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National Visionary Leadership Project 2003

Creator:
National Visionary Leadership Project  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Clark, Jeannine Smith, 1928-  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Powell, Georgette Seabrooke  Search this
Extent:
0.25 Linear feet (1 box)
5 Video recordings (5 VHS 1/2" video recordings)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Oral history
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
June 4, 2003
Scope and Contents note:
This collection contains five videotaped oral history interviews conducted in partnership with the National Visionary Leadership Project and the Anacostia Community Museum's Education Department in 2003. Interviewees include Georgette Seabrooke Powell,William Langford,Louise Daniel Hutchinson, Jeannine Clark, and Charles H. Clark.
Provenance:
Co-founded in 2001 by Camille O. Cosby, Ed.D. and Renee Poussaint, The National Visionary Leadership Project (NVLP), a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization, unites generations to create tomorrow's leaders by recording, preserving, and distributing through various media, the wisdom of extraordinary African American elders - Visionaries - who have shaped American history. Some of these elders are nationally recognized leaders, who are interviewed on videotape by NVLP's co-founders and board members. Other Visionary elders, known primarily in their local communities, are selected and interviewed by NVLP college Fellows. This invaluable primary source material is accessible worldwide on the NVLP website, and permanently archived at the Library of Congress, allowing students, scholars and the public to gain a whole new understanding of this country's past, and the lessons to be learned from it. - NVLP website
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Oral history
Interviews
Citation:
National Visionary Leadership Project 2003, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.09-005
See more items in:
National Visionary Leadership Project 2003
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-09-005

Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Cooper, Anna J., Dr., 1858-1964  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Extent:
11.38 Linear feet (23 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Exhibition records
Photographic prints
Exhibit scripts
Correspondence
Brochures
Date:
1981-02 - 1982-09
Summary:
An exhibition on Anna J. Cooper, Washington D. C. educator and author. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982. Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit scripts, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, and floor plans.
Related Archival Materials note:
Audiovisual materials related to this exhibition located in Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
African American women  Search this
Genre/Form:
Exhibition records -- 1967-1989
Photographic prints
Exhibit scripts
Correspondence
Brochures
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-029
Online Media:

Anacostia story: 1608-1930 exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Extent:
15.25 Linear feet (26 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Exhibition catalogs
Maps
Clippings
Photographic prints
Contact sheets
Exhibition records
Correspondence
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
circa 1977-1978
Summary:
An exhibition on history of the Anacostia neighborhood of Washington, D. C. The show was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from March of 1977 to March 1978. Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit script, administrative records, brochures, posters, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, floor plans, and catalogues.
Related Archival Materials note:
Audiovisual materials related to this exhibition located in Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Exhibition catalogs
Maps
Clippings
Photographic prints
Contact sheets
Exhibition records -- 1967-1989
Correspondence
Citation:
Anacostia story: 1680-1930 exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-039
See more items in:
Anacostia story: 1608-1930 exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-039
Online Media:

Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Cooper, Anna J., Dr., 1858-1964  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
5 Video recordings (5 open reel 1/2" video recordings)
0.5 Linear feet
13 Sound recordings (1 open reel 1/4" sound recordings ; 12 audio cassette sound recordings)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1981-1983
bulk 1981-1981
Scope and Contents note:
Audiovisual materials associated with an exhibition on Anna J. Cooper, Washington D. C. educator and author. The exhibition was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982. Louise Daniel Hutchinson
Related Archival Materials note:
Anacostia Community Museum. Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American women  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper Audiovisual Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Series ACMA AV03-029
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref1360

The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Sterling A. Brown Lecture on Anna J. Cooper

