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Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Pach, Walter, 1883-1958  Search this
Extent:
2.1 Linear feet (Box 1-3, FC 23)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1883-1980
Scope and Contents note:
This series contains family correspondence and extensive professional letters from noted artists and art world figures including critics, writers, collectors, museums and other art institutions. Scattered letters from Pach can also be found here.

See Appendix for partial chronological list of letters from Series 2.
Arrangement note:
This series is arranged as two subseries.

Missing Title

2.1: Family Correspondence, 1883-1980

2.2. General Correspondence, 1903-1969
Appendix: Partial Chronological List of Letters from Series 2:
Missing Title

From J.B. Young [?], October 5, 1900: New York, N.Y. Eric Dell recovered from consumption; Terry also had it and was treated at an English sanitarium; entertained several actors; made a brief trip to the country. 2 pp., illustrated with drawing, "an interpretation of how you will look when you next visit New York."

From Franji Vaatsvoort, September 18, 1903: Haarlem, the Netherlands. Severe storm; received Pach's postcards. Picture postcard (Frans Hals, "Cordelia Voogt Claesd., vrouw van Nicolaes van der Meer"

From Theodore Roosevelt, Washington, D.C., March 5, 1904: President's autograph. Card with engraving of the White House.

From Frank R. Wadsworth, Chicago, Ill., [postmarked] March 2, 1905: Intends to go to Spain; advises Pach to write about art; recommends the Madrid gallery; discusses Chicago's new orchestra hall and the death of Thomas; opinions about the jury system; is sending pictures to Philadelphia, the one eastern city likely to accept them. 6 pp. + enclosures (silhouettes of monkey, 3 birds, and cat by a 10-year-old child).

From Luis E. de la Rochas, Madrid, Spain, December 24, 1905: thanks Pach for photographs of works of art; inquires about the progress of Pach's own painting; will send a picture of his latest painting, as he is interested in Pach's opinion; sends regards to Mr. Chase. 3 pp., in Spanish, illustrated with drawing of a bearded man.

From Edith Bell, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] December 24, 1905: Christmas greetings; thanks Pach for showing her the Goya sketch. 2 pp.

To Claude Monet, Giverny, France, June 3, 1906: advises that knowing how to use color is most important and should become a matter of habit; lists his palette. 1 p., in French, typescript copy.

From Charles Scribner's Sons, New York, N.Y., February 13, 1907: printed form letter with payment for "The Memoria of Velasquez."

From Moriye Ogihara, Vitry-sur-Seine, France, [postmarked] April 24, 1907: mentions Kenzan picture Pach is interested in; thanks Pach for showing sketch to Henri, Ogihara's former teacher; lists some exhibitors in the Salon, with opinions of their work; thinks Rodin's work is great; he met Rodin at his studio. 4 pp. + 1 p. enclosure (note to Yamanaka & Co., New York, about Kenzan picture), in Japanese.

From Piet van der Laan, Leeuwarden, the Netherlands, May 11, 1907: likes portrait of Pach by Chase with its strong "Rembrandtic" shadow; reminisces about Chase; hopes to marry Annie in August. 4 pp.

From Moriye Ogihara, Vitry-sur-Seine, France, September 2, 1907: is glad Pach is returning to Paris; is attending classes at Académie Julian; saw Henri in France recently. 3 pp.

From Moriye Ogihara, Vitry-sur-Seine, France, [postmarked] September 10, 1907: wonders if and when Pach is returning to Paris. Postal card.

From Moriye Ogihara, Vitry-sur-Seine, France, [postmarked] September 12, 1907: urges Pach to visit after his stay in Italy. Picture postcard ("Reine d'Egypte en Isis--Bronze antique").

From [signature illegible], Director, The Royal House, Florence, Italy, October 5, 1907: the king grants permission to copy the Catherine de Medici portrait at the Pitti Palace. 1 p., in Italian.

From Claude Monet, Giverny, France, November 4, 1907: Monet will receive Pach this week on Wednesday or Thursday afternoon. 1 p., in French.

From Lelebuss, New York, N.Y., November 21, 1907: thanks Pach for birthday greetings; several friends are now married.

From Edith Bell, New York, N.Y., November 25, 1907: visited Henri and saw 40 canvases; describes Henri's new studio at 135 E. 40th St.; Lawson and Stevenson called at the studio while she was there; recalls Pach's description of visits to Monet and Ogihara; "it is my belief that Mr. Henri is afraid of George Bellows. He praises him so." 5 pp. + enclosure (photograph of a portrait by Edith Bell).

From Moriye Ogihara, Florence, Italy, December 25, 1907: Christmas greetings; discusses travels in Italy and art seen. 4 pp.

From Moriye Ogihara, Florence, Italy, December 26, 1907: has been to the Academy; praises Miss Frohberg. Picture postcard ("Firenze Lung' Arno Corsine").

To Alice Klauber from Walter Pach, Paris, France, January 3, 1908: he is looking at art; received a picture from her cousin; asks if she saw the article on Matisse he wrote for the Hearst paper. Picture postcard ("Frans Hals, La Bohemienne"), in Japanese, with English postscript.

From Moriye Ogihara, Arezzo, Italy, January 5, 1908: leaving for Assisi soon; stayed too long in Florence sightseeing with Magdalene. Picture postcard ("Arezzo, La Catte drale").

From Moriye Ogihara, Rome, Italy, [postmarked] January 14, 1908: staying at the same pensione as Frost. Picture postcard ("Torso di Belvedere di Dietro").

From Moriye Ogihara, Athens, Greece, January 22, 1908: discusses sightseeing in Greece and his trip through Italy; observations about Frost; "I appreciate Rodin very much since I have been in Italy"; offers to correct Pach's written Japanese.

From Gerda Stein, [place unknown], January 29, 1908: "Dearest love to Lena and best wishes for a very happy Birthday." Greeting card.

From Roger Marx, Editor, -- Gazette des Beaux-Arts -- , Paris, France, February 12, 1908: wants to publish a comprehensive study of the state of painting in the United States; must choose between original engravings and photographic reproductions for illustrations. 2 pp., in French.

From Moriye Ogihara, Cairo, Egypt, February 13, 1908: steamer has been delayed two days but he can continue to work. Picture postcard ("Ramesseum at Thebes").

From [Rais?], Paris, France, [postmarked] March 19, 1908: invites Pach to visit on Friday. 1 p., in French.

From William Merritt Chase, Florence, Italy, July 16, 1908: is leaving for Paris tomorrow; invites Pach to meet him at Caffe [sic] Du Paix that evening. 1 p.

From Helen R. Wilson, Furnes, Belgium, July 30, 1908: enumerates 13 highlights of her stay in Paris, including first view of a Cézanne painting. 4 pp.

From Senateur de la Sarthe, Paris, France, August 4, 1908: expression of sympathy. Note on business card, in French.

From Morton Livingston Schamberg, Paris, France, November 5, 1908: is doing small paintings outdoors and in his hotel room; is reluctant to leave Paris but wants to visit Italy, too; went to the Autumn Salon 3 times and found the work of Matisse "very beautiful"; "I am inclined to consider it a very personal art rather than the part of a great movement considering Matisse the leader, and the art doctrines evolved by the Steins (damn nice people...)... are to me the most awful nonsense"; prefers Renoir to Cézanne; is impressed by Egyptian portraits in the Louvre; has completed about 36 panels. 3 pp.

From Olga [de?], Paris, France, December 24, 1908: has completed 3 portrait commissions; wants to see the Velasquez, which is said to be "splendid." Picture postcard ("Paris, Eglise Saint-Augustin"), in French.

From Piet van der Laan, Leeuwarden, the Netherlands, February 6, 1909: is looking for a new teaching position; their infant son is now healthier. 3 pp.

From Annie van der Laan, Leeuwarden, the Netherlands, March 13, 1909: thanks Pach for the brush and birthday greetings; invites him to the Netherlands; tells about their baby. 1 p., in Dutch.

From Piet van der Laan, Leeuwarden, the Netherlands, March 15, 1909: discusses Shaw's -- Candida -- and -- Man and Superman -- ; is studying Nietzsche. 2 pp.

From Arthur B. Davies, New York, N.Y., May 29, 1909: discusses Pach's essay about him. 1 p.

From Moriye Ogihara, Tokyo, Japan, May 30, 1909: "Devil came into my mind and I am suffering and suffering"; Saito visited with news of Pach and pictures to exhibit at the Taiheiyo Art Association. Sequence of 5 picture postcards (1, "Wisteria"; 2. "Peony Blossoms at Yotsame"; 3. [bridge--title in Japanese]; 4. "Iris"; 5. "Peony Blossoms at Yotsame").

From Arthur B. Davies, New York, N.Y., June 1 [10?], 1909: wishes to reschedule studio visit by Pach and Mr. Of. 2 pp.

From Arthur B. Davies, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] July 9, 1909: interested in Gauguin and how he compares with Degas. 1 p.

From Maurice Brazil Prendergast, Boston, Mass., December 6, 1909: saw the Cézanne painting in Boston and agrees it is beautiful, "conscientious and absolutely sincere"; has not heard recently From Davi[e]s, "one of the few very sympathetic friends I am fortunate to possess." 4 pp.

From Arthur B. Davies, New York, N.Y., April 8, 1910: sends clipping about Matisse; recommends article about the Venus de Milo. 1 p.

From K. Tohary, Tokyo, Japan, May 11, 1910: Moriye Ogihara died in Tokyo, April 22, following an attack of vomiting blood; Tohary plans to publish a book about him; requests that Pach send Ogihara's letters and any recollections he wants to contribute. Rice paper scroll.

From Arthur B. Davies, New York, N.Y., May 14, 1910: "I found your article on Matisse the most enlightening I have read so far." 1 p.

From Albert Pinkham Ryder, New York, N.Y., May 26, 1910: thanks Pach for "kindly interest" in his work. 1 p. + enclosure (reprint of a poem, "The Voice of the Forest").

From Henri Rouart, La Queue en Brie, France, September 17, 1910: sorry he was unavailable to welcome Pach and his friends. 1 p., in French.

From [unknown], New York, N.Y., [postmarked] October 5, 1910: empty envelope with no return address. Sketch of head on reverse.

From Clifton A. Wheeler, Mooresville, Ind., October 12, 1910: describes fellow passengers aboard ship; gives details of getting paintings through customs; advises Pach to start preparing necessary documents for bringing home his property. 5 pp. + enclosures (4 small etchings: 2 portraits, 2 landscapes).

From Charles Sheeler, Philadelphia, Pa., October 26, 1910: after a period of difficulty, his work shows progress; Schamberg thinks Sheeler's recent landscapes are "Cézanne like"; has had little opportunity to see the work of modern painters; hopes to go to New York for upcoming exhibitions at the Photo Secession Gallery, particularly Picasso, Cézanne, and Matisse; rejected by Macbeth last fall and by the Art Institute; a Chicago dealer wants to show his work, but friends there advise against involvement with that gallery. 6 pp.

From Julian Alden Weir, New York, N.Y., November 25, 1910: discusses his interest in etching, especially drypoint. 4 pp.

From Morton Livingston Schamberg, Philadelphia, Pa., December 27, 1910: met Stieglitz and "was well satisfied with his attitude. He hasn't the intelligence of a Leo Stein but he is sincerely interested and is getting into a position where he could do one lots of good"; met Hartley; visited Henri's studio; Stieglitz and Henri think "I am too cock-sure of myself. If they only knew"; completed 20 to 25 pictures in the last year; sends photographs of some. 3 pp. + enclosures (7 photographs of Schamberg's work: 6 figures, 1 exhibition installation).

From Adolph Werner, New York, N.Y., December 21, 1910: is teaching less at the university now that he is the "President's lieutenant." 2 pp.

From Clifton A. Wheeler, Mooresville, Ind., January 3, 1911: discusses Davies' collection of Cézanne photographs; he and Hila were married; regrets that Pach was not named director of the museum in Indianapolis. 7 pp.

From Auguste Renoir, Cagnes, France, March 28, 1911: thanks Pach for allowing him to review the article before publication; wants the interview portion withheld because it seems critical of Saint-Saens and Pillet-Will and suggests posthumous publication; feels flattered by Pach's review. 4 pp., in French.

From Eugène Leroy, Paris, France, March 27, 1911: is happy to have been of service; the Association Philotechnique enjoys meeting foreigners who appreciate its teachings and will take home pleasant memories of France. Note on calling card, in French.

From Charles Loeser, Florence, Italy, April 28, 1911: exchanged 4 of his Cézanne paintings for a larger one From Vollard; Pach's German friend should contact Vollard immediately if she is interested in acquiring one; Denis Cochin traded a Cézanne for a Goya at Durand-Ruel. 8 pp.

From Auguste Rodin, Paris, France, June 1, 1911: is willing to meet with Pach to discuss Fujikawa's book on Ogihara. 2 pp., in French.

From E. D. Smyth, Côtes-du-Nord, France, August 31, 1911: will answer Pach's letter; apologizes for being fussy about the Stendahl etc." Picture postcard (Etables, Côtes-du-Nord, Les Grottoes.")

From E.D. Smyth, Côtes-du-Nord, France, September 5, 1911: is leaving soon for Saint-Malo; will return Pach's "Tuscan book" and send 2 others; recounts events of the summer; describes some hotel guests and the cottage where her family is staying; wants to see Daumier originals. 14 pp.

From Ruth A. Wilmot, Brooklyn, N.Y., October 7, 1911: is glad their misunderstanding is straightened out; someone on the boat unintentionally insulted her companion; homesick for Paris; working again; finds New York "invigorating." 5 pp.

From Joe Garvey, Alpine, N.J., November 21, 1911: is back From honeymoon; wants to go to Europe but first must sell property. 4 pp.

From Herman Reimers, Christiana, Norway, November 24, 1911: thanks Pach for the gift of an etching; will not be moving to Paris after all; was appointed director of political affairs at the ministry. 4 pp., in French.

From Tete, New York, N.Y., December 14, 1911: Christmas greetings; misses him; family news; has been in contact with Pach's parents. 4 pp., with sketches of busts on the envelope.

From Margherita Innocenti, Pensione Innocenti, Florence, Italy, December 22, 1911: thanks Pach for kind words about her and for recommending the pensione; 4 American women are there now. 3 pp., in Italian.

From Margherita Innocenti, Pensione Innocenti, Florence, Italy, February 9, 1912: -- Ladies -- . Will be happy to have friends of Pach stay at the pensione. 1 p., in Italian.

From E.D. Smyth, Florence, Italy, February 21, 1912: describes guests at Pensione Innocenti; met young Italian artist, Gino "Sensano or Sanseno [Severini]," who knows Stella and other mutual friends; recounts visits with Signorina A.B. and Mr. Loeser; returning by sea due to Helen's illness; will not see Pach again this trip. 6 pp.

From Louis Lombard, [place unknown], April 15, 1912: note of dedication, 1 p. + 2 pp. enclosure (copy of "Chants d'Amour," a poem by Henry Marx), in French.

From E.D. Smyth, [place unknown], Ireland, April 27, 1912: "Have made half my notes From the cahier" and will send them to H.M. soon. Postal card.

From Eugène, Paris, France, [postmarked] April 26, 1912: will come on Sunday at 9:00; is happy that Pach was not expelled because now he can work in peace for a few more days. 1 p., in French.

From Arthur Burdett Frost, Davos, Switzerland, May 5, 1912: has eye problems that doctors cannot treat; Jack is recovering; plans to spend summer in the Black Forest and return to Davos for the winter; Pach writes well; finds it "refeshing to read really honest stuff"; is working on a book of caricatures. 8 pp.

From Fujikawa, Paris, France, June 4, 1912: saw Mr. Molissa and is interested in his work; Pach should express Fujikawa's thanks to Molissa; is going to Florence where he hopes to see Pach; requests photographs of any new work Pach completes. 3 pp. + 5 enclosures (brief thank you notes From M. Lernait, Tererco?, L. Lombard, Louis Varday, and Romanet), in French.

From Georges Speirer, Paris, France, June 6, 1912: heard From friends that Pach is in Florence. 2 pp., in French.

From Arthur B. Davies, New York, N.Y., June 19, 1912: discusses arrangements for payment and shipping of Cézanne painting; has found a buyer; Macbeth will handle customs; Macbeth will send Pach photographs of Rockwell Kent's pictures; will see Pach in Paris in October. 3 pp.

From [signature illegible (L.L.?)], Levallois, France, July 1, 1912: hopes Pach will spend the winter in Paris; is glad Pach is pleased with his paintings of Arezzo. 4 pp., in French.

From Maurice Socard, Paris, France, July 19, 1912: thanks Pach for his letters; will send photographs taken at his country house; friends agree with Pach's assessment of Milan. 6 pp., in French.

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, July [30?], 1912: is not surprised that Pach received a discouraging letter From Floury, who has requested another translator; Faure wants Pach to do the job. 4 pp., in French.

From Arthur B. Davies, New York, N.Y., October 2, 1912: Cézanne painting is now at Macbeth's; gives details of problems with customs; is unable to accompany Walt Kuhn in search of artists for the Armory Show; "the possibilities [of the Armory Show] loom tremendous yet so many can only see another opportunity of showing their work"; "you can do so much for Kuhn in every way and I also believe he has a really healthy outlook with considerable ability." 2 pp.

From Egisto Fabbri, Paris, France, November 28, 1912: declines Pach's invitation, due to illness. 1 p.

From G.A. Bourdelle, [place unknown], December 4, 1912: the Toussaint sculpture can be installed with or without a socle; declined to participate in the New York exhibition before realizing Pach was the organizer; keep the photograph of Toussaint's work. 3 pp., in French.

From [unknown], Gambier, Ohio, [postmarked] December 4, 1912: empty envelope with no return address.

From Wilhelm Lehmbruck, Paris, France, December 6, 1912: Two sculptures, -- Woman Kneeling -- and -- Large Torso -- , and 2 drawings are being sent to Pach for his exhibition. 1 p., in French.

