis Kind Gallery  Search this
Berdich, Vera, 1915-2003  Search this
Blackshear, Kathleen, 1897-1988  Search this
Brown, Roger, 1941-1997  Search this
Ito, Miyoko, 1918-1983  Search this
Kapsalis, Thomas Harry, 1925-  Search this
Kim, Jin Soo, 1950-  Search this
Nilsson, Gladys, 1940-  Search this
Nutt, Jim, 1938-  Search this
Ramberg, Christina  Search this
Rossi, Barbara, 1940-  Search this
Spears, Ethel, 1903-1974  Search this
Wirsum, Karl, 1939-  Search this
Extent:
10 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Scrapbooks
Collages
Drawings
Interviews
Prints
Sketches
Transcripts
Video recordings
Date:
circa 1895-2010
bulk 1950-2005
Summary:
The papers of Chicago artist and educator Ray Yoshida measure 10 linear feet and date from circa 1895 to 2010, with the bulk of the material dating from 1950 to 2005. Yoshida's career as a painter and collagist as well as his long tenure as a professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago are documented through biographical material, personal correspondence, notebooks and writings, teaching records, personal business records, printed material, source material, photographs, sketchbooks, artwork by Yoshida and others, and scrapbooks. Items within the collection also document Yoshida's personal interest in collecting folk art and artifacts.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Chicago artist and educator Ray Yoshida measure 10 linear feet and date from circa 1895 to 2010, with the bulk of the material dating from 1950 to 2005. Yoshida's career as a painter and collagist as well as his long tenure as a professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago are documented through biographical material, personal correspondence, notebooks and writings, teaching records, personal business records, printed material, source material, photographs, sketchbooks, artwork by Yoshida and others, and scrapbooks. Items within the collection also document Yoshida's personal interest in collecting folk art and artifacts.

Biographical material about Ray Yoshida includes award certificates, identification records, student records, and interview transcripts. Also found is one video recording of a documentary short about Yoshida's art and object collection at his Chicago home.

Correspondence includes letters, postcards, and greeting cards from friends, colleagues, and artists, including Roger Brown, Jim Nutt, Gladys Nilsson, Christina Ramberg, Karl Wirsum, Miyoko Ito, Jin Soo Kim, Barbara Rossi, Vera Berdich, and Tom Kapsalis.

Notebooks contain notes on art history, art technique, Japanese language, travel, and other subjects. Many of the notebooks include sketches and contain loose items.

Writings by Yoshida consist of college papers, fragments of writings on art and other subjects, and notes. Writings by others include essays by Yoshida's students, exhibition essay drafts, and poetry.

Teaching records primarily document Yoshida's tenure as a professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, though a few records of guest professorships at other schools are included. These records include course evaluations, employment records, teaching notes, and letters of recommendation for students. Miscellaneous teaching records include department memos, course summaries, correspondence, and notes.

Personal business records consists of documentation regarding the sale, exhibition, and loan of artwork by Ray Yoshida, including his business dealings with the Phyllis Kind Gallery. Additionally there are several files regarding the estate of artist Roger Brown.

Printed material includes exhibition catalogs, announcements, news clippings, newsletters and press releases documenting Yoshida's career and other subjects.

Source material consists of material that Yoshida gathered and intended to use for his art. Collected printed material includes postcards, comics and comic books, mail order catalogs, magazines, product labels, and advertisements. Also found are many small clippings from comics collected for collages.

Photographs depict Ray Yoshida, friends, students, travel, and artwork. Also found are a few photographs of Karl Wirsum's studio, as well as photographs of various subjects collected by Yoshida. Additionally, there is one photograph album from the early 1910s of an unidentified family.

Sketchbooks include pencil and ink sketches of various subjects.

Artwork by Ray Yoshida includes collages on paper, pencil sketches, and ink drawings. Artworks by others include numerous prints by Kathleen Blackshear, Ethel Spears, and Vivian Mayers, and collages, drawings, and prints given to Yoshida by students and friends. Some work by unidentified artists is included as well. Other artwork, such as handmade picture and alphabet books, appears to have been created by children and collected by Yoshida.

Scrapbooks include volumes that were created by Yoshida as well as books created by others. Three of the scrapbooks containing source images, clippings, and comics appear to have been created by Yoshida. Additional scrapbooks were created by others and collected by Yoshida.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 12 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1950-2005 (0.5 Linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1952-2009 (2 Linear feet; Boxes 1-3, 11, 15)

Series 3: Notebooks, circa 1956-circa 2000 (0.3 Linear feet; Box 3)

Series 4: Writings, circa 1950-2003 (0.3 Linear feet; Box 3)

Series 5: Teaching Records, circa 1960-2003 (0.6 Linear feet; Boxes 3-4)

Series 6: Personal Business Records, circa 1960-2010 (0.4 Linear feet; Box 4)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1906-2010 (1.8 Linear feet; Boxes 4-6, 11, OV 14)

Series 8: Source Material, circa 1940-circa 2005 (0.7 Linear Feet; Boxes 6-7, 11)

Series 9: Photographs, circa 1910-circa 2005 (0.5 Linear feet; Box 7)

Series 10: Sketchbooks, circa 1960-circa 2000 (1.1 Linear feet; Boxes 7-8, 11-13)

Series 11: Artwork, 1903-2009 (0.7 Linear feet; Boxes 8, 13)

Series 12: Scrapbooks, circa 1895-circa 2005 (1 Linear feet; Boxes 8-10, 13)
Biographical / Historical:
Ray Yoshida (1930-2009) was a Japanese American painter, collagist, and educator based in Chicago, Illinois.

