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Eugene O. Leonard photograph collection relating to Pocatello and Fort Hall, Idaho

Collector:
Leonard, Eugene O.  Search this
Publisher:
Albertype Co.  Search this
Cardinell-Vincent Co.  Search this
Detroit Photographic Co.  Search this
Detroit Publishing Co.  Search this
H.G. Zimmerman & Co.  Search this
J.L. Robbins Co.  Search this
Newman Postcard Co.  Search this
The Rotograph Co.  Search this
Union Pacific Railroad Company  Search this
Van Ornum Colorprint Co.  Search this
Andrews, Wesley  Search this
Mitchell, Edward H.  Search this
Tammen, Harry Heye, 1856-1924  Search this
Thayer, Frank S.  Search this
Photographer:
Bennett's Lightning Portraits  Search this
Eastman Kodak Company  Search this
Hedum and Bishop  Search this
Newcomb Bros.  Search this
Rodgers and Newing  Search this
Todd Photograhic Co.  Search this
William L. Koehne Studio  Search this
Ahuja, D. A.  Search this
Cobb, George N.  Search this
Gifford, Benjamin A.  Search this
Haynes, F. Jay (Frank Jay), 1853-1921  Search this
Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942  Search this
McEvoy, J. J.  Search this
Rise, Carl H., 1888-1939  Search this
Rothrock, George H.  Search this
Savage, C. R. (Charles Roscoe), 1832-1909  Search this
Vroman, A. C. (Adam Clark), 1856-1916  Search this
Weitfle, Charles, 1836-1921  Search this
Wrensted, Benedicte, 1859-1949  Search this
Names:
United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs. Fort Hall Agency  Search this
Leonard, Robert M. (photo album compiler and donor)  Search this
Extent:
4 Glass positives
6 Prints and postcards (photogravure)
1 Tintype
100 Negatives (circa, glass)
220 Copy prints (circa)
9 Prints and postcards (cyanotype)
99 Items (99 photomechanical prints and postcards, halftone, color halftone, collotype, photgravure)
1,000 Negatives (circa, nitrate)
734 Photographic prints (circa, silver gelatin, albumen, and platinum (including photographic postcards and cabinet cards))
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Bannock  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Glass positives
Prints and postcards
Tintypes
Negatives
Copy prints
Photographic prints
Postcards
Photographs
Place:
Soda Springs (Idaho)
Yellowstone National Park
Fort Hall Indian Reservation (Idaho)
Pocatello (Idaho)
Shoshone Falls (Idaho)
Date:
circa 1880-1920
Scope and Contents note:
Unbound album pages (labeled A through Q) with photographs documenting the people and culture of the Pocatello-Fort Hall area, including Native Americanss (particularly Shoshone-Bannock tribes), agency employees, and missionaries. Included are images of encampments, Sun Dance ceremonies, the Fort Hall Agency, Indian schools and churches, the Run for Fort Hall Lands on June 17, 1902, the War Bonnett Roundup at Idaho Falls, Shoshone Falls and other natural features and landscapes, a large number of street and aerial views of Pocatello, A. L. Cook's drug store in Pocatello, and members of the Cook family. In addition, there are photographs of Nez Perce, Hopi, San Juan, and Navaho Indians, and one image of the Lapps Indians at Port Townsend, Washington. A large number of the photographs were made by Benedicte Wrensted.

The albums were compiled by Robert Leonard, Eugene O. Leonard's son, who also made copy prints of many of the photographs and negatives. They include flyers, newspapers, envelopes, and other scraps collected by Leonard.
Biographical/Historical note:
Eugene O. Leonard (1884-1964) moved to Pocatello, Idaho, in 1893 to live with his aunt, the widow of A. L. Cook and owner of the Cook building and drugstore. Leonard attended Weiser College and Academy (now College of Idaho), Whitman College, and Northwestern University. He acquired degrees in phamacy and pharmaceutical chemistry from Northwestern University, and a degree in assaying studies from the Chicago College of Chemistry. After graduation from the College in 1908, Leonard returned to Pocatello to manage the Cook Drug Store until 1918. He worked as Pocatello City Chemist and set up the College of Pharmacy at Idaho State College, where he also taught and served as dean (1918-1954). In the 1930s, Leonard obtained a MS and PhD from Utah State University. Possibly encouraged by his collector aunt, Leonard established a collection of Native material culture objects and documentations, including artifacts and these photograhs, based on his interest in the Shoshoni and Bannock tribes at nearby Fort Hall.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 92-3
Location of Other Archival Materials:
The Idaho Museum of Natural History at Idaho State University holds artifacts collected by Eugene O. Leonard.
The Bannock County Historical Museum in Pocatello holds the Leonard Family Papers, 1893-1917.
Restrictions:
Original nitrate negatives are in cold storage and require advanced notice for viewing. Many have associated prints.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Pharmacy  Search this
Sun Dance  Search this
Schools  Search this
Camps  Search this
Dance  Search this
Genre/Form:
Postcards
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 92-3, Eugene O. Leonard photograph collection relating to Pocatello and Fort Hall, Idaho, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.92-3
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-92-3
Online Media:

Postcard collection relating to Fox and other Native American tribes

Extent:
7 Postcards (7 postcards: halftone and color)
12 photographic postcards and prints (silver gelatin and albumen)
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Sicangu Lakota (Brulé Sioux)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Ho-Chunk (Winnebago)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Postcards
Place:
Tama County (Iowa)
Sac and Fox Reservation (Iowa)
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents note:
The collection consists largely of images of Fox Indians of Tama, Iowa, including portraits of families, delegates, and dancers, as well as images of food preparation and a wigwam. It also includes images of a Taos woman baking and portraits of Crow, Dakota, Navajo, and Winnebago people, including Chief Spotted Tail, Chief Crazy Horse, artist Max Big Man, and Chief White Cloud.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Postcards
Citation:
Photo lot 88-24, Postcard collection to Fox and other Native American tribes, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.88-24
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-88-24

