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National Visionary Leadership Project 2003

Creator:
National Visionary Leadership Project  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Clark, Jeannine Smith, 1928-  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Powell, Georgette Seabrooke  Search this
Extent:
0.25 Linear feet (1 box)
5 Video recordings (5 VHS 1/2" video recordings)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Oral history
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
June 4, 2003
Scope and Contents note:
This collection contains five videotaped oral history interviews conducted in partnership with the National Visionary Leadership Project and the Anacostia Community Museum's Education Department in 2003. Interviewees include Georgette Seabrooke Powell,William Langford,Louise Daniel Hutchinson, Jeannine Clark, and Charles H. Clark.
Provenance:
Co-founded in 2001 by Camille O. Cosby, Ed.D. and Renee Poussaint, The National Visionary Leadership Project (NVLP), a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization, unites generations to create tomorrow's leaders by recording, preserving, and distributing through various media, the wisdom of extraordinary African American elders - Visionaries - who have shaped American history. Some of these elders are nationally recognized leaders, who are interviewed on videotape by NVLP's co-founders and board members. Other Visionary elders, known primarily in their local communities, are selected and interviewed by NVLP college Fellows. This invaluable primary source material is accessible worldwide on the NVLP website, and permanently archived at the Library of Congress, allowing students, scholars and the public to gain a whole new understanding of this country's past, and the lessons to be learned from it. - NVLP website
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Oral history
Interviews
Citation:
National Visionary Leadership Project 2003, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.09-005
See more items in:
National Visionary Leadership Project 2003
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-09-005

Legacy Keepers: Interview with Louise Daniel Hutchinson

Creator:
National Visionary Leadership Project  Search this
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Collection Creator:
National Visionary Leadership Project  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS, 1/2")
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Place:
Maryland
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2003
Scope and Contents:
Through an oral history interview, historian Louise Daniel Hutchinson explains she learned the value of education from her parents, community activism from her mother, and citizenship from her teacher Dr. Paul Phillips Cook at Miner Teacher's College. Born in Maryland, grew up in a family of nine, and raised Catholic, Hutchinson experienced history as happened through attending segregated churches and segregated schools; and witnessing the Brown versus Board of Education arguments in-person. She describes her perspective on living in Texas while attending Prairie View A&M University; and her experience working with Dorothy Porter Wesley when she was a student at Howard University. She talks about the visionaries she knew or met including Mary McLeod Bethune, Nannie Helen Burroughs; and her other sources of inspirations, including Anna Cooper and Mary Church Terrell. Hutchinson describes her experiences working for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Washington, D.C., National Portrait Gallery, Frederick Douglass Home for the National Park Service, and the Anacostia Museum. She also talks about the books she wrote about the exhibitions on Out of Africa and Anna J. Cooper, exhibitions she curated - Harlem Renaissance and The Frederick Douglass Years , and researching and writing about her family's history.
Interview. Part of the National Visionary Leadership Project 2003. Dated 20030604.
Biographical / Historical:
Co-founded in 2001 by Camille O. Cosby, Ed.D. and Renee Poussaint, The National Visionary Leadership Project (NVLP), a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization, unites generations to create tomorrow's leaders by recording, preserving, and distributing through various media, the wisdom of extraordinary African American elders - Visionaries - who have shaped American history. National Visionary Leadership Project 2003 collection contains five videotaped oral history interviews conducted in partnership with the National Visionary Leadership Project and the Anacostia Community Museum's Education Department in 2003. Interviewees include Georgette Seabrooke Powell, William Langford, Louise Daniel Hutchinson, Jeannine Clark, and Charles Clark. Full transcripts of the interviews are available for reference in the archive.
General:
Title transcribed from cover page of the video recording's transcript.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American families  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Education  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Citation:
Legacy Keepers: Interview of Louise Daniel Hutchinson, National Visionary Leadership Project 2003, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-005, Item ACMA AV000921
See more items in:
National Visionary Leadership Project 2003
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-005-ref3

Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Extent:
9.15 Linear feet (17 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Exhibit scripts
Photographic prints
Exhibition records
Catalogs
Brochures
Correspondence
Place:
Africa, West -- History -- Exhibitions
Date:
1979-02 - 1980-02
Summary:
An exhibition on the history of the transatlantic slave trade, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood and held there from February 1979-February 1980. Curated by Louise Daniel Hutchinson. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit scripts, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, floor plans, and catalogues.
Related Archival Materials note:
Audiovisual materials related to this exhibition located in Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist.
Topic:
Slave trade -- America -- Exhibitions  Search this
Slave trade -- Africa -- History  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Slave insurrections -- United States -- Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Exhibit scripts
Photographic prints
Exhibition records -- 1967-1989
Catalogs
Brochures
Correspondence
Citation:
Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-031
See more items in:
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-031
Online Media:

Camara Laye: Conversation about Africa

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Africa, West
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1977
Scope and Contents:
Camara Laye talked about griots who transmit the oral culture of Africa; his work as oral historian; the novel he was writing; the seven African countries that compressed the Empire Mali and the countries' shared culture; Kinte project with Alex Haley; African civilization as a social, humanistic civilization and European civilization as a mechanic civilization; expanded African family versus limited European family; limited independence of Africa; and regrouping of Africa. Following Camara Laye lecture, the remainder of the recording includes a demonstration/conversation about tie dying technique; and two women conversing about an alphabet book of African culture and what they are going to do the following day.
Lecture. Audio Only. French with English interpretation. AV001386: poor audio quality. Dated 19770728.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001375_B

ACMA AV001386_A
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African culture  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Storytelling  Search this
Griots  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Camara Laye: Conversation about Africa, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-031, Item ACMA AV001375_A
See more items in:
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-031-ref1

Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization audiovisual records

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (1 open reel 1/2" video recordings)
9 Sound recordings (5 audio cassette sound recordings ; 4 open reel 1/4" sound recordings)
0.2 Linear feet
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Place:
Africa, West -- History -- Exhibitions
Date:
circa 1978-1980
Scope and Contents note:
Audiovisual materials created for an exhibition on the history of the transatlantic slave trade, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood and held there from February 1979-February 1980. Curated by Louise Daniel Hutchinson. This collection contains the audiovisual output of the exhibit, including narration sound recordings created for use within the exhibit and video and sound recordings of related talks and exhibit tours.
Related Archival Materials note:
Anacostia Community Museum. Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Museum exhibits  Search this
Slave trade -- Africa -- History  Search this
Slave trade -- America -- Exhibitions  Search this
Slave insurrections -- United States -- Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-031, Series ACMA AV03-031
See more items in:
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-031-ref1010

African History: Dr. Leonard Jeffries

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Jeffries, Leonard  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Lectures
Place:
Africa
United States
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1978
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Leonard Jeffries speaks to supervisory staff at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (ANM) during the development of the exhibition, Out of Africa: From West African Kingdoms to Colonization. He discusses levels of analysis (factual level, conceptual level, theoretical level, and practical level) when studying and presenting history to others. He explains history is viewed through varying perspectives and talks about the Euro-American and African-Asiatic perspectives and value systems. Throughout the lecture, Jeffries talks about the history of slavery and the slave trade; African servitude versus Euro-American slavery; Euro-American abolitionists versus African abolitionists; Euro-American materialism and profit making; African history, traditions, and perspective; black history, and black experience. He explains misconceptions are made in the study and portrayal of history; and museums can either challenge these misconceptions or continue them. He stresses Africa has been called the dark continent, and this statement along with others presents black history and black experience in a negative context, which results in cultural genocide. Finally, Jeffries reviews and discusses the sections of the future ANM exhibit and explains the best ways to present topics of each section.
Presentation/lecture. Part of Out of Africa: From West African Kingdoms to Colonization Audiovisual Records. AV003271: Part 1, Levels of Analyses. AV003257: Part 2, America. Sound quality poor - static throughout both recordings. Dated: 19780605.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - Out of Africa: From West African Kingdoms to Colonization - explores early African civilizations, the slave trade, the abolitionist movement and the founding of the first African republic, Liberia. Maps, graphics, and tapes depict the ancient kingdoms of Ghana, Mali, Songhei, Kanem-Bornu and the Hausa States. Headdresses, masks, housepots, gold weights, taped music and musical instruments and door panels represent the cultures of Nigeria, the Ivory Coast, Ghana, Mali, Liberia and Sierra Leone. The journey into slavery is told in a diary of a ship's doctor, the account book of a slave trader and letters of a young passenger. Slave revolts are treated in documents, photographs and portraits. Photographs, books and other publications are included in a section on the Abolitionist movement. Additional documents and photographs tell the story of those who chose to return to Africa. The exibition was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1979 - February 1980. Curated by Louise Daniel Hutchinson.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003257
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Museums  Search this
Blacks -- History  Search this
Blacks -- Study and teaching  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Slave trade  Search this
Colonization  Search this
Abolitionists  Search this
African culture  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Lectures
Series Citation:
Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-031, Item ACMA AV003271
See more items in:
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-031: Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-031-ref1011