Raymond Kakuo Yoshida was born in Kapaa, Hawaii, in 1930. He attended the University of Hawaii for two years and completed a B.A. in Arts Education at the Art Institute of Chicago in 1953. He also served in the U.S. Army for two years during the Korean War. In 1957 he recieved his M.F.A from Syracuse University and became a faculty member at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1959. He was named Frank Harold Sellers Professor in the Department of Painting and Drawing in 1971, retired as professor emeritus in 1998, and continued to teach until 2003.

Yoshida was a member of the Chicago Imagists, a loose and informal group of representational artists from the late 1960s to early 1970s who were influenced by Surrealism and connected to the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Yoshida's friends and contemporaries among this group include but are not limited to Roger Brown, Ed Paschke, Christina Ramberg, and Barbara Rossi. Yoshida was an inspiring teacher and he mentored many of the later Chicago Imagists such as Gladys Nilsson, Jim Nutt, and Karl Wirsum.

Yoshida's paintings and collages were strongly influenced by comics as well as his own collection of folk and outsider art. He regularly exhibited at Phyllis Kind Gallery in Chicago from 1975 to 1996, and a major retrospective of his work was organized by the Contemporary Museum of Honolulu in 1998. He retired to Hawaii in 2005 where he lived until his death in 2009 due to cancer. The School of the Art Institute of Chicago's Sullivan Galleries held a posthumous retrospective exhibition of Yoshida's work from 2010-2011 and the John Michael Kohler Art Center had an exhibition of Yoshida's personal collection of art and artifacts in 2013.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in 2012 by Ray Yoshida via Terri Yoho of the Kohler Foundation, representing Yoshida's estate, and in 2013 and 2015-2016 by Jennifer Sabas and Shayle Miller, estate executors.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate copy requires advance notice. One box of letters from Jim Nutt are ACCESS RESTRICTED; use requires written permission.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Folk art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art -- History  Search this
Art -- Technique  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Asian American painters  Search this
Asian American educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Scrapbooks
Collages
Drawings
Interviews
Prints
Sketches
Transcripts
Video recordings
Citation:
Ray Yoshida papers, circa 1895-2010, bulk 1950-2005. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.yoshray
See more items in:
Ray Yoshida papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-yoshray
Online Media:

Oral history interview with George Tsutakawa

Interviewee:
Tsutakawa, George  Search this
Interviewer:
Kingsbury, Martha, 1941-  Search this
Names:
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Extent:
119 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1983 September 8-19
Scope and Contents:
An interview of George Tsutakawa conducted 1983 September 8-19, by Martha Kingsbury, for the Archives of American Art's Northwest Oral History Project, in Seattle, Washington.
Tsutakawa speaks of his youth in Japan and Seattle, and the importance of a bicultural family and education on his development; the influence of European art magazines and American movies in Japan; family members who were influential; his early sculpture; Alexander Archipenko; the Asian art community in Seattle; teaching at the University of Washington School of Architecture; Bauhaus philosophy; the Seattle Public Library fountain; his World War II experiences; art and World's Fairs; fountains he has sculpted and his feelings about them; and permanency in art.
Biographical / Historical:
George Tsutakawa (1910-1997) was a Japanese American painter and sculptor based in Seattle, Washington. Born in Seattle in 1910, he moved with his mother to Fukuyama, Japan, at the age of seven. While there, he took an interest in art, and was influenced by traditional Japanese practices. Returning to Seattle at age 16, he continued his education in art at the University of Washington. His interest in sculpture led to numerous commissions for fountians worldwide, a form that combined his experiences in both the Pacific Northwest and Japan. During his career, Tsutakawa designed, built, and installed over 70 fountains.
General:
Originally recorded on 7 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 14 digital wav files. Duration is 6 hr., 43 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Northwest Oral History Project, begun in 1982 to document the Northwest artistic community through interviews with painters, sculptors, craftsmen, educators, curators, and others, in Oregon, Washington and Montana.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Fountains -- Washington (State) -- Seattle  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Asian American sculptors  Search this
Asian American painters  Search this
Asian American educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.tsutak83
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-tsutak83

Oral history interview with George Tsutakawa [videorecording]

Creator:
Tsutakawa, George  Search this
Interviewer:
Tsutakawa, Mayumi  Search this
Extent:
12 Items (Master: 12 videocassettes (Beta) (circa 20 min. each), sd., col., 1/2 in.)
4 Videocassettes (U-matic) (Duplicate (3 sets, 12 total videocassettes), sd., col., 3/4 in.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Videocassettes (u-matic)
Video recordings
Interviews
Date:
1987 June 26-27
Scope and Contents:
An interview of George Tsutakawa conducted 1987 June 26-27, by his daughter Mayumi Tsutakawa, for the Archives of American Art at Tsutakawa's home and studio in Seattle, Washington and at three of his fountain sculpture sites.
He discusses his youth and early education in Japan, demonstrates Sumi painting, and describes early Seattle art communities and University of Washington classes. He recalls his WWII experiences and his friendship with Mark Tobey and others, and explains the origins and evolution of fountain sculpture. Paul J. Karlstrom of the Archives of American Art introduces and concludes the interview.
Biographical / Historical:
George Tsutakawa (1910-1997) was a Japanese American painter and sculptor based in Seattle, Washington. Born in Seattle in 1910, he moved with his mother to Fukuyama, Japan, at the age of seven. While there, he took an interest in art, and was influenced by traditional Japanese practices. Returning to Seattle at age 16, he continued his education in art at the University of Washington. His interest in sculpture led to numerous commissions for fountians worldwide, a form that combined his experiences in both the Pacific Northwest and Japan. During his career, Tsutakawa designed, built, and installed over 70 fountains.
General:
Originally recorded on 12 videocassettes. Duration is 4 hr.
Related Materials:
This interview was followed up in 1988 by documenting Tsutakawa's return to Fukuyama, Japan to dedicate a major work for the city's new museum of contemporary art (cataloged separately under George Tsutakawa in Japan video project). Footage from this interview was used, along with footage from the 1988 Fukuyama footage, in the documentary "George Tsutakawa: An Artists' Pilgrimage" c1990 by the Archives of American Art.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
For information on how to access this interview contact Reference Services.
Topic:
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Asian American sculptors  Search this
Asian American painters  Search this
Asian American educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.tsutak87
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-tsutak87

