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Sand Creek Massacre: 11 Multigenerational Impacts - Gail Ridgley

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2014-10-16T19:49:21.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
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SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_mLtil0HEhAA

Session 2—Slavery in the Spanish Empire: The Philippines and the Southwest Borderlands

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2021-10-25T16:17:15.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
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SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_bPtX7u_TAHg

Mascots, Myths, Monuments, and Memory 06 — Contested Symbols in Sports and American Culture

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2018-03-10T15:47:40.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
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SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_iCEEryDSnoU

Youth Activism: Raise Your Voice

Creator:
Smithsonian Affiliates  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2021-04-30T22:07:19.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
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SmithsonianNeighbor
Data Source:
Smithsonian Affiliates
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNeighbor
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_EcntynSmH3E

Mascots, Myths, Monuments, and Memory 08 — Bree Newsome and Introduction to the Afternoon Session

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2018-03-10T15:47:41.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
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SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_Aq8Pf45wWIE

Going Home 03: The Early Years - Patricia Zell

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2014-11-21T20:20:14.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
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SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_sFF58_Mzlk8

Festival Recordings: Maroon Narrative: Maroon Identity in the 1990s; Jamaica, Guianas, Mexico

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Maroon Program 1992 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Spinks, Vondale (recorder)  Search this
Woodley, Harold (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Lamoraille, Antione  Search this
Hernandez Palomino, Gabino  Search this
Balla, Romain  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Colombians  Search this
French Guianese  Search this
Maroons  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Colombia
Suriname
Jamaica
French Guiana
Date:
1992 June 27
Local Numbers:
FP-1992-CT-0179
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 27, 1992.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Identity (Philosophical concept)  Search this
Indigenous peoples -- Civil rights  Search this
Education  Search this
Maroons  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1992, Item FP-1992-CT-0179
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife / Series 3: Creativity and Resistance: Maroon Culture in the Americas / 3.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5e48046ad-36fd-4219-8fef-4ab797b068c7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1992-ref728

American Indian politics and the American political system / David E. Wilkins, University of Minnesota ; Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark, University of Victoria

Author:
Wilkins, David E (David Eugene) 1954-  Search this
Stark, Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik  Search this
Physical description:
xxvi, 309 pages : illustrations, maps ; 27 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
Date:
2018
Topic:
Politics and government  Search this
Government relations  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Self-determination, National  Search this
Race relations  Search this
Social policy  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1110532

Beatrice Medicine papers

Creator:
Medicine, Beatrice  Search this
Extent:
28 Linear feet (65 document boxes, 1 box of oversize materials, 1 box of ephemera, 1 shoebox of index cards, 1 map drawer)
Culture:
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Native American  Search this
American Indian -- Education  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Place:
Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North & South Dakota
Date:
1914-2003
bulk 1945-2003
Summary:
The Beatrice Medicine papers, 1913-2003 (bulk 1945-2003), document the professional life of Dr. Beatrice "Bea" Medicine (1923-2005), a member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, anthropologist, scholar, educator, and Native rights activist. The collection also contains material collected by or given to Medicine to further her research and activism interests. Medicine, whose Lakota name was Hinsha Waste Agli Win, or "Returns Victorious with a Red Horse Woman," focused her research on a variety of topics affecting the Native American community: 1) mental health, 2) women's issues, 3) bilingual education, 4) alcohol and drug use, 5) ethno-methodologies and research needs of Native Americans, and 6) Children and identity issues. The collection represents Medicine's work as an educator for universities and colleges in the United States and in Canada, for which she taught Native American Studies courses. Additionally, because of the large amount of research material and Medicine's correspondence with elected U.S. officials and Native American leaders, and records from Medicine's involvement in Native American organizations, the collection serves to represent issues affecting Native Americans during the second half of the 20th century, and reflects what Native American leaders and organizations did to navigate and mitigate those issues. Collection materials include correspondence; committee, conference, and teaching material; ephemera; manuscripts and poetry; maps; notes; periodicals; photographs; training material; and transcripts.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Beatrice Medicine reflect Medicine's interests as an academic and an activist, and contain correspondence, committee, conference, and teaching material, ephemera, manuscripts and poetry, maps, notes, periodicals, photographs, and training material (see series scope notes for further details on contents). The majority of the material is printed matter that Medicine collected, with less of her own work included. Taken together, the collection reflects issues affecting Native Americans during the second half of the 20th century, as well as the network of Native American leaders and organizations that navigated these issues. Student papers, letters of recommendation, evaluations, and documents containing personally identifiable information are restricted.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into 24 series:

Series 1: Native American Culture and History, 1954-1962, 1967-1975, 1978-1989, 1991-1997, 1999-2002

Series 2: Appropriations, Economics, and Labor, 1955, circa 1970-1980, 1988, 1993, circa 1995-2000

Series 3: Archaeology, 1935-1950, 1952-1973, 1987-1995

Series 4: Native American Artists, Authors, Crafts, Film, and Poets, 1951-1969, 1972-2002

Series 5: Census, Demographic, and Poll Data, 1974, 1984-1986

Series 6: Civil Rights, 1972, 1980, 1983-1997

Series 7: Committee Material: Correspondence, Meeting Minutes, and Memos, 1985-1995

Series 8: Conference Material, 1955-1962, 1965, 1968-1974, 1976-2002

Series 9: Correspondence, 1952, 1959, 1962, 1966-2000

Series 10: Education: Native American Institutions and Teaching Material, 1948-2002

Series 11: Ephemera: Campaign, Pow-Wow, and Other Event Buttons, and Calendars, 1973, 1976, circa 1980-2000

Series 12: Health: Alcohol and Drug Addiction and Recovery, Disabilities, Healthcare, Mental Health, Nutrition, and Wellness, 1955, 1965, 1969-1999, 2004

Series 13: Historic Preservation, 1942, 1956, 1960-1969, 1979, circa 1985-1998

Series 14: Invitations, 1966-1979, 1982, 1991-2002

Series 15: Linguistics: Native American Languages, 1961, 1963, 1975, 1978-1981, 1987-1995

Series 16: Manuscripts, 1964-2003

Series 17: Maps, 1982-1991

Series 18: Museum Material: Native American Museums, Exhibit Preparation, and the National Museum of the American Indian, 1949, 1962, circa 1976-1998

Series 19: Oversized Material, 1962, circa 1965-1996, 1999

Series 20: Published material: Journals, Magazines, Monographs, and Newsletters, 1914, 1932, 1944, 1946-1947, 1952-2003

Series 21: Reports, 1947-1949, 1956-1998

Series 22: Training Material, 1968, 1988-2000

Series 23: Women and Gender, 1962, 1965, circa 1970-1997

Series 24: Restricted Material, 1972, 1978, 1987-1999
Biographical / Historical:
A member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, Beatrice "Bea" Medicine—also known by her Lakota name Hinsha Waste Agli Win, or "Returns Victorious with a Red Horse Woman"—was born on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in Wakpala, South Dakota on August 1, 1923.