From Henri Matisse, Tangier, Morocco, December 6, 1912: agrees to lend the 7 paintings requested for exhibition in New York; lists titles, insurance values, and indicates which are for sale; -- Le Luxe -- is fragile; no drawings are available; will ask Fénéon to loan as many paintings as possible. 2 pp., in French.

From Robert Henri, New York, N.Y., January 3, 1913: discusses photographs of Besnard's work; reminisces about discovering decorations by Besnard at the College of Pharmacie; compliments Pach's Winslow Homer article; "there is a growing state of expectancy about the 'armory' exhibition, and there is little doubt but that it will make a great stir, and do a great deal of good in a great variety of directions"; news of George Bellows, Guy Pène du Bois, Boss, Kent, Coleman, Sprinchorn, Sloan, Van Sloun, and Bohnen. 4 pp.

From Odilon Redon, [place unknown], France, January 6, 1913: he is flattered by Pach's article, which he believes will enhance his reputation in America; Pach should try to visit soon, as they plan to go south in a few days. 2 pp., in French.

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Paris, France, January 16, 1913: agrees with Pach that each generation of artists draws inspiration From undeveloped ideas found in the work of preceding generations; no French architectural style has emerged since the 18th century, confirming the idea that eras without defined aspirations produce no monuments; current politics and intellectual freedom presage hope for the 20th century; as Pach demonstrated, painting was the dominant 19th-century aesthetic, thus developments in other arts will come From painting; a new architecture is needed for modern life; in a time when money reigns supreme, artists should practice simplicity; machines are now a powerful presence in all of life. 4 pp., in French.

From Constantin Brancusi, Paris, France, [postmarked] January 24, 1913: his cousin has just finished a painting that Pach should see; invites Pach to dinner. 1 p., in French.

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, February 11, 1913: if he goes to England, he will contact Mr. Fry; wants to introduce a painter friend to the Steins; Pach is a rare friend and intellectual equal. 2 pp., in French.

From Jacqueline d'Argent, Chinon, France, March 1, 1913: has fond memories of their interesting conversations; present acquaintances are not intellectual and gossip too much; applied for a medical assignment in Algeria but is unsure about moving. 2 pp., in French.

From Constantin Brancusi, Paris, France, March 13, 1913: asks Pach to decide the price of the bronze; congratulations on the success of the exhibition. 3 pp., in French.

From Arthur B. Davies, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] April 5, 1913: borrowed works are being returned to Europe; Roman Bronze Co. could make a good cast of Brancusi's -- Mlle. Pogany -- owned by Belle Greene; "looking forward to a genuine recreation in Boston as to art interest"; doubts Chicago's appreciation, Mr. Eddy notwithstanding. 2 pp.

From Ary Le Bland, Paris, France, April 5, 1913: a copy of -- La Vie -- , featuring the information Pach provided about Redon, is being sent; asks Pach to write about art trends in America for -- La Vie -- and publicize the magazine. Postal card, in French.

From Jacques Villon, Paris, France, April 13, 1913: congratulates and thanks Pach for promoting the acceptance of modern art; extends appreciation to Davies and Kuhn. 3 pp., in French.

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, [place unknown], France, April 18, 1913: received Pach's letter and check; the Duchamp brothers are embarrassed by their success and do not talk about it; wishes Gleizes were having his share of it; asks how the other artists fared; a commission agency requested cubist paintings for America; worried that cubism is becoming a commodity; the 4 copies of -- Noa, Noa -- he purchased at a good price have been shipped. 2 pp., in French.

From M. Lernait [Lemaitre?], Saigon, Indochina, May 25, 1913: thanks Pach for writing and for his friendship; the countryside near Saigon is beautiful; he misses Paris. 4 pp., in French.

From Jacques Villon, Versailles, France, June 19, 1913: thanks Pach for selling another painting; Salon d'Automne opens later than usual this year; Torrey called on him, Marcel, and Picabia; Raymond is going on vacation soon; sends regards to Davies and Kuhn. 4 pp., in French.

From Maurice Brazil Prendergast, Boston, Mass., June 25, 1913: is recovering From surgery; thanks Pach for sending postcards and showing interest in him. 3 pp.

From Jean Le Roy, Paris, France, [postmarked] July 1, 1913: comments on the success of Pach's exhibition; has a temporary job; finished college; might travel to Guinea; discusses his poetry published in -- Les Bandeaux d'Oro -- ; met de Verhaeren, whom he admires. 4 pp., in French.

From Marcel Duchamp, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, July 2, [1913?]: heard all about the American exhibition From his brothers; thanks Pach for "enthusiastically defending their work"; still awaiting payment; will spend August in England; Torrey called on them. 3 pp., in French.

From Maurice Brazil Prendergast, Boston, Mass., [postmarked] July 11, 1913: is recovering From his "hospital experience"; recounts trouble with studio lease; asks Pach to notify him of suitable space available in New York. 4 pp.

From Maurice Socard, Paris, France, August 1, 1913: Pach is a kindred spirit; Pach's competence and ability to elicit appreciation for modern painting made the show a success. 2 pp., in French.

From F. Wentscher, [place unknown], Hungary, August 24, 1913: is painting out of doors; won't return to Paris until November. Postal card, with original illustration of horse-drawn carriage, in German.

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, August 25, 1913: is delighted with Americans' enthusiastic acceptance of French painting; current prices are ridiculous and scandalous; bought a great Delacroix at reasonable cost; complains about his editor; awaits word From Mr. Fry, to whom he has sent a Cézanne; will go to London in September; saw an interesting Matisse show but preferred Bonnard's exhibition; he sees Renoir frequently; finds it deeply moving to see Renoir make constant improvements in his work despite old age and sickness. 4 pp., in French.

From Jacqueline d'Argent, Blida, Algeria, September 8, 1913: is now practicing medicine in Blida; describes the scenery and local people; congratulates Pach on his marriage. 6 pp., in French.

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, September 25, 1913: just received Pach's article and will comment on it in the next letter; thanks Pach for promoting his and friends' work; will see the Steins soon and try to learn more of the rumored American reaction against their ideas; the Salon d'Automne opening is delayed until November; Pach's mention of the Delaunay affair confirms rumors of discord; asks Pach to determine if and when unsold paintings and sculpture were returned. 2 pp., in French.

From Clifton A. Wheeler, Indianapolis, Ind., December 22, 1913: museum's schedule cannot accommodate Pach's exhibition; describes upcoming January show; the museum hopes to acquire a Davies painting; "the exhibition in Chicago (The International) did not strike me with overwhelming force, but I have enough respect for the opinions of Mr. Davies and yourself to admit that the fault may have been my own"; congratulations on engagement to Miss Frohberg. 7 pp. + 1 p. postscript from -- Hila Drake Wheeler -- wishing Pach and Miss Frohberg happiness.

From G. Villon, Paris, France, [1914]: congratulations on the birth of Pach's son; heard From her husband who is in the army; asks Pach's opinion of some drawings; is working with blind children in a hospital. 4 pp., in French.

From Constantin Brancusi, Paris, France, January 26, 1914: asks Pach to determine whether the owner of -- Muse Endormie -- wants the piece in marble; a reduced price is possible, but he must know soon; met Mrs. Stieglitz; asks Pach's advice about showing his marbles in New York. 4 pp., in French.

From Constantin Brancusi, Paris, France, February 19, 1914: received the check; distressed to be participating in a show that may prove harmful to Pach's cause; asks Pach not to be hurt by his unwitting mistake. 4 pp., in French.

From Walter Arensberg, Boston, Mass., March 1, 1914: "The exhibition was tremendously fresh and fine"; compliments Pach's work. 1 p.

From Jean Le Roy, Paris, France, [postmarked] March 4, 1914: congratulations on Pach's marriage; encourages him to continue painting; news of Lombard and Clapp. 2 pp., in French.

From Maurice Brazil Prendergast, Saint-Malo, France, June 12, 1914: thanks Pach for reproducing his work in -- Century -- magazine; is returning home sooner than planned; Renoir's new work is "way ahead of his former landscapes." 3 pp.

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Courbevoie, France, June 26, 1914: is impatient for news of a proposed project; Mrs. A. Roosevelt will be in touch with Pach; her work has shown progress; during the past year, modern art has begun to attract interest and generate discussion among some previously unreceptive people. 2 pp., in French.

From Morton Livingston Schamberg, Paris, France, June 30, 1914: "Would love to meet Brancusi and Duchamp-Villon but damn it, I can't speak French." Picture postcard ("P. Cézanne, -- L'été -- fragment").

From Odilon Redon, Bièvres, France, July 10, 1914: if Pach organizes another exhibition, he wants to participate. 3 pp., in French.

From Joseph Stella, Venice, Italy, July 20, 1914: discusses his travels in Europe; Greece reminded him of Davies's pictures; no reply From the futurists in Milan; recounts a meeting with Walkowitz in Patrai, Greece. 5 pp.

From Alexandre Mercereau, Paris, France, [postmarked] July 30, 1914: can secure work by interesting artists for exhibition; inquires whether foreign works and jewelry are acceptable; he organized an international exhibition of cubism with an accompanying symposium in Prague; offers to lecture in the United States if Pach can find a way to pay for the trip; is sending information about an organization he founded; wants to establish an American branch; needs an American editor for his books; Brancusi's participation is essential. 4 pp., in French.

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Paris, France, August 7, 1914: just received registered letter and invitations; continuing with exhibit plans is impossible, as all of their friends are mobilized; work of Gleizes, Villon, and Metzinger being exhibited in Berlin probably will be lost; a negative reply From Chapell ended long-held hopes; wholehearted thanks due to Pach for countless efforts and true friendship; the French are ready to die for peace and freedom; confident of the future, despite anxiety over friends now in danger. 4 pp., in French.

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France, August 26, 1914: war conditions make collaboration impossible; is serving as a paramedic; no bad news concerning anyone Pach knows. 2 pp., in French.

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, September 11, 1914: will consult with friends about planning an exhibition in the United States; Gleizes is at Toul; Villon is with the British army at Rouen. 2 pp., in French.

From Albert Pinkham Ryder, New York, N.Y., September 13, 1914: is looking forward to having the Pachs and Mr. Wheeler visit his studio. 2 pp.

From Michael Stein, Agay, France, October 19, 1914: requests details about the exhibition Pach is organizing; Pach should tell Matisse "he must now look to America for a market for his art for some time to come"; "it is about time he [Matisse] were ranked among the accepted classics and bought freely." 3 pp.

From Jean Le Roy, Brest, France, [postmarked] November 10, 1914: plans to enlist soon; is worried about Kohler at the front. 4 pp., in French.

From Jacques Villon, [place unknown], France, November 23, 1914: comments on the war and his painting; congratulates Pach on his New York exhibition. 1 p., in French.

From Piet van der Laan, Zutphen, the Netherlands, January 24 and February 8, 1915: Congratulations on the birth of Raymond; cannot visit Pach in Paris because of the war. 4 pp. + 3 pp. enclosure (copy of a poem by Dante), in Italian.

From Raoul Dufy, Le Havre, France, January 29, 1915: sent 2 copies of his Bestiarie; wants Pach to choose a drawing, watercolor, or Bestiarie as a gift of thanks; heard From Derain, Apollinaire, and Gleizes, all in the army; de la Fresnaye was wounded; asks if Basler, Brummer, and Kahnweiler are art dealers now that they have settled in New York; considers Basler an honest man. 4 pp., in French.

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Acheux, France, February 26, 1915: still in Saint-Germain where his wife continues her work at the military hospital; Villon spent the entire winter in the trenches but bears it well; glad Quinn bought Cat and Parrot; thinks Quinn should have the final versions in wood rather than cast reproductions and instructs Pach to discuss it with him; received Marcel's articles and reproductions; understands the change that has affected Pach's desire for new means of artistic expression. 2 pp., in French.

From Raoul Dufy, Le Havre, France, March 3, 1915: lists the 4 paintings he is sending; accepts and reiterates the payment schedule; Pach should select a painting for himself; will send some paintings on silk; promises to write about decorative art in his next letter. 4 pp., in French.

From Marcel Duchamp, Paris, France, March 12, [1915?]: received the Matisse catalog and remembers the goldfish painting; Villon is in good health and good spirits; is optimistic about prospects for peace by summer; after a family vacation in Rouen, he finished glass and other projects; Raymond is happy in Saint-Germain, where his wife is a hospital nurse; does Pach know if Delaunay is in America; wants to visit Brancusi; has no news of Picasso, Braque, or Derain. 4 pp., in French.

From Marcel Duchamp, Paris, France, April 2, [1915?]: is preparing for an exhibition; describes arrangements for sending Raymond's works to Pottier; 2 paintings, a drawing, and papers are being sent to Pach; reports on the work and conditions of Raymond, Rifemont-Dessaisner, and Villon; has decided to leave France and go to New York; wants to know when he should come and if securing employment as a librarian will be difficult; does not want his family to know of these plans for a while; includes price list for paintings. 3 pp., in French.

From Jacques Villon, Acheux, France, April 13, 1915: glad to learn that his paintings and engravings have sold; is looking forward to returning to normal life and working with greater intensity; being welcomed in New York should boost his self-confidence and provide some peace of mind regarding financial security; the matter of Dr. Stum's paintings cannot be settled until the war ends; is sending Pach engravings and drawings; a shipment of sketches made during the war can be published as documentaries; after being away From home for 8 months, he envies Pach's happy family life; emerging spring contrasts sharply with human evil. 3 pp., in French.

From Marcel Duchamp, Paris, France, April 27, [1915?]: is displeased by the reply received; understands that Pach misses Paris and the artist's life he led there; he is increasingly dissatisfied and the point is to leave Paris rather than to go to New York; asks help in finding a library job in New York so he will not have to depend on selling paintings; does not want his family to know yet. 7 pp., in French.

From Marcel Duchamp, Paris, France, May 21, 1915: has decided to depart on June 5, despite family and sentimental reasons for rescheduling; spoke to Raymond about Arensberg's magazine; Mme. Picon probably has articles by Mercereau, Gleizes may have articles, and other friends could contribute poems and prose; has decided on a job for the duration of his stay in America, but it will prevent him From painting. 3 pp., in French

From Theodore Duret, Paris, France, May 22, 1915: hopes Pach's efforts at promoting the latest in modern art, especially Van Gogh and Lautrec, have been successful; has written a comprehensive book on Van Gogh, which is to be published when the war ends; asks if the Van Gogh painting he loaned to the exhibition has been sold. 4 pp., in French

From Alice Derain, Paris, France, May 28, 1915: thanks Pach for sending a check and for handling her affairs; the paintings From Mme. Lebas were not shipped because Derain is not satisfied with them and decided not to sell; some landscapes may be available soon because Derain has spare time and can try to work; a recent portrait of the couturier Monsieur Poiret may be his best painting yet. 2 pp., in French

From Georges Rouault, Versailles, France, [postmarked] June 1, 1915: (1) Discusses works in progress that may be suitable for the exhibition Pach is organizing; the shipment will also include a ceramic plaque for Quinn; Quinn persists in asking about Rouault's military status; 6 times already he has been disqualified due to a weak heart; academies, medals, and awards are not about art; nature and other artists are more inspiring than unimaginative teachers. (2) Pach should keep a Rouault piece unless he prefers to select one when in France; his simplified ceramics are real faiences; his paintings are lighter and more fluid; his show after the war will include German types and landscape and religious paintings. (3) Perhaps Quinn will be interested in the paintings shipped; within the year, a larger selection of ceramics will be available for Quinn, but at the moment his focus is on painting. 4 pp. (3 separate notes), in French

From Jean Le Roy, [place unknown], France, June 12, 1915: describes his flower-decorated trench and the surrounding countryside; started a magazine called Les Imberbes with an editor and typographer friend; intends to send poems to Pach's American publication. 5 pp. + 1 p. enclosure (poem, "Printemps"), in French

From Maurice Brazil Prendergast, Boston, Mass., July 7, 1915: thanks Pach for Dufy's book; "tell Monsieur Dufy when you write him I felt more pleased than if I got a gold medal"; he and Charlie will leave soon for Maine. 4 pp

From Marcel Duchamp, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] July 28, 1915: inquires whether Pach received the palette he sent; spent the evening with Quinn, Gregg, and Kuhn; Gregg was likable and Kuhn fascinating; thinks Quinn could be supportive; Quinn was anxious to know if cubism has been killed by the war; once his English improves, he wants to convince Quinn to discard his ideas about the politics of art. 2 pp., in French

From Alice Derain, Paris, France, August 7, 1915: sends receipt for payment in full; her husband is in the service; Braque was seriously wounded; Doucet died; Picasso is in Paris; her husband hopes to meet Pach. 2 pp., in French

From Raoul Dufy, Paris, France, September 18, 1915: has received a payment toward Quinn's account; Quinn has purchased additional works; credits many sales to his association with Pach; is able to paint while in the military; after the war, he hopes the French can become better acquainted with American painters; is pleased to hear that Prendergast liked his gift; wants to see photographs of Prendergast's work; requests catalogs with reproductions of American furniture. 4 pp., in French

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, [place unknown], October 17, 1915: feels renewed interest in his work; continues his research; observations about the war; Villon has suffered and was awarded a Military Cross; requests news of Pach and mutual friends; Pach should determine Quinn's intentions. 3 pp., in French

From Henri Matisse, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France, November 20 and 29, 1915: is delighted by the prospect of an exhibition of French art; will do what he can to help obtain the Seurat painting for exhibition; thanks Pach for selecting his work for the exhibition at Bourgeois and agrees to send additional pieces; lists etchings sent to Miss Bryant via Pottier; the photographs showed great improvement in Pach's portraits; advises a warmer palette; will offer additional frank comments after seeing new pictures; is working hard and just finished an important painting, which already has been sold; is still recovering From bronchitis. 12 pp., in French

From Louis Lombard, [place unknown], France, December 28, 1915: best wishes for the coming year. Postal card, in French