Masaru Takiguchi papers

Creator:
Takiguchi, Masaru, 1941-  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet ((on partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1979-1983
Scope and Contents:
Takiguchi's resume; 111 slides of his work; directions to his home; three exhibition posters and an exhibition catalog; and clippings, mostly photocopies.
Biographical / Historical:
Masaru Takiguchi (1941- ) is a Japanese American sculptor based in Houston, Texas.
Provenance:
Microfilmed as part of AAA's Texas Arts Documentation Project. Donated 1984 by Masaru Takiguchi.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Asian American sculptors  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.takimasa
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-takimasa

Yasushi Tanaka letters to Frederic C. Torrey

Creator:
Tanaka, Yasushi, 1886-1941  Search this
Names:
Butler, John Davidson, 1890-1974  Search this
Cann, Louise Gebhard  Search this
Torrey, Frederic C.  Search this
Extent:
35 Items ((partially microfilmed on 1 reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1913-1924
Scope and Contents:
Letters from Tanaka to Torrey concern the contemporary art world, his paintings, exhibitions, and fellow artists both in Seattle and Paris, notably muralist John Davidson Butler. Tanaka writes of his marriage to Louise Gebhard Cann, his struggle with the Occidental ideals in Seattle art circles, concern for his mother and brothers in Tokyo, his emigration to Paris and its state after World War I, and the success of his one-man show at the Galerie de Marsan 1924, of which he writes "...I succeeded at last in ... verifying my fame as one of the ablest contemporary painters here in Paris...". Also included are a few letters from Cann to Torrey, 3 exhibition catalogs (1914-1921), and 3 clippings (1915-1921).
Biographical / Historical:
Yasushi Tanaka (1886-1941) was a Japanese American painter and art instructor, born in Saitana, Japan, May 13, 1886. In 1904 he emigrated to Seattle, Washington, settling permanently in Paris in 1920. Torrey was an art dealer with the San Fransisco gallery Vickery, Atkins & Torrey. Tanaka's wife, writer Louise Gebhard Cann, was the author of several articles and books on French artists.
Provenance:
Donated 1992 by Gryffyd Partridge. The letters were received in the papers of his father, Seattle artist Roi Partridge; it is unclear how Partridge received them.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Asian American painters  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.tanayasu
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-tanayasu

Chuzo Tamotzu papers

Creator:
Tamotsu, Chūzō, 1888-1975  Search this
Names:
Evergood, Philip, 1901-1973  Search this
Ribak, Louis, 1902-1979  Search this
Rush, Olive, 1873-1966  Search this
Shonnard, Eugenie Frederica, 1886-1978  Search this
Sloan, John, 1871-1951  Search this
Tamotzu, Louise Kates  Search this
Extent:
12 Microfilm reels
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microfilm reels
Date:
1920-1982
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence; biographical data; list of works of art; photographs; sketchbook; annotated books; financial material; a diary; sketches; prints; and printed material.
REEL SW 6: Correspondence, including 2 letters from Philip Evergood; biographical data; photographs; list of paintings sold; sketches; prints; catalogs; and clippings.
REELS 3031-3041: Biographical information; a list of works of art; correspondence, 1930-1975; photographs of Tamotzu, his family, friends and works of art; a sketchbook, 1945-1946; annotated books; files on his trips to Japan and his work about Hiroshima, New Mexico and its artists' community, galleries, museums, art associations, collectors and artists Philip Evergood, Louis Ribak, Olive Rush, Eugenie Shonnard, John Sloan and others; financial material; exhibition announcements and catalogs; clippings; printed material; and a diary kept by Tamotzu's wife Louise Kates Tamotzu.
Biographical / Historical:
Chuzo Tamotzu (1888-1975) was a Japanese American painter based in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Tamotzu was born in Japan and came to the United States in 1920. He moved to Santa Fe in 1948.
Provenance:
Reels 3031-3041: Microfilmed as part of the Archives of American Art's Texas project.
Material on reel SW 6 lent for microfilming 1970 by Chuzo Tamotzu and material on reels 3031-3041 lent for microfilming 1983 by Louise Kates Tamotzu, widow of Tamotzu. All material subequently donated to the University of New Mexico, Center for Southwest research.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Topic:
Painting, American  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Asian American painters  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.tamochuz
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-tamochuz

