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MS 3941 Materials assembled by Hewitt for preparation of articles in Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 30 and for replies to inquires from the public

Collector:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Correspondent:
Bogaskie, F.  Search this
Skinner, Alanson, 1886-1925  Search this
Creator:
MacKinley, W. E. W., Captain  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology -- Bulletin 30  Search this
Society of American Indians  Search this
Brant, Joseph, 1742-1807  Search this
Old Smoke  Search this
Sayenqueraghta  Search this
Scott, Hugh Lenox, 1853-1934  Search this
Williams, Eleazer  Search this
Culture:
Eskimos  Search this
Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox)  Search this
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Adirondack  Search this
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Black Mincqua  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Pekwanoket  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Wendat (Huron)  Search this
Mohawk  Search this
Maya  Search this
Algonquin (Algonkin)  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Sauk  Search this
Onondaga  Search this
Tuscarora  Search this
Erie (archaeological)  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Susquehannock (archaeological)  Search this
Wyandot  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Kainai Blackfoot (Kainah/Blood)  Search this
Sihasapa Lakota (Blackfoot Sioux)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Calendars
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Contents: Adirondack tribe (St Lawrence River) Old Manuscript Number 3553. Adoption Old Manuscript Number 4007. Refers to Algonquian method of counting -only; see Haas note 2/18/72; Old Manuscript Number 3864. "Alligewi"; Animism Old Manuscript Number 3867 and 2842-c, box 6. Blood Indians, origin of name; Brant, Joseph Old Manuscript Number 3874. Chippewa, origin of name Old Manuscript Number 3646. Chiefs, function and significance of Old Manuscript Number 2842-c, box 6. Delaware tribe, New Jersey area claimed by Old Manuscript Number 3866. Detroit River, tribes near; Ekaentoton Island-- see Ste. Marie Island Environment (Bulletin 30 draft by O. T. Mason) Old Manuscript Number 4007. Erie, origin of name Old Manuscript Number 3646. Erie and Black Mincqua tribes Old Manuscript Number 3586. [Eskimo] Arctic tribes, leaving elderly and sick people to die Old Manuscript Number 3668. Family, Bulletin 30 draft and notes Old Manuscript Number 4011 and 2842-c, box 6. Grand River (Tinaatoua), name of; Hebrew calendar; Hewitt, list of Bulletin 30 articles by Old Manuscript Number 4066. Hoboken, origin of name; Iroquois, "On the Northern and Eastern Territorial Limits of the Iroquoian people, in the 16th Century," and Algonquian tribes, at Chaleur Bay. Iroquois at Gulf of St Lawrence and Bay of Gaspe Old Manuscript Number 3625.
Iroquois, location of Six Nations tribes reservations Old Manuscript Number 3763. Iroquois false face; Iroquois preparation of corn ("as food") Old Manuscript Number 4009. Iroquoian early dress Old Manuscript Number 3660. Iroquoian "Gachoi" tribe, identity of (Correspondence with F. Bogaskie.) Old Manuscript Number 3816. Iroquoian moon names and concept of time; Iroquoian social organization, and place name-name origins; "Man," Iroquoian term for Old Manuscript Number 3781. Iroquoian towns Old Manuscript Number 4006. Kentucky, meaning of the word; Kentucky, origin of name Old Manuscript Number 3840. Lenni Lenape, meaning of the word; Logstown-- see Shenango Old Manuscript Number 3773. Lost Ten Tribes as American Indians Old Manuscript Number 3670. Mayan linguistic family and other Mayan linguistic notes including Quiche and Tepehuanan notes Old Manuscript Number 3473. Mexico: idols, sacrifices, etc. Old Manuscript Number 3807. Mexico: Indian languages. Letter from Captain W.E.W. MacKinley Old Manuscript Number 3778. Missouri, Indian village, location of Old Manuscript Number 3944. Mohawk land near Lake Champlain; Mohawk grammar; Montour family, notes for Bulletin 30 Old Manuscript Number 3812. Muskhogean social organization. Letter from J. J. Harrison. Old Manuscript Number 3891. New England tribes Old Manuscript Number 3513.
Niagara, origin of name; "Old Smoke"-- see Sayenqueraghta Old Manuscript Number 3949. Onondaga tribe, text of memorial inscription to, and correspondence Old Manuscript 4391 and 4271- box 1 (part.) Ontwaganha or Toaganha, origin and meaning of name Old Manuscript Number 3864. Owego, meaning of town's name; Pekwanoket tribe (Cape Cod); Pemaquid, Abnaki word and its origin Old Manuscript Number 89. Piasa bird- pictograph formerly near present Alton, Illinois. Article is similar to that by Cyrus Thomas, Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 30. Old Manuscript Number 3981. Potawatomi, notes on the name Old Manuscript Number 4034. Potawatomi Green Corn Dance; Roanoke, origin of name Old Manuscript Number 3998. Sacagawea, spelling of; St Ignace, 3 settlements (Michigan); St Marie Island or Ekaentoton Island; Sauk, Bulletin 30 article and galley proof, notes Old Manuscript Number 3764. Sayenqueraghta or "Old Smoke" (correspondence with Alanson Skinner) Old Manuscript Number 3949. Scalping Old Manuscript Number 4025. Shenango and Logstown Old Manuscript Number 3773. Sioux, origin of name Old Manuscript Number 3624. Society of American Indians, resolutions by thanking General Hugh L. Scott, Fr. Anselm Webber and others Old Manuscript Number 3868. Susquehanna, origin of name Old Manuscript Number 3707. Tacoma, origin of name Old Manuscript Number 3470.
Thunderbird, notes on Old Manuscript Number 3552. Tinaatoa-- see Grand River; Toronto, origin of name; Tuscarora villages Old Manuscript Number 3998. Wampum Old Manuscript Number 3998. War club with inscription; West Virginia panhandle tribes Old Manuscript Number 3945. Williams, Eleazer Old Manuscript Number 3998. Women, status of Old Manuscript Number 3566. Wyandots (Huron) List of tribes of which Wyandots of today are constituted. Old Manuscript Number 3774.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3941
Topic:
American Indian  Search this
Inheritance -- Adoption  Search this
Religion -- animism  Search this
Names, tribal -- Blood  Search this
Names, tribal -- Chippewa  Search this
Government and politics -- chiefs  Search this
Land tenure and claims -- Delaware  Search this
Names, tribal -- Erie  Search this
Death and mortuary customs -- abandoning elderly and sick  Search this
Marriage and family  Search this
Names, place -- Grand River  Search this
Jews  Search this
Iroquois Indians  Search this
Land tenure and claims  Search this
Masks -- False Face  Search this
Clothing and dress  Search this
Food preparation -- Corn  Search this
Time -- concepts  Search this
Social structure  Search this
Names, place  Search this
Towns, villages and other settlements  Search this
Names, place -- Kentucky  Search this
Names, tribal -- Leni Lenape  Search this
Muskogean Indians  Search this
Names, place -- Niagara  Search this
Names, place -- Owego  Search this
Abenaki Indians  Search this
Names, tribal -- Pemaquid  Search this
Pictographs -- Piasa bird  Search this
Potawatomi Indians  Search this
Dance -- Green Corn  Search this
Names, tribal -- Potawatomi  Search this
Names, place -- Roanoke  Search this
Towns, villages and other settlements -- St Ignace  Search this
Religion -- Mexico  Search this
Sacrifices -- Mexico  Search this
War -- Scalping  Search this
Indian interest groups -- Society of American Indians  Search this
Names, tribal -- Susquehanna  Search this
Names, tribal -- Tacoma  Search this
Folklore -- Thunderbird  Search this
Names, place -- Toronto  Search this
Tuscarora Indians  Search this
Trade, gifts and other exchanges -- Wampum  Search this
Weapons -- war club  Search this
Marriage and family -- women, status of  Search this
Names, place -- Hoboken  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Algonquin  Search this
Honniasant  Search this
Lenape  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Susquehannock  Search this
Mexico  Search this
Genre/Form:
Calendars
Citation:
Manuscript 3941, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3941
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw34e5d46f4-47a1-44d7-8e6d-d282280cd7f8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3941