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Fisk University  Search this
Howard University  Search this
M Street High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Oberlin College  Search this
Preparatory High School for Colored Youth (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Université de Paris IV: Paris-Sorbonne  Search this
Virginia Theological Seminary and College (Lynchburg, Va.)  Search this
Brown, Sterling A., 1901-1989  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Egypt, Ophelia Settle  Search this
Martin-Felton, Zora  Search this
Terrell, Mary Church, 1863-1954  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (open reel, 1/2 inch)
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Poetry
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Lynchburg (Va.)
United States
Southern States
Date:
1981
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Sterling A. Brown talks about his experiences and teachers, including Anna J. Cooper, at M Street High School (later known as Dunbar High School); and education and segregation, which was fought by Cooper and Mary Church Terrell. He provides a short history and legacy of Cooper, who he considers a role model; and reads prose by Anna J. Cooper which highlights her educational philosophy and her views regarding education and the roles of teachers. Brown talks about his education and academic career; reminiscences his teaching experiences particularly at Virginia Theological Seminary and College, and living in Lynchburg, Virginia; and reads a few of his own poems, which focus on black life experiences in the Southern United States. Ophelia Settle Egypt, a friend of Sterling Brown, reminiscences about her experiences attending Howard University and adventures with Brown and his wife, Daisy: their resentment of Jim Crow and riding on a segregated bus. Mr. Muhammad reads his poems in tribute of Sterling Brown and "for everyone in the struggle of identifying what is what and who is who and what we need to do about it." Zora Martin-Felton introduces the speakers throughout the lecture series.
Lecture, and poetry and prose reading. AV003057 and AV003051: video. AV001053 and AV001353: audio only. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. AV003057, AV003051, and AV001053: undated. AV001353: dated 19810426.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.;Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.;Professor, poet, and literary critic Dr. Sterling A. Brown (1901-1989) was born and raised in the Washington, D.C area. He grew up on a farm in Howard County, Maryland; and attended Waterford Oaks Elementary, Dunbar High School, Williams College in Massachusetts, and Harvard University. He married Daisy Turnbull in 1927. Brown taught at Howard University, Fisk University, Vassar College, New York University, Atlanta University, Yale University, and Virginia Theological Seminary and College in Lynchburg, Virginia. His studies and poetry focused on black history and culture of the Southern United States.;Originally named Preparatory High School for Colored Youth and later known as M Street High School, Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, located in Washington, D.C., was the first black public high school in the United States. During the first half of the twentieth century, Dunbar was an academically elite public school with many of its teachers holding master and doctorate degrees. By the 1950s, the school was sending 80 percent of its students to college. During the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century, Dunbar struggled to keep its prestigious reputation and high standards. As with many troubled urban public schools, Dunbar standards fell and some students struggle with basic reading and math. The Dunbar Legacy Lecture Series, which was held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum in the early 1980s, consisted of lectures by and about people associated with Dunbar High School.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003051

ACMA AV001053_A

ACMA AV001053_B

ACMA AV001353_A

ACMA AV001353_B
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
Education  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Race  Search this
Human Rights  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Women's rights  Search this
Civil rights leaders  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
African American poets  Search this
Poets  Search this
Social history  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Poetry
Citation:
The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Sterling A. Brown Lecture on Anna J. Cooper, Exhibition Records AV03-029, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV003057
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref906

The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Paul Phillips Cooke Lecture

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Frelinghuysen University (Washington, D.C.).  Search this
M Street High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Miner Teachers College  Search this
Oberlin College  Search this
Preparatory High School for Colored Youth (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
St. Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute  Search this
Université de Paris IV: Paris-Sorbonne  Search this
Wilberforce University  Search this
Cooke, Paul P.  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Cooper, George A. C., Reverend  Search this
Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963  Search this
Grimké, Francis J. (Francis James), 1850-1937  Search this
Hunt, Ida Gibbs, 1862-1957  Search this
Martin-Felton, Zora  Search this
Terrell, Mary Church, 1863-1954  Search this
Washington, Booker T., 1856-1915  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (open reel, 1/2 inch)
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Raleigh (N.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1981
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Paul Phillips Cooke speaks on the subject of Anna J. Cooper: Teacher and Human Being. He talks about Cooper's life and the time in which she lived; and her human and religious influences. Cooke, who assisted with the Cooper exhibition at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, provides an overview of Cooper's history and addresses questions from the lecture audience. Cooke also provides an overview of the history of educational institutions and schools, and the education system in Washington, D.C. He discusses civil rights, legislation changes in D.C., and how civil rights legislation affected Cooper, W. E. DuBois, and Booker T. Washington. Zora Martin-Felton introduces Cooke providing a short history of his Anacostian roots.
Lecture. AV003264: Part 1. AV003220: Part 2. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. AV003264 and AV003220: undated. AV001346: dated 19830925, audio only, contains part of (copy of) AV003220 recording.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.;Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.;Educator, author, statesman, and former president of the District of Columbia Teacher's College Dr. Paul Phillips Cooke (1917-2010) was born in New York City and raised in Washington, D.C. He attended Dunbar High School, Miner Teachers College, New York University, Catholic University of America, and Columbia University, where he received his doctorate. Cooke was married to Rose Cooke for 63 years.;Originally named Preparatory High School for Colored Youth and later known as M Street High School, Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, located in Washington, D.C., was the first black public high school in the United States. During the first half of the twentieth century, Dunbar was an academically elite public school with many of its teachers holding master and doctorate degrees. By the 1950s, the school was sending 80 percent of its students to college. During the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century, Dunbar struggled to keep its prestigious reputation and high standards. As with many troubled urban public schools, Dunbar standards fell and some students struggle with basic reading and math. The Dunbar Legacy Lecture Series, which was held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum in the early 1980s, consisted of lectures by and about people associated with Dunbar High School.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003220