School of Design in Chicago : refugees east and west / Beatrice Takeuchi

Creator:
Takeuchi, Beatrice, 1921-  Search this
Names:
Chicago School of Design  Search this
Aaron, David  Search this
Filipowski, Richard, 1923-2008  Search this
Giedion, S. (Sigfried), 1888-1968  Search this
Hayakawa, S. I.  Search this
Keck, George Fred  Search this
Kepes, Gyorgy, 1906-2001  Search this
Leckie, Hubert W., 1913-1993  Search this
Moholy-Nagy, László, 1895-1946  Search this
Richard, Edgar  Search this
Waldheim, Jack  Search this
Extent:
54 Pages
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
1998
Scope and Contents:
Beatrice Takeuchi memoir, 1998. Takeuchi begins with her recollections of the bombing of Pearl Harbor and her stay in a War Relocation camp and describes in detail her impressions of the faculty, staff, and students at School of Design in Chicago. Most notable recollections involve instructors Lazlo Moholy-Nagy, Jack Waldheim, George Fred Keck, Hubert Leckie, S.I. Hayakawa, and others. The memoir concludes with a summation of her career in the arts.
Biographical / Historical:
Beatrice Takeuchi (1921-2020) was a Japanese American educator based in Chicago, Illinois and Washington, D.C. Takeuchi was born in Seattle, Washington. After the bombing of Pearl Harber, she was sent to a War Relocation Center, Pallyup, Washington and Minidoka, Idaho in August 1942. In October of 1942 she was allowed to leave to pursue studies in industrial design and architecture at the Chicago School of Design (fd. 1937 as New Bauhaus). From 1945-54 she taught foundation and visual design and held various positions in architecture and design studios in Washington, D.C., moving to NYC in 1954 and working as a free lance architect until 1968. She lived and worked in Chicago from 1968-1993, when she retired to Michigan.
Provenance:
Donated 1998 by Beatrice Takeuchi.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Architects  Search this
Topic:
Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945 -- Diaries  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American architects  Search this
Asian American educators  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.takebeat
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-takebeat

Oral history interview with Toshiko Takaezu

Interviewee:
Takaezu, Toshiko  Search this
Interviewer:
Williams, Gerald, 1926-2014  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Cleveland Institute of Art -- Faculty  Search this
Cranbrook Academy of Art -- Students  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Princeton University -- Faculty  Search this
Grotell, Maija  Search this
Horan, Claude.  Search this
Extent:
33 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2003 June 16
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Toshiko Takaezu conducted 2003 June 16, by Gerry Williams, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Quakertown, N.J.
Takaezu describes growing up in Hawaii in a large family; her first work as a commercial potter; working with Claude Horan; how religion factors into her work; studying ceramics at Cranbrook Academy of Art with Maija Grotell; the role of universities and apprenticeships in the craft movement; teaching at Princeton and the Cleveland Institute of Art; visiting artists in Japan; setting up a studio in Clinton, N.J.; her teaching philosophy; the evolution of her work from functional to closed vessels; the inside of her large pots; the importance of color and glazes; her career highlights; the inspiration she finds in nature; her role in political and social activities; her relationship with galleries, including Perimeter and Charles Cowles Gallery; her exhibition history; and the changing face of the American craft movement. She also recalls Claude Horan, Maija Grotell, Otagaki Rengetsu, Kaneshige, Rosanjin, Jeff Schlanger, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Toshiko Takaezu (1922-2011) was a Japanese American ceramist of Quakertown, New Jersey. Gerry Williams (1926- ) is the co-founder and former editor of Studio Potter in Dunbarton, New Hampshire. Takaezu's birth date is also cited as 1929.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound cassette. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 38 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Ceramics -- Technique  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American ceramicists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.takaez03
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-takaez03

Oral history interview with Chuzo Tamotzu

Interviewee:
Tamotsu, Chūzō, 1888-1975  Search this
Interviewer:
Loomis, Sylvia Glidden  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
An American Group (Organization)  Search this
Artists Equity Association  Search this
Federal Art Project  Search this
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Eddy, Stuart  Search this
Force, Juliana, 1876-1948  Search this
Knight, Frederic C., 1898-1979  Search this
Mandelman, Beatrice  Search this
Philipp, Robert, 1895-1981  Search this
Ribak, Louis, 1902-1979  Search this
Rush, Olive, 1873-1966  Search this
Extent:
11 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1964 September 3
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Chuzo Tamotzu (Tamotsu) conducted 1964 September 3 by Sylvia Loomis for the Archives of American Art.
Tamotzu discusses studying Occidental, Oriental art in Japan; traveling to Korea, Manchuria and China, South Sea Islands, Singapore, then Europe for a year; coming to New York in 1920; his involvement with An American Group; Juliana Force recruiting him for the Federal Art Project; being on the Easel Project and also on the Graphic Art Project; the Works Projects Administration; given "pink-slip" on the Project since he was not a U.S. citizen; stint in the U.S. Army, Office of Strategic Service doing propaganda paintings for psychological war material for the Japanese Army and soldiers; settling in Santa Fe, N.M.; Oriental painting; and Artist Equity Association. Tamotzu mentions Beatrice Mandelman, Louis Ribak, Robert Philip, Stuart Eddy, Frederick Knight, and Olive Rush.
Biographical / Historical:
Chuzo Tamotzu (1888-1975) was a Japanese American painter based in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Tamotzu was born in Japan and came to the United States in 1920. He moved to Santa Fe in 1948.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 1 digital wav file. Duration is 40 min.
Provenance:
Conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Painting, Japanese  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Art, Oriental.  Search this
Arts, Japanese -- Western influences  Search this
Painting, Asian  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Asian American painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.tamots64
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-tamots64