From Theodore Duret, Paris, France, December 29, 1915: read a favorable review of the Van Gogh exhibition; asks if Pach was able to sell Duret's Van Gogh still life; his book about Van Gogh will be printed after the war. 4 pp., in French

From Maurice Socard, [place unknown], December 31, 1915: has been in Paris throughout the war; is teaching at the Lycée Ch. [ sic]; believes Germany wants to organize the world; explains his view of the causes of the war and predicts the outcome. 6 pp., in French

From Mary Socard, Paris, France, December 31, 1915: greetings and good wishes; believes the war will be followed by much misery and great changes. 2 pp., in French

From Jean Le Roy, [place unknown], France, [postmarked] [?,?] 1916: his commanding officer knows Picasso, Marie Laurencin, and Derain; Lafitte was killed; wants news of Pach; thank the magazine Others if his poem "Spring" is accepted. 5 pp., in French

From Georges Rouault, [place unknown], France, [undated] [1916?]: received the catalog and Pach's review with the reproduction of his painting; his grandchild is sick; they are going to the seashore; is working on an exhibit; thanks Pach for helping sell a painting; though in poor health, he may have to join the army; suggests an album of reproductions. 10 pp., in French

From Jacques Villon, Paris, France, January 5, [1916]: he is assigned to the central atelier for camouflage; works with other artists, not all of whom share his outlook; has many ideas for new work; no news From Marcel or Picabia. 4 pp., in French

From Georges Rouault, [place unknown], France, [postmarked] January 22, 1916: personally delivered the paintings to Pottier for shipment; worries that the large works will not have the style and the color of the small ones; wants to have his exhibition ready before going to Italy; has not seen Villon recently. 2 pp., in French

From Piet van der Laan, Zutphen, the Netherlands, February 7, 1916: thanks Pach for the "ex-libris"; he is busy translating a lengthy book on medieval Italy; discusses Dante. 4 pp

From Jacques Villon, [place unknown], February 10, 1916: speculates that an art form may develop From the war. 1 p., in French

From Maurice Brazil Prendergast, New York, N.Y., March 23, 1916: confirms 5 titles for inclusion in the exhibition catalog; has a good photograph for Pach's book. 2 pp

From Maurice Socard, Paris, France, April 2, 1916: remembers Pach as one of his best students; one of the many reasons for their friendship is Pach's love for France; quotes Descartes; compares the French ideal of liberty with the German interpretation; comments on French and German science. 4 pp., in French

From Ruth Wilmot, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] April 9, 1916: compliments Pach on the lectures he presented to her group; encloses payment. 2 pp

From Henri Matisse, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France, April 28, 1916: extends best wishes for the success of the exhibition; asks Pach not to reveal the extremely reduced price of the painting Arensberg bought; asks if Max Weber has a large gallery; wants to obtain sound recordings of typical exotic chants. 4 pp., in French

From Jean Le Roy, [place unknown], [postmarked] May 8, 1916: thanks Pach for sending the Cézanne catalog; has been at the front for 13 months; Kohler is a decorated hero; Siegfried's fate is unknown; plans to publish his poems when next in Paris. 4 pp., in French

From Gino Severini, Paris, France, May 29, 1916: wants to have an exhibition in New York; has 30 or 35 paintings and 20 drawings representing several periods and can supply text for a lecture; recently published on Mallarmé and pictorial aesthetics; is presently writing another critical study; suggests Pach arrange for a show at Montross or Macbeth and specifies his usual terms; philosophical differences have caused him to part From the group of futurists Pach knows; still considers himself a futurist and will use the term because it helps the public grasp his ideas; no one, including Picasso, Derain, Dufy, and Metzinger, is making a profit From exhibitions. 4 pp., in French

From Mme. Victor Le Roy, Paris, France, May 30, 1916: belatedly acknowledges receipt of Jean's poems; [UNK] husband, Victor, died near Verdun; Jean may come home on leave. 1 p., in French

From Jean Le Roy, [place unknown], [postmarked] June 2, 1916: thanks Pach for forwarding his poems to American publications; believes poets are well treated in the United States; uncle Victor died in the war; Carreau was wounded. 4 pp., in French

From Raoul Dufy, Paris, France, June 3, 1916: thanks Pach for writing an article defending the ideas of modern French art, which had come under attack by a young American critic; wants to know if there are opponents of French modern art in New York; exhibitions are returning to Paris; Quinn purchased -- The Yellow Hat -- ; is sending a thank-you gift and an etching. 1 p., in French

From Emil Gay, Watkins Glen, N.Y., June 12, 1916: enjoyed Pach's lectures. 6 pp

From E.D. Smyth, [place unknown], England, June 16, 1916: news of a mutual friend killed in the war; discusses Jean Le Roy. 4 pp

From Camille Redon, Cannes, France, [July 1916?]: Redon is recuperating in Cannes; asks for the return of their pictures, when feasible. 2 pp., in French

From Camille Redon, [place unknown], July 4, 1916: Redon is gravely ill with pulmonary congestion; the doctors are concerned. 1 p., in French

From Jacques Villon, Puteaux, France, [postmarked] July 12, 1916: Miss Bryant's purchase boosted his morale and was welcome financially; Marcel is delighted with America; speculates that Marcel may eventually settle in America. 3 pp., in French

From Camille Redon, Bièvres, France, August 6, 1916: Redon was buried several days ago; a gallery in the Petit Palais will be devoted to him and there will be an exhibition at the Beaux-Arts in the spring; reflects on the solitude and anonymity of many great artists during their lifetimes. 4 pp., in French

From Georges Rouault, Paris, France, [postmarked] August 14, 1916: Pach should return all paintings and drawings when he can; thanks Pach for his help; his wife and infant daughter are unwell; bought a new house; will be able to work when the family leaves Paris; received the item Pach sent him From Quinn much sooner than anticipated. 2 pp., in French

From Souza Cardoso, [place unknown], Portugal, [postmarked] September 25, 1916: comments on the picture shown on the card. Picture postcard (photograph of a woman and child in costume), in French

From Henri Matisse, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France, October 14, 1916: the information Pach sent about Bourgeois raises hopes for a good exhibition at his gallery; in reply to the question about a frame for the portrait of Arensberg, insists that modern paintings do not need frames, especially gold ones that contain a picture by stopping its extension; will look at Pach's paintings any time; Mrs. Havemeyer parted with the Ingres as a condition for another purchase; From photographs, gives his opinion of the authenticity and condition of 12 paintings. 11 pp., in French

From Henri Matisse, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France, November 6, 1916: sends description and opinion of a picture he omitted From a previous letter; art is selling well in Paris. 4 pp., in French

From Paul Signac, Saint-Tropez, France, November 18, 1916: illness prevents him from complying with Pach's request to select works for exhibition; suggests sources From which to borrow Seurat paintings. 3 pp., in French

From Florence Bing, New York, N.Y., [undated (1917)]: condolences on the death of Pach's mother. 1 p

From Albert Gabriel, [place unknown], [undated (1917)]: "Accept my sincere sympathy." Note on calling card

From Leigh Hunt, [place unknown], [undated (1917)]: "Heartfelt sympathy." Note on calling card

From Professor Adolph Werner, [place unknown], [undated (1917)]: "Condolence." Note on calling card

From Ruth Wilmot, [place unknown], [undated (1917)]: condolences on the death of Pach's mother. 2 pp

From Mme. Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Compiègne, France, [postmarked] January 6, 1917: her husband is hospitalized with multiple ailments, including typhoid; condolences on the death of Pach's mother. 2 pp., in French

From Constantin Brancusi, Paris, France, January 19, 1917: thanks for check From Quinn; is pleased that he was satisfied with the sculptures, despite difficulty in assembly; plans to visit the United States after the war. 3 pp., in French

From Gino Severini, Paris, France, February 7, 1917: has written a preface explaining the ideas of the avant-garde; wants Pach to oversee the translation; asks that the three fragile pastels be framed inexpensively by Stieglitz. 2 pp., in French

From Childe Hassam, New York, N.Y., March 30, 1917: thanks Pach for help in determining latest possible date to submit work for exhibition. Note on the reverse of printed announcement of a show of Hassam's etchings and drawings at Frederick Keppel & Co., November 16- December 2

From Gino Severini, Paris, France, April 28, 1917: expresses appreciation for the success of his exhibition; his paintings should be returned at a more favorable time; a longer version of his preface on modern art will appear in -- Le Mercure de France -- ; asks to be remembered to his friends and for news of sales and reviews of his show. 4 pp., in French

From [signature illegible], New York, NY., May 14, 1917

From [signature illegible], New York, NY., May 16, 1917

From Charles Sheeler, Philadelphia, PA., May 17, [1917?]

From Charles Cooper, New York, NY., May 19, 1917

From [signature illegible], [Vienna, Austria?], July 22, 1917

From Alexandre Mercereau, [place unknown (at the front)], July 26, 1917: is sending Pach a selection of his writings, which he hopes can be published in the United States; is anxious for a good translation; believes the book he just wrote is his best and is willing to offer it to an American publisher before it appears in France. 4 pp., in French

From Gino Severini, Paris, France, September 6, 1917: discusses work in progress; offers congratulations on the first Independents show; praises Pach's selfless efforts; authorizes use of any remaining works for other exhibitions; thanks Pach for arranging sales and sending reviews. 4 pp., in French

From [signature illegible], [place unknown], October 26, 1917

From Louis Lombard, [place unknown], France, October 26, 1917: reminisces about good times together; has less desire to write poetry now; is learning German and Italian. 2 pp., in French

From Maurice Socard, Paris, France, November 3, 1917: describes superb Renoirs seen in the Rue de la Boetie; hopes Pach's remarkable efforts on behalf of modern art will be fruitful; notes qualities needed for portrait and landscape painting. 4 pp., in French

From Louis Lombard, Ingolstadt, Germany, [postmarked] November 26, 1917: boredom and solitude are his routine; thanks Pach for gifts of books and tobacco; sends holiday greetings. Postal card, in French

From Camille Redon, Paris, France, December 8, 1917: if it remains unsold, Pach should keep the Redon painting until the war is over; American troops are arriving; she follows the exhibitions; likes Matisse; Mr. Quinn is behind in his payments. 4 pp., in French

From Arthur Burdett Frost, Madison, N.J., January 5, 1918: thanks Pach for condolences upon the death of his son; wants Pach to look at his son's work and consider writing an article. 4 pp

From Georges Rouault, Versailles, France, [postmarked] January 15, 1918: discusses titles of 2 pieces; general terms are more suitable titles for his subjects; Matisse was ridiculed by many because for a year he numbered all canvases; Rouault's albums will be numbered rather than titled; suggests framing and matting techniques for the double-sided piece; his new paintings won't need glass; he has always been lonely, but now is isolated as well; has a new daughter. 4 pp., in French

From Arthur Burdett Frost, [place unknown], February 1, 1918: thanks Pach for his interest in his son Arthur; offers a photograph of Arthur to illustrate Pach's forthcoming article. 4 pp

From Arthur Burdett Frost, [place unknown], [between February 1 and March 12, 1918]: thanks Pach for the manuscript; plans to send additional photographs of Arthur. 4 pp

From Arthur Burdett Frost, [place unknown], [between February 1 and March 12, 1918]: returning Pach's manuscript; requests a copy. 2 pp

From Alexandre Mercereau, Paris, France, [postmarked] February 9, 1918: thanks Pach for finding him a publisher; financial gain is secondary to having a publisher of good reputation who will provide proper translation; mentions Pach's frequent contact with Gleizes and Duchamp, who surely support his efforts on behalf of modern art; Vareze recommends Julio Gonzales's decorative work for Pach's exhibition; wants to help a friend sell a de Miranda painting. 2 pp., in French, + business card ("Alexandre Mercereau, Homme de Lettres, President de la Société Les Grandes Conférences") + 2 photographs (inscribed portrait of Mercereau taken at the front, June 1915, and portrait of Charles III and Maria-Ana by Carreño de Miranda)

From Maurice Socard, Paris, France, February 20, 1918: letter of gratitude for Pach's friendship and efforts on behalf of modern art; discusses idealism, imagination, art, and the search for truth. 3 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 12, 1918: is sending copies of his last 3 books; thinks -- The Holy Face -- is his most important book; it is about war in general and includes personal experiences From the present war. 4 pp., in French

From Mme. Le Roy, Paris, France., May 19, 1918: Jean died while a prisoner of war. 3 pp., in French

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Cannes, France, May 20, 1918: is sending Quinn a drawing and photograph that relate to his rooster sculpture and show the original architectural setting for the piece; will send the script of a comedy written with a friend for performance at a military hospital, which Pach may translate and publish in America; glad that the rift between Pach and Marcel is mended; recently saw Matisse hard at work; Villon is in the army and has no time for work. 4 pp., in French

From Gaby Duchamp, [place unknown], France, May 23, 1918: thanks Pach for arranging sales to Quinn; her husband is well, doing research, and will resume his art when the war ends; Raymond is in the hospital in Cannes; there were interesting Matisse and Picasso exhibitions in Paris. 2 pp., in French

From French Army, [place unknown], July [?], 1918: confirms the death of Jean Le Roy on April 26; sends details of the battle, as Pach requested, and text of citation. 4 pp., in French

From Mme. Le Roy, Paris, France, August 19, 1918: thanks Pach for the touching gesture of dedicating his University of California course to Jean's memory; sends a copy of the citation Jean received the day he died. 3 pp., in French

From J. Van Gogh Bonger, Far Rockaway, N.Y., August 20, 1918: sons wrote of good times with Pach in Berkeley; they were in Honolulu and now should be in Japan; first volume of the "Letters" has been translated; discusses her brother's friendship with Redon. 4 pp

From Camille Redon, Bièvres, France, September 23, 1918: thanks Pach for lecturing on Redon and his work; has a full set of engravings and lithographs; litho stones were erased, but copper plates are at the museum in Amsterdam; plans to sell prints after the war and will offer Pach some he lacks; comments on arrival of American forces, with whom her son-in-law is an officer. 4 pp., in French

From Morton Livingston Schamberg, Philadelphia, Pa., September 30, 1918: belated thanks for the two Indian tiles; he and Sheeler readily agreed who should have which tile. 2 pp

From Frederic C. Torrey, San Francisco, Calif., October 8, 1918: is glad Pach is in California; anticipating the end of the war; tell Mme. Van Gogh he regrets not meeting her. 4 pp

From Mme. Duchamp-Villon, Paris, France, October 11, 1918: Raymond died of uremia; she plans to return to work at the front; will send Raymond's design for a chess set; wonders if Quinn purchased the rooster drawing. 2 pp., in French

From Vincent Van Gogh Bonger, Kobe, Japan, October 27, 1918: "Best regards From Vincent." Picture postcard ("Joie de Vivre")

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], October 30, 1918: thanks Pach for sincere appreciation of The Holy Face; the book received mixed reviews; if there is an English edition, Pach should be the translator; agrees to contribute to the magazine; suggests an article on "America in the War"; the final volume of History of Art will not be published until after the war due to paper shortages; maybe Pach can obtain appropriate paper. 2 pp., in French

From Maurice Socard, Paris, France, November 12, 1918: finally met with Pach's friend for a discussion of Pach's aesthetic preferences and the relationship between philosophy and art; read about Pach's University of California lectures; Paris is celebrating the end of the war. 7 pp., in French

From Jacques Villon, Paris, France, November 13, 1918: Raymond died following a second operation; is determined not to leave Raymond's work unfinished. 2 pp., in French

From Marcel Duchamp, Buenos Aires, Argentina, November 15, [1918?]: as a close friend and admirer of Raymond, Pach must be grieving his death; although provincial, Buenos Aires is calm and conducive to work; brought notes for the glass and plans to continue drawings for it; Argentines are aware of cubism but do not understand it; is planning an exhibition for Buenos Aires in May or June; asks Pach to help H.M. Barzun, who will be contacting him about the show; outlines his schedule for the coming year; anticipates readjusting to peacetime. 3 pp., in French

From Jean Le Roy, [place unknown], [postmarked] December 15, 1918: thanks Pach for bringing his pamphlet to Arensberg's attention; discusses his interest in rhythm in poetry. 4 pp., in French

From Frederic C. Torrey, San Francisco, Calif., December 19, 1918: holiday greetings; compliments Pach's writing, specifically his latest article in the Dial; discusses the Dana prize awarded in Philadelphia to McComas. 5 pp

From the Butlers, New York, NY., [postmarked] December 23, 1918: Christmas card, "Victory Christmas"

From Frederic C. Torrey, San Francisco, Calif., January 3, 1919: Pach was misidentified as curator of Hindu art in American Art News; discusses taxes on art sales; still wants to sell his Cézanne lithograph and can reduce the price; asks if Arensberg would be interested in purchasing Un Descendant. 4 pp

From Mabel Torrance, New York, N.Y., January 12, 1919: just learned the classes will be discontinued. 3 pp

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], January 21, 1919: thanks Pach for efforts with American publishers on his behalf; before the war only Germany had a culture large enough to take immediate interest in his kind of intellectual endeavors; awaiting instructions From Johnson concerning the articles he is writing; comments on diplomats of the Entente and political matters; compliments -- Modern School -- ; is sending a brochure about a restored castle his brother is attempting to sell. 4 pp., in French

From Frederic C. Torrey, San Francisco, Calif., February 3, 1919: nude is on the way to Arensberg a day late; his wife will be very happy to sell Un Descendant; "I want the Russian experiment to be given a fair chance"; comments on "Russian 'refugees"'; thanks Pach for assistance in the "Arensberg matter." 7 pp

From Frederic C. Torrey, San Francisco, Calif., February 7, 1919: received Arensberg's check; painting was shipped late, with a lesser valuation, due to changes in regulations; discusses new tax bill. 3 pp

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], May 4, 1919: notes the poor reception of his book in France and the United States; discusses his current work; opinions of world politics. 4 pp., in French

From Maurice Socard, [place unknown], May 12, 1919: much disagreement about the terms of the peace treaty; feels that Germany must serve a term in purgatory. 3 pp., in French [filmed with the wrong envelope]

