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Strong Women/Strong Nations 5: Panel 1, Trail Blazers

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
Lectures
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2016-03-25T16:26:44.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_DQo-lop0NJ4

Frangula purshiana (DC.) A. Gray ex J.G. Cooper

Biogeographical Region:
76 - Southwestern U.S.A.  Search this
Collector:
W. L. Jepson  Search this
Min. Elevation:
244  Search this
Place:
Ukiah to the Hupa Indian Reservation, Mendocino Co., In Redwood Forest., California, United States, North America
Collection Date:
10 Aug 1902
Taxonomy:
Plantae Dicotyledonae Rosales Rhamnaceae Rhamnoideae
Published Name:
Frangula purshiana (DC.) A. Gray ex J.G. Cooper
Barcode:
03367993
USNM Number:
2977203
See more items in:
Botany
Flowering plants and ferns
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3db77f5ef-b630-41d6-b466-13012a670053
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_14892132

MS 3334 Copy and translation of a letter in Dakota

Translator:
Drift, Ivan  Search this
Addressee:
Polk, James K. (James Knox), 1795-1849  Search this
Correspondent:
Hupakinyan  Search this
Inyangmani  Search this
Culture:
Dakota (Eastern Sioux)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
With interlinear translations, from Hupa kinyan [--- Flying] and Inyan mani [Walking Stone] to President Polk. Manuscript document, 2 pages including free English translation by Drift with the assistance of Ben McBride, Sr. Manuscript document, 2 pages. Letter from Drift to --- Welch, regarding translation. Autograph letter signed, 1 page. Unsigned memo to J.P. Harrington, Bureau of American Ethnology, enclosing the above. May 20, 1935. Typescript document, 1 page.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3334
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Sioux (Eastern)  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 3334, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3334
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c0b1aa33-a58a-44cf-9e35-69bdec57d087
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3334

Native Americans

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The continuing traditions of the original inhabitants of this nation were presented in the Native Americans area by representatives of the more than 200 Native American communities throughout the United States. Working with the Smithsonian, they had examined their traditions and created the programs, speaking to their way of life today and their hopes for the future.

The Native Americans area was designed with Native traditions in mind. The entire area lay within a circle that represented the wholeness of life, emphasizing that, in Native philosophy, everything is interrelated. A corn field formed the outlying circle; corn, the contribution of Native Americans to the peoples of the world, is regarded as the gift of Mother Earth. With squash and beans sharing the field, the entire area was thus surrounded by the three staple foods of the Southwest, the "three sisters" of the Iroquois. The Learning Center, designed by architect Dennis Sun Rhodes, Arapaho, faces East, the direction of sunrise and of life, and visitors were intended to proceed inside sunwise, in a circle. In its design and in its presentations of music, crafts, dance, and discussion, the Native Americans area honored the first Americans.

Building upon six years of programming during preceding Festivals, the Bicentennial presentations presented a region-by-region overview of American Indian folklife:

June 16-20, Northeast (Six Nations, Iroquois, Mohawk, Seneca, Onandaga, Tuscarora, Algonkian, Passamaquoddy, Penobscot, Shinnecock, Hassanamisco, Nanticoke, Susquehanna, Wampanoag, Narragansett, Gay Head, Mohegan, Schaghticoke)

June 23-27, Great Lakes (Oneida, Ojibwa)

July 1-5, Southeast (Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, Seminole, Tuscarora, Muskogee, Tunica-Biloxi of Louisiana, Mattaponi, Houma Tribe of Louisiana, Alabama Creek, Lumbee)

July 7-11, Southern Plains (Comanche, Kiowa, Kiowa Apache, Omaha, Pawnee, Ponca, Southern Cheyenne)

July 14-18, Prairie (Sac and Fox)

July 21-25, Northern Plains (Northern Cheyenne)

July 28-August 1, Northwest Coast (Alaska Federation of Natives, Confederated Tribes of Siletz, Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation)

August 4-8, Southwest (San Juan Pueblo, Navaho, White Mountain Apache, Comanche)

August 11-15, Plateau (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakima Indian Nation, Ute, Klamath)

August 18-22, Basin (Northern Paiute, Southern Paiute, Washo, Western Shoshone, Walker River Paiute)

August 25-29, Northern California (Miwok, Wintun, Pomo, Yurok, Karok, Tolowa, Hupa, Klamath, Tchinook, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla, Quileute)

September 2-6, Arctic (Alaska Federation of Natives)

Lucille Dawson served as program coordinator, assisted by Thomas Kavanagh. The multi-year program was shaped by the Native Americans Advisory Group, including Louis Bruce, Rayna Green, Dell Hymes, Clydia Nahwooksy, Alfonso Ortiz, and William Sturtevant.
Participants:
Northeast