Oral history interview with Akio Takamori

Interviewee:
Takamori, Akio, 1950-  Search this
Interviewer:
Riedel, Mija, 1958-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
8 Items (wav files (7 hr., 51 min.), digital)
184 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2009 March 20-21
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Akio Takamori conducted 2009 March 20-21, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Takamori's studio, in Seattle, Washington.
Interview of Akio Takamori, conducted by Mija Reidel for the Archives of American Art, in Seattle, Washington on March 20, 2009. Takamori speaks of growing up in Nobeoka, Japan where his father ran a medical clinic in a diverse part of town; the post war structure of society and the buildings themselves; his interest in art as a young childing drawing figural scenes; class and social situations he observed as a child; his father's interest in both Japanese and Western art; an interest in Peter Bruegel that turned into a lifelong inspiration; the role of politics in his family; moving to Miyazaki, Japan as a young teenager to live with his grandparents while going to school; joining the art club in high school and his fellow club mates who introduced him to more contemporary Japanese and European art; creating Happenings in high school; his interest in county folklore and superstitions and its eventual role in his art; the interaction between Western contemporaries and Japanese traditions in his work; his interest in art history; attending Musashino Art College in Tokyo, Japan where he majored in industrial ceramics; being dissatisfied with college; his political activism while in college; experimenting with paper mache to create three dimensional objects; the mingei movement; his apprenticeship in Koishiwara, Japan where he learned the fundamentals of functional potter; meeting lifelong friends such as Christ Holmquist and mentor Ken Ferguson while in Koishiwara; moving to the United States in 1974 and attending Kansas City Art Institute under the direction of Ferguson; various projects he undertook while finishing his degree at Kansas City; receiving his MFA from Alfred University, where he experimented with the idea of what contemporary art should be; his slab pieces; his first residency at the Archie Bray foundation in Helena, Montana and his continued relationship with the Foundation; traveling between Japan and the United States while acting as a substitute professor at various universities; his relationship with Garth Clark's gallery for over 20 years; teaching full time as a professor at the University of Washington in Seattle, beginning in 1993; the importance of stressing both technique and creativity; his joy at watching the development of his students; transitions in his work brought on each decade and through constant travel; the role of globalization in his work; the narrative of the group pieces he has created in recent years; his memory as constant inspiration and more recent projects, including larger, figurative works. Takamori also recalls Victor Babu, Val Cushing, Wayne Higby, Tony Hepburn, Ted Randall, Robert Turner, William Perry, Peter Voulkos, Rudy Autio, David Shaner, Jun Kaneko, Jamie Walker, Doug Jeck, Amie McNeel, Mark Zirpel, Patti Warashina, Viola Frey, Betty Woodman, Elizabeth Brown, Josh DeWeese and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Akio Takamori (1950-2017) was a Japanese American ceramist based in Seattle, Washington.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 8 digital wav files. Duration is 7 hr., 51 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Asian American ceramicists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.takamo09
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-takamo09

Akio Takamori papers

Creator:
Takamori, Akio, 1950-  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
0.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
[ca.1981-2003]
Scope and Contents:
Catalogs, exhibition invitations, magazine articles, correspondence, and sketches by Takamori.
Biographical / Historical:
Akio Takamori (1950-2017) was a Japanese American ceramicist based in Seattle, Washington.
Provenance:
Donated 2004 by Akio Takamori as part of the Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
Authorization to publish, quote, or reproduce requires written permission from Akio Takamori. Contact Reference Services for more information.
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Asian American ceramicists  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.takaakio
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-takaakio

Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers

Source:
Stocksdale, Kay Sekimachi  Search this
Creator:
Stocksdale, Bob, 1913-2003  Search this
Names:
Central Utah Relocation Center  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Tanforan Assembly Center (San Bruno, Calif.)  Search this
War Relocation Authority  Search this
Anderson, Norman  Search this
Collingwood, Peter, 1922-2008  Search this
Larsen, Jack Lenor, 1927-2020  Search this
Maloof, Alfreda Ward  Search this
Maloof, Sam  Search this
Merrill, Forrest L.  Search this
Okubo, Miné, 1912-2001  Search this
Shawcroft, Barbara  Search this
Stocksdale, Bob, 1913-2003  Search this
Stocksdale, Kay Sekimachi  Search this
Turner, Tran  Search this
Uchida, Yoshiko  Search this
Former owner:
Stocksdale, Kay Sekimachi  Search this
Extent:
19.5 Linear feet
0.125 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Interviews
Sound recordings
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Watercolors
Photographs
Date:
circa 1900-2015
Summary:
The papers of woodturner Bob Stocksdale and fiber artist Kay Sekimachi measure 19.5 linear feet and 0.125 GB and date from circa 1900 to 2015. Found are biographical materials, correspondence, writings, professional files, exhibition files, project files, personal business records, printed and digital material, scrapbooks, photographic material, and artwork. Of note are records from Sekimachi's forced internment during World War II at Tanforan Assembly Center and Topaz War Relocation Center from 1942 to 1944.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of woodturner Bob Stocksdale and fiber artist Kay Sekimachi measure 19.5 linear feet and 0.125 GB and date from circa 1900 to 2015. Found are biographical materials, correspondence, writings, professional files, exhibition files, project files, personal business records, printed and digital material, scrapbooks, photographic material, and artwork. Of note are records from Sekimachi's forced internment during World War II at Tanforan Assembly Center and Topaz War Relocation Center from 1942 to 1944.

The bulk of biographical materials are from Kay Sekimachi with some originating from her time spent in forced internment at Topaz and Tanforan camps. These records include identification cards, War Relocation Authority printed materials, and school records. Also found are awards, resumes, and blank stationery. Some materials are from Stocksdale's 85th birthday and memorial service.

Letters and extensive greeting cards are from friends, family, and professional acquaintances. Correspondents include Norman Anderson, Peter Collingwood, Jack Lenor Larsen, Sam and Alfreda Maloof, Forrest L. Merrill, Miné Okubo, Barbara Shawcroft, and others.

Writings and notes are scattered and include two interviews with Kay Sekimachi, hanging instructions, and notes. Writings by others are by Jack Lenor Larsen, Tran Turner, and Yoshiko Uchida.