Sacred Deer Drawn on Red Rock Just North of Village of Jemes Photograph of Relief Drawing

Collection Creator:
Reagan, Albert B., 1871-1936  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (leaf )
Culture:
Jemez Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
n.d
Local Numbers:
NAA INV 08687900

NAA MS 1658
Local Note:
photograph of Relief drawing
Topic:
Works of art  Search this
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 1658, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 1658 Jemez, Open and Secret
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms1658-ref31
Online Media:

George Demont Otis papers

Creator:
Otis, George Demont, 1879-1962  Search this
Names:
Hartley, Grace, 1905-  Search this
Nixon, Pat, 1912-1993  Search this
Extent:
172 Items ((partially microfilmed on 2 reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Date:
1931-1974
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence; photographs; writings; printed material; miscellaneous papers regarding Otis and his work collected by his niece, Grace J. Hartley.
REEL 266: Correspondence, biographical material, poetry, notes on Southwest Indians, lists of paintings, photographs of Otis and his work, sketchbooks, clippings, catalogs, announcements, and miscellaneous papers.
REEL 2813: Seven photographs of Otis' works; clippings; a biographical sketch, 1948; letters, 1973-1974; and exhibition announcements, 1974.
UNMICROFILMED: Photocopies of letters, clippings, announcements, and resumés. Included is a letter from Patricia Nixon to Hartley thanking her for a painting by Otis.
Biographical / Historical:
Landscape painter and teacher; San Francisco Bay Area and Los Angeles, California. Specialized in paintings of Indians.
Provenance:
Material on reel 266 lent for microfilming by Otis' neice Grace Hartley in 1971; she donated additonal material in 1974.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Painters -- California  Search this
Art teachers -- California  Search this
Topic:
Indians of North America  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Identifier:
AAA.otisgeor
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-otisgeor

Willard Leroy Metcalf papers

Creator:
Metcalf, Willard Leroy, 1858-1925  Search this
Names:
Freer, Charles Lang, 1856-1919  Search this
Griswold, Florence, 1850-1937  Search this
Extent:
150 Items ((on partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Date:
1876-1925
Scope and Contents:
23 letters between Metcalf and Charles L. Freer, 1917-1919, discussing prospective purchases of Metcalf's work for the Freer Collection, and 2 personal letters to Florence Griswold, 1905-06. Also included are a diary for 1876, recording the progress of some of his paintings, detailing sketching trips around Boston and Vermont, and noting daily expenses; sketchbooks, 1885, 1905, 1913-14; photographs of his murals and paintings; snapshots of his friends and himself; and a scrapbook of clippings, 1905-1925.
Biographical / Historical:
Landscape painter, illustrator; New York City. One of The Ten American Painters. Worked in Southwest U.S. painting Zuni Indians 1881-1883; associated with artists' colonies in Old Lyme, Conn., and Cornish, N.H.
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming by Addison Metcalf, 1969.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Landscape painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Painting, American  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Identifier:
AAA.metcwill2
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-metcwill2

Edward Harvey Davis photograph collection

Creator:
Davis, Edward H., b. 1862  Search this
Extent:
770 Photographic prints (approximate number, black & white)
2000 Negatives (photographic) (approximate number)
Culture:
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Cora  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Cochimi  Search this
Cahuilla  Search this
Cocopa  Search this
Cora  Search this
Hualapai (Walapai)  Search this
Kiliwa  Search this
Kumeyaay (Diegueño)  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Opata  Search this
Piipaash (Maricopa)  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Seri  Search this
Tohono O'odham (Papago)  Search this
Wixarika (Huichol)  Search this
Yavapai  Search this
Chemehuevi  Search this
Yoreme (Mayo)  Search this
Nevome (Pima Bajo)  Search this
Paipai (Pi-Pi/Pais)  Search this
Guaycura (Waicuri)  Search this
Yoeme (Yaqui)  Search this
Campo Band of Kumeyaay  Search this
Kamia (Desert Kumeyaay)  Search this
Manzanita Band of Kumeyaay  Search this
San Carlos Apache  Search this
White Mountain Apache  Search this
Pechanga Band Luiseño  Search this
Soboba Luiseño  Search this
Payómkawichum (Luiseño)  Search this
Yavapai [Fort McDowell]  Search this
Cahuilla [Morongo Band of Mission Indians]  Search this
Desert Cahuilla [Torres-Martinez Reservation/Torres-Martinez Band]  Search this
Yoeme (Yaqui) [Pascua Yaqui]  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Negatives (photographic)
Negatives
Place:
Mexico
Arizona
California
Date:
1903-1939
Summary:
Davis visited the Diegueno and Luiseno in southern California; the Pi-pi (Pais), Kil-e-wah (Cahuilla), and Waicuri of Lower California, Mexico; the Yuma, Cocopah, Pima, Papago, Maricopa, Mojave, Hualapai (Walapai), Yaqui, and White Mountain Apache in Arizona; the Cora, Huichol, Opata, Mayo, and Yaqui of Mexico; the Seri of Tiburon Island; the Chemehuevi of Nevada and California; the Modoc and Klamath Lake Indians in Oregon; and the Paiute in Nevada. His collection contains photographs of Apache, Cahuilla, Chemehuevi, Cochimi, Cochiti Pueblo, Cocopa, Cora, Guaicuruj, Huichol, Kawia, Kiliwa, Kumeyaay (Diegueno), Luiseno, Maricopa, Mayo, Mission, Mohave, Opata, Paipai, Papago (Tohono O'odham), Pima (Akimel O'odham), San Carlos Pueblo, San Manuel, Seri, Ute, Walapai (Hualapai), Yaqui, and Yuma.
Arrangement note:
Collection arranged by item number.
Biographical/Historical note:
Artist, photographer, and artefact collector, Edward Harvey Davis was born on June 18, 1862 in New York. He traveled to California in 1884 for health reasons (Bright's disease i.e. actue of chronic nephritis (a kidney disorder)), arriving in 1885, and settled on 320 acres in an area called Mesa Grande, east of San Diego. Later that year he returned to New York to marry, bringing his new bride, Anna May Wells back to California with him. They would eventually have four children. Shortly after settling in California, Davis became interested in the the Kumeyaay (Northern Diguenos), the Mesa Grande Indians indigenous to that area, and spent the remainder of his life collecting artifacts, studying and photographing them. He collected so many items that his ranch house ran out of room for them, necessitating the building of another structure (adobe) to house them. As a result of this interest and care of the Mesa Grande Indians in San Diego County, in 1907, Davis was named a ceremonial chief by the Indians themselves. Originally trained as an artist, Davis first worked as a drafter and architect. Upon his arrival in San Diego in 1885, he fortuitously invested in and profited from the booming real estate industry of the time. Davis became known to George Gustav Heye when Heye initially purchased a collection of Indian artifacts from him for the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation in 1915. With the money from the sale of his collection, Davis was able to open a resort lodge called the Powam that same year. His real estate investments and his lodge enabled Davis to finance his fieldwork, most of which he did on his own. In 1916 however, Davis also became an official field collector for the Museum of the American Indian in New York. Sporadically, from 1917 to 1930, Heye contracted Davis to conduct field trips to California, Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Mexico, and Tiburon Island, visiting over two dozen different Indian peoples in the course of his travels. Wherever he went, Davis continued to photograph the Native peoples, but did not consider these photographs to be part of his contract with Heye. Heye later purchased the bulk of Davis's photograph collection. Davis also had sketched objects and landscapes during his travels as a method of preserving what he saw. Davis died in San Bernardino on February 22, 1951. In addition to his photographs, Davis authored several scholarly articles.
Provenance:
Purchased;, Edward H. Davis;, 1917 and 1948.
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
Topic:
Indians of Mexico -- Photographs  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest -- Photographs  Search this
Indians of North America -- Basin -- Photographs  Search this
Indians of North America -- California -- Photographs  Search this
Indians of North America -- Arizona -- Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Photographic prints
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.031
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-031