Six Nations, Iroquois

Mohawk

Mary Adams, basket maker

Mike Adams, basket maker

Sally Ann Adams, basket maker

Richard Hill, headdress maker

Stan Hill, bone carver

Tammy Hill, craft sales

Mary Longboat, cornhusk worker

Margaret Torrence, basket maker

Cam Wilson, silversmith

Mark Wilson, craft sales

Wanda Wilson, dancer

Oneida

Eula Chrisjohn, cornhusk worker

Irving Chrisjohn, cornhusk worker

Richard Chrisjohn, Sr., wood carver

Richard Chrisjohn, Jr., wood carver

Onondaga

Andrea Jimerson, dancer

Marty Jimerson, dancer

Huron Miller, project coordinator

James Skye, wood carver

Guy Williams, dancer

Ruby Williams, dancer

Tim Williams, dancer

Seneca

Helen Harris, dancer

Linda Harris, dancer

Philman Harris, drum and rattle maker

Steve Harris, dancer

Hazel Jimerson, dancer

Lester Jimerson, dancer

Mamie Jones, dancer

Paul Jones, dancer

Kevin Johnny John, dancer

Mike Johnny John, dancer

Vera Miller, beadworker

Rodney Pierce, dancer

Marlene Thomas, dancer

Hazel Thompson, gancer

Phillip Thompson, dancer

Natie Watt, basket maker

Ruth Watt, basket maker

Tuscarora

Louise Henry, beadworker

Oscar Moses, Lacrosse stick maker

Kevin Patterson, Lacrosse stick maker

Wes Patterson, Lacrosse stick maker

Edward Sayer, finger weaving

Wilmer Wilson, 1925-2002, craft sales manager

Algonkian

Chuck Comanda, canoe maker

Mary Comanda, canoe maker

William Comanda, canoe maker

Ojibwa

Audrey Pawis, quill worker

Discussants

Asenith D. Vogt, coordinator

Joseph A. Nicholas, discussant, Passamaquoddy

Andy Akins, discussant, Penobscot

Charles Jennings, discussant, Penobscot

Brian Miles, discussant, Pequot

Eva Smith, discussant, Shinnecock

Diane Bess, discussant, Shinnecock

Lois Wilcox, discussant, Hassanamisco

Kenneth Clark, discussant, Nanticoke

Kathy Clark, discussant, Nanticoke

Jody Hale, discussant, Susquehanna

Lydia Hale, discussant, Susquehanna

Edith Andrews, discussant, Wampanoag

Naomi Andrews, discussant, Wampanoag

Alberta Wilcox, discussant, Narragansett

Lloyd Wilcox, discussant, Narragansett

Helen Attaquin, discussant, Gay Head, Aquinnah Wampanoag

Mother Helen Attaquin, discussant, Gay Head, Aquinnah Wampanoag

Stilson Fands, discussant, Mohegan

Trudy Lamb, discussant, Schaghticoke

George Mitchell, Commissioner of Indian Affairs for the State of Maine

Southeast

Cherokee

Wanda Barr, dance leader

Mike Daniels, pottery

Cecil Hall, discussant

Don Mabray, discussant

Frank Mclemore, discussant

Eva Nordwell, discussant

Eunice Old Field, weaver

Knohovtee Scott, jewelry, silversmith

Ross Swimmer, discussant

Dick Spahr, head cook

Mary Lou Spahr, cook

Mrs. Ross Swimmer, discussant

Anicl Barr, dancer

Sheila Barr, dancer

Brenda Johnson, dancer

Jeanette Reese, dancer

Gina Pritchett, dancer

Michelle Ummtukee, dancer

Chickasaw

Aaron Christy, guide

Hazel Christy, dancer, beadwork

Overton James, discussant

Emma Mose, dancer

Buster Ned, dancer

Calvin Ned, dancer

Rhonda Ned, dancer

Wanda Ned, dancer, beadwork

Bienum Pickens, dancer, stickball, drummer

Adam Sampson, singer, dancer, stickball

Richard Sampson, dancer, stickball

Junior Thomas, dancer

Mary Wallace, dancer

Mrs. Overton James

Choctaw

Clelland Billy, stickball

Glendale Billy, food, cook

David Gardner, discussant

Lucinda Gibson, arts and crafts

Eula Goings, cook

Hugh Jefferson, stickball, discussant

Ray Jefferson, stickball

Louise Isscomer, beading

Myrtle Lowman, basket weaving

Sherrin Matlock, discussant

Mrs. David Gardner, discussant

Creek

Claude Cox, discussant

Paul Culley, 1925-, dancer

Wynena Evans, beadwork, singer

Brian Fife, dancer, discussant

Margaret Freeman, cook

Hepsey Gilroy, looming, dancer

Solomon McCombs, artist

Buddy Scott, silversmith, dancer

Genda Scott, basket weaving, dancer

Gene Timothy, discussant, food, Lacrosse

Mrs. Claude Cox, discussant

Seminole

Beulah Bemo, arts and crafts

Mallene Davis, singer, dancer; Miss Indian Oklahoma

Kelly Haney, artist, dancer, stickball

Samantha Hooper, education guide, dancer

Ida Little, food, shell shaker, dancer

Terry Little, cook

H. T. Miller, stomp dancer, stickball

Tom Palmer, stomp dancer, stickball

Ida Lee Redbird, shell shaker, dancer

Jennie Lee Rice, shell shaker, dancer

Ed Tanyan, discussant

Mrs. Ed Tonyan, discussant

Cherokee

William Crow, wood carver

Betty Crow, bead worker

Tuscarora

Ernest Carter, discussant

Benjamin Maynor, discussant

Muskogee

Angela Lyles, discussant

Ann Taylor Tate, discussant

Tunica-Biloxi of Louisiana

Rose Marie Gallardo, discussant

Mary Vercher, discussant

Mattaponi

Chief Curtis Custalow, discussant

Gertrude Custalow, discussant

Houma Tribe of Louisiana

Steve Cheramie, discussant

Randolph Francis, discussant

Alabama Creek

Connie S. Tullis, discussant

Buford L. Rolin, discussant

Lumbee

Donna Chavis

Sonya Allen

Southern Plains

Carla Allrunner, dancer

Richard Asenap, program coordinator

Joe Attocknie, 1911-1984, singer, flute player

Rosalie Attocknie, 1926-2011, artist

Bobbi Bradley, artist

Hawana Bradley, artist

Ronald Burless, artist

Ed Chappabitty, singer

Evelyn Chappabitty, singer

Florence Chasenah, beadworker

Gerald Chasenah, dancer

James Chasenah, singer

Kim Chasenah, dancer

Wallace Coffey, narrator, dancer

James Cox, narrator, tribal chairman

Marie Cox, craftsperson

Sam Devenney, historian, photographer

Jamie Franklin, dancer

Rita Franklin, dancer

Patty Hall

Carol Hall

Melvin Kerchee, singer, dancer

Melvin Kerchee, Jr., dancer

Nettie Kerchee, 1921-2003, dress maker, bead worker

Diane Motah, craftsperson

Lee Motah, historian, narrator

Haddan Nauni, singer

Rose Nauni, craftsperson

Leslie Niedo, bead worker

Frank Oberly, narrator

Mary Oberly, craftsperson

Sam "Doc" Peweardy, singer

Bill Poafpybitty, graphics, sculptor

Richard Ralph Poafpybitty, 1963-1996, actor

Sarah Pohosucut, historian

Henry Pratt, flute player, dancer, singer

Leonard Riddles, artist

Kenneth Saupitty, narrator

Gene Sovo, war dancer

Junior Sovo, war dancer

Margie Sovo, moccasin maker

Jerome Tahawah, singer

Edmond Tate, dancer

Joyce "Doc" Tate Nevaquaya, 1932-1996, flute player, dancer, artist

Jermone Tahawah, singer

May Tonips, beadworker, graphics, sculptor

Rick Tosee, dancer

George Wallace, singer

Juanita Wallace, singer

Eva Watchataker, beadworker

George "Woogee" Watchataker, dancer, flute player

Junior Weryackwe

Eva Weryackwe

Patricia Whitewolf, shawl maker

Sheryle Whitewolf, dancer

Elmer Winnerchy, 1917-1986, singer

Evelyn Winnerchy, 1917-1996, dancer

Prairie

Sac & Fox Tribe

Bill Grass

John Gakey

Shannon Franklin

Omer Jefferson, Jr.