ACMA AV001346_B
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
Education  Search this
Religion  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Race  Search this
Human Rights  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Women's rights  Search this
Civil rights leaders  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
Social history  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Citation:
The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Sterling A. Brown Lecture, Exhibition Records AV03-029, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV003264
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref907

Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Music, Literary Reading, and Sound Effects

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Music
Sound effects recordings
Literary readings (radio programs)
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1981
Scope and Contents:
Components used for exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. Recording of song Moonlight Sonata; literary reading of Send Me No Flowers which has religious influences; and ambient sound of children talking (schoolroom sound effect).
Music, literary reading, and sound effects. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. Dated 19810127.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.;Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
Students  Search this
Children  Search this
Religion  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Music
Sound effects recordings
Literary readings (Radio programs)
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Music, Literary Reading, and Sound Effects, Exhibition Records AV03-029, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV003514
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref908

Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Puppet Show

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum Black Heritage Puppet Theatre  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Frelinghuysen University (Washington, D.C.).  Search this
M Street High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Oberlin College  Search this
Preparatory High School for Colored Youth (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Université de Paris IV: Paris-Sorbonne  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Music
Puppet plays
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1981
Scope and Contents:
A puppet show, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum Black Heritage Puppet Theatre, provides school children with an introduction to the exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The main character in the puppet show is a student who needs to present a report on a black woman who lived in Washington, D.C. and who made an outstanding contribution to the lives of black people. The puppet show highlights Cooper's teaching career; her advocacy for education, black students, and civil rights; and the period of time in which she lived. Music played prior to puppet show, and children in the audience sing a rhyme about Cooper's live after puppet show.
Puppet show. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. Dated 19810415.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.;Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Education  Search this
Educators  Search this
Students  Search this
Children  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Race  Search this
Human Rights  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Music
Puppet plays
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Puppet Show, Exhibition Records AV03-029, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV003070
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref909

Anacostia Story:1608-1930 audiovisual records

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
4 Sound recordings (4 audio cassette sound recordings)
3 Video recordings (1 open reel 1/2" video recording ; 2 VHS 1/2" video recordings)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
circa 1977-1978
Scope and Contents note:
Audiovisual materials created for an exhibition on the history of the Anacostia neighborhood of Washington, D. C. The show was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from March of 1977 to March 1978. Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. This collection contains the audiovisual output of the exhibit, including video and sound recordings created for use within the exhibit and recordings of related talks and the exhibit opening.
Related Archival Materials note:
Anacostia Community Museum. Anacostia story: 1860-1930.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Anacostia Story:1860-1930 audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-039, Series ACMA 03-039
See more items in:
Anacostia story: 1608-1930 exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-039-ref1118

The Anacostia Story: Speaking of Federal City

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Narration
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
circa 1977
Scope and Contents:
Footage of exhibition. Very short narration which mentions Federal City.
B-roll footage and narration (about 1 minute of each). Part of Anacostia Story 1608 -1930 Audiovisual Records. Poor quality, sound distorted. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition, The Anacostia Story, presented the history and development of Anacostia between 1608 and 1930 told through artifacts, photographs, early prints, documents and memorabilia. Well-known residents of the area, including Frederick Douglass, Elzie Hoffman, Dr. Charles Nichols, and Solomon G. Brown, were featured. The exhibition was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from March of 1977 to March 1978.
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Communities  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Narration
Unedited footage
Citation:
The Anacostia Story: Speaking of Federal City, Exhibition Records AV03-039, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-039, Item ACMA AV003094
See more items in:
Anacostia story: 1608-1930 exhibition records
Anacostia story: 1608-1930 exhibition records / Series ACMA 03-039: Anacostia Story:1608-1930 audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-039-ref920