Fred Harvey Company collection of Carl Moon Southwest photographs

Photographer:
Moon, Carl, 1878-1948  Search this
Publisher:
Fred Harvey (Firm)  Search this
Extent:
434 Photographs
Container:
Box 1
Culture:
Havasupai (Coconino)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Tesuque Pueblo  Search this
White Mountain Apache  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Hopi [Sipaulovi]  Search this
Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo)  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographs
Place:
San Felipe Pueblo (N.M.)
Arizona
New Mexico
Date:
1907-1914
Summary:
This collection contains photographs that were commissioned by Fred Harvey Co. and shot by Carl Moon circa 1907-1914. The photographs depict American Indian communities in the southwest including A:shiwi (Zuni), Acoma Pueblo, Diné (Navajo), Hopi, Laguna Pueblo, and Taos Pueblo among many others.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains 203 glass transparencies, 2 nitrate negatives, and 1 autochrome (plus 228 copy negatives and copy transparencies) that were commissioned by Fred Harvey Co. and shot by Carl moon circa 1905-1914. The photographs depict the southwest American Indian communities of A:shiwi (Zuni), Acoma Pueblo, Dine (Navajo), Havasupai (Coconino), Hopi Pueblo, Isleta Pueblo, K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo), Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo), Laguna Pueblo, Nambe Pueblo, Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo), San Felipe Pueblo, San Ildefonso Pueblo, Taos Pueblo, Tesuque Pueblo, and White Mountain Apache. Some images were also shot in Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona. The photographs are a mix of portraits, posed action shots, and architecture shots. Some of the photographs appear to have been staged by the photographer. There are a few photographs in this collection that may have been shot by Moon prior to his employment with the Fred Harvey Company.

The copy negatives and transparencies were created by the Museum of the American Indian (NMAI's predecessor museum). There are sometimes multiple copy negatives and copy transparencies per glass plate transparency.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 17 series by culture group or location. Series 1: A:shiwi (Zuni), Series 2: Acoma Pueblo, Series 3: Diné (Navajo), Series 4: Havasupai (Coconino), Series 5: Hopi, Series 6: Isleta Pueblo, Series 7: K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo), Series 8: Kewa (Santa Domingo Pueblo), Series 9: Laguna Pueblo, Series 10: Nambe Pueblo, Series 11: Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo), Series 12: San Felipe Pueblo, Series 13: San Ildefonso Pueblo, Series 14: Taos Pueblo, Series 15: Tesuque Pueblo, Series 16: White Mountain Apache, Series 17: Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

The collection is physically arranged first by collection type (transparencies and negatives) and then in photo numeric order.
Biographical / Historical:
Born in 1878 in Wilmington, Ohio, Carl E. Moon (originally spelled Karl) took up photography after serving with the Ohio National Guard. He moved to Albuquerque, N.M. in 1903 and opened a photograph studio where he began photographing American Indians in the U.S. southwest region. After publishing and exhibiting many of his photographs nationally, he was commissioned by the Fred Harvey Company in 1907 to take photographs of American Indian communities in the southwest. The Fred Harvey Company was founded by Frederick Henry Harvey and consisted of a chain of successful gift shops, restaurants, and hotels know as Harvey Houses. Moon photographed individuals in his El Tovar Studio in the Grand Canyon, Ariz. and also traveled to communities in the region including A:shiwi (Zuni), Diné (Navajo), Hopi, and Laguna Pueblo, among many others. The Fred Harvey Company used these photographs in their postcards, brochures, and publications for the tourist industry. The Fred Harvey Company also partnered with the Sante Fe Railroad to help generate tourism to the southwest region and Moon became the official photographer for the railroad. Moon also took up drawing and painting and studied with American painter Thomas Moran. Moon stayed with the Fred Harvey Company until 1914.

