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[Sketches for the "Dagger Comb" : journal page,]

Author:
Tupper, Earl Silas, 1907-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Tupper, Earl Silas, 1907-  Search this
Tupper Corporation  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (Graphite on paper., 11" x 8-1/2"?)
Type:
Archival materials
Sketches
Holographs
Manuscripts
Date:
February 13, 1937
Scope and Contents:
Holograph: loose-leaf notebook page, 5 holes, containing text and sketches for a Tupper invention, a folding comb which he called a dagger comb. Located in Box 3, Folder 4.
Local Numbers:
03047007 (AC Scan No.)
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but master (preservation) tapes are stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Combs  Search this
Inventions -- 1920-2000 -- United States  Search this
Inventors -- 1930-2000  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketches -- 1930-1940
Holographs -- 1930-1940
Manuscripts -- 1930-1940
Collection Citation:
Earl S. Tupper Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Earl S. Tupper Papers
Earl S. Tupper Papers / Series 2: Early Business Papers and Scientific Notes / Notes on Inventions
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8a7255034-d340-4c87-8ec2-a352f1e84ba6
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0470-ref807

Dr. William Phillips Innovative Lives Presentation

Topic:
Innovative Lives Program (NMAH public program series)
Interviewee:
Phillips, William, Dr., 1948-  Search this
Creator:
Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.  Search this
Interviewer:
Cater, Anita  Search this
Names:
Chu, Steven  Search this
Cohen-Tannouudji, Claude  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (4 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Videotapes
Betacam sp (videotape format)
Oral history
Interviews
Mini dv (videotape format)
Photographs
Date:
2001-04-27
Summary:
Approximately 5-1/2 hours of video footage documenting an interview with Dr. William Phillips, a physicist and Nobel Laureate (Physics, 1997). Phillips discusses his background, work at the National Institute of Standards (NIST) using laser light to cool gases to the lowest temperature ever achieved, and his memories of winning the Nobel Prize.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains approximately 5-1⁄2 hours of original (digital), master (BetaCam SP), and reference videos (VHS) documenting William Phillips, physicist and Nobel Laureate (Physics, 1997). Audience participants are students from Ormond Stone Middle School (Centreville, Virginia); Queen Anne School (Upper Marlboro, Maryland); Nysmith School (Herndon, Virginia): and Gwynn Park Middle School (Brandywine, Maryland).
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into three series.

Series 1, Original Videos, 2001

Series 2, Master Videos, 2001

Series 3, Reference Videos, 2001
Biographical / Historical:
Dr. William Phillips was born November 5, 1948 in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. He received his B.S. from Juniata College in 1970 and his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1976. Phillips was awarded the Chaim Weizmann Fellowship at MIT to work on collisions and Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in spin-polarized hydrogen. After leaving MIT in1978, Phillips joined the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) which was renamed the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). At NIST, Phillips worked on precision measurements of the proton gyromagnetic ratio and of the Absolute Ampere. Also, he pursued laser cooling experiments which led him and colleagues Steve Chu and Claude Cohen-Tannoudji to win the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1997.

The Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation was founded in 1995 at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History through a generous gift from the Lemelson Foundation. The Center's mission is: to document, interpret, and disseminate information about invention and innovation; to encourage inventive creativity in young people; and to foster an appreciation for the central role invention and innovation play in the history of the United States. The Innovative Lives series brings together museum visitors and, especially, school aged children, and American inventors to discuss inventions and the creative process and to experiment and play with hands-on activities related to each inventor's product. This collection was recorded by the Innovative Lives Program of the Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

Nobel Voices Video History Project (AC0771)
Provenance:
Transferred to the Archives Center by the Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation, May 17, 2001.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions. Signed releases on file.
Topic:
Physics  Search this
Inventors -- 20th century  Search this
Inventions -- 1980-2000  Search this
Nobel Prizes  Search this
Lasers  Search this
Physicists  Search this
Slides  Search this
Physicists -- 1930-2000  Search this
Genre/Form:
Videotapes
BetaCam SP (videotape format)
Oral history -- 2000-2010
Interviews -- 2000-2010
Mini DV (Videotape format)
Photographs
Citation:
Dr. William Phillips Innovative Lives Presentation, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0770
See more items in:
Dr. William Phillips Innovative Lives Presentation
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8b9b7c94e-be97-42df-b56d-dbe59dd654c4
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0770
Online Media:

Sendzimir Mill Video Documentation

Interviewer:
Liebhold, Peter  Search this
Creator:
Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.  Search this
Names:
Washington Steel Mill  Search this
Sendzimir, Tadeusz, 1894-1989  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (3 boxes)
27 Video recordings
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Videotapes
Oral history
Interviews
Date:
December 1996.
Scope and Contents:
Inventor Tadeusz Sendzimir, a Polish immigrant, designed and installed the first "Z" Mill for cold rolling stainless steel in the United States. The videohistory documents the story of a new approach to the rolling process of steel technology transfer and consumer demand for a new product;video documents the mill in operation and interviews with active and retired workers.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into 3 series.