Prologue to Evolution of a Community Part II

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Narration
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1972
Scope and Contents:
Introductory narration for museum exhibit, Evolution of a Community, draws parallel between the greed and ignorance of Europeans enslaving and dehumanizing Africans beginning in 1442, and the racism and inequality of African Americans 500 years later. The museum exhibit examines the social ills - unemployment, feeble health care, starving bodies, poor housing, and deadly drugs - that daily plaque the community of Anacostia.
Narration. Part of Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Evolution of a Community, an exhibit at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from January 1972 though December 1972, presented the history of Anacostia from post-World War II to the present through photos, text, drawings, video tape programs, and a slide/tape show. Evolution of a Community Part II, also known as Anacostia Today, was on display at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from March 1973 though July 1973. The exhibitions developed as a result oral histories collected from Anacostia residents.
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Community museums  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Racism  Search this
Race discrimination  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Unemployment  Search this
Housing  Search this
Starvation  Search this
Drugs  Search this
Medical care  Search this
Social history  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Narration
Citation:
Prologue to Evolution of a Community Part II, Exhibition Records AV03-040, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-040, Item ACMA AV003284
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series ACMA AV03-040: Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref555

Evolution of a Community Exhibition Installation

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1972
Scope and Contents:
Building, painting, prepping, and installation of museum exhibit, Evolution of a Community, at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum.
B-roll footage of installation of museum exhibit. Part of Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Evolution of a Community, an exhibit at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from January 1972 though December 1972, presented the history of Anacostia from post-World War II to the present through photos, text, drawings, video tape programs, and a slide/tape show. Evolution of a Community Part II, also known as Anacostia Today, was on display at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from March 1973 though July 1973. The exhibitions developed as a result oral histories collected from Anacostia residents.
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Unedited footage
Citation:
Evolution of a Community Exhibition Installation, Exhibition Records AV03-040, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-040, Item ACMA AV003575
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series ACMA AV03-040: Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref556

Opening: Evolution of a Community Pt. 1

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Blackstone Rangers Band  Search this
Anderson, Stanley J.  Search this
Dale, Almore  Search this
Hope, Marion C.  Search this
Jackson, Samuel C. (Samuel Charles), 1929-1982  Search this
Jones, Alton  Search this
Kinard, John, 1936-1989  Search this
Ripley, S. Dillon (Sidney Dillon), 1913-2001  Search this
Smith, Helen Belding  Search this
Smith, Henry P., 1911-1995  Search this
Washington, Walter E., 1915-2003  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Barry Farms (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1972
Scope and Contents:
The Smithsonian Institution president, Anacostia residents, and city politicians provide remarks for the official opening of the exhibition Evolution of a Community at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum. Their speeches cover the history, purpose, and growth of the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum; an introduction to the exhibit; the role of museums, particularly the role of the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum within in the community of Anacostia and the city of Washington, D.C.; a short history of the people of Anacostia, including the establishment of Anacostia and Barry Farms; the importance of recording history for the people of a community; the present state of Anacostia; and what Anacostia will be for future generations. Recording also includes footage of exhibit displays, museums visitors, and exterior of the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum; and a musical performance by Blackstone Rangers Band.
Exhibition opening. Part of Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records. AV003208: part 1. AV003182: part 2. AV003208: glitches/skips in video recording. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Evolution of a Community, an exhibit at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from January 1972 though December 1972, presented the history of Anacostia from post-World War II to the present through photos, text, drawings, video tape programs, and a slide/tape show. Evolution of a Community Part II, also known as Anacostia Today, was on display at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from March 1973 though July 1973. The exhibitions developed as a result oral histories collected from Anacostia residents.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003208
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Community museums  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Museum techniques  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Social history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Unedited footage
Citation:
Opening: Evolution of a Community Pt. 1, Exhibition Records AV03-040, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-040, Item ACMA AV003182
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series ACMA AV03-040: Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref558