Kate Walker

Winnie Gibson

Delphine Foreman

Sarah Riley

Sharon Byers

Bill Foreman

Jerry Nanaeto

Kimberly Nanaeto

Harriet Nanaeto

Barbara Hawkins

Kartherine Franklin

Ronnie Harris

Sandy Harris

R.J. Harris

Merle Boyd

Tammy Boyd

Pamela Boyd

Mabel Harris

George Harris

Leona Starr

Jimmy Starr

James L. Starr

Leota Black

Carl Butler

Cecil Littlehead

Clarissa Littlehead

Oma Patrick

Irene Harris

Georgianna LeClair

Teresa LeClair

Larry Blanchard

Linda Standing

Karen "Candy" Hunter

Henry O. Hunter

Douglas Franklin

Dino Riley

George Switch

Jessica Patterson

Muriel Patterson

Valerie Patterson

Carol Patterson

Frances Coker

Richard Mullake

Kay Kay Goodeagle

Mary Clark

Donald Marland

Mary Mack

Guy Wakalee

Huge Wakalee

Marilyn Thurman

Herschel Tiger

Jack Thorpe

Lee Bass, Jr.

Elmer Manatowa, Jr.

Northern Plains

Northern Cheyenne

Harry Littlebird, Sr., gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Annie Joyce Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Richard Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game

Serena Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Limona Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Rose Ann Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Ginger Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Theresa Brady, dancer, gourd dance, arts & crafts, cook

Curtis Brady, dancer, gourd dance, hand game

Steve Brady, dancer, gourd dance, hand game

Eggonn Brady, dancer, gourd dance, hand game

Elsie Wick, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Donna Wick, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Christine Wick, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

James Wick, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Dennis Wick, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Ernest King, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Grover Wolfvoice, 1890-1978, hand game, arts & crafts

Dale Brady, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Joe Lonewolf, dancer, gourd dance, arts & crafts, singer

Crawford Lonewolf, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, singer

Charles Brady, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Arnie Brady, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Hilda Manley, dance, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

James Littlebird, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Harriet Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Geofredo Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, singer

Clinton Birdhat, dancer, hand game, singer

Marlene Belly Mule, dancer, gourd dance, arts & crafts, cook

Ruth Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Stacey Gwen Littlebird, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Rose Medicine Elk, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

John Medicine Elk, Sr., gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

John Killsontop, Sr., gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Rose Killsontop, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Mike Bearcamesout, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Robert Bearchum, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Robert Redwoman, hand game, arts -- & -- crafts, singer

Mary Redwoman, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Elmer Fightingbear, dancer, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Tommy Rockroads, dancer, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Dave Glenmora, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Wilson Brady, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Tim Littleboy, dancer, hand game, arts & crafts

Webby Runsabove, dancer, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Billy Runsabove, dancer, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Fernando Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Steve Littlebird, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer, coordinator

Northwest Coast

Les Houck

Merle Holmes

Charles Rick

Charles McKnight

Edmund Ben

Delores Pigsley

Archie Ben

Paul Jackson

Shirley Walker

Raymond Ben

Judy McKnight

Melvin McKnight

Bunni Houck

Jerry Running Foxe

Paulene Rick

Joe McKnight

Randy Rick

Boby Dumont

Victoria Ben

Dave Harley

Carlene Easter

Delbert Bell

Caroline Easter

Alaska Federation of Natives

Judy Brady

Herman Davis

Ruth Farquhar

Sharon Frank

Larry Garrity

Laura Eliz Joseph

Larry Judy

Alice Kitka

Marla Kitka

Donna Lang

Dorothy Lord

Tim McGraw

Lillian Nielsen

Mike Spoon

Martin Strand, Jr.

Martina Strand

Marlene Thomas

Cynthia Williams

Ethel Williams

Karin Williams

Janice Williams

Isabella Brady

Ethel Makinen

George Ramos

Marie Thiemeyer

Margy Johnson

Southwest

Amos Beatty

Jimmy Thompson

Charles Henry

Ron Quay

Wilkie Dazen

John Chissay

Mike Cooley

Pat Cooley

Bruce Cooley

Theresa Truesdell

Myrna Tessay

Wilfred Peaches

Manuelita Early

Jerry Lupe

Mike Truesdell

Bernice Endfield

Lula Machuse

Azlie Lupe

Pheobe Gooday

Nelson Lupe, Sr.

Shirleen Bullock

Beverly Machuse

June Marie Dale

Ophelia Peaches

Maria Endfield

Umatilla

Traditional Long House Group from Pendleton, Oregon

Edith K. McCloud, narrator, bead worker

Lillian E. Hoptowit, craftsperson, bead worker

Terry L. Hoptowit, dancer

Rosie McCloud, dancer

Eliza B. Nez, dancer

Joseph P. Tias, dancer

Bernadette B. Nez, dancer

Anthony G. Hoptowit Sr., crafts

Anna Marie Brown, buckskin worker

James Hoptowit, dancer

Donna B. Nikolaide, dancer, assist.

Willard D. Showay, singer

Arthur Williams, singer, crafts-beadwork

Lonnie R. Selam Sr., singer

William A. Johnson Sr., feather worker

Mrs. Arthur Williams, bead worker

Phillip Jackson, dancer, assist.

Eliza Bill, coordinator

Norma June Mosquito, dancer

Beksee Mosquito, singer, drummer

John Willard Hoptowit, dancer

Maisie McCloud, dancer

David Dean McKay, dancer

Babette Cowapoo, dancer

Ellen Taylor, dancer

Julie Taylor, dancer

Alberta Taylor, dancer

Ellen Johnson, bead worker

Cidric Bill, dancer

Anthony G. Hoptowit Jr., dancer

Emile Bill, dancer

Robert Bill, dancer

Sheila Bill, dancer

Sonny Gail McCloud, dancer

Angie McCloud, dancer

Raphael Bill, dancer, assist.

Veva E. Bill, storyteller

Sylvester Selam, dancer

Gabriel Selam, singer

Sandy Sampson, dancer, narrator, sign language

The Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakima Indian Nation of Toppenash, Washington will also be featured. Simon Sampson is the coordinator.

We will feature the Ute Reservation led by Gwen Mojado, the Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada led by Harold Wyatt, and the Klamath Tribe of Oregon led by Leonard Norris.