From Félix Fénéon, Paris, France, May 15, 1919: thanks Pach for selling -- Esquisse d'un Dimanche d'Eté a la Grande Jatte -- and for the check. 1 p., in French

From Marcel Duchamp, Buenos Aires, Argentina, June 6, 1919: regrets having abandoned plans for an exhibition there; Buenos Aires is ready for new art. 2 pp., in French

From Xavier Martinez, Piedmont, Calif., June 16, 1919: received Courbet, Society of Independent Artists, and Redon catalogs; congratulates Pach. 2 pp., in Spanish

From Ismael Smith, New York, N.Y., June 25, 1919: Margarita Cordoba From Cuba, representing the Independents, is sending a picture of la Mazantinita, a famous Spanish ballerina. 1 p., in Spanish, +8 pp. enclosure (11 designs for bookplates)

From Jacques Villon, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, June 26, 1919: thanks Pach for check, letter, and catalog; writes of his work plans for the coming year, when he expects to make up for lost time; comments favorably on Pach's painting; notes activities of his friends, including Gleizes, Picabia, and Marcel. 2 pp., in French

From Marion L. Chamberlain, Santa Barbara, Calif., August 10, 1919: she and Miss Phillips enjoyed Pach's lectures at the Berkeley Summer School; they purchased 2 Renoir lithographs From Mr. Torrey. 4 pp

From Marcel Duchamp, Paris, France, [postmarked] September 3, 1919: his friends and their lives seem little changed since the war; other than the work of his brother and Picabia, he sees little of artistic interest; will be in New York in December; saw Yvonne Duchamp-Villon. 3 pp., in French

From Charles Loeser, Florence, Italy, November 18, 1919: describes his house with its special music rooms; 6 Cézanne paintings hang in one room; has a drawing which he believes is by Velasquez; discusses art collecting; "I have always liked Leo Stein, so long as he talked to me on any matter other than art." 6 pp

From Sybil Kent Kane, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] November 26, 1919: thanks Pach for etchings of "my beloved Chapel." 1 p

From Pietro Brunelleschi, Florence, Italy, [postmarked] December 5, 1919: accepts Pach's invitation for the following day. Note on business card, in Italian

From [Mme.] Duchamp-Villon, Laon, France, January 4, 1920: looks forward to Pach's proposed visit to France; discusses widowhood, her new job in Laon, and the material difficulties of postwar existence; Marcel took Cézanne paintings with him to New York; will send a print of Le Coq. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, January 11, 1920: economic conditions preclude publication of his fourth volume at this time; saw Redon a month before he died, when he spoke of indifference to the opinions of others and concern with expressing himself; discusses the masterpieces in his personal collection, among them Redon, Delacroix, Daumier, and Van Gogh. 8 pp., in French

From Edgar L. Hewett, Archaeological Institute of America, San Diego, Calif., February 2, 1920: met with Sloan and Henri to make arrangements for the "Indian art exhibition"; thanks Pach for encouragement with the exhibition plan; compliments Pach's article in the Dial. 1 p

From Xavier Martinez, Piedmont, Calif., March 12, 1920: thanks for the Dial and the invitation; compliments Pach's article on American Indian art; thinks Pach writes just as well as he paints; is enthusiastic about plans for an American Indian exhibition. 2 pp., in Spanish, + enclosure (sketch of American Indian head)

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, April 20, 1920: is happy about what Pach tells him of Delacroix; he owns 3 works by Delacroix and considers him one of the greatest painters; paper shortages have delayed publication of volume 4; asks if Pach is willing to undertake more translation work; someone else has offered, but Pach is preferred; -- The Dance on Fire and Water -- is being sent for Pach's opinion; the book best condenses Faure's ideas on the aesthetic interpretation of history; like Pach, he organizes exhibits around topics. 4 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, April 23, 1920: Pach must let him know right away if he can do the translation; discusses publishers' contracts; Faure will furnish all photographs for illustration at prewar prices; Pach's other Faure translations have drawn high praise. 2 pp., in French

From J. Metzinger, [place unknown], May 15, 1920: thanks Pach for the check and efforts on his behalf in New York; Pach should keep an unsold painting and dispose of the others as he wishes; people no longer laugh at cubism, but they don't yet understand it; despite war and the hard times that followed, cubism survives; offers his help if Pach wants to exhibit there. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, May 23, 1920: discusses the details of his 4-volume -- History of Art -- now being published; a copy of volume 1 is being sent to Pach. 2 pp., in French

From John Sloan, Santa Fe, N.M., June 9, 1920: began painting the week after arriving in Santa Fe; a Corpus Christi procession provided subject matter; had work accepted for the "Metropolitan Anniversary Ex."; comments on "Art and Craftsmanship" article in the Dial. 2 pp., illustrated with a drawing of Sloan in his studio

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, June 20, 1920: discusses the publication of his book, especially the quality and cost of illustrations for the English edition; judging any work of art requires distance in time and space. 4 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], July 3, 1920: discusses costs for engraved plates and cheaper electrotype plates; asks Pach to select photographs of Peruvian and Mexican monuments, Mexican sculpture, and an American Indian decorated tent or other appropriate images for use in Mediaeval Art; this second volume will contain new illustrations of the art of India and Gothic art. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, July 11, 1920: thanks Pach for writing an article about him; comments favorably on Pach's paintings; is considering adding a section on modernist painting, which would mention Pach, to the third edition of -- History of Modern Art -- . 2 pp., in French

From Jacques Villon, Puteaux, France, July 25, 1920: he recently read the notes found among Raymond's papers, but the haphazard and often obscure ideas would reveal nothing new to Pach; is sending pictures of the horse, some showing the prewar plaster version and others the beginning of the final verson; Raymond's experience in the cavalry made him an expert horseman, and many sketches of horses made during the war show he continued to think of the sculpture he had started; is also sending photographs of sketches, a bust of Professor Gosset, plans for a chess set, and other works; some of Raymond's notes pertain to the design of a surgical center; is certain that Raymond would have continued the research that led him From literal representation to mechanical aspects; thanks Pach for preserving the memory and work of the late artist. 5 pp., in French

From Jacques Villon, [place unknown], August 1, 1920: is sending Pach several photographs and 2 drawings; gives installation instructions for Raymond Duchamp-Villon's last sculpture, Dr. Gosset, with sketches of front and side views of the piece [large portions illegible]. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, August 13, 1920: discusses illustrations for his book; Marcel Duchamp will not be included; mentions other artists he has omitted or included and the relative value assigned to each, perhaps mistakenly; discusses those classified as impressionists and neoimpressionists; mentions new directions in art, among them scientific ones. 8 pp., in French

From L.L. Kane, Long Lake, N.Y., August 26, 1920: Pach's pictures are "quite safe at 47th St. until your return"; he especially appreciates Mme. Derain, which hangs with 2 Copley portraits in the breakfast room. 4 pp

September 12, 1920: note indicating Samuel Ramos is with the Comision Mexicana de Cooperacion Intelectual

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, September 28, 1920: provides correct spellings for works of art, as requested; will send proof sheets of printed photographs with placement instructions; still waiting for the promised photographs of American Indian art. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, November 10, 1920: discusses in detail the illustrations for his book, their placement and captions; an article about cinema in the -- Freeman -- expresses ideas very close to his own; reflects on current politics. 6 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, November 26, 1920: thanks Pach for the photographs; hopes instructions regarding illustrations and page-setting were received; requests a signed copy of the contract with -- Harpers -- ; is still thinking about writing an article for the -- Freeman -- ; is enclosing an advertising circular designed for his book and suggests something similar for the American edition. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, December 22, 1920: the photograph of Herculeum arrived; his editors are pleased; volume 4 will be ready in a few days and a copy will be sent to Pach; the American edition contains stupid mistakes; plans to write an article for the Freeman; will send Pach his article on cinema. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, January 17, 1921: describes his visit to London, emphasizing the British Museum; likes little of British art; considers Bonnard, Matisse, Picasso, and Derain in the forefront of modern art; he appreciates Pach's opinions on art, even when in disagreement; because Pach is younger, his views are an excellent indicator of current taste. 4 pp., in French

From Piet van der Laan, Utrecht, the Netherlands, January 21, 1921: thanks for the bookplate Pach designed; compliments his article in the Freeman; is attempting to sell paintings by a young Dutch artist friend. 3 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, February 3, 1921: hopes to rewrite volume 1, as he is unhappy with it; Spanish translation is delayed due to paper shortages; his brother's chateau is to be sold; wrote an article on Charlot. 3 pp., in French

From [Mme.] Duchamp-Villon, Paris, France, February 11, 1921: discusses in detail the choice of lodgings available to the Pach family for their stay in Paris; Marcel can help Pach place the Gosset figure as he saw it assembled; instructs Pach to sell the Cézanne. 2 pp., in French

From Maurice Brazil Prendergast, New York, N.Y., February 28, 1921: thanks Pach for introducing him and Charlie to Mr. and Mrs. Brummer; their work will be exhibited at Brummer's March 15-April 1; read Pach's article on Matisse; will try to see the exhibition. 3 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 1, 1921: discusses changes to the title of his 4-volume -- History of Art -- ; volume 1 is being shipped to Pach soon; believes French academics slander France. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 4, 1921: Is still trying to find a place for the Pachs to stay; his own apartment will not be available until August; discusses the title of his book and asks Pach to write the introduction; the article on Charlot was not published. 2 pp., in French

From Clara La Follette, -- Freeman -- , New York, N.Y., [postmarked] March 7, 1921: sends letter received by the -- Freeman -- that she thinks will amuse Pach. 1 p., + 2 pp. enclosure (letter rubber stamped February 23, 1921 [date of receipt?] to Mr. Huebsch From Alfred Stieglitz, New York, N.Y. [of an exhibition review by Pach published in the -- Freeman -- ]: "Mr. Pach undoubtedly did his best--but I fear that the real significance of the work was beyond him.--I regret it")

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 14, 1921: will send proofs of Napoleon; desires advice From Pach concerning whether it should be translated; thinks the subject will be of interest in America. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], July 29, 1921: plans to meet Pach in Cahors; -- History of Art -- was chosen as one of the 10 best French books recommended to Americans by the Comité France-Amerique. 2 pp., in French

From Camille Redon, Paris, France, [postmarked] August 1, 1921: thanks Pach for translating an article about Redon; offers a Redon work to Mrs. Pach. 1 p., in French

From Elie Faure, Dordogne, France, August 15, 1921: 4 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 16, 1921: has sent Pach his article on Charlot, which will be published soon by -- L'Esprit Nouveau -- ; discusses his work, including an article on cinema and -- Napoleon -- ; inquires about payment and translation rights for articles appearing in the -- Freeman -- . 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, April 16, 1921: the translation of his Charlot article must mention it is excerpted from -- L'Esprit Nouveau -- ; the French are boycotting American films, especially Charlie Chaplin's; compliments Pach's translations; -- History of Art -- has been an unexpected success; Napoleon promises to do well and is being serialized in -- Grande Revue -- ; he and Pach will divide the profits; may have found a convenient place for the Pachs to stay. 2 pp., in French

From [Mme.] Duchamp-Villon, Paris, France, April 20, 1921: offers to help Pach find lodging when he visits; asks if Quinn has received the sculpture. 1 p., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, June 29, 1921: unable to find a place for Pach to stay; -- History of Art -- is selling well; reprints and new volumes will require translation; asks if Pach could bring his daughter a statuette of Charlot to put on their car, as is now the fad. 2 pp., in French

From George Ferdinand Of, New York, N.Y., November 28, 1914: is anxious to see Pach and hear about his trip. Picture postcard ("Museé de Louvre.-- -- Les Baigneuses.-- -- Vernet.--LL").

From Jean Le Roy, Nièvre, France, [postmarked] December 29, 1914: wants Pach's opinion of his poems; is in the army; heard Pach is organizing an exhibition; asks for news of the Duchamp brothers. 4 pp., in French.

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France, January 19, 1915: advises patience until the world of art returns; a weak heart disqualified Marcel From military duty; congratulates Pach on the exhibition; is invited to San Francisco but doubts cubist works will be accepted; discusses prices of his medallions. 2 pp., in French.

From Camille Redon, Paris, France, [postmarked] August 1, 1921: thanks Pach for translating an article about Redon; offers a Redon work to Mrs. Pach. 1 p., in French

From Elie Faure, Dordogne, France, August 15, 1921: 4 pp., in French

From Clara La Follette, Freeman, New York, N.Y., August 16, 1921: opinions of French government; comments on Faure's article on the cinema; urges Pach to send the article he mentioned; is looking for a studio. 4 pp

From Henri Matisse, Nice, France, September 7, 1921: agrees to Pach's terms concerning the Redon paintings, but there is no one available who is capable of separating the torn papers of -- Radiant Flower -- ; after 3 weeks of laziness, he is painting again and it is like starting over at the beginning. 2 pp., in French

From [Mme.] Duchamp-Villon, Puteaux, France, September 18, 1921: [Illegible]. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, September 29, 1921: 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, October 27, 1921: thanks Pach for checks received; discusses advantages and disadvantages of using a picture for promoting his works; his daughter is most disappointed that there are no more Charlot statuettes; asks Pach to sell lottery tickets for charity. 4 pp., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, November 9, 1921: thanks Pach for catalog; photograph of "St. Francis at Brooklyn" reminds him of "the naive art of all the eccentric regions of Europe." 4 pp

From Jacques Villon, [place unknown], France, November 9, 1921: is glad to have met Mrs. Pach; Matisse engraving is not yet ready due to printing problems. 4 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, November 13, 1921: discusses the details of his contract with -- Harpers -- , which he considers unjust; his father-in-law died; reports on the sick painter friend for whom the benefit raffle was held. 6 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, November 28, 1921: if the misunderstanding concerning the -- Harpers -- contract is not corrected, it will be a disaster; their artist friend needs further surgery; hopes Pach can sell more tickets for the raffle, which will precede an exhibit in February or March; lists artists--among them Bonnard, Dufy, Matisse, Signac, and Braque--who have donated works for the raffle; regrets that his last book devoted so little space to Derain. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, December 19, 1921: thanks Pach for help in clearing up a misunderstanding with his American publisher; discusses his 4-volume work, including opinions of the layouts and illustrations of each; Pach should decide whether to attribute a painting to de Pietro or Sassetta; plans to write about Derain; an exhibition, organized for an artist friend in need, includes a lottery with contributions From Matisse, Derain, and Picasso; will send Pach 250 lottery tickets; announces the upcoming marriage of François, a talented decorator, and asks if work could be found for him in New York or if his projects could be reproduced in an American publication. 4 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], December 23, 1921: received a letter From Briggs and praises the loyalty and honesty of American publishers; thanks Pach for perseverance in bringing to publication, in English translation, -- History of Art -- ; lottery tickets are being sent, many going to Mrs. Whitney; asks if Pach could help to interest American publisher Nelson in the collections of an expanding French publishing firm looking for capital; is sending -- Mediaeval Art -- and François' furnishing projects. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, December 31, 1921: considers volume 1 "our" -- History of Art -- out of gratitude for Pach's excellent translation; discusses the illustrations and general appearance of the book; -- Mediaeval Art -- and lottery tickets will be sent soon; has 2 paintings he wants Pach to sell in the United States, a Venetian school Crucifixion and a version of Gros's -- Murat a la Bataille d'Aboukir -- ; describes the paintings, discusses prices and Pach's commission. 3 pp., in French

From Maurice Brazil Prendergast. New York, N.Y., January 26, 1922: Discusses quality of reproductions for Shadowland; wants to assist, should Pach decide to write an article; compliments Pach's writing. 3 pp

From Maurice Brazil Prendergast, New York, N.Y., February 2, 1922: is returning Pach's manuscript; agrees with him about Cézanne; "I was much influenced by Pissarro but with water colors it was nature pure and simple that influence [ sic] me"; is impressed with -- Shadowland -- . 3 pp

From Leigh Hunt, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] February 23, 1922: congratulates Pach and the museum. 1 p

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 21, 1922: is sending -- Renaissance Art -- , which completes the series; Pach should return the stubs of all sold lottery tickets; the Spanish artist for whom the lottery was organized is now recovering From surgery; complains of a dull artistic season, including a Salon des Indépendants devoid of interest; the best was a Matisse exhibit, along with Derain's and Picasso's latest work; increasingly poor leadership has him worried about the future of Europe; inquires about two articles he sent to the -- Freeman -- . 5 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 30, 1922: Americans have won 8 of the lottery prizes (most of them with Mrs. Whitney's tickets) consisting of 6 etchings and 2 paintings; what to do with the artworks is a problem in view of customs requirements. 2 pp., in French

From Camille Redon, Paris, France, April 7, 1922: mailed 2 etchings and 30 proofs made of each of Redon's copper engravings; the plates went to the Print Museum; thanks Pach for the beautiful etching and photographs he sent. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, April 10, 1922: received the -- Freeman -- article; just completed a response to the review of his book, which he prefers to send to the -- Dial -- rather than the -- Freeman -- ; wrote a new introduction to Greek Art for future editions; hopes Pach has sold paintings; thinks one of the paintings could pass as a fake for customs purposes. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris. France, April 11, 1922: the attribution of his Baron Gros is certain, but its condition is not perfect; discusses articles being translated by Pach; discusses the French language in Canada; he and Pach agree on important points; Pach is unfair to Bonnard, who eventually will be regarded as a minor master; Derain is a great painter who overshadows Matisse. 2 pp., in French, labeled "second letter" (enclosed with letter of April 10, 1922)

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, May 6, 1922: received the checks; is returning a signed contract for -- Cinéplastique -- and inquires about American customs concerning royalty payments; will mail books to Pach and pictures to Harper's; the lottery prizes are being sent; the Corots and Courbet at Rosenberg Gallery particularly impressed him; family news; dispair over current politics. 2 pp., in French

From Pedro Henríquez Ureña, Universidad Nacional de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico, May 31, 1922: discusses Pach's remuneration and class schedule for the summer session. 1 p

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, June 17, 1922: regrets not being able to meet Pach in Mexico and wishes Rivera had invited him, too; will try to delay French publication of his article so the -- Dial -- can print it first; another piece on the aesthetics of machinism has already been published in France; finished a long chapter of -- The Spirit of the Forms -- and wants Harper's to consider it completed; after going to Vichy for his health, he will take a vacation; wants to know all about Pach's archaeological discovery in Mexico. 2 pp., in French

From John Sloan, Santa Fe, N.M., [postmarked] August 4, 1922: has a car for summer travels; the Henris are there; has been painting. 2 pp., illustrated with drawing of a car on a winding mountain road ("Climbing the Bahada [no exaggeration!]")