Evolution of a Community Part III: Crime, Unemployment, Education

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Campbell, James  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Narration
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1972
Scope and Contents:
Through narration and street interviews conducted by James Campbell, Anacostia residents talk about the tight knit, safe community prior to the rise in crime; insignificant employment and recreation opportunities after increased migration to Anacostia as a result of Southwest Urban Renewal projects; how increased population and lack of opportunities lead to increased crime, drug use, and unemployment in Anacostia; government trying to control crime though programs like methadone maintenance rather than dealing with the deepest concerns; and reasons for high rate of unemployment, including inadequate schools, racial discrimination, and ineffective unemployment and social services. Teachers talk about overcrowded classes, outdated curriculum, and the overall education system; students discuss their teachers.
Narration and interviews. Part of Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records. Interviews product of Street Interviews. AV003499: street interviews and narration from 001505 - 001710 [also on recording: Narration about West African Slave Trade and Out of Africa Narration]. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Evolution of a Community, an exhibit at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from January 1972 though December 1972, presented the history of Anacostia from post-World War II to the present through photos, text, drawings, video tape programs, and a slide/tape show. Evolution of a Community Part II, also known as Anacostia Today, was on display at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from March 1973 though July 1973. The exhibitions developed as a result oral histories collected from Anacostia residents.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003499
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Unemployment  Search this
Discrimination in employment  Search this
Crime  Search this
Drugs  Search this
Methadone maintenance  Search this
Education  Search this
Teachers  Search this
Students  Search this
Racism  Search this
Race discrimination  Search this
Public welfare  Search this
Recreation centers  Search this
Migration, Internal  Search this
Social history  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Narration
Interviews
Citation:
Evolution of a Community Part III: Crime, Unemployment, Education, Exhibition Records AV03-040, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-040, Item ACMA AV003304
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series ACMA AV03-040: Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref559

Evolution of a Community Part I

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Narration
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1972
Scope and Contents:
Narrator, possibly reading from a book or diary, describes a streetcar journey around the Washington, D.C. metro area on August 5, 1906. He states the character's observations and experiences encountering negroes along the journey, including internally questioning the motives of negroes.
Narration. Part of Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records. AV003371-1 and AV003371-2 same content; AV003371-2 sound beeps throughout the recording. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Evolution of a Community, an exhibit at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from January 1972 though December 1972, presented the history of Anacostia from post-World War II to the present through photos, text, drawings, video tape programs, and a slide/tape show. Evolution of a Community Part II, also known as Anacostia Today, was on display at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from March 1973 though July 1973. The exhibitions developed as a result oral histories collected from Anacostia residents.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003371-2
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Racism  Search this
Race discrimination  Search this
Social history  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Narration
Citation:
Evolution of a Community Part I, Exhibition Records AV03-040, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-040, Item ACMA AV003371-1
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series ACMA AV03-040: Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref560

Evolution of a Community: Tour of the Exhibit

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Birney Elementary School  Search this
Douglass Hall (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
United States. Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands  Search this
Eisenhower, Dwight D. (Dwight David), 1890-1969  Search this
Howard, O. O. (Oliver Otis), 1830-1909  Search this
MacArthur, Douglas, 1880-1964  Search this
Patton, George S. (George Smith), 1885-1945  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Barry Farms (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1972
Scope and Contents:
Historian Louise Daniel Hutchinson leads tour of museum exhibit Evolution of a Community. The tour includes four stops: Douglass Hall (black shopping center), Old Birney School, a black home, and a black church. Prior to the tour, Hutchinson provides a history of Anacostia from its earliest beginnings when the Nacotchtank Indians, part of the Algonquian family, lived on the land now known as Anacostia until General Howard bought land, Barry Farms, to break up into lots to sell to free blacks through the Freedman's Bureau. During the tour, Hutchinson describes employment in the 1920s; segregation in schools, businesses, and theaters; the clearing of Tent/Shack City, where veterans lived, with tear gas and fire under the direction of Douglass MacArthur, George Patton, and Dwight Eisenhower in 1932; home life and items found in a black home in the 1920s; and the importance of the church to the spiritual and social lives of black people.
Tour of exhibit. Part of Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records. Video recording quality: image drop out and skips in recording. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Evolution of a Community, an exhibit at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from January 1972 though December 1972, presented the history of Anacostia from post-World War II to the present through photos, text, drawings, video tape programs, and a slide/tape show. Evolution of a Community Part II, also known as Anacostia Today, was on display at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from March 1973 though July 1973. The exhibitions developed as a result oral histories collected from Anacostia residents.
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset (Evolution of a Community) and contents of video recording (tour of the exhibit).
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Employment  Search this
Business enterprises  Search this
African American business enterprises  Search this
Schools  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Churches  Search this
African American churches  Search this
Housing  Search this
Veterans  Search this
Algonquian Indians  Search this
Nacotchtank Indians  Search this
Social history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Unedited footage
Citation:
Evolution of a Community: Oral History of Anacostia, Exhibition Records AV03-040, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-040, Item ACMA AV003047
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series ACMA AV03-040: Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref561