Teriananda papers

Author:
Teriananda, 1947-  Search this
Names:
Peltier, Leonard  Search this
Extent:
0.83 Linear feet (2 archival boxes )
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Articles
Writings
Letters
Clippings
Reports
Date:
1972 - 1999
Summary:
The Teriananda Paperscontain writings authored by Teriananda, as well as various position papers, news articles, flyers, correspondence, and group newsletters that represent the political activities she participated in on behalf of Native American and other indigenous peoples.
Scope and Contents:
This collection, from the 1970s to the 1990s, is comprised of published and unpublished writings by Teriananda, as well as letters, reports, newspaper and magazine articles, group newsletters, flyers and announcements of political events, and news releases. The issues represented here, including support work for "The Longest Walk," the campaign for justice for Leonard Peltier, and the Big Mountain relocation are indicative of the concerns in parts of Indian country in the United States and elsewhere during these decades.
Arrangement:
The Teriananda papers are arranged into two series:

Series I: Writings (1978-1991)

Series II: Political Activities (undated; 1972-1996)
Biographical / Historical:
Teriananda was born in Manhattan in 1947, where she grew up and has continued to live throughout her adult life. Teriananda's father, born in Brooklyn, became a financial officer and independent scholar, her mother, born in British Guiana (now Guyana), was a classical pianist who immigrated to the United States and later became an editorial assistant, working part-time during Teriananda's childhood. Her parents instilled in Teriananda a belief that she was "a citizen of the world." She studied ballet as a youngster, and, as a teenager, immersed herself in the artistic and intellectual milieu of the Lower East Side and Greenwich Village. An improperly diagnosed back injury while she was a senior in high school resulted in severe back problems in the 1970s that have persisted throughout her life.

Teriananda became interested in indigenous struggles in the 1970s following a "back crisis" that almost took her life yet proved to be psychically transformative. In seeking to know who she was, she realized she needed to know where she was, and this led her to ask who the original inhabitants of the continent were. She soon became involved in activist struggles for indigenous rights, and worked with a number of Native American groups during the 1970s and 1980s, including, among other things, the International Treaty Council's attempts to found the U.N.'s permanent Working Group on Indigenous People, support for Yvonne Wanrow and Leonard Peltier, the issue of uranium contamination from mining on Native American land, and the problem of the Joint Land Use Area near Big Mountain on the Hopi and Navajo reservations.

Teriananda also worked on issues surrounding the AIDS crisis after the death of several friends from this disease. She had become familiar with the possibilities of natural medicines, partly through contact with traditional Native teachers, and she became active promoting the benefits of nutritional, herbal and other natural therapies to sufferers of AIDS. As Teriananda's own health issues persisted and worsened, she turned to Tibetan Buddhism, and has devoted herself to artistic pursuits influenced by this spiritual path, although she has worked artistically since the early 1970s, when she stopped dancing. Although she has cut back on her activism, due to health problems and family demands, Teriananda remains a committed political activist who stays informed of current issues and is determined to pass on the heritage of struggles for peace and justice to the next generation.
Provenance:
Donated to the National Museum of the American Indian Archives by Teriananda in March 2003
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the NMAI Archivist. The Archives has no information on the status of literary rights for the work of others found in these papers; researchers are responsible for determining any question of copyright.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Civil rights  Search this
Indians of North America -- Relocation  Search this
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Traditional medicine  Search this
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Land tenure  Search this
Indians of South America  Search this
Indians of Central America  Search this
Genre/Form:
Articles
Writings
Letters
Clippings
Reports
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Teriananda papers, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.009
See more items in:
Teriananda papers
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4c4026e79-6475-49d9-ac8d-c282f248302d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-009