African History: Dr. Leonard Jeffries

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Africa
Africa, West
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
United States
Date:
1978
Scope and Contents:
Presentation for supervisory staff regarding future exhibit
Presentation. Part of Out of Africa: From West African Kingdoms to Colonization Audiovisual Records. AV003271: Part 1, Levels of Analyses. AV003257: Part 2, America. Dated: 19780605.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - Out of Africa: From West African Kingdoms to Colonization - explores early African civilizations, the slave trade, the abolitionist movement and the founding of the first African republic, Liberia. Maps, graphics, and tapes depict the ancient kingdoms of Ghana, Mali, Songhei, Kanem-Bornu and the Hausa States. Headdresses, masks, housepots, gold weights, taped music and musical instruments and door panels represent the cultures of Nigeria, the Ivory Coast, Ghana, Mali, Liberia and Sierra Leone. The journey into slavery is told in a diary of a ship's doctor, the account book of a slave trader and letters of a young passenger. Slave revolts are treated in documents, photographs and portraits. Photographs, books and other publications are included in a section on the Abolitionist movement. Additional documents and photographs tell the story of those who chose to return to Africa. The exibition was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1979 - February 1980. Curated by Louise Daniel Hutchinson.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003257
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Slave trade  Search this
Slave insurrections  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Series Citation:
Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-031, Item ACMA AV003271
See more items in:
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-031: Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-031-ref1012

Out of Africa Narration by David Eaton

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (open reel, 1/4 inch)
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Narration
Place:
United States
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
circa 1979
Scope and Contents:
Narrator David Eaton speaks of slavery and oppression; and freedom from slavery and fighting for the rights that come with it.
Narration. Part of Out of Africa: From West African Kingdoms to Colonization Audiovisual Records. AV003297, AV003300, and AV001371: same content. AV003297 and AV003300: undated. AV001371: dated 19791026.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - Out of Africa: From West African Kingdoms to Colonization - explores early African civilizations, the slave trade, the abolitionist movement and the founding of the first African republic, Liberia. Maps, graphics, and tapes depict the ancient kingdoms of Ghana, Mali, Songhei, Kanem-Bornu and the Hausa States. Headdresses, masks, housepots, gold weights, taped music and musical instruments and door panels represent the cultures of Nigeria, the Ivory Coast, Ghana, Mali, Liberia and Sierra Leone. The journey into slavery is told in a diary of a ship's doctor, the account book of a slave trader and letters of a young passenger. Slave revolts are treated in documents, photographs and portraits. Photographs, books and other publications are included in a section on the Abolitionist movement. Additional documents and photographs tell the story of those who chose to return to Africa. The exibition was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1979 - February 1980. Curated by Louise Daniel Hutchinson.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003300

ACMA AV001371
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Blacks -- History  Search this
Blacks -- Study and teaching  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Slaves -- Emancipation  Search this
Liberty  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Narration
Citation:
Out of Africa Narration by David Eaton, Exhibition Records AV03-031, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-031, Item ACMA AV003297
See more items in:
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-031: Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-031-ref1013