Staff Seminar: Exhibition Planning for Evolution of a Community Part II

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Lorton Correctional Complex (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Neighborhood Youth Corps (U.S.)  Search this
Crawford, H.R.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Meetings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1972
Scope and Contents:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (ANM) staff discuss exhibition design and other details for Evolution of a Community Part II. They discuss how to best present each section of the exhibition: prologue, drug abuse, unemployment, crime, prison and rehabilitation, and education. The staff is particularly concerned with how children and youth will interact with and think about the drug abuse section; they discuss ways to further educate youth about drugs and how to emphasize the future can be different for the youth. Some of the staff is concerned that the exhibit addresses the problems, but not the solutions. They debate the role of the museum in the community, how to involve the Anacostia residents and community organizations further in the creation of exhibitions, and providing exhibition related activities and resources to the community. Additionally, the ANM staff discuss possible audiovisual components, graphics, photographs, three dimensional displays, and interactive elements to add to the exhibition. This recording also includes interviews with youth about their thoughts on the role of ANM and museums in general; and questions to ask H.R. Crawford, particularly in regards to his views on public housing.
Discussions (meeting) and interviews. Discussions related to exhibition, Evolution of a Community Part II. Interviews for Housing in Anacostia Video Project (transcribed from asset) and inquiries about role of museum. Part of Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records. Poor audio quality (interference). Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Evolution of a Community, an exhibit at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from January 1972 though December 1972, presented the history of Anacostia from post-World War II to the present through photos, text, drawings, video tape programs, and a slide/tape show. Evolution of a Community Part II, also known as Anacostia Today, was on display at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from March 1973 though July 1973. The exhibitions developed as a result oral histories collected from Anacostia residents.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003275-2
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Community museums  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Museum techniques  Search this
Drugs  Search this
Drug abuse  Search this
Drug abuse -- Treatment  Search this
Youth  Search this
Children  Search this
Housing  Search this
Public housing  Search this
Unemployment  Search this
Public welfare  Search this
Credit unions  Search this
African American business enterprises  Search this
Crime  Search this
Prisons  Search this
Social history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Meetings
Interviews
Citation:
Staff Seminar: Exhibition Planning for Evolution of a Community Part II, Exhibition Records AV03-040, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-040, Item ACMA AV003275-1
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series ACMA AV03-040: Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref563

Sixth Anniversary Seminar: The Relevance of Anacostia Neighborhood Museum

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Anderson, Stanley J.  Search this
Challinor, David, 1920-2008  Search this
Gaither, Edmund B.  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Jones, Theresa  Search this
Kinard, John, 1936-1989  Search this
Martin-Felton, Zora  Search this
Reynolds, Greg  Search this
Robbins, Warren M.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
5 Video recordings (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Conferences
Museum records
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1973
Scope and Contents:
John Kinard provides an introduction to the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (ANM) and the Sixth Anniversary Seminar. As the keynote speaker, Edmund Barry Gaither provides his thoughts on museums: the concept of the museum and its intentions, particularly the roles of specialty museums; the desirable museum scene; and neighborhood museums and their unique potential. Louise Hutchinson, ANM historian, presents the history of Anacostia with a slideshow. Zora Martin-Felton, ANM education specialist, talks about the importance of community engagement in the evolution of a museum and its exhibits, working with children in the community, working with docents, and the current ANM exhibit about Africa. Gregory Reynolds, former member of ANM's Youth Advisory Council, provides his thoughts on the evolution of ANM and the Youth Advisory Council; ANM staff and board of directors; and the relationship of ANM to the community of Anacostia. Warren M. Robbins, founder of Museum of African Art, discusses the functions of museums; and museums' past preoccupation with objects and current preoccupation with public interest. Theresa Jones talks about the relevancy of ANM to community action agencies, and how ANM has served community action agencies. Finally, David Challinor talks about traditional museums, and Stanley J. Anderson speaks about the community based, or neighborhood, museum. A question and answer session follows each group of speakers.
Seminar. Part of Conference Recordings. AV003071: part 1. AV003056: part 2. AV000792: part 3. AV000788: part 4. AV003054: part 5. Presentations often continue onto the following recording. Dated: 19730921 and 19730922. AV003054: undated.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003056