From L.L. Kane, Long Lake, N.Y., August 12, 1922: wants to read Pach's article in the Freeman; admires his ability to present lectures in other languages; describes his Adirondack camp. 2 pp

From Henri Matisse, Nice, France, September 2, 1922: mailed copies of all the engravings he made during the summer; asks Pach's advice on lowering the price of Redon's pastels; he is now back at work in Nice after 2 months in Paris. 2 pp., in French

From Jacques Villon, Soissons, France, September 6, 1922: the estimate for publishing was higher than anticipated; asks Pach to intercede; inquires about Pach's trip to Mexico; news of various friends; discusses summer plans. 2 pp., in French

From Sybil Kent Kane, Long Lake, N.Y., September 7, 1922: thanks Pach for sending the picture of a jug; her book is about the life of Blessed Margaret Mary. 4 pp

From Suzanne La Follette, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] September 10, 1922: due to understaffing at the -- Freeman -- there was no art coverage during the summer; suggests Pach write a series of articles on Delacroix, Cézanne, Renoir, Redon, Van Gogh; opinions of Faure's second volume; news of Boardman Robinson; has changed her name back to Suzanne From Clara. 6 pp.

To Professor D. Ramon Mena From Walter Pach, Mexico City, Mexico, October 4, 1922: the mosaic mask discovered by Professor Aguierre and displayed in the National Museum is an object of great interest; it presents important problems to American antiquities experts and to those studying aesthetics; an important detail is the way in which material is handled; discusses fundamental difference in the work of the imitator and the mosaic mask; the technical question and expressive question are inseparable; appreciates the compliment of being asked his opinion. 3 pp., in Spanish

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, October 22, 1922: received payment for photographs and book royalties; discusses Rivera's talent, disagreeing with Pach's view of his originality; Rivera has remarried; shares Pach's admiration for Mexican art; now that his article has appeared in the -- Dial -- , he has nothing further to publish in America other than History of Art; since Pach is now devoting more time to painting and etching, he will need to find Faure a new translator; asks Pach if chapters From The Spirit of the Forms and essays on great literary figures could appear in American publications; discusses some of his theories of art and the structural aspect of his own writings. 6 pp., in French

From Jean Charlot, [place unknown], Mexico, November 5, 1922: Pach's article appeared in -- Mexico Moderno -- ; Orozco will be exhibiting watercolors; the fresco Accion del Artes is almost finished; is becoming interested in religious painting. 4 pp., in French

From Diego Rivera, [place unknown], Mexico, December 7, 1922: thanks Pach for his valuable friendship; the Mexican Independents, now formally organized, are invited to show with the Society of Independents in New York; Orozco, Charlot, Revueltas, Figueiros, Leal, Alba, Cahero, Bolanos, Ugarte, Cano, Nahui, Ate, Rivera, and children will represent Mexico; discusses space needs and suggests possible hanging arrangements; needs to find a way to pay for transportation; please convey their appreciation to the Society; Pach should tell Miss Porter that although there was a mix-up in communications, Rivera is still interested in the small exposition. 4 pp., in Spanish

From Jacques Villon, [place unknown], France, December 21, 1922: [Illegible]. 8 pp., in French

to Magda Pach From Gaby [Mme. Jacques Villon?], [place unknown], December 27, 1922: wishes the Pach family would visit them for several months; Villon is working hard, as always; except for a vacation in Brittany, they rarely go anywhere; engravings are time consuming but right now sell better than paintings; asks about Pach's stay in Mexico. 2 pp., in French

From Carlo Lemba, Florence, Italy., [?,?] 1923: thanks Pach for remembering him and for the very beautiful Rembrandt; requests a catalog or photograph. Picture postcard ("Firenze--Palazzo Vecchia--Il Cortile"), in Italian

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, January 21, 1923: thanks Pach for his translation; discusses modifications to be made in the first volume; details plans for future publications; lists illustrations for the last chapter of History of Art. 10 pp., in French

From José Vasconcelos, [place unknown], Mexico, February 23, 1923: received Pach's letter and sends appreciation for the international approach of his work. Telegram, in Spanish

From José Clemente Orozco, [place unknown], Mexico, February 27, 1923: introduces his friend, Mexican poet José Juan Tablada; friendship with Tablada would be a great satisfaction to Pach; Tablada could courier Mexican works From the Independents exhibition when he returns home; they learned much about contemporary art From Pach's lecture series; when he returns to Mexico, Pach can expect an affectionate welcome. 2 pp., in Spanish

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 4, 1923: at last, publication of -- Mediaeval Art -- has been announced; the definitive edition of his work is currently in progress; discusses new prefaces for all 5 volumes; rewrote the last chapter of volume 4, which does not mention Bonnard but expands discussion of Matisse, Picasso, and Derain, whom he considers the greatest contemporary painter. 2 pp., in French

From Secretario de Educacíon Publica, [place unknown], Mexico, March 14, 1923: José Vasconselos thanks Pach for his efforts on behalf of Mexican painters in this year's Independent Artists Salon. 1 p., in Spanish

From Jean Charlot, [place unknown], Mexico, [postmarked] March 31, 1923: was happy to receive Pach's illustrated article about Seurat; the enclosed flier rebuts another slanderous article about the exhibit; the catalog reproduction of the painting Pach started in Mexico was recognized by everyone; Diego called it more Mexican than their own contributions; Diego finished his first panel for the ministry frescoes; Diego's brother-in-law executed a successful encaustic mural in Guadalajara; Diego sends thanks to Pach, but cannot write because he works From 8:00 a.m. until 10:00 p.m.--without eating--which is hard on his aides who must do likewise. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, April 24, 1923: an American definitive edition is under consideration; will send Pach copies of work by Spain's best artist since Goya; still thinks Derain is the best painter; Matisse's exhibition lacks humanity; discusses European political problems. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, May 10, 1923: is now writing a book about the mechanism regulating the life cycles of societies; did not see all the exhibits because he is now drawn more to social psychology, which helps him understand painting; life takes precedence over painting; his article was misunderstood in America and France by supporters and opponents alike; painting, no longer the dominant art form as it was in the previous century, is being overtaken by cinema; assures Pach of his friendship and trust; understands that his ideas provoke resistance even among the best of friends. 6 pp., in French

From Suzanne La Follette, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] June 23, 1923: thanks Pach for article; sends proofs of first article; was advised not to go to Germany; will visit England, France, and Italy. 4 pp

From J. Van Gogh Bonger, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, June 27, 1923: read that the Pachs were cited as among the best of the Independents; the pictures are back, and she is glad they were exhibited in the United States; is anxious to publish Van Gogh's letters in English; opinions of Meier-Graefe's book; opinions of recent articles in the -- Times -- and the -- Freeman -- ; "What I never forgive Meyer-Greafe [ sic] is his suggestion that Theo, after his marriage could not provide for Vincent any longer"; is sending a Van Gogh drawing to Pach in appreciation for his help. 3 pp

From Diego Rivera, [place unknown], Mexico, July 3, 1923: introduces Covarrubias; on behalf of the group, thanks Pach and the Independents in New York; Pach's Mexican street scene showed intimate and strong character; hopes for even better representation next year; describes current projects of several Mexican artists; Covarrubias has photographs of murals in progress. 2 pp., in Spanish

From Lewis Mumford, Brooklyn, N.Y., July 5, 1923: congratulates Pach on Modern Art; "it is far and away the best piece of criticism we've had in America, to my knowledge." 1 p

From Alfred Stieglitz, Lake George, N.Y., July 21, 1923: he and O'Keeffe are enjoying Pach's translation of Faure; Stieglitz has read it in the original; O'Keeffe doesn't know French. 1 p

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], October 8, 1923: if Harper's cannot locate the photograph Faure sent of a Picasso painting, Pach should select a substitute; requests assistance in coilecting a fee owed by a publisher; complains about the usual reluctance of museums to accept paintings; suggests that Boston or the Barnes Foundation might be interested in the Gros, Delacroix, and Venetian school paintings he wants to sell; -- History of Art -- will be translated into Spanish and possibly German; hopes for more contacts with the United States. 2 pp., in French

From J. Van Gogh Bonger, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, October 18, 1923: could not find anyone to deliver the drawing to Pach, so she mailed it; is working on an exhibition to be held in London; Zigrosser visited. 1 p., negative photostat

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, December 1, 1923: has mailed the photographs Pach requested; believes he has told Pach of all the proposals received From America and still awaits answers relating to some; Waldo Frank visited; found Miss La Follette most congenial; the package of photographs also contains a small drawing as a memento of their collaboration. 2 pp., in French

From Ariella Brunelleschi, Florence, Italy, [postmarked] December 12, 1923: her entire family sends thanks; best wishes for a good trip. Picture postcard ("Firenze--Galleria Uffizi La Nativita de Gesu dett.--Van Der Goes Ugo"), in Italian

From Jacques Villon, [place unknown], December 25, 1923: is delighted to learn that Pach has resumed painting and wants to see a photograph of his portrait of Magda; the common desire to travel west is a distraction, as is his penchant for making etchings rather than painting; has problems with his engraving of a Cézanne and will do a Laurencin next; complains of difficulties painting; is mailing the edited first proofs of the book on Raymond; Yvonne is gone; he missed seeing Miss La Follette; Rosenberg is in New York; paintings are hard to sell; New Year's greetings to the Pach family. Postscript From Gaby expresses her own best wishes and those of Marcel; she hopes to see them in Puteaux the following year. 5 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], January 24, 1924: approves of the way in which Pach used his Renoir to illustrate an article; still trying to sell the Gros painting abroad; the Venetian painting was shipped today, and he awaits Pach's impression of it; Faure is convinced the landscape, most likely of Toledo, and at least one figure were painted by El Greco in his youth; awaits photographs of Pach's paintings and etchings; is delighted to learn of Pach's lecture series in Kansas, which includes one on Faure's fourth volume. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], January 31, 1924: praises solidity, intelligent composition, and exceptional synthetic quality of Pach's portrait of his son; the portrait of Pach's wife is less successful; praises the harmony in Pach's mythological painting but its composition is less than perfect; Pach shows great progress; is sending a photograph of a first-class Corot that is for sale; discusses the price and how they would share the profit. 2 pp., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, February 6, 1924: read Pach's article in -- Harper's -- "with interest, with zest and with envy." 4 pp

From Jacques Villon, Paris, France, March 2, 1924: received photographs of Pach's paintings; praises the balance and harmony in Magda's portrait, but expresses reservations concerning the portrait of Raymond; unable to send photographs of his own work because he was too busy finishing the Cézanne engraving that will be exhibited at Bernheim's to raise funds for a monument to Cézanne; has mixed feelings about the direction of his own painting and leans more toward nature; a proof of Pach's foreword is ready; the book on Raymond will be out soon; some of Raymond's letters were edited so as not to appear to be soliciting sympathy. 6 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], March 10, 1924: has just received notification that volume 4 was published and will convey his opinion after seeing it; thanks Pach for intelligent publicity; discusses corrections to be made in the next edition; asks Pach to persuade the publisher to make an American edition that conforms to the French one; the Corot was sold; everyone seems to be buying and selling paintings; Faure sold From his own collection pieces he no longer likes in order to buy a house; he buys what he can at low cost, notably Corot and Courbet landscapes and a drawing by Cézanne; Pach should try to influence the gallery to sell Faure's painting quickly because the money is needed for home repairs; wrote an article on contemporary art trends for the Dial. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], March 11, 1924: the news contained in Pach's cable frees him From current financial worries; he is sending the painting immediately and warns Pach about mislabeling on the back of the picture; insists that Pach take a substantial commission; though it makes him sad to part with the painting, he now can provide a secure future for his family. 2 pp., in French

From Suzanne La Follette, Plymouth, England, March 11, 1924: the voyage has been "rough and dull." 2 pp

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], March 19, 1924: received the fourth volume in translation and finds the illustrations much better than those in the first 3 volumes; expresses gratitute to Pach; is sending a gift of a Rodin etching; just saw Derain and is certain the artist is evolving, despite his somewhat disoriented state; Matisse's last exhibit was disappointing and lacked human qualities. 2 pp., in French

From Arthur Burdett Frost, Pasadena, Calif., March 30, 1924: thanks Pach for his exhibition idea; cannot participate because he has no suitable work available; "I used to be very careless about my original drawings"; Jack moved to California for health reasons; Jack paints desert landscapes that sell well. 4 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, April 1, 1924: the Gros painting has been in transit for 3 weeks; deplores the exchange rate and discusses Pach's commission; is pleased that Pach will be the translator for -- The Gods -- and hopes he will do -- The Spirit of the Forms -- , even though this work will take him away From painting; wants to see Pach's pamphlet on Seurat, whom he likes more and more; Faure has added to his collection paintings by Corot, Courbet, Delacroix, Bonnington, and others he discovered in the attic of a secondhand shop; Miss La Follette visited; asks Pach to inquire about the fate of his Shakespeare essay. 4 pp., in French

From Jacques Villon, [place unknown], France, April 6, 1924: agrees wholeheartedly to the proposed exchange; thanks Pach for a check; wants him to accept, as a gift, any Villon painting still in Pach's hands; will follow Pach's instructions concerning the book; is painting but cannot find himself in that medium; his next engraving will be a Rousseau. 2 pp., in French

From E.H. Anderson, Director, New York Public Library, New York, N.Y., April 9, 1924: acknowledges gift of etchings. 1 p

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, May 2, 1924: sends a check for Pach's commission on the sale of the Murat painting; is glad Pach liked his gift of a Rodin etching; discusses changes to volume 3 and wonders why a particular reproduction was omitted From the American edition; -- The Spirit of the Forms -- is still under revision, and he has been busy writing -- Cervantes -- ; like Pach, he admires Matisse's lithographs but feels uneasy about the virtuoso element apparent in his annual painting exhibits; Despiau's portraits are more and more admirable; met Braque, whose work now interests him more; since Braque has renounced cubism, only Picasso remains; Picasso's last noncubist exhibit was curious and somewhat disturbing. 2 pp., in French

From Leigh Mitchell Hodges, Doylestown, Pa., May 4, 1924: sends sonnet inspired by a Pach etching. 1 p. + enclosure ("Sonnet--To Walter Pach's etching of Miss M-----")

From Julius Meier-Graefe, Berlin, Germany, July 22, 1924: Pach is the first American to attempt and succeed at serious examination of art From Corot to the present; is sending a copy of volume 3 of -- Modern Art -- , which discusses some of the same issues addressed in Pach's book; believes cubism, expressionism, and impressionism to be manifestations of decadence; in his book, Pach failed to cite German contributions. 3 pp., in German

From Elie Faure, Dordogne, France, July 31, 1924: hopes to see Pach in Dordogne during August; the article on illustrious men he has known will need to be twice as long, so Pach should make arrangements; discusses a remarkable book about sport by his Frenchified Brazilian friend Braga and suggests a translation would be of interest to Americans; Braga wrote the most intelligent articles ever published about Faure in French and plans a history of world literature that would mirror -- History of Art -- . 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Dordogne, France, August 2, 1924: Pach should tell Wells that Faure accepts the 5,000-word limitation; the article consists of a series of portraits of famous men and concludes with a sincere tribute to America. 1 p., in French

From Julius Meier-Graefe, Schlaghtensee, Germany, [postmarked] August 5, 1924: advises Pach not to judge the paintings of [von Marees?] on the basis of his early Dresden period, but look at the Munich work. Postal card, in German

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, August 11, 1924: read -- Masters of Modern Art -- ; "I wish I could give you the support you ask for. And I have found yr. book informing, stimulating, provoking and sincere. But I cannot even begin to see what you do in cubism"; advises Pach to choose writing over painting, as it is impossible to do both. 8 pp

From Elie Faure, Dordogne, France, August 24, 1924: regrets that Pach did not visit him; plans to go to Italy in September but hopes to see Pach in Paris afterward; hesitates to accept a long lecture tour in America. 2 pp., in French

From James Oppenheim, New York, N.Y., August 24, 1924: Gertrude is seriously ill; Oppenheim's son has faith in his work; Oppenheim's book was reviewed; is delighted with the book on Matisse. 2 pp

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, September 13, 1924: expresses his opinion of modern art and artists; "I did not mean what the Ku-Kluxers or Coolidgeites mean when they speak of the latest phenomena in painting as Bolshevik. But in a prophetic, devastatingly deep way that's what they are. And they may serve a kindred purpose, namely to bury the dead form. But they are undertakers, grave-diggers, and at best manure makers only. Artists they are not and Picasso not at all;" Pach "overestimates" Delacroix's ability as an artist. 4 pp

From John Gould Fletcher, London, England, October 7, 1924: thanks Pach for the book on Duchamp-Villon; compliments the "excellent" introduction; agrees that "Duchamp-Villon was the true descendant of the stonecutters of Chartres"; Faure's -- History of Art -- is "remarkable"; he is trying to publish a rebuttal to the concluding chapter; the -- Freeman -- failed. 3 pp

From Luz Pérez, [place unknown], Mexico, October 24, 1924: the book Pach sent is enchanting; congratulations on the success of the exhibition; best wishes for future success. 2 pp., in Spanish