As a young adult, she studied at the South Dakota State University on the Laverne Noyes Scholarship, where she attained her B.A. in Anthropology in 1945. Between 1945 and 1951, Medicine worked a variety of teaching positions, including for three American Indian institutions (see Chronology for Medicine's complete work history). In 1951, Medicine went back to school and worked as a research assistant until she earned her master's degree in Sociology and Anthropology from Michigan State University in 1954. For the remainder of her life, Medicine served as faculty, visiting professor, and scholar-in-residence at thirty-one universities and colleges in the United States and Canada, teaching cultural and educational anthropology courses, as well as Native American Studies. As an educator, Medicine carried out her research on a variety of issues affecting Native American and First Nation communities, including: 1) mental health issues, 2) women's issues—professionalization, sterilization, socialization, and aging, 3) bilingual education, 4) alcohol and drug use and abuse, 5) ethno-methodologies and research needs, and 6) socialization of children and identity needs. Medicine's research in American Indian women's and children's issues, as well as her research in gender identity among the LGBT community was among the first to document the narratives of the members of these groups.

In 1974, Medicine testified alongside her cousin, Vine Deloria, Jr., as an expert witness in the Wounded Knee trial (United States v. Banks and Means). Following this, Medicine returned to school to pursue her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology, which she completed in 1983 at the University of Wisconsin. With her experience as a researcher, educator, activist, and Lakota woman, medicine sought to create more opportunities for multicultural and bilingual education for minority students, especially those of Native American descent. Such education, she believed, provided students a means to preserve and legitimize their own cultural identity, debase negative stereotyes, and be recognized as individuals who are capable of academic and economic achievement.

Medicine was an active member of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) and pursued her educational agenda further through the establishment of the Committee of Anthropologists in Primarily Minority Institutions (CAPMI) (1987-1995), which brought anthropologists out of retirement to teach at minority institutions. (See Chronology for a complete list of organizations and committees in which Medicine was involved.) The program was short-lived but provided a space for minority students to confront a field that historically misrepresented them, reclaim their narratives and languages, and instigate positive change as potential future anthropologists.

Medicine officially retired on August 1, 1989, but continued to be active in AAA and was honored many times for her contributions to the field of anthropology. Some of her recognitions include the Distinguished Service Award from AAA (1991) and the Bronislaw Malinowski Award from the Society for Applied Anthropology (1996). One of Medicine's highest honors, however, was serving as the Sacred Pipe Woman at the 1977 Sun Dance. Medicine continued her research into retirement, and went on to publish her first book in 2001, Learning to Be an Anthropologist and Remaining "Native": Selected Writings. Medicine died in Bismarck, North Dakota on December 19, 2005. Medicine's final work, Drinking and Sobriety Among the Lakota Sioux was published posthumously in 2006. In honor of her life's work and dedication to education, the Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) created the Bea Medicine Award, a scholarship travel grant for students to attend the Annual Meeting of the SfAA.

Chronology: Beatrice Medicine

1923 August 1 -- Beatrice Medicine (also known by her Lakota name, Hinsha Waste Agli Win, or "Returns Victorious with a Red Horse Woman") is born on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in Wakpala, South Dakota.

1941-1945 -- Receives scholarship: Laverne Noyes Scholarship, South Dakota State University

1945 -- Receives Bachelor of Arts, Anthropology, South Dakota State University.

1945-1946 -- Teacher, Home Economics, Haskell Indian Institute (B.I.A.)

1947-1948 -- Health Education Lecturer, Michigan Tuberculosis Association

1948-1949 -- Teacher, Santo Domingo Pueblo, United Pueblos Agency, Albuquerque, New Mexico

1949-1950 -- Teacher, Navajo Adult Beginner's Program, Albuquerque Indian School

1950-1951 -- Teacher, Home Economics, Flandreau Indian School

1950-1954 -- Fellowship: Illinois Federation of Women's Clubs Fellowships

1951-1954 -- Research Assistant, Sociology and Anthropology, Michigan State University

1953-1954 -- Fellowship: John Hay Whitney Foundation Fellowship

1954 -- Receives Master of Arts, Sociology and Anthropology, Michigan State University. Fellowship: American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship

1954- -- Charter Member, American Indian Women's Service League

1955-1958 -- Teaching and Research Assistant, University of Washington

1956 -- Honor: Outstanding Alumna, South Dakota State University

1960 -- Mentioned as "Who's Who Among American Indians"

circa 1960 -- Alpha Kappa Delta, Sociology Hononary Phi Upsilon Omicron, Home Economic Honorary

1960-1963 -- Lecturer, Anthropology, University of British Columbia

1960-1964 -- Board of Directors, Native Urban Indian Centers in Vancouver, British Columbia and Calgary, Alberta

1963-1964 -- Lecturer/Sociology and Teacher/Counselor, Mount Royal College, Indian Affairs Branch Receives grant: American Council of Learned Societies Research Grant

1965 -- Lecturer, Social Science, Michigan State University

1966 -- Psychiatric Social Worker, Provincial Guidance Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

1966-1967 -- Receives grant: Career Development Grant, National Institute of Mental Health

1966- -- Member, National Congress of American Indians (Education Issues)