After Moon left the Fred Harvey Company, he opened a studio in Pasadena, California and continued his career as a photographer and painter. During this period, Moon painted and donated 26 works depicting Southwest American Indians to the Smithsonian Institution (now in the Smithsonian American Art Museum's collection). He also sold 24 oil paintings and 293 photographic prints to Henry E. Huntington that are now part of the Huntington Library in San Marino California. With his wife Grace Purdie Moon, he also produced and illustrated children's books of collected Native American stories and legends. Moon died in San Francisco, Calif. in 1948.
Related Materials:
The Huntington Library in San Marino California holds a large collection of Carl Moon works, including oil paintings and photographic prints. The University of Arizona Libraries, Special Collections also holds photographs shot by Carl Moon and the Smithsonian American Art Museum holds 26 Carl Moon paintings.
Separated Materials:
Two nitrate negatives are stored at an offsite storage facility.
Provenance:
Donated to the Museum of the American Indian by the Fred Harvey Company in 1963.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Some images restricted: Cultural Sensitivity.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Arizona  Search this
Indians of North America -- New Mexico  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Fred Harvey Company collection of Carl Moon Southwest photographs, Box and Photo Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.090
See more items in:
Fred Harvey Company collection of Carl Moon Southwest photographs
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-090
Online Media:

Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation ethnographic film collection

Creator:
Cadzow, Donald A., 1894-1960  Search this
Cattell, Owen  Search this
Coffin, Edwin F. (Edwin Francis), b. 1883  Search this
Ford, James B., 1844-1928  Search this
Gilmore, Melvin R. (Melvin Randolph), 1868-1940  Search this
Hendricks-Hodge Expedition (1917-1923).  Search this
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Landini, Louis  Search this
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Wildschut, William  Search this
Names:
Chaves, Lorenzo  Search this
Drags Wolf  Search this
Foolish Bear  Search this
Heye, Thea  Search this
Mandan, Arthur  Search this
Waihusiwa  Search this
Extent:
147 Motion picture films
25 Videocassettes (Digital Betacam)
58 Electronic discs (DVD)
Culture:
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Minitari (Hidatsa)  Search this
Pilagá  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Motion picture films
Videocassettes (digital betacam)
Electronic discs (dvd)
Date:
1917-1938
Scope and Contents note:
This collection of films produced and acquired by the Museum of the American Indian (MAI) contains materials created by and for the MAI as ethnographic studies and as documentation of its own activities (including archaeological expeditions and cultural exchanges) between 1917 and 1938. Tribes represented include: Arikara, Crow, Navajo, Pilaga, Pueblo, Shoshone, and Zuni. Also included is footage of Hidatsa representatives and Zuni translators in Washington, D.C. and at the MAI; footage of MAI founder and director George Gustav Heye; and footage of the Hawikku (Hawikuh) and Kechipauan archaeological sites, Zuni Pueblo, New Mexico. The collection consists mainly of successive 16mm and 35mm negative film duplicates and prints of now-destroyed original 35mm nitrate negatives. Series 4 gathers paper records directly pertaining to the collection. Preservation copies of the films exist on 35mm polyester film and Digital Betacam video tape. Access copies are available on DVDs.

The first series in this collection includes film, video, and DVD duplicates of ethnographic films funded, overseen, and filmed by agents of the MAI throughout the Western and Southwestern United States. The second series includes ethnographic films acquired rather than produced by the MAI of the Navajo and Pilaga. The third series consists of film produced by the MAI documenting its own activities, including an excavation at Hawikuh and Kechipauan, New Mexico; footage of MAI founder and director George Gustav Heye; and footage of Native visitors to the MAI and to Washington, D.C.
Arrangement note:
This collection is arranged into four series and chronologically within each series. Included are Series 1: Films Produced by the Museum of the American Indian, 1923-1927; Series 2: Films Acquired by the Museum of the American Indian, 1923-1924; Series 3: Documentation of Museum of the American Indian Activities, 1917-1938; and Series 4: Paper Records of the Ethnographic Film Collection. Titles within subseries are generally arranged alphabetically, with unrestricted titles listed before those restricted due to culturally sensitive content.

Within the collection, each unit of motion picture film (reel, videotape, or DVD) is assigned an identifying number. In this system, the final four appended numbers correspond to a title and a format. The full identifying number will appear as such: NMAI.AC.001.001.XX.YY, where XX corresponds to a numbered title and YY indicates the format of the print, as follows:

01: 35mm print (1917–1938, circa the original film dates)

02: 16mm dupe neg (made circa 1961 from XX.01 35mm)

03: 16mm print (from XX.02 for release, circa 1961)

04: 16mm print (from XX.02 for file/work or research, circa 1961)

05: 35mm dupe neg (preservation copy, made 2012–2014 from XX.01 and XX.02)

06: 35mm answer print (made 2012-2014 from XX.05)

07: Digital Betacam (preservation copy, made 2012-2014 from XX.06)

08, 09, 10 (if applicable): DVD (access copy, made 2012-2014 from XX.06)

11 and up: other copies and prints (see title-level notes for explanations)

Thus, for instance, the item with the number NMAI.AC.001.001.02.03 is the 16mm release print copy of the title "Deerskin Tanning and Wrapping the Leggings."

The content of each print or negative corresponding to the same title (XX) may be identical or similar. The content of the 1917-1938-era 35mm prints and the 1960s-era 16mm films differ. As the 35mm prints had deteriorated, damaged footage was removed prior to producing the 16mm negatives. After the 16mm negatives were produced, nitrate intertitles and additional damaged footage were also removed from the 35mm prints. The 2012-2014-era 35mm films were made by combining the existing 35mm prints with footage from the 16mm negatives in order to restore the most complete existing content to its highest possible quality. The Digital Betacam and DVD copies reproduce this restored footage.