From Arthur Burdett Frost, Pasadena, Calif., October 26, 1924: thanks for the brushes, which he will share with Jack; requests recommendations for directing Jack's art reading; Frost now reads mainly on palentology and natural history; if his eyesight permitted, he would paint his concept of earliest man; recalls a terrible summer spent in Rhode Island; contrasts California with the East; recalls the Dresden Gallery; Butler's stay in New York was a "dreadful experience." 5 pp

From Jacques Villon, Paris, France, October 27, 1924: just received Pach's book on painting and thinks his ideas about evolution of painting are admirable; has not yet seen the Salon d'Automne; sales were good, and even those opposed to abstract painting smiled. 3 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, November 1, 1924: has shipped a magnificent painting; is surprised that it is possible to sell paintings in America since the Paris art market is at a standstill; the last good show was the Renoir exhibit at Rosenberg's; books are not selling, and he could not find a publisher for his latest work; publishing houses are closing; prewar politicians and prewar methods are responsible for the disaster; the general economy and his personal situation are grim; melancholy family news. 4 pp., in French

From Henri Matisse, Nice, France, November 18 and December 5, 1924: his son, Pierre, is moving to New York; Pierre wants to work at a gallery specializing in modern art; he and the Steins agree this is a good plan; asks Pach to advise and assist Pierre, and he will request the same of Brummer; Michael Stein suggests Pach meet Pierre at the ship. 4 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, December 1, 1924: is housebound after a small accident, and catching up with work; both the -- Dial -- and -- Harper's -- sent checks; comments on current exhibitions and sales; Pach is his closest American friend; wants to establish closer ties in the United States; France now depends upon American patronage; Mrs. Dillard is sending a Corot to Pach; she might be helpful to Brummer; sometimes she has Renoirs and Derains at reasonable prices. 2 pp., in French

From Xavier Martinez, Piedmont, Calif., December 3, 1924: compliments -- Masters of Modern Art -- and Pach's translation of Faure; disagrees with Faure's chapters on Greece and Mexico; Pach understands the art of Mexico; encloses 2 drawings of Indian madonnas. 1 p., partly in Spanish

From Lewis Mumford, Brooklyn, N.Y., December 15, 1924: thanks Pach for grasping the essence of his book; agrees with Duchamp-Villon's views on architecture. 2 pp

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], January 9, 1925: commiserates with Pach over his rejection by -- Harper's -- ; comments on subjects that appeal to editors of popular magazines; Pach should continue trying to sell the Corot; the owner also has paintings by Renoir and Derain and a Seurat drawing; inquires about the status of translations now at -- Harper's -- ; comments on the superiority of American cinema. 3 pp., in French

From Pedro Henríquez Ureña, La Plata, Argentina, January 13, 1925: hopes Pach will be interested in the work of his friend, Emilio Pettoniti, an advanced Argentine painter; asks where Pettoniti might exhibit in New York. 2 pp., in Spanish

From Diego Rivera, [place unknown], Mexico, January 13, 1925: requests photographs of the work Pach accomplished in France; wants news of Elie Faure; mentions several commissions he is now working on; comments on Charlot; has waited more than a year for word from Aleman; is considering going abroad when through with the Chapingo chapel. 3 pp., in Spanish

to Elie Faure From William H. Briggs, [place unknown], March 3, 1925: not financially feasible to bring out the definitive edition of -- History of Art -- for at least 3 years; wants -- The Spirit of the Forms -- to be volume 5; agrees to publish an English edition of -- The Spirit of the Forms -- and -- The Dance on Fire and Water -- ; -- The Constructors -- , -- The Holy Face -- , and future books are not to be offered to other publishers. 3 pp

From Diego Rivera, [place unknown], Mexico, March 13, 1925: would send photographs of his work but in Mexico it takes too long to get prints; Pach's book fully deserves Faure's praise; Rivera finds Pach's paintings appealing; is grateful for the high esteem with which Pach wrote of his work; work on Chapingo chapel continues; despite serious financial problems, Charlot is constantly progressing; asks Pach's opinions and advice about a Spanish edition of his book; Ravenna Mosaic requested a sample piece of -- The Antilles -- . 7 pp., in Spanish

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 28, 1925: is hurt not to have heard From Pach; Mr. Briggs wrote about translation and publication plans; wants Pach to translate -- The Spirit of the Forms -- ; thanks for getting his autobiography published in the -- Dial -- ; his friend, Mrs. Fougeirol, and daughter, will call on Pach; hopes Pach and Brummer can assist Mrs. Dillard with the sale of her Corot; the Gaugnat sale is unaffordable; Mrs. Dillard also has Renoirs to sell. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], March 29, 1925: is happy that Briggs wants to do the album and will talk to Crès about sales; thanks to Madame B. for the Corot; his version of Delacroix's journal will be published; compliments Pach's painting; asks Pach to speak to Harper's about not using the number of his last volume of -- History of Art -- so the public will buy it without having the earlier volumes. 4 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, May 9, 1925: tells of his voyage to Marrakech; saw Fletcher; Pach will receive the Gaugnat sale catalog; Madame Gaugnat died 6 months after her husband, leaving their son harassed by dealers; a small Renoir may be available; asks Pach to intervene on his behalf with Harper's regarding income tax withholding; discusses Delacroix and impressionist exhibits; discusses the realism of Delacroix's Moroccan paintings. 6 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], May 17, 1925: condolences on the death of Pach's father; is surprised by what Pach told him of the Corot; discusses a French landscape exhibit at the Petit Palais containing too many paintings; Corot reigns. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, May 18, 1925: received the album dedicated to Seurat; -- La Baignade -- and -- La Grande Jatte -- are masterpieces for the very reasons Pach cited: organization, articulation, and mass; comments on works by Matisse, Braque, Géricault, and others recently exhibited in Paris; purchased works by Corot, Delacroix, Courbet, Cézanne, and Renoir at reasonable prices; perhaps Pach could sell a large painting for Pequin; asks if -- Living Age -- will publish his essay on Shakespeare; volume 4 of -- History of Art -- will be out soon; mentions several of his articles accepted for publication; thanks Pach for his excellent translation; now realizes he was unjust to Redon and has made changes in the later edition. 4 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], May 20, 1925: invites Pach to visit him in Dordogne during the summer; describes a Corot that should go to an American museum. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], May 30, 1925: gives instructions for translation revisions; bought 2 magnificent Derains; suggests that consignments be sent to Mrs. Payne Whitney; -- History of Art -- received mixed reviews. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], June 5, 1925: galleys are still incomplete as there are problems with illustrations and captions; his Baron Gros painting is at the French exhibit in Prague; will send a photograph later; asks Pach to help sell the Gros picture and a Daumier. 3 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, July 11, 1925: complains about American and French taxes on royalties; price and quality didn't always coincide at the Gaugnat sale; Mrs. Fougeirol bought one of the best works, and another is being given to the Louvre by young Gaugnat; discusses prices at other recent sales; Matisse shares his opinion of the Gaugnat sale; the Decorative Arts Exhibition was the worst art event he ever saw; an impressive 19th-century French painting show at Bernheim's new galleries included Corot, Delacroix, and Cézanne; those who don't appreciate Delacroix are missing joy; asks Pach's opinion of a plan for a monthly publication about the arts in Paris; next year he will write a history of France. 4 pp., in French

From E.D. Smyth, Tangier, Morocco, July 29, 1925: Helen died last October; Mme. Le Roy died 2 years ago; "London is becoming alive to Cézanne"; saw a Cézanne show at Brown's Gallery. 5 pp

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], August 11, 1925: asks if volume 3 has been published; thinks volume 4 is his best; hopes that the new prefaces added to each volume will make Pach like the whole work better; Rosenberg met with Mrs. Whitney; discusses the quality of reproductions in his book on Derain; describes John Lane's indirect attack on his chapter about English art; was not charmed by Blake; Constable is the only English painter he likes; look for his Shakespeare article in the -- Dial -- . 6 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, September 7, 1925: bought a house at Dordogne; volume 4 is still incomplete; lists photographs he will send soon; this may be a good time to sell his 2 paintings; discusses the sales commission; mentions favorable points of the Gros painting; the other painting may be harder to sell; is considering selling a Daumier and a Delacroix to help pay for his new house. 4 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], September 9, 1925: promises to send the photographs for his book; even the best translation cannot be completely faithful to the original; discusses specific changes to be made; discusses a chapter on Europe being added to volume 4. 6 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], September 21, 1925: is sending 5 photographs; 1 is for -- Harper's -- to include in volume 4, and the remainder are of works he hopes can be sold in the United States; needs money for his new house. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], September 26, 1925: is still waiting for a contract with Criterion; the painting consigned to Ehrich has not sold; maybe Pach could sell it or suggest another dealer; Pach should send instructions to Ehrich; -- Harper's -- will publish -- The Spirit of the Forms -- as volume 5; wants Pach to be the translator but will understand if he declines. 4 pp., in French

From F.P. Keppel, New York, N.Y., October 21, 1925: has received Pach's letter with proofs and suggestions. 1 p

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], October 22, 1925: has received volume 3 and congratulated Mr. Briggs; still thinks the plates should have been produced in France; bills for photographs remain unpaid; thanks Pach for his energy and perseverance; Spanish and German editions are planned; Knopf will publish an English edition of Napoleon; came close to selling the Daumier; comments on the condition of Marat by Gros; inquires about Pach's painting and the possibility of an exhibition in Paris. 4 pp., in French

From Jean Charlot, [place unknown], October 27, 1925: his present work is totally different From the 12 paintings being sent; Pach is one of the few friends abroad who might be interested; Pach should keep one for himself and try to sell the rest; is sending 4 photographs of recent work; he and Diego want to see reproductions of Pach's latest paintings; inventory of works being sent; had problems with his exhibition in Los Angeles. 4 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, November 21, 1925: there will be a delay in sending photographs; thanks Pach for introducing Miss La Follette; -- Harper's -- paid more than expected; Briggs reproached him for choosing Knopf to publish Napoleon. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, November 27, 1925: thanks Pach for introducing Speyer; congratulates Pach on his new job; likes Pach's engravings; wants Pach to translate The Spirit of the Forms; is sending another manuscript for which he hopes Pach can help find a publisher; he owns the picture incorrectly captioned in his last book and it is for sale. 4 pp., in French

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., January 7, 1926: she has written about her husband; is happy to be of service to Pach; can furnish more information. 1 p. + 3 pp. enclosure, (manuscripts by Susan M. Eakins of biographical notes on Thomas Eakins, including excerpts From letters to his father written while studying in France; list of paintings completed between 1870 and 1876; teaching methods; notes From Charles Bregler's transcript of Eakins's comments to students)

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, January 19, 1926: Mrs. Dillard sold his English painting to Mr. Speyer; introductions made by Pach facilitated the transaction; no one is to know Faure was the owner; since he cannot pay the duty if the piece at Ehrich is returned to France, Pach should keep it or put it in storage until later; asks if the Metropolitan might be interested in Mrs. Dillard's large Corot; content with Montaigne; still reworking -- The Spirit of the Forms; -- Soutine has become more important; believes Derain shows progress; Matisse's astonishing virtuosity continues to increase; saw admirable work by Picasso; Braque is a beautiful but monotonous painter; considers Charlie Chaplin the great man of America. 4 pp., in French

From Harold O. Voorhis, Secretary, New York University, New York, N.Y., February 23, 1926: confirms Pach's appointment as assistant professor of fine arts. 1 p

From Harold O. Voorhis, Secretary, New York University, New York, N.Y., March 5, 1926: received Pach's acceptance of faculty appointment. 1 p

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 24, 1926: has seen Pach's friends; is looking forward to Pach's visit in the summer; he and his wife are caring for an African-Arab baby; The Spirit of the Forms is almost finished; gives instructions about selling the unfortunate Spanish painting; is sending a drawing as a gift; Mrs. Dillard needs a list of dealers and their specialties. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, April 22, 1926: is pleased to learn the Delacroix drawing was well received; believes Delacroix is becoming greater by the day; is not eager for further lecture tours; his latest book was ignored; foreigners understand him better than the French; regrets that Pach will not be able to visit him in Dordogne; discusses price of the crucifixion painting. 2 pp., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, June 8, 1926: goals for studying art of the past are aesthetic or humanistic; it is a "triumph" that Pach's "anti-Rotarian protest" was published in -- Harper's -- Magazine; "glad to hear yr. painting is taking on, altho' I deplore yr. giving to it the time you should dedicate to writing"; urges him to write about the Gardner collection. 12 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, June 9, 1926: hopes the Pachs will visit him in Paris before the end of July or in Dordogne later; their arrival is late for the painting season, but Tuileries Salon will be open; sold the Daumier in Germany; the profit paid for some home repairs and 2 small Renoir canvases; has a beautiful Cézanne drawing. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Dordogne, France, August 10, 1926: the entire family is at Dordogne and sorry Pach cannot join them; discusses exchange rate; Briggs trusts Pach to translate -- The Spirit of the Forms -- , which will be volume 5 of -- History of Art -- ; asks Pach to consider undertaking the job. 2 pp., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, August 19, 1926: wishes there had been an opportunity for them to visit and have a serious talk during Pach's recent lecture tour; "I fear you will never take the place yr. gifts as a writer could lead you to if you cannot detach yr. self fr. painting itself. It is a pity. For critics are ever so much rarer." 4 pp

From Diego Rivera, [place unknown], Mexico, October 4, 1926: the package Lupe sent to the Pachs was lost when the boat capsized; wants copies of the magazine -- L'Amour de l'Art -- ; Derain's work is better; shares Pach's opinion of Picasso; wants to see Matisse's work; Faure will try to include more Rivera reproductions in the new edition; asks Pach to check on the status of Rudolf Tesch's project for Carnegie Corp.; requests the Charlot exhibition catalog. 4 pp., in Spanish

To Mrs. Pach From Lupe de Rivera, [place unknown], October 6, 1926: thanks for the baby sweater; her daughter, Guadalupe, called Pico, was tiny and ill at birth but now thrives. 2 pp., in Spanish

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, October 25, 1926: agrees that Mr. Brandt's Cézanne and Renoir are copies; comments on -- The Studio of Ingres -- ; discusses illustrations for -- The Spirit of the Forms -- ; compliments Pach's article on Mexican art; is going to Mexico for a vacation and needs advice on a budget; asks if Pach could sell a large horse painting by Gros in the United States. 6 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], November 3, 1926: Mrs. Dillard has a Fragonard worthy of a museum or a fine collection; asks about hotel rates in New York City. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, November 12, 1926: is grateful that Pach will be translating -- The Spirit of the Forms; -- Pach should persuade Mr. Briggs to expedite the publisher's contract; saw Seurat's exhibition of more than 200 luminous drawings and a Bonnard show of rich and subtle still-lifes; 2 paintings by Matisse were highlights in an otherwise indifferent Salon d'Automne; Miss La Follette and her brother visited; the Baron Gros painting, which Mme. Dillard will handle, is a masterwork that the Metropolitan Museum [of Art] could be proud of; still believes in Soutine; would like to meet Barnes though a ruse might be needed. 4 pp., in French

From Suzanne La Follette, Choisy, France, November 19, 1926: visited Elie Faure and hopes to see him again; a review of her book will appear in -- Saturday Review -- . 6 pp

From Pedro Henriquez Ureña, Miramar, Argentina, January [?], 1927: Valovaciones cannot pay for contributions or translations; Pach should publish a translation of his book in the magazine so that Argentines will be familiar with him and his ideas. 2 pp

From Suzanne La Follette, [place unknown], January 9, 1927: the publisher is not promoting her book well; thinks Lewis Mumford is "gifted." 3 pp

From Suzanne La Follette, Paris, France, January 13, 1927: asks about resorts on the Mediterranean; Chester wrote enthusiastically of his travels in Italy. 3 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, February 22, 1927: has had no reply From Mexico; "Art and Morals," which appeared in the Dial, should be retranslated; -- History of Art -- is being translated into Czech and possibly Japanese; artistic life in Paris is boring; Matisse is definitely the most tolerated; Soutine is not doing much; Pach should try to sell the Gros painting for Mrs. Dillard. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 8, 1927: a safe-deposit box was transferred, with difficulty, from Pach's name to his; saw a beautiful Renoir exhibition; prices are high and only Delacroix and Corot are affordable now; Derain should protect himself From dealers. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 29, 1927: Mr. Briggs received proofs of Pach's translation; discovered Siluster letters and will soon meet his aged widow and daughter, who may have more documents; no longer thinks of Mexico; is probably going to Egypt; they are unlikely to see one another this year; is disturbed that Pach failed to sell the Gros; museums prefer average paintings to fine sketches; suggests other places Pach might try to sell the painting; describes his newly acquired Theodore Rousseau landscape; reports on the Renoir exhibition at Bernheim's; painters in Paris seem more and more influenced by Renoir and less and less interested in Cézanne; Delacroix rises as Ingres falls. 4 pp., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Fabriano, Italy, May 10, 1927: review of his book missed its "contribution... to a criticism that is based on a question of design"; invites Pach to consider this issue in a review. 4 pp

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], June 8, 1927: Delacroix is becoming popular; at the sale of the Bureau collection ordinary Daumier watercolors brought high prices and wonderful Corot drawings sold cheaply; is unhappy with the captions for the plates in his last edition; witnessed Lindbergh's landing. 4 pp., in French

From Marcel Duchamp, Paris, France, June 24, 1927: announces his recent marriage; describes a Redon watercolor that Pach might sell to the Bings; Mrs. Bing expressed interest in the Brancusi bust now stored at Brummer, King, and Parker. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, July 6, 1927: received the Delacroix book; he shares Pach's devotion to Delacroix, who is becoming fashionable in France; he may eventually acquire some Delacroix watercolors; a superb Géricault is on view at the Victor Hugo Museum; museums hang paintings poorly; Degas and Manet are idolized, while Cézanne and Renoir are just tolerated. 2 pp., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Stockholm, Sweden, July 25, 1927: Pach's review showed "intelligent and friendly comprehension"; "my Three Essays is an ironied and veiled attempt to demonstrate that there is a big part of the job that any well trained mediocrity can achieve"; "great artists like Antonello are not prophets but fulfillers of prophecy." 2 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, October 3, 1927: spent his vacation traveling in Provence; has abandoned a project that attracted amateur attention; intends to study Chagall; -- History of Art -- will be translated into Japanese. 2 pp., in French