1967 -- Receives grant: Ethnological Research Grant, National Museum of Canada

1967-1968 -- Lecturer, Sociology and Anthropology, University of Montana

1968 -- Teacher, "Cultural Enrichment Program," Standing Rock Indian Reservation, South Dakota Cited in "The Role of Racial Minorities in the United States," Seattle, Washington

1968 March -- Speaker: "The Pow-Wow as a Social Factor in the Northern Plains Ceremonialism," Montana Academy of Sciences

1968 May -- Speaker: "Patterns and Periphery of Plains Indian Pow-Wows," Central States Anthropological Society

1968 June -- Speaker: "Magic Among the Stoney Indians," Canadian Sociology and Anthropological Association, Calgary, Alberta

1968 August -- Speaker: "Magic Among the Stoney Indians," International Congress of Americanists, Stuttgart, German Speaker: "The Dynamics of a Dakota Indian Giveaway," International Congress of Americanists, Stuttgart, German

1968-1969 -- Director, American Indian Research, Oral History Project and Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of South Dakota

1968-1970 -- Consultant, Text Book Evaluation Committee, American Indians United

1969 -- Assistant Professor, Teacher Corps, University of Nebraska

1969 September -- Speaker: "The Red Man Yesterday," Governor's Interstate Indian Council, Wichita, Kansas

1969 December -- Speaker: "The Native American in Modern Society," Northwestern State College

1969-1970 -- Assistant Professor, San Francisco State University Speaker: "The Indian in Institutions of Higher Learning," Annual Conference, National Indian Education Association

1969-1975 -- Member, Editorial Board, American Indian Historical Society

1970 -- Mentioned for second time as "Who's Who Among American Indians" Steering Committee Member, Indian Ecumenical Convocation of North America Member, Planning Committee Indian Alcoholism and Drug Use

1970 August -- Speaker: "The Role of the White Indian Expert," 2nd Annual Conference, National Indian Education Association

1970 October -- Speaker: "The Ethnographic Study of Indian Women," Annual Convention, American Ethnohistorical Soceity

1970 November -- Speaker: "The Anthropologists as the Indian's Image Maker," Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association Speaker: "The Anthropologist and Ethnic Studies Programs," Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association

1970-1971 -- Associate Professor, Anthropology, San Francisco State University Member, Mayor's Committee on the Status of Women, San Francisco, California

1971 -- Member, Native American Scholars Board, Steering and Selection, American Indian Historical Society

1971 May -- Speaker: "Ethnic Studies and Native Americans," National Education Association

1971-1973 -- Pre-Doctoral Lecturer, Anthropology, University of Washington Consultant, American Indian Heritage Program

1972 -- Honored in "Potlatch" ceremony by Makah Tribal people at the National Indian Education Conference for contributions to Indian education Receives grant: American Council of Learned Societies Travel Grant, Americanist Annual Meeting, Rome, Italy Curriculum Advisor, Lakota Higher Education Center, Prine Ridge, South Dakota

1972 March -- Speaker: "Warrior Women Societies," Northwest Anthropological Conference

1972 April -- Chairperson and Speaker: "Racism and Ethnic Relations," Society for Applied Anthropology

1972 June -- Chairperson, Native American Studies Symposium, International Congress of Americanists, Mexico

1972 August -- Speaker: "Warrior Women of the Plains," International Congress of Americanists, Rome, Italy

1972 November -- Speaker: "Native Americans in the Modern World," Southwest Minnesota State College

1973 -- Expert Witness, Yvonne Wanro Trial, Spokane, Washington Member, Organization of American States, First Congress of Indigenous Women, Chiapas, Mexico Speaker: "Self-Direction in Sioux Education," American Anthropological Association Speaker: "North American Native Women: The Aspirations and Their Associations," presented as a Delegate to the Inter-American Commission on Indigenous Women, Chiapas, Mexico

1973-1974 -- Visiting Professor, Anthropology, Native American Studies Program, Dartmouth College

1973-1976 -- Member, Committee on Minorities in Anthropology, American Anthropological Association

1973- -- Consultant, Human Services Department, Sinte Gleska Community College

1974 -- Expert Witness, Wounded Knee Trial, Lincoln, Nebraska Speaker: "Indian Women's Roles: Traditional and Contemporary," Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association

1974-1975 -- Visiting Professor, Anthropology, Colorado College

1975-1976 -- Visiting Associate Professor, Anthropology, Stanford University

1975-1977 -- Member, Steering Committee, Council of Anthropology and Education, American Anthropological Association

1976 -- Visiting Professor, Educational Anthropology, University of New Brunswick Expert Witness, Topsky Eagle Feathers Trial, Pocatello, Idaho Panelist, White House Conference on Ethnic Studies, Washington, D.C.

1977 -- Expert Witness, Greybull Grandchildren Custody Case, Portland, Oregon American Indian representative to the World Conference on Indigenous People, Geneva, Switzerland Honor: Outstanding Alumna, South Dakota State University

1977 August 18 -- Medicine serves as Sacred Pipe Woman at the Sun Dance, Green Grass, South Dakota

1977-1980 -- Education Consultant, National Congress of American Indians, Washington, D.C.

1978 -- Cited in the Directory of Significant 20th Century American Minority Women, Gaylord Professional Publications Biographical Sketch in "Moving Forward" of the Bookmark Reading Program, Third Edition

1978 August -- Speaker: "Issues in the Professionalization of Native American Women," Annual Meeting, American Psychological Association

1978-1982 -- Advanced Opportunity Fellow, Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

1979 -- Visiting Professor, Department of Education Policy Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison

1979 August -- Honorary Doctorate of Human Letters, Northern Michigan University Speaker: "The Dakota Indian Memorial Feast: Reservation and Urban Manifestations," International Congress of Americanists, Lima, Peru

1980 -- Member, Nominations Committee, American Anthropological Association Biographical Sketch in "Native American Indian Personalities, Historical and Contemporary," Dansville, New York: The Instructor Publications, Inc.