MS 1912 Assorted historical texts

Collector:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Addressee:
Preston, William Col  Search this
Creator:
Springstone, William  Search this
Names:
Raven Chief  Search this
Culture:
Odawa (Ottawa)  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Illinois Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Contains copy of letter dated August 9, 1780, addressed to Col William Preston, relative to a threatened attack by the Indians (Cherokee), signed by Jas. Martin. Also copy of an affidavit by William Springstone, formerly a trader in the Cherokee town of Sciligo (Tciligo) referring to a "treaty" between Raven Chief of the Cherokee and the British Agent in Georgia, and an agreement to attack the inhabitants of Virginia and Carolina. (undated) Includes note on "Black Padoucas" (Bowles, (1792) quoted by Bowen, 1876. Note on the Illinois, Ottawa, Chippewa and Potawatomi, and the Miami,-purchase of land by the U. S. Notes on Civil War, etc.
Bibliographic notes from "Arthur, John Preston- Western N. C., 1730 to 1913. Published by the D.A.R. of (?), Raleigh, Edwards and Broughton, 1914."
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1912
Topic:
Treaties -- Cherokee  Search this
Land tenure and claims -- Miami  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1912, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1912
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3fb30caf2-a2d9-4f76-802f-832c1876cbb7
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1912
Online Media:

Iroquois land claims / edited by Christopher Vecsey and William A. Starna

Author:
Vecsey, Christopher  Search this
Starna, William A  Search this
Physical description:
ix, 186 p. : maps ; 24 cm
Type:
Congresses
Place:
New York (State)
Date:
1988
Topic:
Iroquois Indians--Claims  Search this
Iroquois Indians--Land tenure  Search this
Indians of North America--Claims  Search this
Indians of North America--Land tenure  Search this
Call number:
KFN5940.A75I76 1988X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_361756

Indian nullification of the unconstitutional laws of Massachusetts relative to the Marshpee tribe, or, The pretended riot explained by William Apes

Title:
Indian nullification of the unconstitutional laws of Massachusetts relative to the Marshpee tribe
Pretended riot explained
Author:
Apess, William 1798-1839  Search this
Author:
Snelling, William Joseph 1804-1848  Search this
Physical description:
168 pages, [1] leaf of plates illustrations (wood engraving) 19 cm
Type:
Books
Paper binding labels (Binding)
Publishers' cloth bindings (Binding)
Relief prints
Date:
1835
Topic:
Legal status, laws, etc  Search this
Land tenure  Search this
Indians of North America--Legal status, laws, etc  Search this
Mashpee Indians--Land tenure  Search this
Mashpee Indians--Legal status, laws, etc  Search this
Call number:
E99.M4 A6 1835
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_986298

Providing for the distribution of the land and assets of certain Indian rancherias and reservations in California

Author:
United States Congress Senate Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs  Search this
Physical description:
50 pages 23 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
California
Date:
1874
Topic:
Indian land transfers  Search this
Land tenure  Search this
Indians of North America--Land tenure  Search this
Call number:
E78.C15 U65 1874
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_948200

The boundaries between us : natives and newcomers along the frontiers of the Old Northwest Territory, 1750-1850 / edited by Daniel P. Barr

Author:
Barr, Daniel P. 1971-  Search this
Physical description:
xix, 261 p. : 1 map ; 25 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Ohio River Valley
Date:
2006
C2006
Topic:
Indians of North America--First contact with other peoples  Search this
Land tenure  Search this
Government relations  Search this
Frontier and pioneer life  Search this
Relations with Indians  Search this
Race relations  Search this
Politics and government  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_792223

Land and politics in the Valley of Mexico : a two thousand-year perspective / edited by H.R. Harvey

Author:
Harvey, H. R. 1931-  Search this
Physical description:
xiii, 325 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm
Type:
Congresses
Place:
Mexico
Mexico, Valley of
Date:
1991
To 1519
1540-1810
Topic:
Aztecs--Land tenure  Search this
Aztecs--Agriculture  Search this
Aztecs--Politics and government  Search this
Land tenure--History  Search this
Peasantry--History  Search this
Politics and government  Search this
Call number:
F1219.76.L35L36 1991X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_412652

Linguistic families of American Indians North of Mexico / by J. W. Powell ; revised by members of the staff of the Bureau of American Ethnology

Author:
Powell, John Wesley 1834-1902  Search this
Physical description:
1 map : col. ; 50 x 44 cm., folded to 22 x 16 cm
Type:
Maps
Place:
North America
Date:
1915
Topic:
Indians--Languages  Search this
Indians--Land tenure  Search this
Call number:
PM206X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_290684

Papers / Andrew Pickens

Author:
Pickens, Andrew 1739-1817  Search this
Subject:
Pickens, Andrew 1739-1817  Search this
Physical description:
ca. 21 items
Type:
Microforms
Place:
South Carolina
Date:
1981
1782
1782-1804
1783-1861
Topic:
Land tenure--History--Sources  Search this
History  Search this
Sources  Search this
Call number:
mfc710
mfc 710
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_271751

Indians and the land contributions by the Delegation of the United States

Author:
Inter-American Conference on Indian Life Delegation from the United States  Search this
Physical description:
1 volume (various pagings) illustrations 27 cm
Type:
Congresses
Conference papers and proceedings
Date:
1940
Topic:
Land tenure  Search this
Indians of Mexico--Land tenure  Search this
Indians of North America--Land tenure  Search this
Call number:
E53 .I61
E53.I61
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_170748

Indios y los terrenos contribución por la delegación de Los Estados Unidos, primera Conferencia entre-americana sobre la vida de los Indios, Patcuaro, Méjico, Abril 1940

Author:
Congreso Indigenista Interamericano (1st : 1940 : Patzcuaro, Mexico)  Search this
Physical description:
79 pages in various pagings plates 27 cm
Type:
Congresses
Conference papers and proceedings
Date:
1940
Topic:
Land tenure  Search this
Agriculture  Search this
Indians--Agriculture  Search this
Indians--Land tenure  Search this
Call number:
E53 .I61a
E53.I61a
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_170749

Marie Mason Potts the lettered life of a California Indian activist Terri A. Castaneda