Sekimachi's and Stocksdale's professional activities are documented through files relating to their participation at conferences, awards ceremonies, and lectures. Also found are fiber samples, order forms for materials and equipment, and notes on techniques and design by Kay Sekimachi. Exhibition records include extensive documentation on Marriage in Form, In the Realm of Nature, and Loom and Lathe as well as files for various solo and group exhibitions for both Sekimachi and Stocksdale. Gallery and institution files include material on multiple or unnamed exhibitions. Exhibiton documentation may include correspondence, writings, proposals, printed material, financial and loan records, condition reports, and photographs. Project files contain material for proposed book projects, a retrospective, and portfolio, by and about Sekimachi and Stocksdale. Also found are three commissions files for works by Sekimachi. A proposed retrospective on the work of Bob Stocksdale by Kay Sekimachi includes a digital sound recording of recollections.

Personal business records include sales books, purchase records for works of art by others, appraisals, contracts, consignment receipts, and insurance records.

Published books, clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs, magazines, and newsletters are found within printed materials. Of note is a publication by the San Francisco Chronicle entitled "This World" which features illustrations by Miné Okubo.

Four scrapbooks compiled by Kay Sekimachi date from 1937 to 1944. Most of the scrapbooks contain printed material from magazines and other sources with images such as children, valentines, food, birds, clothing, and may include scattered sketches and notes by Sekimachi. One scrapbook dates from the end of Sekimachi's internment at Topaz and relocation to Cincinnati, Ohio. This scrapbook includes sketches and printed materials concerning local and global events. Loose material found in this series was likely meant to be pasted into a new or the forth scrapbook. These materials include relocation information, Japanese-American publications, maps, clippings, sketches, and printed programs.

The bulk of photographic materials consist of slides of various vacation locations and homes and date from the 1960s to the 1980s. Also found are scattered portraits of Kay Sekimachi and Bob Stocksdale, as well as a photo of Miné Okubo with Roy Leeper and Cecil Thompson. Artworks are largely by Kay Sekimachi and include watercolor and pencil sketches as well as designs for fabrics and a weaving portfolio. Watercolor and pencil sketches are of Tanforan Assembly Center and date from circa 1942.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1920-2003 (1.5 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1943-2014 (7.6 linear feet; Box 2-10)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1960s-2008 (0.2 linear feet; Box 10)

Series 4: Professional Files, 1950s-2011 (1.1 linear feet; Box 10-11, 22)

Series 5: Exhibition Files, 1951-2015 (2.9 linear feet; Box 11-14, ER01; 0.125 GB)

Series 6: Project Files, circa 1900-2004 (0.3 linear feet; Box 14)

Series 7: Personal Business Records, 1970s-2010 (0.7 linear feet; Box 14-15)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1943-2011 (2.3 linear feet; Box 15-17, 22)

Series 9: Scrapbooks, 1937-1946 (0.9 linear feet; Box 17, 21)

Series 10: Photographic Material, circa 1950-2001 (0.9 linear feet; Box 18)

Series 11: Artwork, 1942-circa 1970 (1.1 linear feet; Box 18-20, 22-23)
Biographical / Historical:
Bob Stocksdale (1913-2003) was a woodturner active in California. He was known for bowls he formed from rare types of wood. Kay Sekimachi (1926- ) is a Japanese-American fiber artist and educator also active in California. She began her career in weaving on and off the loom and was part of the New Basketry movement.

Born in Indiana, Bob Stocksdale began his interest in carving by whittling with a pocket knife. Later, he created his own lathe with a washing machine motor and turned items such as baseball bats. During World War II, he was a conscientious objector and worked at various camps performing forestry work. It was in one of the camps that he turned his first bowl on a lathe.

After the war, Stocksdale settled in the Bay Area of California where he established his own woodturning shop in his basement. He concentrated on making bowls out of rare woods. His work has been recognized throughout the world and in 1998, he received the American Association of Woodturners Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2003, he received the James Renwick Alliance Masters of the Medium Award.

Kay Sekimachi was born in San Francisco, California in 1926. As a high school student, she was forcibly interned through Executive Order 9066 issued by President Franklin D. Roosevelt which incarcerated approximately 120,000 Japanese and Japanese-American citizens during World War II. Along with her mother and siblings, Kay lived at Tanforan Assembly Center and later moved to Topaz War Relocation Center in Utah. She continued her schooling at Topaz and after 1944, was resettled in Cincinnati, Ohio.

After graduating from high school, Kay Sekimachi enrolled at the California College of Arts and Crafts and the Haystack Mountain School of Crafts where she learned the craft of weaving under Trude Guermonprez and Jack Lenor Larsen. Her early works were tapestries and garments. She later used her weaving techniques as part of the New Basketry movement to create baskets and boxes out of fibers. Also an educator, Kay taught weaving at San Francisco Community College. She received the American Craft Council Gold Medal for Consummate Craftsmanship in 2002.

After the dissolution of his first marriage through which he had two children, son Kim and daughter Joy Stocksdale, Bob married Kay Sekimachi in 1972. The two had been acquainted for many years as they were both craft artists living in the Bay Area. Although they married later in life, Kay and Bob travelled the world and exhibited their art together in many exhibitions including Marriage in Form and Loom and Lathe.

Bob Stocksdale died in Oakland, California in 2003. Kay Sekimachi continues to exhibit her work and lives in Berkeley, California.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are an oral history interview of Bob Stocksdale conducted February 16-March 21, 2001, by Signe Mayfield and an oral history interview of Kay Sekimachi [Stocksdale] conducted July 26-August 6, 2001, by Suzanne Baizerman. Both interviews were conducted in Berkeley, California, during the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America.
Provenance:
The Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers were donated in 2003, 2004, and 2015 by Kay Sekimachi Stocksdale as part of the Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Use of original audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Concentration camps -- United States  Search this
Textile design  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Fiberwork -- Technique  Search this
Woodwork -- Study and teaching  Search this
Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
Textile crafts -- Study and teaching  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American fiber artists  Search this
Asian American educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Watercolors
Photographs
Citation:
Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers, circa 1900-2015. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.stockbob
See more items in:
Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-stockbob

Roger Shimomura papers

Creator:
Shimomura, Roger, 1939-  Search this
Names:
Chin, Frank, 1940-  Search this
Day, Akiko  Search this
Hughes, Jonathan R. T.  Search this
Miller, Wayne  Search this
Extent:
2.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Scripts (documents)
Date:
1965-1990
Summary:
The papers of painter, printmaker, performance artist, and teacher Roger Shimomura measure 2.6 linear feet and date from 1965 to 1990. Found within the papers are biographical materials, correspondence, writings, notes, printed material, one scrapbook, and photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of painter, printmaker, performance artist, and teacher Roger Shimomura measure 2.6 linear feet and date from 1965 to 1990. Found within the papers are biographical materials, correspondence, writings, notes, printed material, one scrapbook, and photographs.