1981 -- Visiting Professor, Graduate School of Public Affairs, University of Washington-Seattle Speaker: "Linguistically Marginated: The Transformation of Dominated Speech Varieties," American Anthropological Association

1982 -- School of Social and Behavioral Science Academic Planning, California State University Speaker: "Policy Decisions: Federal Regulations and American Indian Identity Issues," Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association

1982-1983 -- Anthropology Department Curriculum Committee, California State University

1982-1985 -- Associate Professor of Anthropology, Coordinator, Interdisciplinary Program in American Indian Studies, California State University Coordinator, Interdisciplinary Program in American Studies Program, California State University

1982- -- President, Assembly of California Indian Women

1983 -- Receives Ph.D., Cultural Anthropology, University of Wisconsin Expert Witness, Fortunate Eagle Trial, Reno, Nevada Award: Outstanding Woman of Color, National Institute of Women of Color, Washingtonton, D.C. (for anthropological contributions) Award: Outstanding Minority Researcher, American Educational Research Association Publishes book with Patricia Albers: The Hidden Half: Indian Women of the Northern Plains Honor: Significant Academic Book (The Hidden Half), Choice, Association of Colleges and Research Libraries, American Library Association

1983-1984 -- Student Affirmative Action Coordinating Council, California State University

1983-1986 -- Member, Executive Board, Southwest Anthropological Association Member, Governing Board, Common Cause

1984 -- Member, Advisory Board of National Research for Handicapped Native Americans, North Arizona University Scholarly Publications Award Selection Committee, California State University Award: Faculty Award for Meritorious Service, California State University Speaker: Field Work Methods: "Ties That Bond," Committee on the Status of Women in Anthropology," Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association Speaker: "Career Patterns of American Indian Women," Council of Education and Anthropology, Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association

1984 November -- Faculty Award for Meritorious Service, California State University

1984-1985 -- Participant, Chancellor's Office Grant to "Cross-Cultural Perspectives in the Social Sciences," California State University

1985 November -- Speaker: Conference on "The Native American: His Arts, His Culture, and His History," West Virginia State College

1985-1986 -- Board of Directors, Naechi Institute on Alcohol and Drug Education

1985-1988 -- Professor, Department of Anthropology and Director, Native Centre, University of Calgary

1985-1989 -- Member, Malinowski Awards Committee, Society for Applied Anthropology

1987 -- Honor: Outstanding Minority Professorship Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks Visiting Professor, University of Michigan

1987-1995 -- Member, Committee of Anthropologists in Primarily Minority Institutions, American Anthropological Association

1988 August 1 -- Medicine officially retires.

1989 -- Volunteer (Committee of Anthropologists in Primarily Minority Institutions, American Anthropological Association), Standing Rock College Honor (twice): Outstanding Minority Professorship Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks Visiting Professor, Wayne State University.

1990 -- Honor: "Outstanding Contributions for the promotion of sex equity in Education," Illinois State Board of Education Honor: Outstanding Lakota Woman, Standing Rock College

1991 -- Honor: Distinguished Service Award, American Anthropological Association. Medicine was the first American Indian to receive this award.

1991 -- Visiting Professor, Saskatchewan Indian Federal College Visiting Professor, Colorado College Visiting Professor, Anthropology, Humboldt State University

1992 -- Visiting Distinguished Professor, Women's Studies, University of Toronto

1993 -- Visiting Professor, Rural Sociology, South Dakota State University Award: Distinguished Native American Alumna Award, South Dakota State University

1993-1994 December -- Research Co-ordinator, Women's Perspectives, Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples

1994- -- Adjunct Professor, University of Alberta

1995 -- Scholar in Residence, Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul Visiting Scholar, Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia Award: Ohana Award, Multi-Cultural Counseling Excellence, American Association of Counselors

1996 -- Award: Bronislaw Malinowski Award, Society for Applied Anthropology. Buckman Professor, Department of Human Ecology, University of Minnesota

circa 1997- -- Associate Professor of Anthropology Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, California State University

2001 -- Publishes book: Learning to Be an Anthropologist and Remaining "Native": Selected Writings.

2005 -- Award: George and Louise Spindler Award, Council on Anthropology and Education, American Anthropological Association.

2005 December 19 -- Medicine dies during emergency surgery in Bismarck, North Dakota.

2006 -- Book: Drinking and Sobriety Among the Lakota Sioux is published posthumously.

2008 -- The Society for Applied Anthropology creates the Bea Medicine Award.
Provenance:
The papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Beatrice Medicine between 1997 and 2003, and by Ted Garner in 2006.
Restrictions:
Materials relating to student grades, letters of recommendation, and evaluations have been restricted.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Alcohol  Search this
Gender imagery  Search this
Discrimination  Search this
Linguistics -- Research -- United States  Search this
Photographs  Search this
Lakota Indians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Citation:
Beatrice Medicine papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.1997-05
See more items in:
Beatrice Medicine papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3cae267e3-888b-46b8-a525-c7c0ad396b59
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1997-05

Demanding justice and security indigenous women and legal pluralities in Latin America edited by Rachel Sieder

Editor:
Sieder, Rachel  Search this
Physical description:
viii, 299 pages illustration 24 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Latin America
Amérique latine
Lateinamerika
Date:
2017
Topic:
Indian women--Legal status, laws, etc  Search this
Indian women--Social conditions  Search this
Indian women--Political activity  Search this
Indian women activists  Search this
Legal polycentricity  Search this
Femmes des Peuples autochtones--Conditions sociales  Search this
Femmes des Peuples autochtones--Activité politique  Search this
Femmes activistes des Peuples autochtones  Search this
Pluralisme juridique  Search this
15.85 history of America  Search this
POLITICAL SCIENCE--Political Freedom & Security--Human Rights  Search this
SOCIAL SCIENCE--Developing Countries  Search this
HISTORY--South America  Search this
SOCIAL SCIENCE--Ethnic Studies--Native American Studies  Search this
SOCIAL SCIENCE--Women's Studies  Search this
POLITICAL SCIENCE--Colonialism & Post-Colonialism  Search this
SOCIAL SCIENCE--Anthropology--Cultural  Search this
Indigenes Volk  Search this
Frau  Search this
Frauenbewegung  Search this
Diskriminierung  Search this
Latin America  Search this
Indians  Search this
Indigenous peoples  Search this
Women  Search this
Security  Search this
Justice  Search this
Pluralism  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1162873