This preservation and restoration effort was made possible by funding from the National Film Preservation Foundation, Save America's Treasures, and the Smithsonian Collections Care and Preservation Fund, as well as support from the National Museum of the American Indian.
Historical Note:
The Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation was founded by George Gustav Heye in 1908 as a repository for his extensive collection of American Indian artifacts. Through the MAI, Heye funded extensive archaeological and anthropological fieldwork throughout the Americas. This collection represents a series of ethnographic films made in the course of MAI expeditions throughout the Western and Southwestern United States, as well as similar films purchased by the museum. The films record a variety of American Indian traditions, including crafts, foodways, games, and ceremonies, and were spurred by the era's perception of Native communities as "fast-disappearing" and vulnerable to dramatic change. The activities recorded range from quotidian to highly culturally sensitive, as followed Heye's all-encompassing collecting strategy.

The MAI's motion picture expeditions took place between 1923 and 1927 and were carried out by a number of agents of the museum, usually in the course of gathering artifacts. Many of these agents were anthropologists accompanied by professional photographers, but other footage is amateur. The MAI treated the series in full as technical educational material, noting in their 1962 motion picture film catalog that "they are not suitable for general entertainment."

The moving image collection of the MAI included these self-produced films as well as similar films purchased by the museum and film shot in the course of the museum's activities, including documentation of archaeological digs, staff, and Native visitors. In 1961-1962, recognizing the educational potential of its collection, the MAI received a grant from the National Science Foundation to transfer the original deteriorating nitrate prints to safety film, discarding film and editing prints in the process. In 2012-2014, the National Museum of the American Indian completed a transfer of the titles to Digital Betacam and DVD formats, combining footage from both original and 1961-1962-era prints to salvage as much content as possible. This work was completed with funding from the National Film Preservation Foundation, Save America's Treasures, and the Smithsonian Collections Care and Preservation Fund.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday–Thursday, 9:30 am–4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).

Ceremonial images are restricted due to cultural sensitivity. Consult the archivist for further information.
Rights:
Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Archaeological expeditions  Search this
Archeology -- Hawikuh -- New Mexico  Search this
Ethnological expeditions  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Antiquities  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Indians of North America -- Social life and customs  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest  Search this
Indians of South America  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Museum of the American Indian Ethnographic Film Collection, Call Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.001
See more items in:
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation ethnographic film collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-001

MS 7211 Description of a basket in the USNM collection

Creator:
Dodge, K. T. (Katherine Taylor)  Search this
Names:
Chilchuana, Apache  Search this
Nets-a-dis-pat, Apache  Search this
Extent:
3 Pages
Culture:
Apache  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Writer claims the basket is the largest ever brought into the San Carlos agency. The basket was made by Nets-a-dis-pat, wife of Chilchuana. Note largely concerns the price of the basket and obtaining it for the museum. Notes suggests there was also a photograph but it has not been located.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 7211
Topic:
Baskets  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 7211, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS7211
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms7211

MS 4741 Material concerning painting of Navajo War God

Creator:
Symonds, Harry S.  Search this
Extent:
9 Pages
Culture:
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Photographs
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Transmitting photograph and explanation of picture of Navaho War God, painted by native artist. Correspondence, 1953-54, 5 pages; explanation of picture and translation of War God's horse song, 4 pages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4741
Topic:
Navaho  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Manuscript 4741, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4741
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4741

MS 7137 Orator Fuller Cook papers

Creator:
Cook, O. F. (Orator Fuller), 1867-1949  Search this
Author:
Archer, W. Andrew (William Andrew), 1894-1973  Search this
Photographer:
Waite, C. B. (Charles Betts), 1861-1927  Search this
Extent:
57 Pages
71 Photographs
Culture:
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Hohokam Tradition (archaeological culture)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Photographs
Place:
Arizona
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Includes "Pima Baskets with Labyrinth Designs," with apparently related shorter manuscripts, bibliographic data, and photographs of Casa Grande and baskets, some in use. Also includes W. Andrew Archer's "Bibliography of O.F. Cook," June 15, 1950. In addition, photographs of artifacts, most anthropomorphic; a Hohokam pottery collection from southern Arizona; and photographs of mummies and Mexican antiquities by C.B. Waite.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 7137
Other Title:
Pima Baskets with Labyrinth Designs
Bibliography of O.F. Cook
Topic:
Basket making -- Pima  Search this
Archeology -- Arizona  Search this
Archeology -- Mexico  Search this
Pima (Akimel O'odham)  Search this
Mexico  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Manuscript 7137, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS7137
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms7137

MS 3951 Sketch of a pattern of a sandal of yucca fibre from cliff-dwelling No. 3, Jicarilla Apache Reservation, Dulce, N.M

Extent:
1 Page
1 Photograph
Culture:
Jicarilla Apache  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Photographs
Drawings
Date:
August 1898
Scope and Contents:
Includes four sketches and 1 photograph of designs in sandstone wall, Cliff-dwelling No. 2, Jicarilla Apache Reservation.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3951
Topic:
Dulce (Rio Arriba County, New Mexico) -- Archeology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Photographs
Citation:
Manuscript 3951, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3951
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3951

Colonel Gus Artsman photograph collection from Fort Sumner

Collector:
Artsman, Gus, Colonel  Search this
Extent:
4 Copy negatives (35 mm)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Mescalero Apache  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Copy negatives
Place:
Fort Sumner (N.M. : Fort)
Date:
circa 1865
Scope and Contents note:
Three portraits of Native Americans of the Southwest, probably Navajo or Mescalero, and one image of two Dakota people. The portraits were likely made at Fort Sumner and may have been made by Artsman. The image of Dakota individuals is probably a commercial photograph.
Biographical/Historical note:
Colonel Gus Artsman was an army officer who served at Ft. Sumner, New Mexico, around 1864-1866.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 78-5
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Citation:
Photo lot 78-5, Colonel Gus Artsman photograph collection relating to Fort Sumner, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.78-5
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-78-5