Biographical materials include a photograph of Shimomura and a resume. The bulk of the papers consist of correspondence files about exhibitions, grants, performances, lectures, and the Japanese-American redress movement. Correspondence is with friends, colleagues, galleries, and with universities and colleges. Correspondents include Frank Chin, Akiko Day, Jonathan R. T. Hughes, and Wayne Miller. Writings and notes include Shimomura's artist's statement, scripts to four plays, and one folder of miscellaneous notes. The papers also include clippings, exhibition announcements, catalogs and miscellaneous printed material. A scrapbook contains clippings of articles that document Shimomura's career. Photographs are of artwork by other artists.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 6 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1989-1990 (Box 1; 1 folder)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1969-1990 (Boxes 1-3; 2.3 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1984, 1987-1989 (Box 3; 5 folders)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1975-1990 (Box 4; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 5: Scrapbook, 1975-1989 (Box 4; 1 folder)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1970s (Box 4; 1 folder)
Biographical Note:
Roger Shimomura (b. 1939) is a Japanese American painter, printmaker, performance artist, and teacher who has worked primarily in Kansas since 1969.

Roger Shimomura was born in 1939 in Seattle, Washington. He was a third generation Japanese-American and received his B.A. in Graphic Design from the University of Washington in 1961, and a M.F.A. in Painting from Syracuse University in 1969. Shimomura spent two childhood years in one of 10 concentration camps for Japanese-Americans during WWII, and later served as an officer in the United States Army from 1962 to 1965. He was active in the Japanese-American redress movement in the 1970s. Since the 1970s, Shimomura's work has combined American popular imagery with the Japanese ukiyo-e tradition.

He has had over 125 solo exhibitions of paintings and prints, as well as presented his experimental theater pieces at such venues as the Franklin Furnace, New York City, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, and The Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. Shimomura has been a visiting artist and lectured on his work at more than 200 universities, art schools, and museums across the country. Shimomura began teaching at the University of Kansas' Department of Art in 1969 and worked there until his retirement in 2004. At that time he started the Shimomura Faculty Research Support Fund, an endowment to foster faculty research in the Department of Art. Throughout his career, Shimomura has had numerous exhibitions and experimental theater pieces on a national level. In 1999, the Seattle Urban League designated a scholarship in his name that has been awarded annually to a Seattle resident pursuing a career in art. In 2002, the College Art Association presented him with the "Artist Award for Most Distinguished Body of Work," for his 4 year, 12-museum national tour of the painting exhibition, "An American Diary." Shimomura continues to live and work in Kansas.
Provenance:
Roger Shimomura donated his papers in 1990, as part of the Archives of American Art's Northwest Asian-American project in Seattle.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Japanese American painting  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
Asian American painters  Search this
Asian American printmakers  Search this
Asian American performance artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Scripts (documents)
Citation:
Roger Shimomura papers, 1965-1990. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.shimroge
See more items in:
Roger Shimomura papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-shimroge

Norie Sato papers

Creator:
Sato, Norie, 1949-  Search this
Names:
Center for Contemporary Art (Seattle, Wash.)  Search this
Seattle Arts Commission  Search this
Soho Television  Search this
Dolan, Margo  Search this
Extent:
0.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1974-1991
Scope and Contents:
Project files, exhibition files, teaching/workshop files, correspondence, and printed material relating to Sato's career as a video artist and printmaker and her involvement in professional video and artist organizations mainly in the Seattle, Washington area.
Project files contain letters, reports, notes and printed material concerning Sato's Comprehensive Employment Training Act award, a National Endowment for the Arts media grant, the Seattle Art Commission, Soho Television, the Center for Contemporary Art Talk, the Seattle Bumbershoot Arts Festival, the King County Arts Commission, the U.S. Film and Video Festival, the Focal Point Media Center, and others. Exhibition files contain printed material, notes and letters regarding Sato's exhibitions at various institutions, among them the Philadelphia Print Club, the Brooklyn Museum, and the Guggenheim Museum; a file of catalogs and announcements, 1974-1990; and a file of exhibition entries with acceptance/rejection cards.
Lecture/workshop files relate to Sato's position as a lecturer for the Seattle Printmakers Services Association and the Centrum Foundation. Correspondence, 1975-1980, 1990-1991 (20 items) is mainly regarding sales and exhibitions of work, and includes a group of letters from Margo Dolan, director of the Associated American Artists. The collection also includes a few writings by Sato, printed material, and Sato's annotated resume.
Biographical / Historical:
Norie Sato (1949- ) is a Japanese American video artist and printmaker in Seattle, Washington. Sato was born in Japan, and is the founder of the Center for Contemporary Art (COCA) in Seattle and member of the Seattle Arts Commission.
Provenance:
Donated 1991 by Norie Sato.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Video art  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Prints -- 20th century  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American printmakers  Search this
Asian American video artists  Search this
Function:
Film festivals
Identifier:
AAA.satonori
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-satonori