Terence Turner papers

Creator:
Turner, Terence  Search this
Names:
Chagnon, Napoleon A., 1938-  Search this
Neel, James V. (James Van Gundia), 1915-  Search this
Tierney, Patrick  Search this
Extent:
56.6 Linear feet (100 document boxes, 4 half-document boxes, 21 shoe boxes, 1 oversize box, and 10 map folders)
86 Sound cassettes
79 Sound tape reels (5")
21 Sound tape reels (3")
4 Sound cassettes (microcassette)
3 Sound tape reels (7")
157 Videocassettes (VHS)
48 Videocassettes (MiniDV)
11 Videodiscs (DVD)
10 Videocassettes (U-matic)
6 Electronic discs (DVD)
2 Film reels (Approximately 3200 feet)
1 Videocassettes (VHS-C)
1 Videocassettes (Hi8)
1 Videocassettes (Video 8)
Culture:
Mebêngôkre (Kayapó/Cayapo)  Search this
Yanomami (Yanoama)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Sound tape reels
Sound cassettes (microcassette)
Videocassettes (vhs)
Videocassettes (minidv)
Videodiscs (dvd)
Videocassettes (u-matic)
Electronic discs (dvd)
Film reels
Videocassettes (vhs-c)
Videocassettes (hi8)
Videocassettes (video 8)
Place:
Amazon River Region
Date:
1938-1942
1952-2015
bulk 1964-2008
Summary:
Terence "Terry" Sheldon Turner (1935-2015) was best known for his ethnographic work among the Mebêngôkre (Kayapó) people of the Amazon rainforest and his work as an activist for the Mebêngôkre and other communities. This collection documents his interest in the Mebêngôkre and his work as a human rights activist. It includes field notes, censuses, papers, notes, correspondence, news clippings, sound recordings, films, photographs, charts and diagrams, genealogy and kinship information, and computer discs.
Scope and Contents:
The Terence Turner papers contain materials related to his work as an anthropologist and human rights activist. Turner's primary focus of research was the Mebêngôkre (Kayapó) people of the Amazon rainforest. The collection contains field notes, censuses, papers and draft manuscripts, correspondence, notes, news clippings, sound recordings, films, photographs, charts and diagrams, genealogy and kinship information, and computer discs relating to that interest. His work in human rights is also well documented; the collection contains notes, papers, correspondence, and news clippings. A significant amount of the human rights material relates to the Yanomami controversy which arose when Turner and Leslie Sponsel sent the American Anthropological Association a memo warning of the furor that was likely to result from the publication of the book Darkness in El Dorado by Patrick Tierney. The human rights materials in the collection also include materials relating to the Mebêngôkre and their environmental protection protests and demonstrations. The film and video primarily relate to the Granada Television films for which he consulted and the films produced by the Kayapo with the help of the Kayapo Video Project. There are some materials relating to courses which he taught or took.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 7 series: (1) Research, 1952-2015; (2) Human rights, ethics, and activism, circa 1964-2015; (3) Papers, conferences, and courses, 1959-2013; (4) Correspondence and contacts, 1966-2008; (5) Computer files, 1983-2010; (6) Photographs, 1938-1942, 1952, 1962-2014; (7) Sound recordings, 1962, 1976-2003; and (8) Film and video, 1975-2008
Biographical Note:
Terence "Terry" Sheldon Turner (1935-2015) was best known for his ethnographic work with the Mebêngôkre (Kayapó) people of the Amazon rainforest and his work as an activist for the Mebêngôkre and other communities. He was born in Philadelphia and raised outside of Washington, DC. He earned his A.B. from Harvard University (1957) and M.A. from the University of California, Berkeley (1959), in Modern European History. His interest in how society functions brought him to the Department of Social Relations at Harvard University for his Ph.D. (1965), where his studies turned to Social Anthropology. His interests were still in Europe, but his advisor, David Maybury-Lewis, persuaded him to study the Mebêngôkre in Brazil (Moberg). Despite his initial intentions, Turner developed a lasting relationship with the Mebêngôkre, who gave him the name Wakampu. He worked with the community for more than 50 years, visiting them over 20 times.

Turner and his then wife, Joan Bamberger, lived with the Mebêngôkre (Kayapó) from 1962 to 1964 while conducting research for their dissertations. His initial studies were on socio-cultural change, social organization, political systems, dual organization, a comparison to other Gê tribes, and mythology. Joan studied Mebêngôkre material culture, as it related to both function and significance. Turner's interest in mythology and the ties between the structure and motifs of myths to social structure led him to spend a year (1966-1967) at the University of Paris where Claude Lévi-Strauss was working on a project involving comparisons of mythology and social structure of different Central Brazilian indigenous groups.

Turner taught at Cornell University from 1966 to 1968, at the University of Chicago from 1968 to 1999, and then returned to Cornell from 1999 to 2015 where his wife, Jane Fajans, was also a professor. While teaching at the University of Chicago, Turner developed an interest in Karl Marx and the applications of his theories to anthropology (Moberg). He stated in a Guggenheim grant application that "Another main line of theoretical effort has been my attempt to generalize Marx's concept of value to account for the forms of social value generated in such forms of 'social production', in particular those of the Kayapo and other primitive, classless societies" (Terence Turner papers). In an interview for an article in the Chicago Reader, he said that "The Kayapo didn't have an economic sphere. They didn't have commodity production. Production for them in an immediate sense is production of their lives, and of course then you realize–wow!–this is a society for which the complete human being through all stages of life, right up to death, is the supreme product. It's the most complex and demanding product, and the social order is the whole process of producing that product" (Moberg). His interest in Marx led him to study Piaget, Vygotsky, Leont'ev, and Zinchenko, who "provided analytically principled ways of connecting material activity with forms of consciousness" (Terence Turner papers).