Out of Africa Narration

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Jeffries, Leonard  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Extent:
3 Sound recordings (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Narration
Place:
Africa
United States
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
circa 1979
Scope and Contents:
Young boy recites story about life on a slave ship. Narrator speaks of the slave forts and castles, built by Europeans, along the coast of Africa during slave trade period; and their role in the transatlantic slave trade. He states the slave forts and castles, in Ghana and elsewhere, are being used as cultural centers, museums, and research laboratories today. He explains the Gambians and Alex Haley hope to turn James Island, where ancestors of Kunta Kinte Alex Haley lived, into a memorial to the ancestors.
Narration. Part of Out of Africa: From West African Kingdoms to Colonization Audiovisual Records. AV003363 and AV003380: same content. Transcribed from AV003363: Ron Coleman, Leonard Jeffreys. Transcribed from AV003380: Ron Hughes, Leonard Jeffreys. AV003499: slave forts and castles narration from 000504 - 001504 and 001711 - 002720 [also on recording: Narration about West African Slave Trade and Evolution of a Community Part III: Crime, Unemployment, Education]. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - Out of Africa: From West African Kingdoms to Colonization - explores early African civilizations, the slave trade, the abolitionist movement and the founding of the first African republic, Liberia. Maps, graphics, and tapes depict the ancient kingdoms of Ghana, Mali, Songhei, Kanem-Bornu and the Hausa States. Headdresses, masks, housepots, gold weights, taped music and musical instruments and door panels represent the cultures of Nigeria, the Ivory Coast, Ghana, Mali, Liberia and Sierra Leone. The journey into slavery is told in a diary of a ship's doctor, the account book of a slave trader and letters of a young passenger. Slave revolts are treated in documents, photographs and portraits. Photographs, books and other publications are included in a section on the Abolitionist movement. Additional documents and photographs tell the story of those who chose to return to Africa. The exibition was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1979 - February 1980. Curated by Louise Daniel Hutchinson.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003380

ACMA AV003499
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset and based on contents of recording.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Blacks -- History  Search this
Blacks -- Study and teaching  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Slave trade  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Narration
Citation:
Out of Africa Narration, Exhibition Records AV03-031, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-031, Item ACMA AV003363
See more items in:
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-031: Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-031-ref1014

Out of Africa Narration by John Kinard

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Extent:
3 Sound recordings (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Narration
Place:
Africa, West
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
United States
Date:
1979
Scope and Contents:
Narrator John Kinard introduces three writers and the reading of excerpts from their writings about the kingdoms of ancient Ghana, Mali, and Songhei. Focus on kings who governed ancient Ghana, Mali, and Songhei; their relationship with their people; and ceremonies and customs.
Narration. Part of Out of Africa: From West African Kingdoms to Colonization Audiovisual Records. AV003293, AV003379, and AV003359: same content. AV003293: dated 19790102. AV003379 and AV003359: undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - Out of Africa: From West African Kingdoms to Colonization - explores early African civilizations, the slave trade, the abolitionist movement and the founding of the first African republic, Liberia. Maps, graphics, and tapes depict the ancient kingdoms of Ghana, Mali, Songhei, Kanem-Bornu and the Hausa States. Headdresses, masks, housepots, gold weights, taped music and musical instruments and door panels represent the cultures of Nigeria, the Ivory Coast, Ghana, Mali, Liberia and Sierra Leone. The journey into slavery is told in a diary of a ship's doctor, the account book of a slave trader and letters of a young passenger. Slave revolts are treated in documents, photographs and portraits. Photographs, books and other publications are included in a section on the Abolitionist movement. Additional documents and photographs tell the story of those who chose to return to Africa. The exibition was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1979 - February 1980. Curated by Louise Daniel Hutchinson.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003379

ACMA AV003359
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Blacks -- History  Search this
Blacks -- Study and teaching  Search this
Kings and rulers, Ancient  Search this
Manners and customs  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Narration
Citation:
Out of Africa Narration by John Kinard, Exhibition Records AV03-031, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-031, Item ACMA AV003293
See more items in:
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-031: Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-031-ref1015