Northern California

Miwok Tribe

William Franklin, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Cora Franklin, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Margaret Villa, dancer, lecturer, jewelry maker

Theresa Coy, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Carl Mathiesen, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Inez Mathiesen, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

David Franklin, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Ronnie Franklin, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

James Franklin, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Norman Franklin, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Robert Coy, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Elaine Barber, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Dorothy Stanley, food demonstration, lecturer

Dwight Zutchke, dancer, lecturer

Wintun Tribe

Mary Norton, food sales

Frances McDaniel, basket maker

Pomo Tribe

Elsie Allen, 1899-1990, basket maker, Ukiah, California

Yurok Tribe

Elaine Glairy, jewelry maker

Mary Birchfield, food sales

Ollie Foseide, 1921-, basket maker, Hoopa, California

Warren Abbott, food sales, dancer

Lareta James, dancer, singer

Dewey George, 1899-1985, boat maker, dance leader, McKinleyville, California

Rosie Silva, dancer, singer

Julius Aubrey, boat making assistant, dancer

Oscar Taylor, net maker, singer, dancer

Eileen Figueroa, basket maker, singer

Sam Jones, 1913-1996, stick game player

Mark Sundberg, stick game player, dancer, canoe assistant

Lisa Sundberg, dancer, jewelry maker

Joy Sundberg, Northern California coordinator, lecturer

Karok Tribe

Charlie Tom, singer, drummer, dancer

Jo Peters, 1923-, jewelry maker, basket maker, lecturer, Hoopa, California

Tammy Peters, dancer, jewelry maker

Laura George, guide, assistant

Lorna Dodge, lecturer, guide, assistant

Tolowa Tribe

Billy Richards, dancer

Mark Richards, dancer

Nicole Richards, dancer

Loren Bommelyn, 1956-, lead singer, Fort Dick, California

Fred Moorehead, lead singer

Betty Green, dance assistant

Kim Richards, dancer

Tanya Richards, dancer

Ronnie Richards, dancer

Marvin Richards, dancer

Denise Lopez, dancer, guide

Denise Richards, dancer, guide

Pam Mattz, dancer

Joan Richards, food sales

Darlene Richards, food sales

Lorene Richards, dancer

William Richards, food sales

Viola Richards, food sales

Bill Bommelyn, dancer

Walter Richards, singer

Lila Moorehead, sand bread maker, cook

Hupa Tribe

Merve George, band leader, dancer

Eleanor Abbott, language class leader

Andy Andrioli, lecturer, guitar player, dancer

Kim Yerton, dancer, learning center assistant

Janice Yerton, learning center assistant

Endora Saxson, dancer

Mike Waterman, drummer

Doug Duncan, lead guitar player

George Disdy, guitar player

Ann Taylor, assistant

Pat Andrioli, assistant

Paiute Tribe

Joseph Saulque, lecturer, historian

Film and Video Presentation

Vern Korbe

Carol Korbe

Dick O'Rourke

Lorraine O'Rourke

Brian Tripp

Dolly Tripp

Daniel O'Rourke

Klamath Tribe

Leonard Norris, Jr., Coordinator

Cecil L. Gallagher

Nick Kimbal

Charlie Bates

Rhonda Jimenez

LaNell L. Jackson

Rose Mary Tree Top

Jean Tina Bates

Bill L. Jackson

Anna Marie Jackson

Valgene Teeman

Marc McNair

Tchinook Tribe of Oregon

Karleen F. McKenzie

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla

Leslie Minthorn, Coordinator

Quileute Tribe

Robert Bojorcas, 1943-, Coordinator, Eugene, Oregon
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1976, Series 6
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5faad8354-a427-4717-95e3-f0b878e67f3a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1976-ref44

Native American Architecture

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
In the third year of collaboration between the Folklife Festival and the Department of Energy, attention turned to Native American architecture. In recent years, a new interest in native American dwellings had begun to focus on their energy efficient features as well as the symbolism of traditional Indian structures. For example, experiments comparing the energy efficiency of the tipi with a modern American home indicated that on freezing winter nights the Indian lived at a similar comfort level. Their hardwood-burning fires warmed the tipi at a comparable efficiency level to oil heated furnaces, because the space required for each person was a tenth the area non-Indians were accustomed to.

Indian communities in the late 1970s were experiencing a revival of old house building. The Wichita of central Oklahoma had resumed building the distinctive beehive-shaped houses of red cedar ribs that had seemed to be lost a half-century ago. In Northwestern California the Hupa had been reconstructing their traditional cedar plank houses on the sites of three old rancheria (or village) locations. Both the Hupa family house and the slightly smaller men's sweat house belonged to the oldest architectural tradition in North America, the pit house. Here earth serves as excellent insulation, walling the four-foot deep excavations where the Hupa once warmed themselves during the damp winter and cooled themselves throughout the baking summer.

Visitors entering the Indian lodges built at the Festival could notice the skillful use of available materials. These home traditions perpetuated practical adaptations to climate; also, they indicated the human impulse to invest the immediate environment with spiritual meaning.

Diana Parker served as Energy Exhibit Coordinator, with Gary Floyd as Technical Coordinator.
Participants:
Doris Kicking Woman, tipi painter, Browning, Montana

George Kicking Woman, tipi painter, Browning, Montana

Molly Kicking Woman, tipi painter, Browning, Montana

Ernest Doyebi, 1920-2004, arbor and windbreak builder, Anadarko, Oklahoma

Billy Evans Horse, arbor and windbreak builder, Carnegie, Oklahoma

Alonzo Chalepah, arbor and windbreak builder, Carnegie, Oklahoma

Roy Cypress, chickee builder, Ochopee, Florida

Irene Cypress, chickee builder, Ochopee, Florida

Ted Cypress, chickee builder, Ochopee, Florida

Rachel Cypress, chickee builder, Ochopee, Florida
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1979 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1979, Series 7
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1979 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5fce4e994-8a99-465d-951f-39c38a7484f1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1979-ref52

Christopher Cardozo Collection of Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs

Creator:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Names:
Harriman Alaska Expedition (1899)  Search this
Former owner:
Cardozo, Christopher  Search this
Extent:
12.5 Linear feet
Culture:
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Apache  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)  Search this
Sicangu Lakota (Brulé Sioux)  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Duwamish (Dwamish)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Hupa  Search this
Klamath  Search this
Jicarilla Apache  Search this
Kootenai (Kutenai)  Search this
Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Coast Salish  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)  Search this
Wishram  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1899-1930
Summary:
The collection comprises Edward S. Curtis original and copy negatives, prints, and photogravures relating to the Harriman Alaska Expedition and Curtis's 20 volume publication, the North American Indian (NAI), as well as ephemera and one gold-tone of Fort Lapawi.
Scope and Contents:
The Christopher Cardozo collection of Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs primarily relate to Curtis's opus, the North American Indian, and also the 1899 Harriman Alaska Expedition. Papers in the collection include promotional ephemera for the NAI as well as articles by Curtis and others. Photographic material includes original and copy negatives, prints, two Harriman Alaska Expedition souvenir albums, and one gold-tone of Fort Lapawi.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in two series: 1. Papers; and 2. Photographs and photogravures.
Biographical / Historical:
Edward Sherriff Curtis (1868-1952) was an American photographer famous for his photographs of the indigenous peoples of North America. His work was highly influential in shaping a sympathetic yet romantic view of cultures that he and many others believed to be "vanishing." Over the course of 30 years, Curtis visited more than 80 Native American communities and published his photographs and ethnographies in the twenty-volume North American Indian (NAI) (1907-1930).