Oral history interview with Eugene and Hiroko Sato Pijanowski

Interviewee:
Pijanowski, Eugene, 1938-  Search this
Pijanowski, Hiroko Sato, 1942-  Search this
Interviewer:
Fisch, Arline M.  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
102 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2003 May 15-16
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Eugene and Hiroko Sato Pijanowski conducted 2003 May 15-16, by Arline M. Fisch, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Honolulu, Hawaii.
The Pijanowskis speak of their unique relationship in life and work; their early years in Japan; the lack of art schools in Japan; their collaborative process; Gene's tendency to deviate from standard styles; Hiroko's work on Japanese metalwork; they comment on their interest in fabric, Japanese paper cord [mizuhiki], fish skin, and ColorCore (a surfacing material with integral solid color throughout its thickness); their series Gentle Solitude, Amaryllis, and Maple Leaves; student labor; their separate careers as teachers; the presence of Japanese and American cultures in their life; their interest in Dutch design; the significance of their international marriage while living in Michigan and Hawaii; they recall various symposia and workshops; they discuss how their travels have effected their works; Hiroko's enjoyment of scuba diving and inspiration from nature; they comment on the difficulties of working together at the same university; other artist couples they know; retiring to Hawaii; Hiroko's interest in haiku poetry; and her responsibilities in Japan of running her uncle's company and helping her elderly mother. The Pijanowskis also recall Kim Cridler, David Watkins, Wendy Ramshaw, Emmy van Leersum and Gijs Bakker, Takahiko Mizuno, Francis Pickens, Mike Capitan, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Eugene (1938- ) and Hiroko Sato (1942- ) Pijanowski are metalsmiths living in Honolulu, Hawaii. Arline M. Fisch is a jeweler and writer.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 9 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hr., 12 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Japanese American women -- Interviews  Search this
Jewelry making -- Study and teaching  Search this
Metal-work -- Study and teaching  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American metal-workers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.pijanoeh03
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-pijanoeh03

Oral history interview with Hiroko Sato Pijanowski

Interviewee:
Pijanowski, Hiroko Sato, 1942-  Search this
Interviewer:
Fisch, Arline M.  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Cranbrook Academy of Art -- Students  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
University of Michigan -- Faculty  Search this
Pijanowski, Eugene, 1938-  Search this
Extent:
123 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2003 May 13-15
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Hiroko Sato Pijanowski conducted 2003 May 13-15, by Arline F. Fisch, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Honolulu, Hawaii.
Pijanowski speaks of her American/Japanese identity; childhood in Japan and her small family; the Christian schools she attended; Geidai University; learning Japanese jewelry design in the U.S.; attending Cranbrook Academy of Art; her thesis on line-inlay, a Japanese technique; meeting Eugene (Gene) Pijanowski, her future husband, at Cranbrook; life in Japan with Gene; moving back to the U.S.; her teaching philosophy; teaching at the University of Michigan; computers and other technological advances that have changed the way metals are taught; her presentation at a 1999 SNAG conference, "A Look Into the Future: The Implementation of Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing for Metalsmiths"; the importance of sharing information; her creative work and its relation to teaching; working with Japanese paper cord [mizuhiki]; Zen philosophy; her reoccurring childhood dreams; her line of jewelry "Hiroko Sato Pijanowski"; and the different types of molds she has made in wax, silicon, and rubber. Pijanowski also discusses jewelry tradeshows; her series Gentle Solitude; Issey Miyake's approach to design and his influence; her haiku club; orchids as inspiration; scuba diving experiences; the World Crafts Conference in Kyoto in 1978; the importance of exhibitions, such as "International Jewelry" in Vienna and "Poetry of the Physical" at the American Craft Museum, New York; galleries such as Helen Drutt in Philadelphia and Yaw Gallery in Michigan; the custom of "renting a gallery space" in Japan; and she concludes the interview with a discussion of the effects of of her depression. Pijanowski also recalls Ruth Taubman, Jim Hopfensperger, Leslie Leupp, Michael Rodemer; Stanley Lechtzin, Herman Junger, Albert Paley, David Watkins, Bob Ebendorf, Otto Kunzli, Michael Rowe, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Hiroko Sato Pijasnowski (1942- ) is a Japanese American metalsmith from Honolulu, Hawaii. Arline M. Fisch is a jeweler.
General:
Originally recorded on 6 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 11 digital wav files. Duration is 5 hr., 42 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Jewelry making -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Jewelry making -- Study and teaching  Search this
Jewelry making -- Technique  Search this
Metal-work -- Study and teaching  Search this
Metal-work -- Technique  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American metal-workers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.pijanoh03
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-pijanoh03

Alice Kagawa Parrott papers

Creator:
Parrott, Alice Kagawa, 1929-2009  Search this
Extent:
8.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1950-2009
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Japanese American fiber artist and ceramicist, Alice Kagawa Parrott, measure 8.3 linear feet and date from circa 1950-2009. The collection mainly documents Parrott's work as a fiber artist. Included are biographical material; personal and profesional correspondence with colleagues, loom manufacturers and family; notes for lectures and weaving notes; fabric dye recipes; project files; business records including fabric sales and financial reports; photographs of Parrott, her studio and dyeing process; printed material; and artwork including garment patterns, pencil sketches of wall hangings, yarn samples, annotated dye studies and samples, sketches, and studies and color stories.
Biographical / Historical:
Alice Kagawa Parrott (1929-2009) was a Japanese American fiber artist and ceramicist based in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in 2019 by Paul Kagawa and Diane Leavitt, trustees, Alice Kagawa Parrott Family Trust.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American fiber artists  Search this
Asian American ceramicists  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.parralic
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-parralic

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