Title:
Lettered life of a California Indian activist
Author:
Castaneda, Terri A. 1955-  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (xvi, 367 pages) illustrations, map
Type:
Biography
Electronic books
Biographies
History
Place:
California
Plumas County
Sacramento (Calif.)
Sacramento
Date:
2020
20th century
Topic:
Maidu Indians--History  Search this
Land tenure--Political aspects--History  Search this
Indian educators  Search this
Indian women activists  Search this
Land tenure--Political aspects  Search this
Maidu Indians  Search this
Call number:
E99.M18 C37 2020 (Internet)
Restrictions & Rights:
Non-linear
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1153345

Conquest by law : how the discovery of America dispossessed indigenous peoples of their lands / Lindsay G. Robertson

Author:
Robertson, Lindsay Gordon  Search this
Subject:
United Illinois and Wabash Land Companies  Search this
United States Supreme Court History  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (xiii, 239 pages) : illustrations, maps, portraits
Type:
Electronic resources
Trials, litigation, etc
Electronic books
History
Place:
United States
Illinois
Indiana
Nordamerika
Indianer
Date:
2005
Topic:
Land tenure--History  Search this
Indian land transfers--History  Search this
Land titles--History  Search this
Constitutional history  Search this
LAW--Administrative Law & Regulatory Practice  Search this
Indian land transfers  Search this
Indians of North America--Land tenure  Search this
Land titles  Search this
Enteignung  Search this
Eroberung  Search this
Call number:
KF228.U5 R63 2005 (Internet)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1149389

The lands of the Five Civilized Tribes a treatise upon the law applicable to the lands of the Five Civilized Tribes in Oklahoma, with a compilation of all treaties, federal acts, laws of Arkansas and of the several tribes relating thereto, together with the rules and regulations prescribed by the Secretary of the Interior governing the sale of tribal lands, the leasing and sale of alloted lands and the removal of restrictions by Lawrence Mills

Author:
Mills, Lawrence 1881-  Search this
Physical description:
xlvi, 804 pages 21 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Arkansas
Oklahoma
United States
Date:
1919
Topic:
Five Civilized Tribes  Search this
Government relations  Search this
Land tenure  Search this
Public lands  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Indians of North America--Government relations  Search this
Indians of North America--Land tenure  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1074739

Native peoples of North America Professor Daniel M. Cobb

Lecturer:
Cobb, Daniel M.,  Search this
Author:
Container of (work): Cobb, Daniel M Native peoples of North America: course guidebook ©2016  Search this
Sponsoring body:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Publisher:
Teaching Company  Search this
Physical description:
4 videodiscs (approximately 720 min.) DVD video, sound, color 4 3/4 in. + 1 course guidebook (vi, 206 pages : black and white illustrations ; 19 cm)
Type:
Videorecordings
Educational films
Video recordings for the hearing impaired
Filmed lectures
Films for the hearing impaired
History
Lectures
Nonfiction films
Place:
North America
Date:
2016
Topic:
Indian activists--History  Search this
Indian land transfers  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Colonization  Search this
Crimes against  Search this
Cultural assimilation  Search this
Ethnic identity  Search this
First contact with other peoples  Search this
Foreign influences  Search this
Government relations  Search this
History  Search this
Indians of North America--History--Autonomy and independence movements  Search this
Land tenure  Search this
Relocation  Search this
Social conditions  Search this
Social life and customs  Search this
Wars  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Indian activists  Search this
Indians of North America--Civil rights  Search this
Indians of North America--Colonization  Search this
Indians of North America--Crimes against  Search this
Indians of North America--Cultural assimilation  Search this
Indians of North America--Ethnic identity  Search this
Indians of North America--First contact with Europeans  Search this
Indians of North America--Foreign influences  Search this
Indians of North America--Government relations  Search this
Indians of North America--Land tenure  Search this
Indians of North America--Relocation  Search this
Indians of North America--Social conditions  Search this
Indians of North America--Social life and customs  Search this
Indians of North America--Wars  Search this
Call number:
video 001581
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1071606

Strange lands and different peoples : Spaniards and Indians in colonial Guatemala / W. George Lovell and Christopher H. Lutz with Wendy Kramer and William R. Swezey

Title:
Spaniards and Indians in colonial Guatemala
Author:
Lovell, W. George (William George) 1951-  Search this
Lutz, Christopher 1941-  Search this
Kramer, Wendy  Search this
Swezey, William R.  Search this
Physical description:
xix, 339 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Guatemala
Spain
America
Date:
2013
To 1821
Topic:
Government relations  Search this
Indians of Central America--First contact with other peoples  Search this
Indians of Central America--Colonization  Search this
Mayas--Social conditions  Search this
Mayas--Land tenure  Search this
History  Search this
Colonization  Search this
Foreign relations  Search this
Colonies  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1021217

Priscilla Reining Papers

Creator:
Reining, Priscilla  Search this
Extent:
2 Flat boxes
60.25 Linear feet (145 boxes)
23 Computer storage devices (floppy discs, zip discs, data tapes, and magnetic tape)
6 Sound recordings
2 Map drawers
Culture:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Kikuyu (African people)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Minnesota Chippewa [Red Lake, Minnesota]  Search this
Haya (African people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Computer storage devices
Sound recordings
Map drawers
Correspondence
Photographs
Electronic records
Place:
Tanganyika
Tanzania
Kenya
Uganda
Niger
Burkina Faso
Bukoba District (Tanzania)
Date:
1916-2007
bulk 1934-2007
Summary:
The Priscilla Reining papers, 1916-2007, primarily document the professional life of Reining, a social anthropologist and Africanist who worked for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) from 1974 to 1989. Her area of specialty was sub-Saharan Africa, specializing in desertification, land tenure, land use, kinship, population, fertility, and HIV/AIDS. During the 1970s, she pioneered the use of satellite imagery in conjunction with ethnographic data. She is also known for her ground-breaking research in the late 1980s that showed that uncircumcised men were more susceptible to contracting HIV/AIDS than circumcised men.

The collection contains correspondence, field research, research files, writings, day planners, teaching files, student files, photographs, maps, sound recordings, and electronic records. Reining's research files, particularly on the Red Lake Ojibwa, the Haya, HIV/AIDS, and satellite imagery, form a significant portion of the collection.
Scope and Contents:
These papers primarily document the professional life of Priscilla Reining. The collection contains correspondence, field research, research files, writings, day planners, teaching files, student files, photographs, maps, sound recordings, and electronic records.