From Bernard Berenson, London, England, October 7, 1927: -- Harper's -- will ask Pach to write about the Gardner collection; urges him to accept the offer. 4 pp

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], December 19, 1927: Gagnon has reappeared; Faure purchased a Barye painting at a junk shop; agrees to write a preface to Pach's book. 4 pp., in French

From Leo Stein, Paris, France, February 7, 1928: Read Pach's review of his book in the -- Architectural Record -- ; "when you realize your incompetence for a job because of ignorance you had better keep out, because that very ignorance will prevent you From realizing how big a fool you are making of yourself." 1 p

From Elie Faure, [place unknown],1 April 22, 1928: Had a heart attack; is now working on a book about folk psychology; will lecture in Germany; museums prefer a perfect modern canvas to a masterpiece with slight damage; asks if Pach has tried to find a buyer for Christ; though his books sell, Faure has not prospered; describes several paintings in his collection; he may inherit Mme. Thelaphite's paintings; Mrs. Dillard has a Ribera for sale. 4 pp., in French

From [ signature illegible (Canaan L. Morris?)], Hartford, Conn., May 4, 1928: compliments Pach's lecture of the previous evening; critiques its structure. 2 pp

From Harold O. Voorhis, Secretary, New York University, New York, N.Y., June 15, 1928: confirms Pach's appointment as assistant professor of fine arts. 1 p

From Elie Faure, Dordogne, France, August 11, 1928: is glad to be away From Paris; is very happy about the French translation of Ananias [large portions illegible]. 2 pp

From Jose Clemente Orozco, New York, N.Y., September 1, 1928: -- Form -- magazine deserves attention; offers to write to the editor on Pach's behalf; as Pach suggested, he met with Kraushaar, who didn't seem to like the revolutionary drawings but showed interest in the Art Center Exhibit paintings; speculates that Kraushaar found the Mexican pieces too strange; asks Pach to arrange another meeting; recommends García Maroto's article in -- Contemporaries -- about Rivera and his disgusting commercialism. 4 pp., in Spanish

From José Clemente Orozco, New York, N.Y., September 6, 1928: He and Mr. Owens will visit; the "animator" wants to deceive people of Pach's intelligence; the "animator's" treachery to art is disguised as a personal matter; García Maroto was deceived by the "animator"; lists founders of the Union of Painters and Sculptors who contributed ideas and skills while the "animator" contributed disloyalty; the "animator" claimed credit for a fresco technique developed by Siqueiros and Guerro; the "animator" killed Mexican mural painting and now interferes in all mural painting in Mexico; Maroto says the "animator" is stymied. 10 pp., in Spanish

From José Clemente Orozco, New York, N.Y., September 12, 1928: sends addresses of Jean Charlot and Gabriel Fernandez Ledema; Owens missed the train but hopes to meet Pach soon. 1 p., in Spanish

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, September 22, 1928: received Ananias, but cannot read it without a translator [large portions illegible]. 2 pp., in French

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., October 10, 1928: received his letter and book; "whether it is the desire to purchase or not, I am always pleased to show my husband's pictures"; wishes to keep the Rush pictures and studies in Philadelphia. 3 pp

From Arthur B. Springarn, New York, N.Y., November 1, 1928: thanks Pach for dedicating the book to him; best wishes for the volume's success. 1 p

From Eleanor S. Brooks, Westport, Conn., November 14, 1928: five hundred dollars is a satisfactory amount for the manuscript. 1 p

From José Clemente Orozco, New York, N.Y., November 16, 1928: the publisher sent a copy of Pach's wonderful book and requested his opinion; his response expressed enthusiasm and admiration. 2 pp., in Spanish, + 1 p. enclosure (copy of letter, November 14, 1928, to Ruth Raphael, Harper & Bros., From José Clemente Orozco, New York, N.Y.: endorsement of -- Ananias, or The False Artist -- by Walter Pach)

From Lee Simonson, Editor, Creative Art, New York, N.Y., December 18, 1928: thanks Pach for making changes to his Rivera article; his review of Pach's book is "extremely hard-hitting"; offers opportunity for rebuttal in the next issue; "let us keep the thing above personalities"; Alfred Stieglitz and Leo Stein support Simonson's views. 2 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., January 8, 1929: will send chapters for revision; payment can be handled however Pach prefers. 2 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, January 11, 1929: has not finished reading Pach's book because he is unusually busy; his wife is ill; had to put aside projects to complete a book on the Italian Renaissance; with the exception of Sargent, "official" American painters are not known in France; impressionism and its aftermath have not produced any positive result; would like to see Pach's paintings, not just photographs of them; compliments Pach's etchings; a new edition of his work is in preparation; there may be a Serb translation. 4 pp., in French

From Eleanor S. Brooks, Westport, Conn., January 15, 1929: requests a month's extension for their translation work. 2 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., February 14, 1929: chapter I and the introduction are being sent today. 1 p

From Eleanor S. Brooks, Westport, Conn., March 18, 1929: describes working methods; explains problems in translating Faure's writing. 2 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, April 1, 1929: when Pach visits they will look at art and go to Dordogne; discussed Pach's book with his publisher; recommends not using American examples other than Sargent and possibly Alexander and Frieseke in the French edition; will find an apartment for Pach; Miss Mary Morris has not yet called on him; requests books on the psychology of Americans. 2 pp., in French

From Eleanor S. Brooks, Westport, Conn., May 12, 1929: translation work proceeds slowly; Van Wyck is in the hospital; she doesn't want it publicized. 2 pp

From Eleanor S. Brooks, Westport, Conn., May 26, 1929: Van Wyck's health has not improved. 2 pp

From Eleanor S. Brooks, Westport, Conn., July 10, 1929: thanks Pach for his patience; Van Wyck is now in a private sanitarium; she continues to work on the translation. 1 p

From Eleanor S. Brooks, Westport Conn., August 28, 1929: is sending next chapter soon; Van Wyck's condition has not changed. 1 p

From Elie Faure, Dordogne, France, August 28, 1929: his short review of Pach's book has been accepted for publication in the Dial. 2 pp., in French

From Eleanor S. Brooks, [place unknown], August 30, 1929: another chapter is ready. 1 p

From Elie Faure, Dordogne, France, September 13, 1929: went to Basque country with Soutine; had a good rest and thought about the psychology book he is writing; -- The Italian Renaissance -- appears to be a success; is anxious to see Pach's painting and hear about his time in Paris; hopes to interest Pach in Soutine; when working, Soutine hides like a dog gnawing a bone. 2 pp., in French

From Lewis Mumford, Long Island City, N.Y., October 23, 1929: recounts summer travels; is starting a book about the arts in America since 1870; asks for news of Van Wyck Brooks's condition and how Eleanor is coping; he worries about Eleanor's reaction to the proposal that he edit the Emerson book. 2 pp

From Harold M. Tovell, Toronto, Canada, October 25, 1929: "I do think that as a result of patience and education plus your lectures here, that the tide is turning in favor of our Toronto friends"; inquires about Marcel Duchamp; "the house here would be rather bare if it weren't for the Duchamp family. I hope you will tell him how greatly we prize their works." 4 pp

From Jacques Villon, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, November 23, 1929: Verne wrote on behalf of the Committee of the National Museums accepting Raymond's sculptures; sends text of the Committee's flattering letter; thanks Pach for his continued support of Raymond. 4 pp., in French

From Childe Hassam, New York, N.Y., November 30, 1929: n -- Art in America -- , Pach confuses Horatio and Henry Oliver; Marie Sterner "has gotten together some of the worst things I have ever seen"; "verily art in America is run by old women! but most of them wear trousers." 2 pp

From Leo Stein, Paris, France, December 1, 1929: wants Pach to know the facts regarding his alleged endorsement of Clivette; "I supposed that Hellman was a gentleman and did not suspect a plant." 1 p

From Art Young, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] December 5, 1929: holiday greetings; news of James Opp [ sic], Springarn, Suzanne La Follette, and Glintenkamp; is working on a book and exhibition. 1 p. + 4 pp. enclosure (printed circular, undated, advertising books by Art Young, -- On My Way -- and -- Trees at Night -- , with excerpts from reviews and order form)

From Leo Stein, Paris, France 4218 265-267 [postmarked] January 8, 1930: "There is no artist that I value highly whom you do not also value but... you value many whom I don't"; diagram illustrates Stein's explanation of how their artistic tastes differ. 3 pp

From Elie Faure, Dordogne, France, March 12, 1930: Joubib's [?] awful reputation should be a comfort to Pach's friend who was so badly treated; plans to seek legal advice about suing De la Faille. 2 pp., in French

From Lewis Mumford, Long Island City, N.Y., March 12, 1930: is pleased with his lectures at Dartmouth College; his next book will be "a modern philosophy of life"; compliments Suzanne La Follette's book; he has an article in the first issue of the New Freeman; comments on policies and politics of the "Modern Museum." 4 pp

From Harold M. Tovell, [place unknown], May 16, 1930: "This is about the most perfect thing I have seen for a long time. A truly great work." Picture postcard ("Leonardo da Vinci Bronzlovas. Reiterfigur aus Bronze. Figure a cheval en bronze")

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., July 10, 1930: received Pach's picture postcard of a Millet portrait; the "exhibition of Homer, Ryder, and Eakins at the Modern Museum seems to have pleased universally." 1 p

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, August 22, 1930: "I would rather not see the entire output of a master," even Delacroix; after finishing "the lists of Italian Painters" he will revise Drawings of Florentine Painters; then he plans a book on "The Decline and Revival of Form in the Figure Arts." 8 pp

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., September 25, 1930: continues to enjoy the postcards Pach sent, especially the Millet; has found the painting he wants; there will be an exhibition in New York City in December; her good friend Charles Bregler, a pupil of Eakins's, has restored several of the pictures. 2 pp

From Al [Bing?], New York, N.Y., October 19, 1930: "Museum accepts pictures." Telegram

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., October 21, 1930: received Barye copy and photos of Millet picture; details of upcoming Eakins show in New York City are uncertain; Charles Bregler has discovered retouching on some pictures; they will be cleaned before the exhibition; some may be placed behind glass to prevent future overpainting done in "ignorance"; enclosed sketch describes a study Eakins did while a student in Paris; wonders where other pieces from that period are, since he did many and returned with few. 2 pp

From Bryson Burroughs, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., October 23, 1930: through oversight, Pach's watercolors were not presented at the October meeting; "I forsee no trouble in their reception. The modern style has not the bitter enemies it used to have." 1 p

From Ida E. Guggenheimer, New York, N.Y., November 9, 1930: saw a good exhibition of modern French art at Harriman Gallery and a "gem" at Knoedler; is enthusiastic about Villon's colors; subsequent visits to Brummer's confirmed that her collection is superior; Mr. Kraushaar likes Pach's work and promised to see more; "you are right when you say I cannot expect to compete with the hawks of picture dealers"; comments on Ananias; economic conditions depress Mr. Guggenheimer and may prevent them From traveling. 3 pp

From B. Stein, New York, N.Y., November 17, 1930: thanks Pach for his book; saw Villon's "smashing" show; Gretchen purchased The (Rose) Haulers; financial conditions in the United States are "depressing"; is sorry Pach is "impatient" with writing, as he is gifted; is glad Pach is enjoying painting in Paris; describes ideas about modern furniture, which she wants to buy. 5 pp

From Ida E. Guggenheimer, New York, N.Y., December 1, 1930: "sympathetic" to Pach's "natural gratification at the Metropolitan's action;" Kraushaar will look at Pach's work in her apartment; mentions art seen at Reinhardt's and Brummer's galleries; received a letter From Villon. 2 pp

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., December 12, 1930: Miss Pendleton took the painting Pach wants and will arrange delivery to him; Miss Pendleton would be a good subject to paint; holiday greetings. 1 p

From Ida E. Guggenheimer, New York, N.Y., December 17, 1930: saw Pach's drawings at Kraushaar's; saw work by Houdon at Anderson Galleries; Pach would enjoy Proust's remarks on music and art. 2 pp

From Allen Tucker, New York, N.Y., January 2, 1931: opinions of Corot-Daumier show at the Modern; Tucker had an exhibition. 4 pp

From Leo Stein, Paris, France, [postmarked] January 19, 1931: discusses "analytic" and "non analytic" approaches to a "nonverifiable subject"; "don't regard this letter as an argument. I never argue about art, but simply attempt to explain an attitude." 5 pp

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., January 25, 1931: thanks Pach for bringing Eakins's work to the attention of the Louvre; Charles Linford is a possible choice; "I would prefer to present a picture, rather than sell, so we will not worry about prices"; Riccardo Bertelli's new gallery on 56th is exhibiting Thomas Eakins and Samuel Murray; there is an Eakins show at Babcock Galleries; the national economic situation is too bad to expect painting sales; articles on Eakins mistakenly "report that the little seated figure of Thomas Eakins was his favorite attitude while painting"; pictures shown at Babcock were cleaned by Charles Bregler; glazing was recommended for protection From air pollution; Pach's choice of frame for his Eakins painting is "fine." 4 pp

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., February 19, 1931: sends photographs of paintings available for presentation to the Louvre; her choice of the Hamilton portrait is supported by Samuel Murray, Mr. Cranmer, and David Wilson Jordan; the Barker and Wallace portraits are possibilities; her sister-in-law offers the portrait of Susan Eakins' father; sends photographs of Thomas Eakins dating From student days in Paris; she has not seen the Eakins exhibition in New York. 2 pp

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., February 21, 1931: Bertelli sold John McClure Hamilton, not understanding that it might go to the Louvre; the Barker and Wallace portraits will not be sold. 1 p

From Morris Kantor, New York, N.Y., March 16, 1931: is busy making frames; saw Pach's exhibition at Kraushaar's; "Paris did you a lot of good because your work has changed.... It has more freedom and a better painting quality"; sympathizes with "Baylie's" misfortune; Kraushaar will give "Baylie" a show; Sloan arranged for him to teach at the League. 3 pp

From Bryson Burroughs, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., March 17, 1931: "The Museum is much beholden to you however the David matter turns out"; the decision reached at yesterday's meeting will be announced after the painting is unpacked; compliments Pach's show at Kraushaar's; comments on the installation and specific pieces; "as to the Eakins matter I should be honored to cooperate." 2 pp

From A.S. Baylinson, New York, N.Y., March 19, 1931: complimentary comments on Pach's show at Kraushaar's; is moving to a new, fireproof studio at 54 West 74th Street; "I will have the group work there with me evenings as before, and before long we shall forget the fire"; will teach at the Art Students League in the coming year. 2 pp

From Childe Hassam, New York, N.Y., March 27, 1931: Pach's exhibition, which Hassam viewed twice, includes "the best things I have seen of yours"; spoke with John Sloan and Miss Kraushaar at the gallery; describes his etching of Helen Wells and promises to send a photograph of it. 2 pp

From Bryson Burroughs, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., March 28, 1931: the painting arrived and is "even grander than I had imagined.... It will be one of the masterpieces here"; has been in contact with Mrs. Eakins; thanks Pach for his "beneficent labors." 3 pp

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., March 28, 1931: Burroughs and Brummer were consulted in the search for photographs of Eakins paintings; lists sizes of paintings under consideration; J. Carroll Beckwith might interest the Louvre. 2 pp

From Bryson Burroughs, New York, N.Y., March 31, 1931: "David Bought Hooray." Telegram + 1 p. enclosure (April 1, 1931 From Morgan & Cie., Paris, France: debit notice for collect telegram received From New York the previous day)

From Bryson Burroughs, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., April 14, 1931: Museum is pleased with the David painting; thanks Pach for his role in the transaction; "waiting for the Eakins matter to crystallize"; wants the Pennsylvania Museum to offer Clara or The Bohemian; the Louvre should have an example of Eakins' "very best"; will propose the idea to Kimball. 2 pp

From Arthur B. Springarn, New York, N.Y., April 21, 1931: is "profoundly impressed" by Pach's exhibition; his work shows a new "lack of inhibition"; "I resent the conspiracy of silence of the critics tho' I suppose that is the price you pay for being the author of Ananias"; gives recommendations for Raymond's schooling. 6 pp

From Bryson Burroughs, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., May 3, 1931: "The Penn. Mus. Eakins project takes shape gradually"; Clara may be "suitable"; the "exchange" proposed is complicated and requires "committee actions"; maybe they could give Clara to the Louvre; Kimball will "come round." 3 pp

From Bryson Burroughs, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., May 11, 1931: sends copy of a letter From Fiske Kimball and a reproduction of Clara; upon seeing the painting again "my previous judgement was amply confirmed." 1 p. + 1 p. enclosure (May 8, 1931, to Bryson Burroughs From Fiske Kimball, Director, Pennsylvania Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pa.: "I shall recommend to my Board that a gift be made to the Louvre"; instructs Burroughs to ask Guiffrey whether the Louvre will accept Clara; discusses framing and Eakins's ideas on the subject)

From Jean Guiffrey, Louvre Museum, Paris, France, June 2, 1931: thanks for the Eakins painting; when informed of the gift, his colleagues will be grateful. 1 p., in French

From Abby Greene (Aldrich) Rockefeller, Pocantico Hills, N.Y., June 10, 1931: purchased Pach's painting of anemone; thanks for "the trouble you have taken about the Géricault drawing." 3 pp

From Henri Verne, Director, Louvre Museum, Paris, France, June 18, 1931: thanks Pach for his role as intermediary in the Louvre's acquisition of a Thomas Eakins painting. 1 p., in French

From Bryson Burroughs, [place illegible], France, June 24, 1931: Is arriving in Paris in July; wants to see David-Weill collection; "it is a great comfort the way the Eakins matter turned out and I am really glad to be out of its final arrangement"; is going to Milan to see the -- Très Belles Heures -- . 2 pp