Gary Auerbach portraits of Native American people

Creator:
Auerbach, Gary  Search this
Extent:
44 Prints (platinum)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Kickapoo  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Apache  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Tohono O'odham (Papago)  Search this
Mescalero Apache  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Photographs
Place:
Chelly, Canyon de (Ariz.)
Taos Pueblo (N.M.)
Date:
1992-2003
Scope and Contents note:
The collection contains individual and group portraits of Native American people. Tribal affiliations include Apache, Arapaho, Assiniboine, Delaware, Isleta, Kickapoo, Mescalero Apache, Navajo, San Carlos Apache, Sioux, Taos, and Tohono O'odham. There are also includes images of weavers, dancers, tipis, Canyon de Chelly, Taos Pueblo, and Taos cemetery, as well as a self-portrait of Gary Auerbach. Also included is one autostereoscopic multidimensional platinum print. Additionally, the collection contains Auerbach's book, We Walk In Beauty, which pairs the portraits with excerpts of interviews that Auerbach conducted with the individuals, and promotional materials including exhibit announcements and catalogs.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into two series: 1. Photographs, and 2. Printed material.
Biographical Note:
Following a career as a chiropractor, Gary Auerbach became a professional photographer in 1991. Concerned about the long-term permanence of his photographs, Auerbach taught himself the platinum printing process. From 1992 to 2003, Auerbach made portraits of a number of Native American people, also asking each individual a series of biographical questions. He published the photographs and short biographies in his book, We Walk in Beauty.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 2004-13
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use and access.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 2004-13, Gary Auerbach portraits of Native American people, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.2004-13
See more items in:
Gary Auerbach portraits of Native American people
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-2004-13
Online Media:

Duane H. King photographs of Mikasuki tribal fair

Creator:
King, Duane H.  Search this
Extent:
13 Color prints
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Miccosukee Seminole (Mikasuki)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Color prints
Color photographs
Photographs
Place:
Florida
Date:
1980
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs documenting the Mikasuki tribal fair on December 31, 1980, including Aztec dancers, musician Buffy St. Marie, craftspeople, and visitors.
Biographical/Historical note:
Duane King was an anthropology scholar of Native Americans, particularly the Cherokee. From 1975 to 1982, he served as director of the Museum of the Cherokee Indian in North Carolina. Afterwards, he became executive director of the Cherokee National Historical Society in Tahlequah, assistant director for the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of the American Indian at the Heye Center in New York City, executive director of the Middle Oregon Historical Society in Warm Springs, Oregon, and executive director of the Southwest Museum of the American Indian/Autry National Center in Los Angeles, Califorinia. In 2008 he was named Vice President for Museum Affairs and Director of the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 81-45
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional images of tribal fairs can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in the BAE historical negatives and Photo Lot 24.
The National Museum of the American Indian and the Archives Center at the National Museum of American History also hold photographs of American Indian fairs.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Fairs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color photographs
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 81-45, Duane King photographs of Mikasuki tribal fair, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.81-45
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-81-45

Lee Howard Marmon photographic prints and contact sheets

Creator:
Marmon, Lee Howard, 1925 -  Search this
Names:
Bolger, Ray  Search this
Eisenhower, Mamie Doud, 1896-1979  Search this
Hope, Bob, 1903-2003  Search this
Lewis, Lucy M.  Search this
Extent:
36 Photographic prints (black and white; color)
2 Contact sheets (2 contact sheets (9 photographs each), color)
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Contact sheets
Portraits
Photographs
Place:
New Mexico
Date:
circa 1950-1987
Summary:
The Lee Howard Marmon photographic prints and contact sheets contain 36 color and black and white photographic prints and two color contact sheets of 9 images each. Subjects include Laguna and Acoma elders (1950-1965), publicity images of celebrities (1967-1973), Native American portraiture (circa 1987), the New Mexico pueblos and landscape, and the potter Lucy M. Lewis, her daughters, and their pottery (1987).
Arrangement note:
Prints: organized in folders; arranged numerically by image number
Biographical/Historical note:
Lee Howard Marmon was born as the second son of Lily and Henry "Hank" Marmon on September 25, 1925 in Laguna, New Mexico. Marmon's interest in photography was sparked when he took his first photograph at the age of 11 of an automobile accident on Route 66. Initially planning to attend the University of New Mexico to study geology, Marmon dropped out after several semesters to begin his World War II career as a Sergeant-Major on Shemya Island, Alaska in 1943. Marmon's service to the United States in the Aleutian chain lasted until 1946, after which he returned to Laguna.

Marmon retained an interest in photography and purchased his first professional camera, a 2¼ x 2¾ Speed Graphic. Later in his career, he would use a 4x5 Speed Graphic, a Rolleiflex, a Hasselblad Superwide, and a Hasselblad C model. When Marmon began photographing, he favored Kodachrome sheet film (ASA 8) and super speed B&W (ASA 100). As Marmon was learning this new hobby, his civilian life included employment as the Laguna postmaster and as a worker in his father's store, The Laguna Trading Post. Photography escalated from a hobby to a more serious pursuit after Marmon's father suggested that his son bring a camera along while making store deliveries in order to take portraits of the Laguna elders. These early black and white photographs, taken using fixed-lens cameras and natural light, became some of Marmon's most well-known images.