Reining's research files, particularly on the Red Lake Ojibwa, the Haya, HIV/AIDS, and satellite imagery, form a significant portion of the collection. Her consultancy work is also well-represented, as well as her involvement in a large number of professional organizations. The collection also contains a great deal of material relating to her work on different programs and projects at AAAS, including the Committee on Arid Lands, Ethnography of Reproduction Project, and Cultural Factors in Population Programs. Also present in the collection are materials from her time as Urgent Anthropology Program Coordinator at the Smithsonian Institution, her files as an instructor and professor, and her files as a student at University of Chicago. Materials from her personal life can also be found in the collection, such as correspondence and childhood mementos.
Arrangement:
The Priscilla Reining papers are organized in 13 series: 1. Correspondence, 1944-2007; 2. Research, 1955-1970; 3. AAAS, 1971-1990; 4. Professional Activities, 5. 1957-2007; Daily Planners and Notebooks, 1960-2002; 6. Writings, 1952-1996; 7. Smithsonian Institution, 1964-1971; 8. University, 1958-1994; 9. Student, 1937-1975; 10. Biographical and Personal Files, 1934-2004; 11. Maps, 1916-1989, undated; 12. Photographs, circa 1950-1987, undated; 13. Electronic records.
Biographical / Historical:
Priscilla Copeland Reining was a social anthropologist and Africanist who worked for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) from 1974 to 1989. Her area of specialty was sub-Saharan Africa, specializing in desertification, land tenure, land use, kinship, population, fertility, and HIV/AIDS. During the 1970s, she pioneered the use of satellite imagery in conjunction with ethnographic data. She is also known for her ground-breaking research in the late 1980s that showed that uncircumcised men were more susceptible to contracting HIV/AIDS than circumcised men.

Reining was born on March 11, 1923 in Chicago, Illinois. She studied anthropology at University of Chicago, where she earned both her A.B. (1945) and Ph.D. (1967) in anthropology. During her graduate studies, she studied peer group relations among the Ojibwa of the Red Lake Indian Reservation in Minnesota (1947, 1950-51). Her husband, Conrad Reining, accompanied her to the field, an experience that inspired him to also become an anthropologist.

In 1951-53 and 1954-55, Reining conducted fieldwork among the Haya of Bukoba District, Tanganyika (now known as Tanzania) as a Fellow of the East African Institute of Social Research. While research for her dissertation focused on the agrarian system of the Haya, Reining also conducted fertility surveys for the East African Medical Survey, studying the relationship between STDs and fertility in Buhaya and Buganda. During the 1980s, Reining became interested in AIDS when she observed that the Haya were dying from the disease at a much higher rate than neighboring groups. When she learned of a possible link between circumcision and the spread of HIV, she drew a map of circumcision practice among the ethnic groups of Africa and found that uncircumcised men were 86% more likely to contract HIV than circumcised men. These results were published in "The Relationship Between Male Circumcision and HIV Infection in African Populations" (1989), which she coauthored with John Bongaarts, Peter Way, and Francis Conant.

Beginning in the 1970s, Reining began exploring the use of satellite imagery in ethnographic research. In 1973, she used Landsat data to identify individual Mali villages, the first use of satellite data in anthropology (Morán 1990). That same year, as a consultant for USAID, she also used ERTS-1 imagery to estimate carrying capacity in Niger and Upper Volta (now known as Burkino Faso). She continued to apply satellite data in her research throughout her career, including in 1993, when she returned to Tanzania to study the environmental consequence of population growth and HIV/AIDS among the Haya.

In 1974, Reining joined the Office of International Science of AAAS as a research associate. She stayed on to become Project Director for the Cultural Factors in Population Programs and to direct a number of projects under the Committee on Arid Lands. She also served as Project Director of the Ethnography of Reproduction project, for which she conducted fieldwork in Kenya in 1976. In 1990, she left AAAS for an appointment as Courtesy Professor of African Studies at University of Florida.

Prior to working for AAAS, Reining worked at the Smithsonian Institution (1966, 1968-70), during which she was the coordinator for the Urgent Anthropology Program in the now defunct Center for the Study of Man. She also taught at University of Minnesota (1956-59), American University (1959-60), and Howard University (1960-64). In addition, she worked as a consultant for various organizations, including Department of Justice, Peace Corps, International Bank for Reconstruction & Development (IBRD), Food and Agriculture Organization, and Carrying Capacity Network.

Reining was also actively involved in various organizations. She served as Secretary of the AAAS Section H (Anthropology) and was a founding member of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) Task Force on AIDS. She was also a fellow of the African Studies Association, AAA, AAAS, East African Academy, Society for Applied Anthropology, and Washington Academy of Science. In 1990, she was honored with a Distinguished Service Award from AAA.

Reining died of lung cancer at the age of 84 on July 19, 2007.

Sources Consulted

PR Vita. Series 10. Biographical and Personal Files. Priscilla Reining Papers. National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution

Morán, Emilio F. 2000. The Ecosystem Approach in Anthropology: From Concept to Practice. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan. Page 359

Schudel, Matt. 2007. Anthropologist Broke Ground on AIDS, Satellite Mapping. Washington Post, July 29. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/07/28/AR2007072801190.html (accessed December 8, 2011).

1923 -- Born March 11 in Chicago, Illinois

1944 -- Marries Conrad C. Reining

1945 -- Earns A.B. from University of Chicago

1947, 1950-51 -- Conducts field research on the Ojibwa of Red Lake Indian Reservation in Minnesota.