ACMA AV000792

ACMA AV000788

ACMA AV003054
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Museums  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Museum techniques  Search this
Community museums  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Communities  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Conferences
Museum records
Citation:
Sixth Anniversary Seminar: The Relevance of Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, Record Group AV09-021, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.AV09-021, Item ACMA AV003071
See more items in:
Conference Recordings
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-av09-021-ref505

D.C. History Conference: Presentation by Louise D. Hutchinson on History of Anacostia

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Conferences
Place:
Barry Farms (Washington, D.C.)
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1977
Scope and Contents:
Louise Hutchinson presents the history and growth of Anacostia from 1865-1900. Some of the topics Hutchinson discusses include Dorothea Dix, St. Elizabeth's Hospital, Uniontown, Barry Farms, unemployment, Freedman's Bureau, Lincoln's reconstruction program, development of the business community in Anacostia (including J.T. Campbell and Bruce Underdue), home ownership, description of housing, lawyer Charles Sumner, community churches, Frederick Douglass, Sewing Council lead by Mary Watson Webster, and Solomon G. Brown. Presentation includes slideshow. Presentation part of D.C. History Conference on neighborhood studies.
Presentation. Part of Conference Recordings. Transcription on physical asset: Martin L. King Library. Dated 19770121.
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Conferences
Citation:
D.C. History Conference: Presentation by Louise D. Hutchinson on History of Anacostia, Record Group AV09-021, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.AV09-021, Item ACMA AV003050
See more items in:
Conference Recordings
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-av09-021-ref515

Legacy Keepers: Interview with Louise Daniel Hutchinson

Creator:
National Visionary Leadership Project  Search this
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Collection Creator:
National Visionary Leadership Project  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS, 1/2")
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Place:
Maryland
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2003
Scope and Contents:
Through an oral history interview, historian Louise Daniel Hutchinson explains she learned the value of education from her parents, community activism from her mother, and citizenship from her teacher Dr. Paul Phillips Cook at Miner Teacher's College. Born in Maryland, grew up in a family of nine, and raised Catholic, Hutchinson experienced history as happened through attending segregated churches and segregated schools; and witnessing the Brown versus Board of Education arguments in-person. She describes her perspective on living in Texas while attending Prairie View A&M University; and her experience working with Dorothy Porter Wesley when she was a student at Howard University. She talks about the visionaries she knew or met including Mary McLeod Bethune, Nannie Helen Burroughs; and her other sources of inspirations, including Anna Cooper and Mary Church Terrell. Hutchinson describes her experiences working for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Washington, D.C., National Portrait Gallery, Frederick Douglass Home for the National Park Service, and the Anacostia Museum. She also talks about the books she wrote about the exhibitions on Out of Africa and Anna J. Cooper, exhibitions she curated - Harlem Renaissance and The Frederick Douglass Years , and researching and writing about her family's history.
Interview. Part of the National Visionary Leadership Project 2003. Dated 20030604.
Biographical / Historical:
Co-founded in 2001 by Camille O. Cosby, Ed.D. and Renee Poussaint, The National Visionary Leadership Project (NVLP), a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization, unites generations to create tomorrow's leaders by recording, preserving, and distributing through various media, the wisdom of extraordinary African American elders - Visionaries - who have shaped American history. National Visionary Leadership Project 2003 collection contains five videotaped oral history interviews conducted in partnership with the National Visionary Leadership Project and the Anacostia Community Museum's Education Department in 2003. Interviewees include Georgette Seabrooke Powell, William Langford, Louise Daniel Hutchinson, Jeannine Clark, and Charles Clark. Full transcripts of the interviews are available for reference in the archive.
General:
Title transcribed from cover page of the video recording's transcript.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American families  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Education  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Citation:
Legacy Keepers: Interview of Louise Daniel Hutchinson, National Visionary Leadership Project 2003, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-005, Item ACMA AV000921
See more items in:
National Visionary Leadership Project 2003
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-005-ref3

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