Curtis was born in Whitewater, Wisconsin, to Ellen and Johnson Curtis in 1868. In about 1874, his family moved to a farm in Cordova, Minnesota. At a young age, Curtis built a camera, and it is possible that he may have worked in a Minneapolis photography studio for a time. In 1887, Curtis and his father moved West and settled on a plot near what is now Port Orchard, Washington, with the rest of the family joining them the following year. When Johnson Curtis died within a month of the family's arrival, 20-year-old Curtis became the head of the family.

In 1891, Curtis moved to Seattle and bought into a photo studio with Rasmus Rothi. Less than a year later, he and Thomas Guptill formed "Curtis and Guptill, Photographers and Photoengravers." The endeavor became a premier portrait studio for Seattle society and found success in photoengraving for many local publications. In 1892, Curtis married Clara Phillips (1874-1932) and in 1893 their son Harold was born (1893-1988), followed by Elizabeth (Beth) (1896-1973), Florence (1899-1987) and Katherine (Billy) (1909-?). Around 1895, Curtis made his first photographs of local Native people, including the daughter of Duwamish chief Seattle: Kickisomlo or "Princess Angeline." Curtis submitted a series of his Native American photographs to the National Photographic Convention, and received an award in the category of "genre studies" for Homeward (later published in volume 9 of the NAI). In 1896, the entire Curtis family moved to Seattle, which included Curtis's mother, his siblings Eva and Asahel, Clara's sisters Susie and Nellie Phillips, and their cousin William Phillips. Most of the household worked in Curtis's studio along with other employees. Curtis became sole proprietor of the studio in 1897, which remained a popular portrait studio but also sold his scenic landscapes and views of the Seattle Area. Curtis also sent his brother Asahel to Alaska and the Yukon to photograph the Klondike Gold Rush, and sold those views as well. Asahel went on to become a well-known photographer in his own right, primarily working in the American Northwest.

Curtis was an avid outdoorsman and joined the Mazamas Club after his first of many climbs of Mount Rainier. On a climb in 1898, Curtis evidently met a group of scientists, including C. Hart Merriam, George Bird Grinnell, and Gifford Pinchot, who had lost their way on the mountain, and led them to safety. This encounter led to an invitation from Merriam for Curtis to accompany a group of over 30 well-known scientists, naturalists, and artists as the official photographer on a maritime expedition to the Alaskan coast. Funded by railroad magnate Edward Harriman, the Harriman Alaska Expedition left Seattle in May of 1899, and returned at the end of July. Curtis made around 5000 photographs during the trip, including photographs of the indigenous peoples they met as well as views of mountains, glaciers, and other natural features. Many of the photographs appeared in the expedition's 14 published volumes of their findings.

In 1900, Curtis accompanied Grinnell to Montana for a Blackfoot Sundance. Here, Curtis made numerous photographs and became interested in the idea of a larger project to document the Native peoples of North America. Almost immediately upon returning from the Sundance, Curtis set off for the Southwest to photograph Puebloan communities. By 1904, Curtis had already held at least one exhibit of his "Indian pictures" and his project to "form a comprehensive and permanent record of all the important tribes of the United States and Alaska that still retain to a considerable degree their primitive customs and traditions" (General Introduction, the NAI) had taken shape and already received some press coverage. With his fieldwork now increasing his absences from home, Curtis hired Adolph Muhr, former assistant to Omaha photographer Frank Rinehart, to help manage the Seattle studio.

In 1904, Curtis was a winner in the Ladies Home Journal "Prettiest Children In America" portrait contest. His photograph of Marie Fischer was selected as one of 112 that would be published and Fischer was one of 12 children selected from the photographs who would have their portrait painted by Walter Russell. Russell and Curtis made an acquaintance while Russell was in Seattle to paint Fischer's portrait, and not long afterwards, Russell contacted Curtis to make photographic studies of Theodore Roosevelt's children for portraits he would paint. Curtis subsequently photographed the entire Roosevelt family, and developed a social connection with the President. Several important outcomes came of this new friendship, including Roosevelt eventually writing the foreword to the NAI, as well as making introductions to influential people.

Key among these introductions was one to wealthy financier John Pierpont Morgan, in 1906. After a brief meeting with Curtis during which he viewed several of Curtis's photographs of Native Americans, Morgan agreed to finance the fieldwork for the NAI project for five years, at $15,000.00 per year. It was up to Curtis to cover publishing and promotion costs, with the publication being sold as a subscription. In return, Morgan would receive 25 sets of the 20-volume publication. The ambitious publication plan outlined 20 volumes of ethnological text, each to be illustrated with 75 photogravure prints made from acid-etched copper plates. Each volume would be accompanied by a companion portfolio of 35 large photogravures. With high-quality papers and fine binding, a set would cost $3000.00. 500 sets were planned. Under Morgan, the North American Indian, Inc. formed as body to administer the monies. Also around this time, Frederick Webb Hodge, Director of the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of American Ethnology, agreed to edit the publications.

Curtis then began more systematic fieldwork, accompanied by a team of research assistants and Native interpreters. In 1906, Curtis hired William E. Myers, a former journalist, as a field assistant and stenographer. Over the years, Myers became the lead researcher on the project, making enormous contributions in collecting data and possibly doing the bulk of the writing for the first 18 volumes. Upon meeting a new community, Curtis and his team would work on gathering data dealing with all aspects of the community's life, including language, social and political organization, religion, food ways, measures and values, and many other topics. (See box 2 folder 1 in this collection for Curtis's list of topics.) Curtis and his assistants, especially Myers, brought books and papers to the field relating to the tribes they were currently concerned with, and often wrote from the field to anthropologists at the Bureau of American Ethnology and other institutions for information or publications. In addition to fieldnotes and photographs, the team also employed sound recording equipment, making thousands of recordings on wax cylinders. Curtis also often brought a motion picture camera, although few of his films have survived.

The first volume of the NAI was published towards the end of 1907. Already, Curtis was encountering difficulty in finding subscribers to the publication despite great praise in the press and among those who could afford the volumes. Curtis spent progressively more of his time outside the field season promoting the project through lectures and in 1911, presenting his "Picture Musicale"—a lecture illustrated with lantern slides and accompanied by an original musical score—in major cities. After the initial five funded years, only eight of the twenty volumes had been completed. However, Morgan agreed to continue support for the fieldwork and publication continued.

Starting in 1910, Curtis and his team worked among the Kwakwaka'wakw First Nation on Vancouver Island, and in 1913 began to develop a documentary film project featuring the community in Alert Bay. In 1914, Curtis produced the feature-length film, In the Land of the Headhunters. The film showcased an all-indigenous cast and included an original musical score. Screened in New York and Seattle, it received high praise. However after this initial success, it did not receive the attention Curtis had hoped for, and resulted in financial loss.