1949 -- Earns A.M. from University of Chicago

1951-1953, 1954-1955 -- Field research on Haya of Tanzania

1967 -- Earns Ph.D. from University of Chicago

1972 -- Returns to Tanzania for IBRD consultancy work

1974 -- Begins working at AAAS as a research associate in the Office of International Science

1975 -- Project Director, AAAS

1976 -- Field research on Kikuyu of Kenya for Ethnography of Reproduction

1986-89 -- Program Director, AAAS

1990 -- Courtesy Professor of African Studies at University of Florida Receives Distinguished Service Award from AAA

1993 -- Field research in Tanzania studying environmental consequences of population growth and HIV/AIDS among the Haya

2007 -- Dies of lung cancer at the age of 84 on July 19
Related Materials:
Additional materials at the NAA relating to Priscilla Reining can be found in the papers of Gordon Gibson and John Murra, as well as in the records of the Center for the Study of Man and the records of the Department of Anthropology. Photo Lot 97 contains two Haya photos taken by Reining that are not duplicated in this collection. The papers of her husband, Conrad Reining, are also at the NAA.

The archives of the American Association for the Advancement of Science also holds Reining's papers relating to her work for the organization.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Priscilla Reining's sons, Robert Reining and Conrad Reining, in 2009.
Restrictions:
The Priscilla Reining papers are open for research.

Some materials from the East African Medical Survey and Ethnography of Reproduction project contain personal medical history and are thus restricted. Grant applications sent to Reining to review are also restricted as well as her students' grades, and recommendation letters Reining wrote for her students. Electronic records are also restricted.

A small portion of the materials relating to Reining's Haya research, Ethnography of Reproduction project, and IBRD ujamaa research suffered severe mold damage. These materials have been cleaned and may be accessed. The legibility of some of the documents, however, is limited due to water and mold stains. Mold odor is also still present.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Human ecology  Search this
Fertility, Human  Search this
Kinship  Search this
population  Search this
Landsat satellites  Search this
Remote sensing  Search this
Desertification  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Photographs
Electronic records
Citation:
Priscilla Reining Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2009-25
See more items in:
Priscilla Reining Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw34d98c2cd-c075-443f-b007-9dd7cea86fe2
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2009-25

National Congress of American Indians records

Creator:
National Congress of American Indians  Search this
Names:
Arrow, Inc.  Search this
National Tribal Chairmen's Association  Search this
Native American Rights Fund  Search this
United Effort Trust  Search this
United States. American Indian Policy Review Commission  Search this
United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs  Search this
United States. Indian Claims Commission  Search this
Bronson, Ruth Muskrat  Search this
Curry, James E., 1907-1972  Search this
Deloria, Vine  Search this
Harjo, Suzan Shown  Search this
McNickle, D'Arcy, 1904-1977  Search this
Peterson, Helen L.  Search this
Snake, Reuben, 1937-1993  Search this
Tonasket, Mel  Search this
Trimble, Charles E.  Search this
Extent:
251 Linear feet (597 archival boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Videotapes
Correspondence
Administrative records
Financial records
Audiotapes
Clippings
Date:
1933-1990
bulk 1944-1989
Summary:
The National Congress of American Indian (NCAI), founded in 1944, is the oldest nation-wide American Indian advocacy organization in the United States. The NCAI records document the organization's work, particularly that of its office in Washington, DC, and the wide variety of issues faced by American Indians in the twentieth century. The collection is located in the Cultural Resource Center of the National Museum of the American Indian.
Scope and Contents:
The records of the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) reflect the operations of its Washington, DC, headquarters and, in particular, the activities and responsibilities of its executive director. The papers primarily cover the period 1943 to 1990, although some documents pre-dating NCAI are present. The bulk of the material relates to legislation, lobbying, and NCAI's interactions with various governmental bodies. A large segment also concerns the annual conventions and executive council and executive committee meetings. Finally, the records also document the operations of the NCAI, including personnel, financial, and fundraising material. Materials found throughout the collection include letters, memoranda, handwritten notes, speeches, press releases, newspaper clippings, publications, minutes of meetings, transcripts, reports, agenda, programs, financial records, legislative materials, photographs, and sound recordings.
Arrangement:
The National Congress of American Indians records are arranged in 21 series:

Series 1 -- : NCAI Conventions and Mid-Year Conferences

Series 2 -- : Executive Council and Executive Committee Files

Subseries 2.1: Executive Council

Subseries 2.2: Executive Committee

Subseries 2.3: Executive Committee: Benefit Awards

Series 3 -- : Correspondence Files

Subseries 3.1: Name Files

Subseries 3.2: Chronological Files

Subseries 3.3: Miscellaneous Files

Series 4 -- : Tribal Files

Subseries 4.1: Individual Tribes, Bands and Reservations

Subseries 4.2: Intertribal Organizations

Subseries 4.3: Special Issues

Subseries 4.4: Miscellaneous Tribal Files

Series 5 -- : Records of Indian Interest Organizations

Subseries 5.1: Other Indian Organizations

Subseries 5.2: Non-Indian Support Groups

Subseries 5.3: General Indian Interest Groups

Series 6 -- : NCAI Committees and Special Issue Files

Subseries 6.1: Alaskan Natives

Subseries 6.2: Policy Conference

Subseries 6.3: Religious Freedom and Related Cultural Concerns

Subseries 6.4: Hunting and Fishing Rights

Subseries 6.5: Natural Resources and Indian Water Rights

Subseries 6.6: Nuclear Waste

Subseries 6.7: Solar Bank

Subseries 6.8: AIMS [American Indian Media Surveillance] Committee

Subseries 6.9: HCR 108 and Federal Termination Policies

Subseries 6.10: Emergency Conference of 1954

Subseries 6.11: Jurisdiction --NCAI Commission and Federal Legislation

Subseries 6.12: Law Enforcement

Subseries 6.13: Litigation Committee

Subseries 6.14: Annual Litigation Conference

Subseries 6.15: Trail of Broken Treaties Impact Survey Team

Subseries 6.16: Block Grants

Subseries 6.17: Health and Welfare

Subseries 6.18: Self-Determination and Education

Subseries 6.19: National Conference on Federal Recognition

Subseries 6.20: Economic and Reservation Development

Series -- 7: United Effort Trust (UET)