While Marmon mainly focused on documenting the traditions and lifestyles of the Laguna and Acoma Pueblos, a departure from this theme occurred when he moved from New Mexico to Palm Springs, California in 1966. As the official photographer for the Bob Hope Desert Classic Golf Tournament from 1967 until 1973, Marmon took publicity photographs of golfers participating in the competition along with celebrity entertainers and guests at the accompanying Bob Hope Ball. Marmon also worked as a freelance photographer throughout this time, contributing to publications such as Time Magazine and The Saturday Evening Post, working as a still photographer for Columbia Pictures, and completing a commission from President and Mrs. Nixon to photograph a collection of New Mexican Puebloan pottery.

Marmon moved back to Laguna in 1982, and in the following years he showed his work in a variety of venues, opened a bookstore called The Blue-Eyed Indian, and won an ADDY award for his contribution to the PBS documentary series, Surviving Columbus: The Story of the Pueblo People. In 2003, Marmon published a book, The Pueblo Imagination: Landscape and Memory in the Photography of Lee Marmon, in collaboration with his daughter, author Leslie Marmon Silko, and poets Joy Harjo and Simon Ortiz. The book was heralded as a success, collecting first place awards from The Mountains and Plains Bookseller's Association and from Independent Publisher Online.

After the publication of his book, Marmon's photographic activity began to diminish. His final show, Pueblo Faces and Places, was held in 2007 at the Sky City Cultural Center in Acoma, New Mexico. In recognition for achievements in the photographic field, Marmon was honored as the 88th Annual Inter-Tribal Ceremonial's "Living Treasure" of 2009, the first photographer to be given the award. Throughout his life, Marmon produced a great volume of work. In May of 2009, he donated his personal papers and over 65,000 photographs to the Center for Southwest Research and Special Collections (CSWR) at the University of New Mexico. From a humble beginning of taking photographs of village elders, Marmon eventually built a career out of saving the memories of the Laguna and Acoma tribes and is now one of the country's best-known Native American photographers.
Restrictions:
Researchers must contact the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection. Contact information below.
Topic:
Laguna Indians  Search this
Acoma Indians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Portraits
Photographs
Citation:
Lee Howard Marmon photographic prints and contact sheets, circa 1950-1987, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number).
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.054
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-054

René Bache photograph collection relating to Apache people and Sumatra

Creator:
Bache, René, 1861-1933  Search this
Extent:
4 Prints (silver gelatin)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Apache  Search this
Indonesians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Photographs
Place:
Sumatra (Indonesia)
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs depicting dancers and tiger hunters in Sumatra and portraits of Apache people.
Biographical/Historical note:
René Bache (1861-1933) was a member of a prominent American family and resident of Washington, D.C. He was a journalist and popular writer on a variety of subjects, with publications in Scientific American, The Saturday Evening Post, and Illustrated World.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 106B
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional photographs collected by or relating to Bache held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 8, Photo Lot 14, Photo Lot 24, Photo Lot 78, and Photo Lot 97.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 106B, René Bache photograph collection relating to Apache people and Sumatra, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.106B
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-106b

Photographs of drawings of kachinas

Creator:
Fewkes, Jesse Walter, 1850-1930  Search this
Extent:
12 Prints (silver gelatin)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Pueblo Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Photographs
Date:
circa 1890s
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs of drawings depicting kachinas, which may have been collected for Jesse Walter Fewkes' papers on Hopi and Tusayan kachinas.
Biographical/Historical note:
Naturalist, anthropologist, and archeologist Jesse Walter Fewkes (1850‐1930) served as chief of the Bureau of American Ethnology from 1918 until his death in 1928. Fewkes received a Ph.D. in marine zoology from Harvard in 1877, and was curator of lower invertebrates at the Museum of Comparative Zoology until 1887. He developed an interest in the culture and history of Pueblo communities while on a collecting trip in the western United States. In 1891, Fewkes became director of the Hemenway Southwestern Archeological Expedition and editor of the Journal of American Archeology and Ethnology. In 1895 he embarked on various archeological explorations for the Bureau of American Ethnology, during which he conducted excavations in the Southwest, the West Indies, and Florida.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 134D
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Kachinas  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 134D, Photographs of drawings of kachinas, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.134D
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-134d

George Bird and Elizabeth Curtis Grinnell photograph collection

Creator:
Tuell, Julia E.  Search this
Grinnell, George Bird, 1849-1938  Search this
Extent:
119 Negatives (photographic) (119 glass plate negatives, black and white, 7 x 9 in.)
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Glass plate negatives
Place:
Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana
Rosebud County (Mont.)
Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma
Glacier National Park (Mont.)
Lame Deer (Mont.)
Washita County (Okla.)
Date:
1902-1910
Summary:
The core of this photographic collection (1902-1904) was taken during Grinnell's visits among the Northern (Montana, Rosebud County and Rosebud River, Lame Deer) and Southern (Washita County, Oklahoma) Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne). The photographs document domestic and daily life on the reservation (especially activies involving women), religious ceremonies, camps and dwellings, and important officials. The attributions of the photographs in this collection are far from certain. While many of these images appear to have been taken by Grinnell himself, a substantial portion were also taken by his wife Elizabeth Curtis Grinnell (b. 1876) and their friend Julia E. Tuell. A very small subset of these images (3) also depicts mountains and vistas in Glacier National Park (Flathead County, Glacier County) Montana.
Arrangement note:
negatives: organized in 6 boxes; arranged numerically by image number
Biographical/Historical note:
George Bird Grinnell, naturalist, conservationist and Indian rights activist, was born into a prominent family in Brooklyn, New York. He attended Yale University, receiving his B.A. in 1870 and a Ph.D. in paleontology in 1880. While at Yale, Grinnell participated in a paleontological expedition to the central Plains, Wyoming and Utah. In 1874 he served as naturalist and paleontologist in Lt. Colonel George Armstrong Custer's Black Hills expedition and, in 1875, was a member of William Ludlow's expedition surveying the Yellowstone. In 1899 Grinnell was a naturalist on Edward H. Harriman Expedition to Alaska. Grinnell's lifelong interest in the west was well established long before he left Yale. In 1876, four years before he earned his Ph.D., Grinnell became the editor-in-chief and soon-to-be owner of Forest and Stream magazine. Under his leadership, it became the country's foremost natural history magazine. Grinnell was the magazine's editor from 1876 until 1911, and he used its pages to help promote the creation of national parks. Grinnell played a pivotal role in the creation of Glacier National Park in 1910.