Turner was interested in visual anthropology. He assisted in the production of three British documentaries on the Mebêngôkre people: the BBC's Face Values in 1976 and Granada Television's Disappearing World series episodes "The Kayapo" and "The Kayapo: Out of the Forest" in 1987 and 1989. He also assisted the Mebêngôkre in documenting their own culture. The Mebêngôkre had obtained video cameras in 1985 and Turner encouraged them to obtain more cameras from the Granada crew in return for access to the community in 1987 (Harms). In 1990, he created the Kayapo Video Project, which funded the purchase of cameras, education for the Mebêngôkre filmmakers in filming and editing, and preserving the original footage at the Kayapo Video Archive/Arquivo de Video Kaiapo at the Centro de Trabalho Indigenista. Turner stated in a 1996 request for funding that the purpose of the project was "to generate an extensive archive of videos about all aspects of Kayapo culture and ecological knowledge, and simultaneously build up a cadre of well-trained video camerapersons and video-editors capable of continuing video-making and using activities into the future. The videos will be produced (both shot and edited) by the Kayapo themselves. They will form the backbone of a larger project of Kayapo cultural preservation, provide visual tests for use in a projected Kayapo educational program, and also generate a unique audio-visual record of the ecological knowledge and technology of a major Amazonian culture" (Terence Turner papers).

Turner was also very involved in human rights work and activism for indigenous communities. He felt it was the responsibility of anthropologists to defend the rights of the people whom they studied. He was involved in "anthropological activism," assisting the Mebêngôkre and others in their fight to protect their rights and environment. This interest began when Turner investigated the movement of miners, loggers, and poachers onto Mebêngôkre lands for FUNAI (the Fundação Nacional do Índio) (Harms). There were widespread protests against these incursions by the Mebêngôkre beginning in the early 1970s, which resulted in the Mebêngôkre gaining land rights. Despite this success, conflicts between the Mebêngôkre and Brazilian nationals, as well as within the Mebêngôkre community, continued. Turner both observed and participated in many of these protests and documented the ways in which these actions affected Mebêngôkre society and culture. Two of the most important protests concerned the planned construction of a series of hydroelectric dams on the Xingú River. The first protest, at Altamira in 1989, successfully derailed the project. The success of this protest brought international attention to the Mebêngôkre, who sent representatives to Canada in 1992 to support the Cree, who were protesting the construction of a hydroelectric dam there. The Brazilian government redesigned their original plans for the series of dams on the Xingú River; when these plans were leaked in 2008, another protest ensued. Turner and his daughter, Vanessa, documented this protest.

Turner's commitment to human rights led to him becoming a founding member of the American Anthropological Association's Ethics Committee (1969-1972) and Committee for Human Rights (1992-1997), serving as president of Survival International, U.S.A., heading the Special Commission of the American Anthropological Association to Investigate the Situation of the Brazilian Yanomami (1990-1991), and receiving the Solon T. Kimball Award from the American Anthropological Association in 1998.

Sources Cited

American Anthropological Association. "AAA Mourns the Loss of Dr. Terence Turner." Accessed June 22, 2022. https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/NewsDetail.aspx?ItemNumber=13188

Glaser, Linda B. "Anthropologist Terence Turner dies at 79." Cornell Chronicle, November 11, 2015.

Harms, William. "Terence Turner, anthropologist and human rights advocate for indigenous people, 1935-2015." UChicago News, November 17, 2015.

Moberg, David. "When Worlds Collide: Encounters with Anthropologist Terence Turner and other agents of modernity left the Kayapo of Brazil with something they'd never had before: power." Chicago Reader, October 2, 1997.

Survival International. "Terry Turner." Accessed June 22, 2022. https://www.survivalinternational.org/news/10992

Terence Turner papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

1935 December 30 -- Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1957 -- A.B. from Harvard College in Modern European History, graduating cum Laude

1959 -- M.A. from the University of California, Berkley, in Modern European History

1961 -- Married Joan Bamberger on August 25

1962 -- Began work with Mebêngôkre (Kayapó)

1965 -- Ph.D. from Harvard University's Department of Social Relations in Social Anthropology Research associate at the Museo Nacional do Brasil

1966-1968 -- Visiting assistant professor of anthropology at Cornell University

1968-1982 -- Assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Chicago

1969-1972 -- Member of the American Anthropological Association's Ethics Committee

1976 -- Advisor for the filming of Face Values with the BBC

1980 -- Married Jane Fajans on July 25

1981 -- Daughter Vanessa Fajans-Turner born on September 26

1982-1999 -- Professor of anthropology at the University of Chicago.

1984 -- Daughter Allison Fajans-Turner born on June 15

1987 -- Advisor for the filming of Disappearing World: The Kayapo with Granada Films

1989 -- Advisor for the filming of Disappearing World: The Kayapo: Out of the Forest with Granada Films

1990-1991 -- Chair of the American Anthropological Association's Special Commission to Investigate the Situation of the Brazilian Yanomami

1992-1997 -- Member of the American Anthropological Association's Committee for Human Rights

1998 -- Received Solon T. Kimball Award from the American Anthropological Association

1999-2004 -- Adjunct professor of anthropology at Cornell University.

2004-2015 -- Visiting professor of anthropology at Cornell University.

2015 November 7 -- Died in Ithaca, New York.
Orthography:
The archivist uses Mebêngôkre (Kayapó) or Mebêngôkre to refer to the Mebêngôkre people. However, Turner and other anthropologists whose work is included in the collection used other spelling variations (Mẽbêngôkre, Mebengokre, Megengokré, Kayapó, Kayapo, Kaiapó, Kaiapo, Cayapó, Cayapo, and Caiapo) which have not be altered in folder titles or descriptions.

The archivist uses Yanomami to refer to the Yanomami (Yanoama) people. Some folder titles or contents may use the Yanomamö spelling.
Related Materials:
Materials related to the Mebêngôkre (Kayapó) in the National Anthropological Archives (NAA) can also be found in the William Lipkind papers and Photo Lot 79-1. Materials related to the Yanomami in the NAA can also be found in the Timothy Asch papers, the American Anthropological Association records, and Photo Lot 94-28. Materials related to the Yanomami in the Human Studies Film Archives (HSFA) can be found in the Timothy Asch and Napoleon Chagnon films of the Yanomamo.
Provenance:
The Terence Turner papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Turner's wife, Jane Fajans, in 2020.
Restrictions:
Audiovisual and digital materials are restricted. Please contact the archives for information on the availability of access copies.