Subseries 7.1: NCAI and NTCA Joint Committee

Subseries 7.2: Issues

Subseries 7.3: Legislation

Subseries 7.4: News Releases

Subseries 7.5: Indian Organizations

Subseries 7.6: Inter-Tribal Organizations

Subseries 7.7: Non-Indian Organizations

Subseries 7.8: Tribes

Series 8 -- : Attorneys and Legal Interest Groups

Subseries 8.1: Attorneys

Subseries 8.2: Legal Interest Groups

Subseries 8.3: Legal Services

Series 9 -- : Federal Indian Policy and Legislation Files

Subseries 9.1: American Indian Policy Review Task Force

Series 10 -- : Bureau of Indian Affairs

Series 11 -- : State and Local Government Organizations

Series 12 -- : Census

Series 13 -- : General Alpha-Subject Files

Series 14 -- : Records of Charles E. "Chuck" Trimble

Series 15 -- : Records of Suzan S. Harjo

Subseries 15.1: Indian Claims: Eastern Land Claims

Subseries 15.2: Indian Claims: Statute of Limitations

Subseries 15.3: Conference on -- The Indian Reorganization Act - An Assessment and Prospectus Fifty Years Later

Subseries 15.4: Inter-American Indian Institute (IAII)

Subseries 15.5: Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA)

Subseries 15.6: Institute of the American West (IAW)

Subseries 15.7: Common Cause

Subseries 15.8: Office Files

Series 16 -- : Fund Raising

Subseries 16.1: Gifts, Bequests, and Contributions

Subseries 16.2: Foundations

Subseries 16.3: General --Arrow and NCAI Fund

Series 17 -- : Business and Financial Records Files

Subseries 17.1: Personnel

Series 18 -- : "Give-Away" Files

Series 19 -- : Publications

Subseries 19.1: -- News/Sentinels -- and -- Sentinel Bulletin

Subseries 19.2: Other Publications

Series 20 -- : Photographs

Series 21 -- : Audio and Film Recordings
Biographical / Historical:
The National Congress of America Indians, which describes itself as the oldest and largest American Indian and Alaskan Native organization in the United States, was founded on November 16, 1944, in Denver, CO. NCAI was intended to serve as a link between individual tribal councils and the United States government, by defining and helping to crystallize Indian thought on the administration of Indian affairs. The Congress also aimed to educate the general public about Indians, preserve Indian cultural values, protect treaty rights with the United States, and promote Indian welfare.

At the first convention, delegates representing fifty tribes ratified the constitution and by-laws, drafted resolutions determining the direction of NCAI policy, and elected the organizations' first officers, with Oklahoma Supreme Court Justice Napoleon B. Johnson (Cherokee) as president. The officers, as well as eight elected council members, formed the Executive Council. The Council chose the Executive Director; Ruth Muskrat Bronson (Cherokee) was the organization's first director, from 1944-1948. "Persons of Indian blood" could join the organization either as individuals or as groups. In 1955, however, the constitution was revised to restrict group membership to recognized tribes, committees, or bands, and to make the Executive Council chosen by tribal representatives. These changes gave control of the organization to governing bodies of organized tribes, rather than individuals. A further amendment that year created a five-member Executive Committee, headed by the president, which had all the powers of the Executive Council between council meetings.

Conventions have been held annually in the fall since the formation of the NCAI in 1944. Since 1977, mid-year conferences have been held in May or June of each year, to allow more frequent and thorough discussion of issues. The resolutions passed at these conventions are the basis for all policy of the Executive Committee and Executive Director between meetings. The conventions are also used for informational sessions and meetings of standing and special committees of NCAI. One or two-day workshops may also be held on special topics or Congressional issues of particular concern.

NCAI created a tax-exempt arm in 1949 to accept charitable contributions and apply for grants, the NCAI Fund, which soon changed its name to ARROW, Inc. By 1957, however, ARROW had split off to become an independent organization, and NCAI started a new arm, again called the NCAI Fund. In the coming decades, the NCAI Fund would obtain grants from sources including the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Veteran Affairs, Indian Health Service, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Ford Foundation, humanities councils and others, which they used for conferences, workshops, publications, and other projects.

In its early years, NCAI fought for the recognition of land claims of Alaska natives, the enfranchisement of Arizona and New Mexico Indians, the equitable settlement of tribal land claims, and the right of Indians to select their own attorneys. The NCAI lobbied vigorously for an Indian Claims Commission Bill, which became law in August 1946. NCAI's lobbying efforts on behalf of this act set the pattern for the organization's future role in legislative matters: keeping member tribes abreast of proposed legislation and ascertaining their views, and maintaining a presence in Congress through lobbying and testimony.

Beginning in 1954, the threat of termination pushed NCAI into a period of increased activity. Although some tribes were ready to terminate their relationship with the federal government, much of Indian Country felt threatened by the government's new stated policy. NCAI therefore organized an Emergency Conference of American Indians for February 1954 to protest this new termination policy. An agreement was forged at the conference between the NCAI and the Bureau of Indian Affairs to work together toward slowly liquidating the BIA. The termination period of the 1950s and 1960s, while challenging, saw NCAI increase in confidence and political acumen.

During the 1960s, a number of other activist Indian groups sprang up and began to dilute the singular influence which NCAI had commanded. Newer, more militant groups often considered themselves at odds with NCAI, which was increasingly perceived as conservative. As the number of Indian advocacy groups grew in the 1960s and 1970s, however, NCAI actively partnered with other organizations, particularly the National Tribal Chairmen's Association (NTCA) and Native American Rights Fund (NARF), on a variety of projects.

Charles E. "Chuck" Trimble (Oglala Dakota) served as Executive Director of NCAI in 1972 until 1977, when he resigned to lead the United Effort Trust, a project designed to fight white backlash to Indian rights. NCAI spent most of the next two years trying to find another permanent director. In 1979, Ronald P. Andrade (Luiseno-Diegueno) joined NCAI and unfortunately found a group that was demoralized and underfunded. He was able to return the organization to good health but left in 1982. Si Whitman (Nez Perce), his successor, remained at NCAI for less than a year.