Out of Africa: Self Guided Tour

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Africa
Caribbean Area
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1979
Scope and Contents:
Self guided tour highlighted the five areas of the exhibition 'Out of Africa: From West African Kingdoms to Colonization.' The five areas explored ancient African kingdoms, African artworks, slave forts and slavery on the west coast of Africa, the Middle Passage and slavery in the Caribbean, resistance to slavery in America, and back to Africa movements.
Exhibition tour. Related to exhibition 'Out of Africa: From West African Kingdoms to Colonization.' Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - Out of Africa: From West African Kingdoms to Colonization - explores early African civilizations, the slave trade, the abolitionist movement and the founding of the first African republic, Liberia. Maps, graphics, and tapes depict the ancient kingdoms of Ghana, Mali, Songhei, Kanem-Bornu and the Hausa States. Headdresses, masks, housepots, gold weights, taped music and musical instruments and door panels represent the cultures of Nigeria, the Ivory Coast, Ghana, Mali, Liberia and Sierra Leone. The journey into slavery is told in a diary of a ship's doctor, the account book of a slave trader and letters of a young passenger. Slave revolts are treated in documents, photographs and portraits. Photographs, books and other publications are included in a section on the Abolitionist movement. Additional documents and photographs tell the story of those who chose to return to Africa. The exibition was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1979 - February 1980. Curated by Louise Daniel Hutchinson.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Blacks -- History  Search this
Blacks -- Study and teaching  Search this
Kings and rulers, Ancient  Search this
Art, African  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Slave trade  Search this
Antislavery movements  Search this
Slave insurrections  Search this
Back to Africa movement  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Out of Africa: Self Guided Tour, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-031, Item ACMA AV001372
See more items in:
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-031: Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-031-ref1016

Musical Recordings: African Music

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Music
Place:
Africa
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1970s
Scope and Contents:
Instrumental and vocal music from African cultures including Akonodey by Akan Adowa musicians, Dance Of The Witch Doctor by Festival Music Of The Princess Of Dahomey, and Ewe Chorus with drum, rattle, gong.
Music. Undated.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African culture  Search this
Music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Music
Citation:
Musical Recordings: African Music, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-031, Item ACMA AV003448
See more items in:
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-031-ref1017

Narration about West African Slave Trade

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Narration
Music
Place:
Africa, West
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1970s
Scope and Contents:
Narrator descibes the West African slave trade and the conditions of the slaves, particularly on the ship. African drumming in the background.
Narration. AV003499: also on recording Out of Africa Narration and Evolution of a Community Part III: Crime, Unemployment, Education. Undated.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Slavery  Search this
Slave trade  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Narration
Music
Citation:
Narration about West African Slave Trade, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-031, Item ACMA AV003499
See more items in:
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-031-ref1018

Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Cooper, Anna J., Dr., 1858-1964  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Extent:
11.38 Linear feet (23 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Exhibition records
Photographic prints
Exhibit scripts
Correspondence
Brochures
Date:
1981-02 - 1982-09
Summary:
An exhibition on Anna J. Cooper, Washington D. C. educator and author. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982. Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit scripts, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, and floor plans.
Related Archival Materials note:
Audiovisual materials related to this exhibition located in Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
African American women  Search this
Genre/Form:
Exhibition records -- 1967-1989
Photographic prints
Exhibit scripts
Correspondence
Brochures
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-029
Online Media:

Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Cooper, Anna J., Dr., 1858-1964  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
5 Video recordings (5 open reel 1/2" video recordings)
0.5 Linear feet
13 Sound recordings (1 open reel 1/4" sound recordings ; 12 audio cassette sound recordings)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1981-1983
bulk 1981-1981
Scope and Contents note:
Audiovisual materials associated with an exhibition on Anna J. Cooper, Washington D. C. educator and author. The exhibition was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982. Louise Daniel Hutchinson
Related Archival Materials note:
Anacostia Community Museum. Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American women  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper Audiovisual Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Series ACMA AV03-029
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref1360

The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Sterling A. Brown Lecture on Anna J. Cooper