Meanwhile, Curtis's prolonged absences from home had taken a toll on his marriage and in 1919 Clara and Edward divorced. The Seattle studio was awarded to Clara, and Curtis moved to Los Angeles, opening a photography studio with his daughter Beth and her husband Manford "Mag" Magnuson. Daughters Florence and Katherine came to Los Angeles sometime later. Curtis continued with fieldwork and promotion of the project, and in 1922 volume 12 of the NAI was published. Also in 1922, Curtis was accompanied during the field season in California by his daughter Florence Curtis Graybill, the first time a family member had gone to the field with him since the Curtis children were very small.

Curtis continued to push the project and publications along, yet never without financial struggle and he picked up work in Hollywood as both a still and motion picture photographer. John Pierpont Morgan, Jr., continued to provide funding for the fieldwork in memory of his father, but with the various financial upsets of the 1910s and 1920s, Curtis had a difficult time getting subscribers on board. In 1926, Myers, feeling the strain, regretfully resigned after the completion of volume 18. Anthropologist Frank Speck recommended Stewart Eastwood, a recent graduate from the University of Pennsylvania, to replace Myers as ethnologist for the final two volumes.

In 1927, Curtis and his team, along with his daughter Beth Curtis Magnuson, headed north from Seattle to Alaska and Canada on a final field season. Harsh weather and a hip injury made the trip difficult for Curtis, but he was very satisfied with the season's work. The party returned to Seattle, and upon arrival Curtis was arrested for unpaid alimony. He returned exhausted to Los Angeles, and in 1930 the final two volumes of NAI were published without fanfare. Curtis spent the next two years recovering from physical and mental exhaustion. Beth and Mag continued to run the Curtis studio in LA, but for the most part, Curtis had set down his camera for good. With the NAI behind him and his health recovered, Curtis pursued various interests and employment, eventually, settling down on a farm outside Los Angeles. he later moved in with Beth and Mag. Curtis died at home in 1952.

Sources Cited Davis, Barbara. Edward S. Curtis: the life and times of a shadowcatcher. San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 1984. Gidley, Mick. The North American Indian, Incorporated. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998.
Christopher Cardozo (1948-2021) was a major collector and dealer in Edward S. Curtis photography.
Related Materials:
The National Anthropological Archives holds additional Curtis papers and photographs in NAA.2010-28, the Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs, MS 2000-18, the Edward Curtis investigation of the battle of Little Bighorn and Photo Lot 59, the Library of Congress copyright prints collection.

The Archives of Traditional Music at Indiana University holds Curtis's wax cylinder audio recordings from 1907-1913.

The Braun Research Library at the Autry Museum of the American West holds the Frederick Webb Hodge papers (1888-1931), which contain substantial correspondence from Curtis. The Braun also holds a small amount of Curtis papers and photographs, including some of Curtis's cyanotypes.

The Getty Research Institute holds the Edward S. Curtis papers (1900-1978), which include the original manuscript scores for the Curtis Picture Musicale and film In the Land of the Headhunters.

The Palace of the Governors at the New Mexico History Museum holds original Curtis negatives pertaining to the southwest.

The Pierpont Morgan Library holds the Edward S. Curtis papers (1906-1947), which contain the records of the North American Indian, Inc., as well as Curtis's correspondence to librarian, and later library director, Belle Da Costa Greene. The library also holds a large collection of Curtis's lantern slides, used in his Picture Musicale.

The Seattle Public Library holds correspondence of Curtis to Librarian Harriet Leitch (1948-1951), pertaining to his career.

The Seaver Center for Western History Research at the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History holds collection GC 1143, which contains Curtis's field notes as well as manuscript drafts for the North American Indian.

The Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian holds NMAI.AC.080, the Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs, as well as NMAI.AC.053, the Mary Harriman Rumsey collection of Harriman Alaska Expedition photographs.

The University of Washington Libraries Special Collections holds the Edward S. Curtis papers (1893-1983). Additionally, the Burke Museum holds papers and photographs of Edmund Schwinke, which relate to Curtis's work with the Kwakwaka'wakw community.
Provenance:
The collection was donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Julie Cardozo in 2022.
Restrictions:
Viewing of the photographic negatives requires advance notice and the permission of the Photo Archivist.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Identifier:
NAA.2022-12
See more items in:
Christopher Cardozo Collection of Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw36944a23c-3be7-4086-bab0-4696f3aab866
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2022-12

Man (Hupa) with spear standing next to stream. Published as Watching for Salmon--Hupa

Collection Creator:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (copy negative)
Container:
Box G6
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Glass negatives
Collection Restrictions:
Viewing of the photographic negatives requires advance notice and the permission of the Photo Archivist.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Identifier:
NAA.2022-12, Item x3030B
See more items in:
Christopher Cardozo Collection of Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs
Christopher Cardozo Collection of Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs / Series 2: Photographs and photogravures / North American Indian / Volume 13
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b50d3839-ab46-457e-8518-aef877b55508
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2022-12-ref68

Man (Hupa) with spear sitting next to stream. Published as Spearing Salmon--Hupa

Collection Creator:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (copy negative)
Container:
Box G6
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Glass negatives
Collection Restrictions:
Viewing of the photographic negatives requires advance notice and the permission of the Photo Archivist.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Identifier:
NAA.2022-12, Item x3837
See more items in:
Christopher Cardozo Collection of Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs
Christopher Cardozo Collection of Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs / Series 2: Photographs and photogravures / North American Indian / Volume 13
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw31aa44a6b-fc19-409f-9fb3-893c7135ee53
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2022-12-ref69

Native American Women's Action Council (NAWAC)/National Indian Women's Action Corps (NIWAC)

Collection Creator:
Thorpe, Grace F.  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print
Container:
Box 1, Folder 21
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Date:
1970-1971
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Grace F. Thorpe Collection, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Grace F. Thorpe Collection
Grace F. Thorpe Collection / Series 4: Working on Behalf of Native Americans and Activism
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv47b20251d-3315-4fa8-adb3-9c7939903487
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-085-ref106
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Native American Women's Action Council (NAWAC)/National Indian Women's Action Corps (NIWAC) digital asset number 1

Scrapbook: Return Surplus Lands to Indian People

Collection Creator:
Thorpe, Grace F.  Search this
Extent:
38 Photographic prints
Container:
Box 12
Box 2, Folder 1
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Date:
1971
Scope and Contents:
This scrapbook includes articles, newspaper clippings, letters and photographs from various events and marches Grace participated in regarding the fight for returning surplus lands to Native peoples. These events and materials include--Fishing Rights March (1970) in Yelm, Washington with the McCloud family; Fort Lawton "Surplus" March (1970) in Seattle, Washington; Pit River versus P.G..E. (1970) in Big Bend, California; DQU, Deganawidah Quetzalcoatl University founding (1971) in Davis, California; and documentation as National Commitee Director for the "Return Surplus Lands to Indian People".
Separated Materials:
The cover and back of the scrapbook binder are in Box 12 since they are oversized.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Grace F. Thorpe Collection, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Grace F. Thorpe Collection
Grace F. Thorpe Collection / Series 4: Working on Behalf of Native Americans and Activism
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv488f38056-777d-4178-98b4-90af44699a74
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-085-ref108
3 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Scrapbook: Return Surplus Lands to Indian People digital asset number 1
  • View Scrapbook: Return Surplus Lands to Indian People digital asset number 2
  • View Scrapbook: Return Surplus Lands to Indian People digital asset number 3