Suzan Shown Harjo (Cheyenne-Creek) became director of NCAI on May 1, 1984. Prior to taking this postions, she had served as Congressional Liaison for Indian Affairs at the Department of the Interior during the Carter administration and as legislative liaison for the Native American Rights Fund, as well as working for NCAI during the mid-1970s. Harjo was also an active and published poet, as well as a frequent speaker at events around the country. The National Congress of American Indians was particularly active on Capitol Hill while Harjo was director, advocating for government-to-government status, the Tribal Government Tax Status Act of 1983, repatriation legislation, and economic development programs, among other issues. Harjo was herself very involved in the establishment of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC.

The NCAI Fund was very successful in receiving grants during this period, although they were chronically short of operating funds. Some of their most active projects during this period were the Indian and Native Veterans Outreach Program (INVOP), Inter-generational Health Promotion and Education Program (IHPEP), Environmental Handbook and related educational seminars, Solar Bank, nuclear waste disposal and transportation information sessions, and voter registration.

For years, NCAI's operating expenses had been funded by the Ford Foundation and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). In 1985, the director of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, opposing the use of Federal monies to support outside organizations, began to block the payment for services due to the NCAI. This created a financial crisis from which the NCAI did not recover during Harjo's tenure, and it became the major issue for which she was not rehired in October 1989.

Following the 1989 Annual Convention, Wayne Ducheneaux (Cheyenne River Sioux) became President of NCAI and A. Gay Kingman (Cheyenne River Sioux) was appointed Executive Director. Their first efforts were focused on recovering the financial well-being of the organization, which meant that less attention was devoted to issues in Congress. One of the successful projects NCAI pursued during the next two years was organization and presentation of the Indian pre-conference of the White House Conference on Library and Information Science, which was held in early 1991.

The National Congress of American Indians is still active today, continuing its work of lobbying, support for tribal governments, and advocacy for American Indian issues.
Related Materials:
Other collections at the NMAI Archives Center that include information on the National Congress of American Indians include:

Arrow, Inc., and the American Indian Tribal Court Judges records, 1949-1999 (NMAI.MS.013) James E. Curry papers, 1935-1955 (NMAI.MS.015) National Tribal Chairmen's Association records, 1971-1978 (NMAI.MS.014) Helen L. Peterson papers, 1944-1992 (NMAI.MS.016) Reuben Snake papers, 1971-1996 (NMAI.MS.012)
Provenance:
The National Congress of American Indians designated the National Anthropological Archives (NAA) as its official repository in 1976. This collection was received by NAA in four accessions between 1976 and 1991. It was transferred from NAA to the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center in 2006.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadbast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Government relations -- 1934-  Search this
Indians of North America -- Politics and government  Search this
Indians of North America -- Social conditions -- 20th century  Search this
Indians of North America -- Legal status, laws, etc.  Search this
Indian termination policy  Search this
Alaska Natives -- Land tenure  Search this
Indians of North America -- Civil rights  Search this
Indians of North America -- Economic conditions -- 20th century  Search this
Radioactive wastes -- United States -- Management  Search this
Trail of Broken Treaties, 1972  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Videotapes
Correspondence
Administrative records
Financial records
Audiotapes
Clippings
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Collection Title, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.010
See more items in:
National Congress of American Indians records
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4710475fc-a6c0-427e-ad01-f83634f2caa5
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-010
Online Media:

MS 2197 Pamunkey notebook

Collector:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Creator:
Cook, Lavinia  Search this
C., R., Mrs  Search this
Smith, John, 1580-1631  Search this
Strachey, Thomas  Search this
Dalrymple, William  Search this
Extent:
38 Pages
Culture:
Pamunkey  Search this
Mattaponi  Search this
Chickahominy  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Maps
Newsclippings
Date:
post 1893
Scope and Contents:
Includes occasional brief references to the Mattaponi and Chickahominy. Contents: Indian medicines by Lavinia Cook, 3 pages; names of Chiefs, from "Mrs R. C.," 1 page; the country and animals hunted, 1 page; tenure of lands, 1 page; population, 1 page; government, 1 page; "sustentation," 1 page; local names in King William Co., Virginia, 3 pages, note about Roxy (Roxanna) Indians near Norfolk, Virginia: "Meherrins?," 1 page; note on Cumberland town, English settlement on Pamunkey river, and "Cumberland Indians" visited by Gatschet, November 16, 1890, 3 pages; vocabulary notes from John Smith, Thomas Strachey, and the Reverend William Dalrymple, 3 pages; historical notes extracted in Virginia State Library, 2 pages; sketch map of King William County, Virginia, 1 page; sketch map of same area, after John Smith, 1608, 1 page.
Newspaper clippings, as follows: "Tribe of Pamunkey," The Daily Times, Richmond, Virginia, October 26, 1890 and November 2, 1890, 6 pages; a notice of the Pamunkey Indians on a reservation near Richmond, Virginia having sent a delegation to the World's Fair to invite other Indians to come and settle on their reservation, Indian Journal of Muskogee, Eufaula, Indian Territory, August 3, 1893, 1 page; "Pamunkeys Want a Sea Trip," Times, Washington, D.C., July 6, 1899, 1 page; "Powhatan's Men Yet Live," Washington [D.C.] Evening Star, Washington, D.C., April 25, 1894, 2 pages; "Pamunkey Indians and Their Little Reservation," Washington Chronicle, Washington, D.C., December 14, 1890, 2 pages. Reference added to file, 1956: The Historical Magazine, 1853, Volume 2, Number 6, page 182, containing Pamunkey vocabulary by Reverend Dalrymple (transcribed by Gatschet in his notebook). Photostat, 1 page.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2197
Local Note:
printed document
Other Title:
Tribe of Pamunkey
Pamunkeys Want a Sea Trip
Powhatan's Men Yet Live
Pamunkey Indians and Their Little Reservation
Topic:
Medicine -- Pamunkey  Search this
Names, Personal -- Pamunkey  Search this
Names, place -- King William County, Virginia -- Pamunkey  Search this
Hunting -- Pamunkey  Search this
Land tenure -- Pamunkey  Search this
population -- Pamunkey  Search this
Government -- Pamunkey  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
King William County (Virginia) -- Place names  Search this
Cumberland Town (Virginia)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Maps
Newsclippings
Citation:
Manuscript 2197, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2197
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw31468d656-ca73-4349-aa19-80a1d8542340
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2197

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