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Fisk University  Search this
Howard University  Search this
M Street High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Oberlin College  Search this
Preparatory High School for Colored Youth (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Université de Paris IV: Paris-Sorbonne  Search this
Virginia Theological Seminary and College (Lynchburg, Va.)  Search this
Brown, Sterling A., 1901-1989  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Egypt, Ophelia Settle  Search this
Martin-Felton, Zora  Search this
Terrell, Mary Church, 1863-1954  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (open reel, 1/2 inch)
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Poetry
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Lynchburg (Va.)
United States
Southern States
Date:
1981
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Sterling A. Brown talks about his experiences and teachers, including Anna J. Cooper, at M Street High School (later known as Dunbar High School); and education and segregation, which was fought by Cooper and Mary Church Terrell. He provides a short history and legacy of Cooper, who he considers a role model; and reads prose by Anna J. Cooper which highlights her educational philosophy and her views regarding education and the roles of teachers. Brown talks about his education and academic career; reminiscences his teaching experiences particularly at Virginia Theological Seminary and College, and living in Lynchburg, Virginia; and reads a few of his own poems, which focus on black life experiences in the Southern United States. Ophelia Settle Egypt, a friend of Sterling Brown, reminiscences about her experiences attending Howard University and adventures with Brown and his wife, Daisy: their resentment of Jim Crow and riding on a segregated bus. Mr. Muhammad reads his poems in tribute of Sterling Brown and "for everyone in the struggle of identifying what is what and who is who and what we need to do about it." Zora Martin-Felton introduces the speakers throughout the lecture series.
Lecture, and poetry and prose reading. AV003057 and AV003051: video. AV001053 and AV001353: audio only. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. AV003057, AV003051, and AV001053: undated. AV001353: dated 19810426.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.;Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.;Professor, poet, and literary critic Dr. Sterling A. Brown (1901-1989) was born and raised in the Washington, D.C area. He grew up on a farm in Howard County, Maryland; and attended Waterford Oaks Elementary, Dunbar High School, Williams College in Massachusetts, and Harvard University. He married Daisy Turnbull in 1927. Brown taught at Howard University, Fisk University, Vassar College, New York University, Atlanta University, Yale University, and Virginia Theological Seminary and College in Lynchburg, Virginia. His studies and poetry focused on black history and culture of the Southern United States.;Originally named Preparatory High School for Colored Youth and later known as M Street High School, Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, located in Washington, D.C., was the first black public high school in the United States. During the first half of the twentieth century, Dunbar was an academically elite public school with many of its teachers holding master and doctorate degrees. By the 1950s, the school was sending 80 percent of its students to college. During the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century, Dunbar struggled to keep its prestigious reputation and high standards. As with many troubled urban public schools, Dunbar standards fell and some students struggle with basic reading and math. The Dunbar Legacy Lecture Series, which was held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum in the early 1980s, consisted of lectures by and about people associated with Dunbar High School.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003051

ACMA AV001053_A

ACMA AV001053_B

ACMA AV001353_A

ACMA AV001353_B
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
Education  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Race  Search this
Human Rights  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Women's rights  Search this
Civil rights leaders  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
African American poets  Search this
Poets  Search this
Social history  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Poetry
Citation:
The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Sterling A. Brown Lecture on Anna J. Cooper, Exhibition Records AV03-029, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV003057
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref906

The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Paul Phillips Cooke Lecture

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Frelinghuysen University (Washington, D.C.).  Search this
M Street High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Miner Teachers College  Search this
Oberlin College  Search this
Preparatory High School for Colored Youth (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
St. Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute  Search this
Université de Paris IV: Paris-Sorbonne  Search this
Wilberforce University  Search this
Cooke, Paul P.  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Cooper, George A. C., Reverend  Search this
Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963  Search this
Grimké, Francis J. (Francis James), 1850-1937  Search this
Hunt, Ida Gibbs, 1862-1957  Search this
Martin-Felton, Zora  Search this
Terrell, Mary Church, 1863-1954  Search this
Washington, Booker T., 1856-1915  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (open reel, 1/2 inch)
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Raleigh (N.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1981
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Paul Phillips Cooke speaks on the subject of Anna J. Cooper: Teacher and Human Being. He talks about Cooper's life and the time in which she lived; and her human and religious influences. Cooke, who assisted with the Cooper exhibition at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, provides an overview of Cooper's history and addresses questions from the lecture audience. Cooke also provides an overview of the history of educational institutions and schools, and the education system in Washington, D.C. He discusses civil rights, legislation changes in D.C., and how civil rights legislation affected Cooper, W. E. DuBois, and Booker T. Washington. Zora Martin-Felton introduces Cooke providing a short history of his Anacostian roots.
Lecture. AV003264: Part 1. AV003220: Part 2. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. AV003264 and AV003220: undated. AV001346: dated 19830925, audio only, contains part of (copy of) AV003220 recording.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.;Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.;Educator, author, statesman, and former president of the District of Columbia Teacher's College Dr. Paul Phillips Cooke (1917-2010) was born in New York City and raised in Washington, D.C. He attended Dunbar High School, Miner Teachers College, New York University, Catholic University of America, and Columbia University, where he received his doctorate. Cooke was married to Rose Cooke for 63 years.;Originally named Preparatory High School for Colored Youth and later known as M Street High School, Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, located in Washington, D.C., was the first black public high school in the United States. During the first half of the twentieth century, Dunbar was an academically elite public school with many of its teachers holding master and doctorate degrees. By the 1950s, the school was sending 80 percent of its students to college. During the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century, Dunbar struggled to keep its prestigious reputation and high standards. As with many troubled urban public schools, Dunbar standards fell and some students struggle with basic reading and math. The Dunbar Legacy Lecture Series, which was held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum in the early 1980s, consisted of lectures by and about people associated with Dunbar High School.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003220