Grinnell's interest in the west extended to its native inhabitants. He was deeply interested in Plains Indians and, year after year, spent his summers visiting different reservations. He had befriended Frank North and his Pawnee scouts, and accompanied them on buffalo and elk hunts. Grinnell witnessed the destruction of game animals, brought about by commercial hunters, and was cognizant of its impact on Plains Indians' way of life. Grinnell, a prolific writer, authored several books and many articles on Cheyenne, Blackfoot, and Pawnee Indians, the most well-know of which was the two volume work entitled "The Cheyenne Indians: Their History and Way of Life," first published in 1923. Until his death, he remained a staunch supporter of Cheyenne rights.

Grinnell was a founding member of both the Audubon Society and Boone and Crockett Club (with Theodore Roosevelt). He chaired the Council on National Parks, Forests and Wildlife, and was president of the National Parks Association. He was a trustee of the New York Zoological Society. Grinnell was also a prominent member of many other associations, such as the American Association of the Advancement of Science and New York Academy of Science. Grinnell was 89 years old when he died in New York City.
Location of Other Archival Materials Note:
See manuscript items in the Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records at the NMAI Archive Center. See also the George Bird Grinnell photograph collection at the Braun Research Library, Southwest Museum, Autry National Center in Los Angeles.
Restrictions:
Researchers must contact the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
Rights:
Some items restricted: Cultural Sensitivity
Genre/Form:
Glass plate negatives
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.140
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-140

Frederick Starr negatives and lantern slides

Creator:
Starr, Frederick, 1859-1933  Search this
Photographer:
Lang, Charles B.  Search this
Grabic, Louis  Search this
Extent:
152 Lantern slides
3344 Negatives (photographic)
Culture:
Zoque  Search this
San Felipe Pueblo  Search this
Mazatec [Huautla]  Search this
Zapotec  Search this
Maya  Search this
Wampanoag  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
Mazahua  Search this
Ute  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Tzotzil Maya  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Tzeltal Maya  Search this
Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Triqui (Trique) [San Joan Copala]  Search this
Shuar  Search this
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
Chol Maya  Search this
Totonac  Search this
Osage  Search this
Chaticks Si Chaticks (Pawnee)  Search this
Tonkawa  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Tlingit  Search this
Mixe  Search this
Chinantec  Search this
Mixtec  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Chibcha  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Mehináku (Mehinacu)  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
Apache  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Cahuilla  Search this
Haida  Search this
Karajá (Caraja)  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Caddo  Search this
Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl)  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Teotihuacán (archaeological culture)  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Purepecha (Tarasco)  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Macushi (Macusi)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Lantern slides
Negatives (photographic)
Negatives
Place:
Colombia
Washington
West Virginia
Kansas
Kentucky
New Mexico
Brazil
Ecuador
Missouri
Wisconsin
Oklahoma
Ohio
New York
Georgia
Mexico
Iowa
Arkansas
Illinois
Pennsylvania
Alaska
Date:
1894-1910
Summary:
The collection includes materials from cultures in the United States, Mexico, Brazil, Guatemala, Colombia, Ecuador, and Guiana: Acoma Pueblo, Apache, Arapaho, Arikara, Assiniboine, Caddo, Cahuilla, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chinantec, Chippewa (Ojibwa), Choco, Chol, Chontal, Cochiti Pueblo, Crow, Cuicatec, Eskimo, Flathead, Haida, Hopi, Huastec, Huave, Iowa, Iroquois, Isleta, Karaja, Kwakiutl, Laguna Pueblo, Macusi, Mandan, Maya, Mazahua, Mazatec, Mehinaku, Menomini, Mixe, Mixtec, Navajo, Nez Perce, Osage, Otomi, Ottawa, Pawnee, Pima, Ponca, Potawatomi, Salish, San Blas, San Felipe Pueblo, Sauk & Fox, Shuar, Sioux, Taos Pueblo, Tarasco, Teotihuacan, Tepehua, Tlaxcala, Tlingit, Tonkawa, Totonac, Triqui, Tzental, Tzotzil, Ute, Wampanoag, Zapotec, Zoque, Zuni.
Arrangement note:
Collection arranged by item number.
Biographical/Historical note:
Frederick Starr was born in Auburn, New York, on September 2, 1858. He received a Ph.D. in biology in 1884 at Coe College, where he was later appointed professor of biology. Starr did postgraduate work in anthropology at Yale. In 1889 he was appointed head of Ethnology at the American Museum of Natural History, and in 1892 he was chosen by William Harper to organize the Anthropology Department at the new University of Chicago. Starr remained at the University until his retirement in 1923. Besides his field studies with various Indian tribes in the United States, Starr traveled to Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, Ecuador, Guiana, Japan, the Philippines, and Africa. He died in Tokyo, Japan, on August 14, 1933. Starr was the author of several books and scholarly articles.
General note:
Starr hired professional photographers Charles B. Lang and Louis Grabic to accompany him on his field trips. One lantern slide of Moses Ladd (Menomini) was taken by William H. Jackson.
Provenance:
Dr. Frederick Starr, Purchased, circa 1929
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
Topic:
Indians of South America -- Brazil  Search this
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest  Search this
Indians of South America -- Colombia  Search this
Indians of North America -- Alaska  Search this
Indians of North America -- Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Indians of Central America -- Guatemala  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Midwest  Search this
Indians of South America -- Ecuador  Search this
Indians of South America -- Guiana  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Lantern slides
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.052
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-052

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