Series 1: Original Videotapes (13)

Series 2: Master Videotapes (7)

Series 3: Reference Videotapes (7).
Biographical / Historical:
Tadeusz Sendzimir, a Polish émigré, came to the United States in 1939 to work at Armco Steel in Middletown, Ohio. Sendzimir had earlier developed radical processes for galvanizing steel (1931) and cold rolling steel (1933). Sendzimir's rolling process departed dramatically from the multi-stand continuous process developed by John Tytus Armco (1924). Instead of using multi-stand four high rolls Sendzimir's mill used a clustered nest of rolls, like two inverted pyramids (1-2-3-4 configuration). A few Sendzimir Mills were built in Europe before WW II stopped construction of experimental steel plants. While Sendzimir was working at Armco, Signode Steel in Chicago ordered on of his "Z" Mills (Sendzimir Mills are called "Z" Mills in the United States). Signode used the mill to successfully roll low carbon steel for strapping and more importantly for rolling ultra thin silicon steel (for radar units) during WW II.

Stainless steel, first developed around 1915, is made by alloying carbon steel with chromium to make a metal that is highly resistant to corrosion. Stainless steel is relatively hard and is difficult to weld, cut, or drill. The physical properties of stainless steel are important to understanding why the "Z" mill has been so successful. Stainless steel was traditionally rolled in sheets on a four high reversing mill (with a Z mill much larger strips forming rolls can be made). Because stainless steel work hardens quickly it cannot be run through a multi-stand mill easily. One advantage of the a Z mill is that the small work rolls provide a sharper bite, greater pressure, and less roll deflection than a four high mill and thus can roll stainless top gage without having to anneal (soften) the roll.

For more on Sendzimir as an inventor see Steel Will: The Life of Tad Sendizmir, Hippocrene Books, New York, 1994 and by Vanda Sendzimir or "My Father the Inventor" in Invention and Technology, Fall 1995, p. 54-63 also by Vanda Sendzimir.
Related Archival Materials:
Mill's central control pulpit in collection of the Division of History of Technology (now Division of Work and Industry).
Provenance:
Created by the Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation and Peter Liebhold of the Division of History of Technology in December 1996.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but the original videos are stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Steel industry and trade -- 1930-2000  Search this
Steel -- Cold working -- 20th century  Search this
Steel, Stainless -- 20th century  Search this
Factories -- 20th century  Search this
Inventions -- 20th century  Search this
Inventors -- 20th century  Search this
Genre/Form:
Videotapes -- 1990-2000
Oral history -- 1990-2000
Interviews -- 1980-2000
Citation:
Sendzimir Mill Video Documentation, December 1996, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0605
See more items in:
Sendzimir Mill Video Documentation
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep82d89b330-16fe-4491-aa22-05a9e091c3cc
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0605

Charles Townes Innovative Lives Presentation

Topic:
Innovative Lives Program (NMAH public program series)
Interviewee:
Townes, Charles, Dr., 1915-  Search this
Speaker:
Berger, Sondra  Search this
Creator:
Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.  Search this
Interviewer:
Nahory, Robert E.  Search this
Extent:
0.5 Cubic feet (3 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Oral history
Videotapes
Betacam sp (videotape format)
Interviews
Date:
1998-12-02
Scope and Contents:
Videotaped interview with Charles Townes, inventor of the MASER (Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation). The interview was part of the "Innovative Lives" public program series. Videotapes include VHS and Beta Cam SP formats.
Arrangement:
Divided into four series.

Series 1: Original videos

Series 2: Master videos

Series 3: Reference videos

Series 4; Digital images
Biographical / Historical:
Charles Townes was born in Greenville, S.C., July 28, 1915. Graduated from Furman University (1935), Duke University (1936), and the California Institute of Technology (Ph.D., 1939). Appointed to faculty of Columbia University, 1948, where he conceived the idea for the maser. Received Nobel Prize for physics for advances in quantum electronics, 1964.
Provenance:
Created by the Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation, National Museum of American History, 1998.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but the original videos are stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions. Signed oral history releases on file.
Topic:
Electronics -- 1960-2000  Search this
Masers  Search this
Inventions -- 1950-2000  Search this
Physics -- 1960-1990  Search this
Astronomy -- 1960-2000  Search this
Nobel Prizes  Search this
Inventors -- 1930-2000  Search this
Physicists -- 1930-2000  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral history -- 1990-2000
Videotapes -- 1990-2000
BetaCam SP (videotape format)
Interviews -- 1980-2000
Citation:
Charles Townes Innovative Lives Presentation, 1998, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0673
See more items in:
Charles Townes Innovative Lives Presentation
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep81c3c8951-c682-42b8-93b4-3cb97e23732b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0673
Online Media:

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