Basket and lid

Donor Name:
National Museum of Natural History  Search this
Height - Basket:
34 cm
Maximum Diameter - Basket:
26 cm
Maximum Height - Basket Lid:
8 cm
Maximum Diameter - Basket Lid:
25 cm
Culture:
Siletz (?)  Search this
Object Type:
Basket / Lid
Place:
Not Given, Oregon (not certain) / California (not certain), United States, North America
Accession Date:
5 Nov 2019
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Accession Number:
2084023
USNM Number:
E423982-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/317139976-d797-40e8-aefb-d54ed367809a
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8457039
Online Media:

Rhinotropis californica (Nutt.) J.R. Abbott

Biogeographical Region:
76 - Southwestern U.S.A.  Search this
Collector:
Harley P. Chandler  Search this
Min. Elevation:
152  Search this
Place:
North Coast Ranges. Hupa Indian Reservation., California, United States, North America
Collection Date:
Jun 1901
Taxonomy:
Plantae Dicotyledonae Fabales Polygalaceae
Published Name:
Rhinotropis californica (Nutt.) J.R. Abbott
Polygala californica Nutt.
Barcode:
03330285
USNM Number:
668878
See more items in:
Botany
Flowering plants and ferns
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3965778b5-8450-4152-9962-cd54a796292a
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_14834469

Collections: Requests for objects from/for Indians-Hupa Indian objects-correspondence

Collection Creator:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Container:
Box 396
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1974-1978
Collection Restrictions:
Files containing Sturtevant's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. Restricted files were separated and placed at the end of their respective series in boxes 87, 264, 322, 389-394, 435-436, 448, 468, and 483. For preservation reasons, his computer files are also restricted. Seminole sound recordings are restricted. Access to the William C. Sturtevant Papers requires an apointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
William C. Sturtevant papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
William C. Sturtevant papers
William C. Sturtevant papers / Series 5: Smithsonian / 5.1: Accessions
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3fdacaba4-9554-41b8-b982-6bd24ab082b4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2008-24-ref10643

[Hupa deerskins in Ethnology collections]

Collection Creator:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Container:
Box 402
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1980
Collection Restrictions:
Files containing Sturtevant's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. Restricted files were separated and placed at the end of their respective series in boxes 87, 264, 322, 389-394, 435-436, 448, 468, and 483. For preservation reasons, his computer files are also restricted. Seminole sound recordings are restricted. Access to the William C. Sturtevant Papers requires an apointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
William C. Sturtevant papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
William C. Sturtevant papers
William C. Sturtevant papers / Series 5: Smithsonian / 5.1: Accessions
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3219743b4-59f8-4183-86f2-75e407150c98
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2008-24-ref10824

Hupa--SI 32

Collection Creator:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Container:
Box 302
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1991
Scope and Contents note:
for Salamander publication
Collection Restrictions:
Files containing Sturtevant's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. Restricted files were separated and placed at the end of their respective series in boxes 87, 264, 322, 389-394, 435-436, 448, 468, and 483. For preservation reasons, his computer files are also restricted. Seminole sound recordings are restricted. Access to the William C. Sturtevant Papers requires an apointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
William C. Sturtevant papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
William C. Sturtevant papers
William C. Sturtevant papers / Series 3: Writings / 3.1: Drafts
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3662f6043-ee26-468f-87e9-98d0c42e6701
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2008-24-ref8760

Letter to Jeremiah Curtin

Creator:
Powell, John Wesley, 1834-1902  Search this
Addressee:
Curtin, Jeremiah, 1835-1906  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Institution. United States National Museum  Search this
Collection Collector:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Culture:
Hupa  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
February 2, 1889
Scope and Contents:
Instructing him that one hundred dollars had been reserved for the purchase of Hupa handicrafts for the U.S.N.M.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1647(26)
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 1647, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 1647 Miscellaneous materials by Hewitt and others
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw34c746baf-43dc-480f-bb72-9d2b536f3eea
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms1647-ref26

Hupa Indians

Collection Creator:
Blue Eagle, Acee, 1907-1959  Search this
Container:
Box 50
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
There are no restrictions on access.
Collection Rights:
Literary property rights to unpublished material in the collection in the National Anthropological Archives has been given to the public.
Collection Citation:
Acee Blue Eagle Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Acee Blue Eagle papers
Acee Blue Eagle papers / Series 6: Photographs / 6.4: Native Americans
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3f0de691e-4d79-44e3-bafd-7a02b2b75ac5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1973-51-ref978

Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian

Photographer:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Extent:
96 Photomechanical prints (photogravure proofs)
184 Printing plates (copper printing plates)
Culture:
Twana  Search this
Hoh  Search this
Walla Walla (Wallawalla)  Search this
Wishram  Search this
Suquamish  Search this
Skokomish  Search this
Quinault  Search this
Quileute  Search this
Apache  Search this
Tolowa  Search this
Hupa  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Squaxon  Search this
Mewuk (Miwok)  Search this
Achomawi (Pit River)  Search this
Klamath  Search this
Yurok  Search this
Kumeyaay (Diegueño)  Search this
Cayuse  Search this
Northern Paiute (Paviotso)  Search this
Santa Ysabel (Santa Isabela) Diegueño  Search this
Kalispel (Pend d'Oreilles)  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
Spokan  Search this
Yakama (Yakima)  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Sicangu Lakota (Brulé Sioux)  Search this
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
A'aninin (Gros Ventre)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Tsuu T'ina (Sarcee)  Search this
Kainai Blackfoot (Kainah/Blood)  Search this
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Cree  Search this
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo)  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Jemez Pueblo  Search this
Serrano  Search this
Washoe (Washo)  Search this
Kutzadika'a (Mono Paiute)  Search this
Kupangaxwichem (Kupa/Cupeño)  Search this
Piipaash (Maricopa)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Hualapai (Walapai)  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Tohono O'odham (Papago)  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Wichita  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Osage  Search this
Yokuts  Search this
Chukchansi Yokuts  Search this
Southern Mewuk (Southern Miwok)  Search this
Wailaki  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Wappo  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photomechanical prints
Printing plates
Photogravures
Photographs
Date:
1899-1927
circa 1980
Summary:
The Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian include photogravure printing plates and associated proofs made from Curtis photographs and used in the publication of The North American Indian volumes 1-9 and 12-19. The bulk of the images are portraits, though there are also images of everyday items, ceremonial artifacts, and camps.
Scope and Contents:
The collection comprises 183 photogravure plates (101 folio and 82 octavo) and 96 associated proofs used in the printing of The North American Indian volumes 1-9 and 12-19. The original photographs used to make the photogravures were made circa 1903-1926 and the photogravure plates were made in 1907-1930. The bulk are portraits, though there are also images of everyday items, ceremonial artifacts, and camps. About half of the proofs in the collection are originals used for Curtis's publication, though the collection also includes proofs made in the process of later publication by the Classic Gravure Company (circa 1980). Vintage proofs include handwritten notes, likely made by Curtis Studio employees in Seattle and Los Angeles. Many of the photogravure plates do not have matching proofs; in particular, there are no proofs for the octavo plates.
Arrangement:
The plates and proofs are arranged by the volume of The North American Indian in which they were published. They are described in this finding aid by the caption and plate number with which they were published.
Biographical / Historical:
Edward Sheriff Curtis (1868-1952) was an American photographer best known for his monumental and now-controversial project, the twenty-volume publication The North American Indian. Here he sought to document in words and pictures the "vanishing race" of American Indians.