Graded papers are restricted for 80 years from the date of their creation and grant applications are restricted for 30 years from the date of their creation. These restrictions are noted on the folder level.

Access to the Terence Turner papers requires and appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Human Rights  Search this
Ethics  Search this
Brazil  Search this
Environmental issues  Search this
Indigenous peoples -- Civil rights  Search this
Citation:
Terence Turner papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2020-03
See more items in:
Terence Turner papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c4036e9a-bdac-4313-9fe0-b42094d645fd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2020-03

After one hundred winters in search of reconciliation on America's stolen lands Margaret D. Jacobs

Title:
After 100 winters
Author:
Jacobs, Margaret D. 1963-  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource
Type:
Electronic resources
Place:
United States
États-Unis
Date:
2021
Topic:
Indians of North America--Government relations  Search this
Indians of North America--Politics and government  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Reparations for historical injustices  Search this
Transitional justice  Search this
Réparations des crimes de l'histoire  Search this
Justice transitionnelle  Search this
HISTORY / Indigenous Peoples of the Americas  Search this
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Indigenous Studies  Search this
HISTORY / Native American  Search this
Indians of North America--Civil rights  Search this
Call number:
E93 .J15 2021 (Internet)
Restrictions & Rights:
Unlimited users
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1161902

Teriananda papers

Author:
Teriananda, 1947-  Search this
Names:
Peltier, Leonard  Search this
Extent:
0.83 Linear feet (2 archival boxes )
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Articles
Writings
Letters
Clippings
Reports
Date:
1972 - 1999
Summary:
The Teriananda Papers contain writings authored by Teriananda, as well as various position papers, news articles, flyers, correspondence, and group newsletters that represent the political activities she participated in on behalf of Native American and other Indigenous peoples.
Scope and Contents:
This collection, from the 1970s to the 1990s, is comprised of published and unpublished writings by Teriananda, as well as letters, reports, newspaper and magazine articles, group newsletters, flyers and announcements of political events, and news releases. The issues represented here, including support work for "The Longest Walk," the campaign for justice for Leonard Peltier, and the Big Mountain relocation are indicative of the concerns in parts of Indian Country in the United States and elsewhere during these decades.
Arrangement:
The Teriananda papers are arranged into two series:

Series I: Writings (1978-1991)

Series II: Political Activities (undated; 1972-1996)
Biographical / Historical:
Teriananda was born in Manhattan in 1947, where she grew up and has continued to live throughout her adult life. Teriananda's father, born in Brooklyn, became a financial officer and independent scholar, her mother, born in British Guiana (now Guyana), was a classical pianist who immigrated to the United States and later became an editorial assistant, working part-time during Teriananda's childhood. Her parents instilled in Teriananda a belief that she was "a citizen of the world." She studied ballet as a youngster, and, as a teenager, immersed herself in the artistic and intellectual milieu of the Lower East Side and Greenwich Village. An improperly diagnosed back injury while she was a senior in high school resulted in severe back problems in the 1970s that have persisted throughout her life.

Teriananda became interested in Indigenous struggles in the 1970s following a "back crisis" that almost took her life yet proved to be psychically transformative. In seeking to know who she was, she realized she needed to know where she was, and this led her to ask who the original inhabitants of the continent were. She soon became involved in activist struggles for Indigenous rights, and worked with a number of Native American groups during the 1970s and 1980s, including, among other things, the International Treaty Council's attempts to found the U.N.'s permanent Working Group on Indigenous People, support for Yvonne Wanrow and Leonard Peltier, the issue of uranium contamination from mining on Native American land, and the problem of the Joint Land Use Area near Big Mountain on the Hopi and Navajo reservations.

Teriananda also worked on issues surrounding the AIDS crisis after the death of several friends from this disease. She had become familiar with the possibilities of natural medicines, partly through contact with traditional Native teachers, and she became active promoting the benefits of nutritional, herbal and other natural therapies to sufferers of AIDS. As Teriananda's own health issues persisted and worsened, she turned to Tibetan Buddhism, and has devoted herself to artistic pursuits influenced by this spiritual path, although she has worked artistically since the early 1970s, when she stopped dancing. Although she has cut back on her activism, due to health problems and family demands, Teriananda remains a committed political activist who stays informed of current issues and is determined to pass on the heritage of struggles for peace and justice to the next generation.
Provenance:
Donated to the National Museum of the American Indian Archives by Teriananda in March 2003
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 3:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the NMAI Archivist. The Archives has no information on the status of literary rights for the work of others found in these papers; researchers are responsible for determining any question of copyright.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Civil rights  Search this
Indians of North America -- Relocation  Search this
Traditional medicine  Search this
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Land tenure  Search this
Indians of South America  Search this
Indians of Central America  Search this
Genre/Form:
Articles
Writings
Letters
Clippings
Reports
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Teriananda papers, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.009
See more items in:
Teriananda papers
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4c4026e79-6475-49d9-ac8d-c282f248302d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-009

Divisions a new history of racism and resistance in America's World War II military Thomas A. Guglielmo

Title:
New history of racism and resistance in America's World War II military
Author:
Guglielmo, Thomas A  Search this
Physical description:
xiv, 509 pages illustrations 25 cm
Type:
Books
History
Place:
United States
États-Unis
Date:
2021
20th century
20e siècle
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945--Participation, African American  Search this
Discrimination in the military--History  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Social aspects  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Participation, Hispanic American  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Participation, Indian  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Participation, Asian American  Search this
Guerre mondiale, 1939-1945--Aspect social  Search this
HISTORY / Military / World War II  Search this
HISTORY / African American & Black  Search this
HISTORY / Indigenous Peoples of the Americas  Search this
Armed Forces--African Americans  Search this
Discrimination in the military  Search this
Military participation--African American  Search this
Military participation--Indian  Search this
Social aspects  Search this
Armed Forces  Search this
African Americans  Search this
History  Search this
Indian  Search this
Hispanic Americans  Search this
Asian Americans  Search this
Forces armées  Search this
Noirs américains  Search this
Histoire  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1159185