ACMA AV001346_B
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
Education  Search this
Religion  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Race  Search this
Human Rights  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Women's rights  Search this
Civil rights leaders  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
Social history  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Citation:
The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Sterling A. Brown Lecture, Exhibition Records AV03-029, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV003264
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref907

Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Music, Literary Reading, and Sound Effects

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Music
Sound effects recordings
Literary readings (radio programs)
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1981
Scope and Contents:
Components used for exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. Recording of song Moonlight Sonata; literary reading of Send Me No Flowers which has religious influences; and ambient sound of children talking (schoolroom sound effect).
Music, literary reading, and sound effects. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. Dated 19810127.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.;Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
Students  Search this
Children  Search this
Religion  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Music
Sound effects recordings
Literary readings (Radio programs)
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Music, Literary Reading, and Sound Effects, Exhibition Records AV03-029, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV003514
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref908

Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Puppet Show

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum Black Heritage Puppet Theatre  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Frelinghuysen University (Washington, D.C.).  Search this
M Street High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Oberlin College  Search this
Preparatory High School for Colored Youth (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Université de Paris IV: Paris-Sorbonne  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Music
Puppet plays
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1981
Scope and Contents:
A puppet show, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum Black Heritage Puppet Theatre, provides school children with an introduction to the exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The main character in the puppet show is a student who needs to present a report on a black woman who lived in Washington, D.C. and who made an outstanding contribution to the lives of black people. The puppet show highlights Cooper's teaching career; her advocacy for education, black students, and civil rights; and the period of time in which she lived. Music played prior to puppet show, and children in the audience sing a rhyme about Cooper's live after puppet show.
Puppet show. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. Dated 19810415.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.;Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Education  Search this
Educators  Search this
Students  Search this
Children  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Race  Search this
Human Rights  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Music
Puppet plays
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Puppet Show, Exhibition Records AV03-029, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV003070
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref909

Prologue to Evolution of a Community Part II

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Narration
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1972
Scope and Contents:
Introductory narration for museum exhibit, Evolution of a Community, draws parallel between the greed and ignorance of Europeans enslaving and dehumanizing Africans beginning in 1442, and the racism and inequality of African Americans 500 years later. The museum exhibit examines the social ills - unemployment, feeble health care, starving bodies, poor housing, and deadly drugs - that daily plaque the community of Anacostia.
Narration. Part of Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Evolution of a Community, an exhibit at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from January 1972 though December 1972, presented the history of Anacostia from post-World War II to the present through photos, text, drawings, video tape programs, and a slide/tape show. Evolution of a Community Part II, also known as Anacostia Today, was on display at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from March 1973 though July 1973. The exhibitions developed as a result oral histories collected from Anacostia residents.
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Community museums  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Racism  Search this
Race discrimination  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Unemployment  Search this
Housing  Search this
Starvation  Search this
Drugs  Search this
Medical care  Search this
Social history  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Narration
Citation:
Prologue to Evolution of a Community Part II, Exhibition Records AV03-040, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-040, Item ACMA AV003284
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series ACMA AV03-040: Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref555

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