Born in Wisconsin in 1868, Edward Curtis grew up on his family's farm in Le Sueur County, Minnesota, from 1874 to 1887. In 1887, he and his father Johnson Curtis settled on a plot near what is now Port Orchard, Washington, and the rest of the family joined them the following year. When Johnson Curtis died within a month of the family's arrival, the burden of providing for his mother and siblings fell to 20-year-old Edward, and Edward set out to do so through his photography. In 1891, Curtis moved to the booming city of Seattle and bought into a joint photo studio with Rasmus Rothi. Less than a year later, he formed "Curtis and Guptill, Photographers and Photoengravers" with Thomas Guptill; the enterprise quickly became a premier portrait studio for Seattle's elite. In 1895, Curtis made his first "Indian photograph" depicting Princess Angeline, daughter of the chief for whom Seattle had been named. The following year he earned his first medal from the National Photographic Convention for his "genre studies."

In 1899, Edward Curtis joined the Harriman Alaska Expedition as official photographer, a position which allowed him to learn from anthropologists C. Hart Merriam and George Bird Grinnell while documenting the landscapes and peoples of the Alaskan coast. This expedition and the resulting friendship with Grinnell helped to foster Curtis's ultimate goal to "form a comprehensive and permanent record of all the important tribes of the United States and Alaska that still retain to a considerable degree their primitive customs and traditions" (General Introduction, The North American Indian). Curtis made several trips to reservations from 1900 to 1904, including a trip with Grinnell to Montana in 1900 and multiple trips to the Southwest, including the Hopi Reservation. He also hired Adolph Muhr, former assistant to Omaha photographer Frank A. Rinehart, to manage the Curtis studio in his absence, a decision which would prove more and more fruitful as Curtis spent less and less time in Seattle.

In 1906, Curtis struck a deal with financier J. P. Morgan, whereby Morgan would support a company – The North American Indian, Inc. – with $15,000 for five years, by which time the project was expected to have ended. Systematic fieldwork for the publication began in earnest that summer season, with Curtis accompanied by a team of ethnological researchers and American Indian assistants. Arguably the most important member of Curtis' field team was William Myers, a former newspaperman who collected much of the ethnological data and completed most of the writing for the project. The first volume, covering Navajo and Apache peoples, was published at the end of 1907, but already Morgan's funding was incapable of meeting Curtis's needs. Despite heaping praise from society's elite, Curtis spent much of his time struggling to find people and institutions willing to subscribe to the expensive set of volumes. After the initial five years, only eight of the proposed twenty volumes had been completed. Fieldwork and publication continued with the support of J. P. Morgan, but Curtis's home life suffered because of his prolonged absences.

In 1919, Curtis's wife Clara was awarded a divorce settlement which included the entire Curtis studio in Seattle. Exhausted and bankrupt, Edward Curtis moved with his daughter Beth Magnuson to Los Angeles, where they operated a new Curtis Studio and continued work on the volumes; volume 12 was published in 1922. The constant financial strain forced Myers to leave the North American Indian team after volume 18 (fieldwork in 1926) and Curtis made his last trip to photograph and gather data for volume 20 in 1927. After the final volumes were published in 1930, Curtis almost completely faded from public notice until his work was "rediscovered" and popularized in the 1970s.

Curtis's "salvage ethnology," as scholar Mick Gidley describes it, was mildly controversial even during his life and has become ever more so as his legacy deepens. In his quest to photograph pre-colonial Indian life through a twentieth-century lens, he often manipulated and constructed history as much as he recorded it: he staged reenactments, added props, and removed evidence of twentieth-century influences on "primitive" life. Curtis's work continues to shape popular conceptions of American Indians and so, while problematic, his legacy--his vision of American Indian life--continues to be relevant.
Related Materials:
NMAI also holds Edward Curtis photographs documenting the Harriman Expedition (1899) as well as platinum prints and photogravures of the images published in The North American Indian.

The Smithsonian Institution, National Anthropological Archives holds Edward Curtis prints submitted for copyright (Photo Lot 59) as well as many of his original negatives, photographs, and papers.

Steve Kern donated photogravure plates to the Center for Creative Photography and the Seattle Art Museum at the same time that he donated this set to MAI.
Provenance:
This collection was donated by Steven and Arlene Kern to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, in 1984.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Pictorial works  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photogravures
Photographs
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.080
See more items in:
Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv47bb7e1cf-cd0f-42a1-ac5b-8ee402c1ab8f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-080
Online Media:

Grace Nicholson: Inventories and Clippings

Collection Creator:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Collection Director:
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Container:
Box 262A, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1928 - 1968
Restrictions:
Image number 011 "Holiday Handcraft" has been removed from the slideshow due to culutral sensitivity.
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation Records, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records / Series 6: Collectors
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4a322f6cb-5196-43ba-a2f9-d7bc7ada72a1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-ref14859
4 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Grace Nicholson: Inventories and Clippings digital asset number 1
  • View Grace Nicholson: Inventories and Clippings digital asset number 2
  • View Grace Nicholson: Inventories and Clippings digital asset number 3
  • View Grace Nicholson: Inventories and Clippings digital asset number 4

Annual Reports

Collection Creator:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Collection Director:
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Container:
Box 404, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1925 - 1927
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation Records, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records / Series 12: Publications / 12.1: Annual Reports
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4baa74eba-582b-4879-9270-61b3ccf8a888
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-ref15242
2 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Annual Reports digital asset number 1
  • View Annual Reports digital asset number 2

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