Intellectual Property Rights for Indigenous Peoples

Collection Creator:
Medicine, Beatrice  Search this
Container:
Box 14
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1995
Collection Restrictions:
Materials relating to student grades, letters of recommendation, and evaluations have been restricted.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Beatrice Medicine papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Beatrice Medicine papers
Beatrice Medicine papers / Series 6: Civil Rights
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw381135042-0201-49ba-ae08-14392ed7185d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1997-05-ref418

Opening new frontiers for tribal Filipinos

Title:
Ethnic minorities, education toward self-determination
Physical description:
p. 4-77 ; 26 cm
Type:
Congresses
Place:
Philippines
Date:
1989
Topic:
Minorities--Education  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Minorities--Civil rights  Search this
Call number:
LC3740.P45 O64 1989
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_526616

Festival Recordings: Communications and Mapmaking: Recovering Native Knowledge; Quichua Traditions on Radio; Mapmaking

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Culture and Development Program 1994 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Wilkes, Will (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Andrade, Trinidad, 1971-  Search this
Salinas de Quispe, Ubaldina, 1957-  Search this
Bernal Trinidad, Andrade, 1971-  Search this
Radio Latacunga  Search this
Embera Wounaan Kuna Congress  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Ecuador
Date:
1994 July 2
Track Information:
101 Recovering Native Knowledge / Trinidad Andrade, Ubaldina Salinas de Quispe.

102 Quicha Traditions on Radio / Ubaldina Salinas de Quispe, Radio Latacunga, Andrade Bernal Trinidad.

103 Mapmaking and Natural Resources / Embera Wounaan Kuna Congress.
Local Numbers:
FP-1994-CT-0241
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 2, 1994.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Radio  Search this
Animal culture  Search this
Gender  Search this
Herbs -- Theraputic use  Search this
Education  Search this
Cartography  Search this
Indigenous peoples -- Civil rights  Search this
Borderlands  Search this
topography  Search this
Ecuadorians  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1994, Item FP-1994-CT-0241
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife / Series 3: Culture and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean / 3.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5f1a15609-2746-4b90-a405-47c43632ddd3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1994-ref679

Festival Recordings: Communications and Mapmaking: Mapmaking; Language Lessons on Rainforest Radio; Empower Indian Women

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Culture and Development Program 1994 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Wilkes, Will (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Utitiaj, Albino María, 1951-  Search this
Tankamash, Carlos Miguel  Search this
Radio Latacunga  Search this
CIMCA (Organization)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Bolivians  Search this
Shuar Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Ecuador
Oriente (Ecuador)
Bolivia
Oruro (Bolivia)
Date:
1994 July 2
Track Information:
101 Mapmaking and Natural Resources.

102 Language Lessons on Rainforest Radio / Radio Latacunga, Albino María Utitiaj, Carlos Miguel Tankamash.

103 Education to Empower Indian Women / CIMCA (Organization).
Local Numbers:
FP-1994-CT-0242
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 2, 1994.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Cartography  Search this
Indigenous peoples -- Civil rights  Search this
Borderlands  Search this
topography  Search this
Radio  Search this
Education  Search this
Language instruction  Search this
language  Search this
Gender  Search this
Ecuadorians  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1994, Item FP-1994-CT-0242
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife / Series 3: Culture and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean / 3.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk52729cbe5-4423-4319-a715-e250188b09e6
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1994-ref680

Festival Recordings: Communications and Mapmaking: Wedding on Radio; Technology Lessons; Education and Native Right

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Culture and Development Program 1994 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Place, Janet L. (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Utitiaj, Albino María, 1951-  Search this
Treviño, Germán, 1958-  Search this
Andrade, Trinidad, 1971-  Search this
Salinas de Quispe, Ubaldina, 1957-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Bolivians  Search this
Shuar Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Ecuador
Bolivia
Date:
1994 July 3
Track Information:
101 A Community Wedding on Indian Radio.

102 Technology Lessons on Rainforest Radio / Albino María Utitiaj.

103 Education and Native Rights / Germán Treviño, Trinidad Andrade, Ubaldina Salinas de Quispe.

104 Indian Radio and Land Rights.
Local Numbers:
FP-1994-CT-0243
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 3, 1994.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Community  Search this
Clothing and dress  Search this
Gender  Search this
Marriage  Search this
Weddings  Search this
Education  Search this
Natural resources  Search this
Fishing  Search this
Hunting  Search this
Tools -- Design and construction  Search this
Radio  Search this
Empowerment  Search this
Indigenous peoples -- Civil rights  Search this
Games  Search this
Land use  Search this
Land, rights, laws  Search this
Ecuadorians  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1994, Item FP-1994-CT-0243
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife / Series 3: Culture and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean / 3.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5da3b207c-f547-443e-aedb-a03db3355042
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1994-ref681

Festival Recordings: Communications and Mapmaking: CIMCA; Radio Latacunga

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Culture and Development Program 1994 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Fane, Linda (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Andrade, Trinidad, 1971-  Search this
Salinas de Quispe, Ubaldina, 1957-  Search this
Guamán, Jorge Gonzalo  Search this
Martina Ninasunta Changoluisa, Maria  Search this
CIMCA (Organization)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Bolivians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Bolivia
Oruro (Bolivia)
Ecuador
Date:
1994 July 4
Track Information:
101 Education and Cultural Identity / CIMCA (Organization), Trinidad Andrade, Ubaldina Salinas de Quispe.

102 Radio Latacunga / Jorge Gonzalo Guamán, Maria Martina Ninasunta Changoluisa.
Local Numbers:
FP-1994-CT-0245
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 4, 1994.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Education  Search this
Radio  Search this
Gender  Search this
Puppet theater  Search this
Rain forests  Search this
Indigenous peoples -- Civil rights  Search this
Ecuadorians  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1994, Item FP-1994-CT-0245
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife / Series 3: Culture and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean / 3.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk52151bdd5-8c29-41a3-b61d-c8c7fd65cbaa
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1994-ref683

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