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., June 27, 1931: Is pleased with the choice of painting for the Louvre; thanks Pach for his efforts. 2 pp

From Bryson Burroughs, aboard SS De Grasse, July 19, 1931: Guiffrey "is delighted about the Eakins and well appreciative of your efforts in regard to it"; Metropolitan Museum of Art may participate in the French exhibition in London next year; "a new era of liberalism and cooperation is about due with the passing of so many ancient trustees"; describes the excellent condition of the -- Très Belles Heures -- . 3 pp

From Caroline Pratt, Chilmark, Mass., August 14, 1931: Discusses Raymond's academic progress and challenges; gives recommendations for the future. 5 pp

From Elie Faure, Peking, China, October 7, 1931: Received a warm welcome in the United States; the end of his trip and the end of his life are darkened by catastrophe. Picture postcard ("Great Wall of China"), in French

From Beatrice [?], New York, N.Y., October 10, 1931: " Simone is ours." Telegram

From Elie Faure, Angkor, Cambodia, November 14, 1931: Expresses love for America and Americans; thinks the hope of the world is in the United States and also between the Urals and Vistula. Picture postcard ("Ruines D'Angkor"), in French

From Ida E. Guggenheimer, New York, N.Y., November 15, 1931: Etta Cone bought a Pach painting and is "enthusiastic" about Duchamp-Villon; "saw the Mouillots at Brummer's and I must confess to being very disappointed"; she "positively rejoice[s]" in her own piece by Duchamp-Villon; many praise Pach's work in her collection; art prices are down; news of various friends, especially musicians. 4 pp

From Jean Crotti, Paris, France, November 18, 1931: "I have always declined to write prefaces for contemporaries (the cases of Villon and Duchamp-Villon being exceptions which I intend shall remain exceptions); it is a job for a professional critic, and not for a man who is himself engaged in painting." 2 pp

From Bryson Burroughs, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., November 24, 1931: Gift of 2 etchings by Pach was received by the Museum. 2 pp

From Elie Faure, Colombo, Ceylon, November 25, 1931: Everyone says his wife and daughter were courageous and that helps him tolerate the loneliness; is anxious to see the Corot book, especially the reproductions; will continue writing for -- Petit Parisien -- ; now believes one must write for the masses. 2 pp., in French

From Henri Verne, Director, Louvre Museum, Paris, France, December 22, 1931: Thanks Pach for his gift of an engraving of New York. 1 p., in French

From Al Bing, New York, N.Y., December 23, 1931: Socrates by David and the Havemeyer collection are now hanging at the Metropolitan; Whitney Museum, Frick Gallery, and the Modern Gallery will all be open when Pach returns; Coffin, "a man of great ability and sterling character," has been elected Museum president; is interested in the Bonaparte exhibition; asks Pach to help sell his Renoir. 12 pp

From Bryson Burroughs, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., January 9, 1932: Trustees will want more information about the Géricault picture; they trust printed sources over his opinions; is hopeful that Coffin can make "improvements"; though Pach is "eminently suited for Museum work," this is a poor time to enter the field. 2 pp

From Albert Morance, La Chef des Services Commerciause et Techniques, Louvre Museum, Paris, France, January 11, 1932: Is returning to Pach the contract concerning his engraving. 1 p. + 2 pp. printed form (Louvre Print Department acquisition form for The Telephone and Telegraph Building, New York, and rules for transfer of works to the Print Department), in French

From Leo Stein, Paris, France, [postmarked] January 12, 1932: Discusses "two questions that always arise in respect to art... (1) What qualities does one note in a work of art. (2) What value has that which one sees." 6 pp

From Allen Tucker, New York, N.Y., January 18, 1932: Pach's stay in Morocco seems to have been beneficial; 1931 was a difficult year; hopeful for the future; "the Whitney has shaken the whole thing up and American shows past and present and I daresay future are everywhere"; "Rivera having a grand time in a pas de deux with Mrs. Rockefeller at the Museum of 'Foreign' Art." 3 pp

From Henri Verne, Director, Louvre Museum, Paris, France, January 26, 1932: Thanks Pach for his role in the Louvre's acquisition of the Eakins painting; it arrived in good shape and was readily accepted; is still considering the Barye castings. 1 p., in French

From Leo Hartman, Harper's Magazine, New York, N.Y., February 1, 1932: The artists mentioned in Pach's article are too obscure for Harper's readers. 1 p

From Al Bing, New York, N.Y., February 7, 1932: Thanks Pach for helping him find a potential buyer for his Renoir; discusses the Furdson and Havemeyer collections at the Metropolitan; family news; is anxious for Pach's return. 7 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., February 8, 1932: "The Depression is not to be underestimated" and could change the social order; discusses colleges for Raymond; Life of Emerson and a volume of his essays reprinted From the Freeman will be out soon; the Prendergasts live nearby; "Charlie P. is surely a true primitive old master to whom only Vasari could do justice in the way of antecedents"; "I kept thinking as I read your book, what new books must logically follow From your mind"; suggests Pach write histories of art criticism and American art. 10 pp

From Henri Verne, Director, Louvre Museum, Paris, France, March 5, 1932: Because Barye's -- Apollon -- is a fragile plaster, the curator cannot risk making castings. 1 p., in French

From Childe Hassam, New York, N.Y., March 8, 1932: Has a print of Helen Wells for Pach; the Metropolitan Museum filmed him at work and play in East Hampton last summer; the Boston Museum commissioned a similar film of Benson. 3 pp

From Ida E. Guggenheimer, New York, N.Y., March 25, 1932: Sent another payment for City of Mexico to Pach's bank; several people have shown interest in Simone; she and the Steins purchased work From Baylinson's Kraushaar show. 3 pp

From Bryson Burroughs, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., March 26, 1932: The Géricault is a "grand picture, but don't pin any faith on the taste of trustees"; Pach would find it frustrating to work within the museum's structure; is anxious to correspond or converse about Hubert and Jan Van Eyck. 2 pp

From Allen Tucker, New York, N.Y., April 10, 1932: Congratulates Pach on his show and catalog; compliments the Morse exhibition at the Metropolitan; "the Whitney gallery has shaken up the attention of people to the present Americans." 2 pp

From D.T. Sieveking, Director, Antikensammlungen, Munich, Germany, April 27, 1932: Returns the completed questionnaire. 1 p. + 1 p. enclosure (questionnaire about Greek figure known as -- Naked Girl with Cap -- ), in German

From John Sloan, New York, N.Y., April 30, 1932: Recounts the politics of the League's presidential election that he lost; Schnakenberg will be an "inactive president"; when the Board turned down Geo. Grosz, Sloan resigned; Jonas Lie threatened to resign if Pach lectures there; Sloan will teach at Archipenko's school next season; Dolly is a manager for the touring Exhibition of Indian Tribal Arts; Baylinson supported Sloan in the "fight"; financial details of the Sixteenth Annual Independent Exhibition. 2 pp

From Charles Bourgeat, Galerie Dru, Paris, France., May 7, 1932: Received payment for Pach's exhibition there; cannot locate the Sisley and Pissarro photographs Pach sent; their aim to show fine and beautiful painting was accomplished with Pach's exhibition; difficult times account for compliments and no sales. 2 pp., in French

From Ida E. Guggenheimer, New York, N.Y., May 10, 1932: Her opinion of photography remains "good, but not art, and deadly after a certain length of time." 1 p

From Ida E. Guggenheimer, New York, N.Y., May 22, 1932: Hopes Pach's article, "Owning Pictures," will be published; the museum's rehung galleries present interesting new comparisons; asks his opinion of the Art Students League controversy; saw Baylinson at the Independent show; purchased a Baylinson drawing From Kraushaar. 3 pp

From the -- Atlantic Monthly -- , Boston, Mass., May 31, 1932: Pach's article is of limited interest to Atlantic Monthly readers. 1 p

From M.L. Allen, -- Harper's -- Magazine, New York, N.Y., June 2, 1932: Pach's article, "American Art in the Louvre," is not appropriate for a general audience. 1 p

From Gino Severini, Fribourg, Switzerland, June 16, 1932: His schedule will not permit another meeting before Pach's departure; the art market will improve; is interested in the prospect of a show at Brummer's; "decoration work" for Weyhe may end in September; thanks Pach for his help. 2 pp., in French

From P. Dubaut, Paris, France, July 19, 1932: Thanks Pach for sending clippings; the gallery behaved professionally but was not overly kind; was generally pleased with the show; is happy to know Pach. 2 pp., in French

From Alfred Vance Churchill, Rockport, Mass., July 25, 1932: Pach was the first to write of the Smith College Museum as "one of the choicest and best directed collections of art in America"; has received many commendations and is putting together extracts "for certain personal uses"; requests additional thoughts From Pach on the collection. 3 pp

From Alfred Vance Churchill, Rockport, Mass., July 25, 1932: Is trying to arrange a lecture for Pach at Smith College and perhaps at Mount Holyoke College; Jere Abbott will succeed him as museum director; thinks his retirement was forced on the trustees by Paul J. Sachs. 4 pp

From Nadine and Ad. Wuester, Paris, France, January 5, 1933: Pach is missed as their circle of friends diminishes; painted at the Côte d'Azur last summer; shows of Renoir and Delacroix were exceptions in a dull art season; Aubrey's gallery is now a junk shop; mentions auctions of the Strauss and Pacquemont collections; Goetz's Delacroix still-life was reattributed to Andrieux; a sketch said to be by Géricault appeared at the Hôtel Drouot; cheap reproductions are being passed off as Géricault watercolors. 5 pp., in German

From Elie Faure, Paris, France., January 7, 1933: France is declining; sends family news; Paul Morand gave his book a favorable review; inquires whether Pach has found work; there are fewer exhibits in Paris; good paintings are now seen only at the big sales such as Strauss. 2 pp., in French

From Marjorie Carpenter, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, January 9, 1933: Confirms lecture date at McMaster University. Telegram

From Gertrude Wolf, Executive Secretary, New York University, New York, N.Y., January 9, 1933: Requests syllabus for last 2 lectures of Pach's course and the examination questions. 1 p

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., [postmarked] January 19, 1933: Informs Pach of prices of two Eakins portraits; many Eakins paintings were damaged by restorers; others are in "splendid condition" due to the efforts of Charles Bregler; comments on Mrs. Whitney's plans to aid painters. 1 p

From William Reinhold Valentiner, Director, Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, Mich., February 9, 1933: Thanks the Pachs for a warm welcome; enjoyed seeing Pach's paintings and his personal collection; the picture signed Hogarth is not by the master; the signature on the Géricault drawing appears genuine. 2 pp., in German

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, June 20, 1933: Has been ill for 2 months; the French economy is poor, resulting in greatly reduced incomes; Rivera has been forbidden to make public speeches; a Chassériau exhibit is open; Joubin, who organized the current Renoir show, knows nothing about painting and villifies artists while they are alive but sanctifies them after they are dead; among the beautiful paintings in the exhibit is a portrait of Sisley and his wife. 6 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, September 23, 1933: Madame Siluster died; she had 4 Delacroix drawings of which Faure kept 2, gave 1 to François, and sent to Pach a portrait sketch of Madame Guizot; Pach should tell Rivera that Faure is upset that he did not translate Mon Périple; is enthusiastic about Rivera's paintings and frescoes and considers him a great illustrator; the chapter Faure sent was ignored, which is a disappointment as he hoped to interest an American editor; is depressed over the rejection of his collected essays; the Renoir exhibition is a disgrace to the memory of the artist, who is misunderstood and detested by the organizers of the show. 4 pp., in French. to Herbert Eustis Winlock From Walter Pach, New York, N.Y. 4218 481-483 November 12, 1933: Refers to previous discussion of the "Indian collection"; suggests a "single gallery of Indian art including Mexican, and adding, if desired, the other peoples whose work has a sufficient art value"; use art rather than anthropology as the criterion; "my idea is that the museum should accept the collection Mr. Sloan intends to offer as a gift From his association, or accept part of it as the nucleus of a gallery of the art of the so-called barbarous peoples." 3 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, December 9, 1933: A Courbet, which Faure believes is his most beautiful, is for sale; indicates price, size, and citation of a reproduction; inquires about the financial crisis in the United States; comments on economic problems, political events, and inertia of the French people; is writing a preface for Rosenberg's Renoir exhibit; asks about Pach's painting and printmaking; requests news of Rivera about whom he wrote an article; Harper's sent money and will reprint The Spirit of the Forms. 4 pp., in French

From Ida E. Guggenheimer, New York, N.Y., December 10, 1933: Saw the Cézanne exhibition twice; "as for Dr. Valentiner, of course I am all with Rivera.... No good can come out of anything as bad as the Hitler program." 2 pp

From Clifton A. Wheeler, Indianapolis, Ind., February 2, 1934: Discusses fellow board members of the Indianapolis Art Association and acquisitions; "modernization" was the response to declining school enrollment; 9 instructors, including Wheeler, were fired; describes life on the top of La Conte Mountain, Tenn., where he painted the previous fall; has mural and portrait commissions, "so long as I can make a living I don't care if I don't teach." 8 pp

From E.D. Smyth, Tangier, Morocco, September 19, 1934: Thanks Pach for sending a painting of Helen; is staying in Helen's house; Gertrude Stein's book about Alice Toklas is "an overwhelmingly cheeky work" that failed to mention Pach; news of mutual friends; reminiscences of visits with the Pachs; James McBey, a Scottish painter and etcher, has settled nearby. 3 pp

From Marcel Duchamp, Paris, France, October 17, 1934: Feels animosity toward Barr, whom he calls narrow-minded; will handle in his own way any resulting confrontation or unpleasantness; told Arensberg, owner of -- Un Descendant -- , not to lend to Barr; asks Pach to find an excuse for refusing Barr; Barr shall reap what he has sown; American collectors are now speculators; sends order forms for his new book. 5 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, December 4, 1934: The owners of the Courbet are impatient; asks if it has arrived in New York; suggests that a collector, Barnes, or the Metropolitan Museum of Art may be interested; his book is being ignored in France; if Pach has money, now is a good time to buy art; tells of works that are selling at reduced prices. 2 pp., in French

From Simonne Maubert, Paris, France, December 22, 1934: Miss Stein wrote with good news of Pach; posed for Miss Stein during the autumn and hopes for similar work next year. 2 pp. + picture postcard ("Palais de Fontainebleau, La Cour Ovale et le Baptistère"), in French

From A. Frohberg and Johanna, Dresden, Germany, December 31, 1934: Thanks Pach for letter and for holiday greetings; the news of Pach's selection for an important commission brings them great joy; news of a family friend who has made progress and overcome obstacles. 2 pp., in German

From Karl Lilienfield, New York, N.Y., May 13, 1935: Confirms the commission Pach will receive if he sells paintings for Alexander M. Bing. 1 p., in German

From Henri Focillon, New Haven, Conn., May 21, 1935: Thanks Pach for sending the fine article he wrote on -- La Patelliere -- , which he saw in Bucharest; when visiting the Politzers, he failed to recognize Pach's name, thus missing the opportunity to express his admiration and respect. 2 pp., in French

From Father [Frohberg] and Johanna, Dresden, Germany, July 2, 1935: Birthday greetings. Picture postcard ("Herzlichen Gluckwunsch zum Geburtstage"), in German

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, September 13, 1935: Opposes exhibitions such as the current one at the Petit Palais; is revising his work on drawings of Florentine painters; "foulness piled over Michelangelo by a lot of German animals, the worst of whom is a biped named Panofsky." 12 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, September 24, 1935: Asks about Pach's frescoes and requests photographs; discusses the dire economy and his own financial situation; believes the movement born of cubism is dead in France and explores this idea more fully in a preface he wrote for Brummer's upcoming Lipchitz exhibition; discusses an exhibition of Italian art and the poorly received article he wrote about it for L'Humanité; visited London, which seemed more alive than Paris; objects to glass on paintings at the National and the Wallace; has not heard From Rivera, possibly because Faure's article was not flattering enough. 4 pp., in French

From Clifton A. Wheeler, Indianapolis, Ind., October 20, 1935: Pach should notify the director of the John Herron Art Institute of his schedule and lecture fees; is teaching at a high school; the art school is now "purely Yale, Beaux Arts competition, and American Academy in Rome." 2 pp

From Edna Strasser, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, October 26, 1935: Called on friends of Pach, the Brinkman family of Haarlem; saw the portrait Pach painted of their brother in 1906. 3 pp

From Arthur Strasser, Seville, Spain, November 18, 1935: Recounts visit with Brinkmans in Haarlem; is impressed by the Prado, Rubens, and El Greco; at Pach's suggestion, they have attended several performances of gypsy music and dancing. 4 pp

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], November 29, 1935: Is enchanted by and praises the most successful part of Pach's triptych; discusses the economy and prospects for work in France; continues to be pessimistic about painting in France; architecture is what is needed now and cinema may become more important than painting; mentions a Flemish exhibition; congratulates Pach on his portrait of a young man, possibly Raymond; the critics who denounced what Faure wrote on the agony of painting now admit he was right. 4 pp., in French

From A. Frohberg and Johanna, Dresden, Germany, March 2, 1936: Belated birthday greetings; tell Magda everything has been done for Zittau [?]. Picture postcard (untitled), in German

From Gerda Stein, New York, N.Y., March 10, 1936: Thanks Pach for his friendship; "accept this simple expression of my appreciation for what you have given me and the earnest hope that it will bring you an answer to some of the problems that perplex you." 4 pp

From Ida E. Guggenheimer, Ontario, Canada, August 4, 1936: Read his review in the -- Nation -- and wants to see the exhibition; the watercolor of Magda acquired by the Brooklyn Museum is one of Pach's best. 1 p

From Charles Bourgeat, Paris, France, August 21, 1936: The Seligmanns request a meeting about the Ingres paintings Bourgeat and Pach discussed earlier; sends 2 color reproductions of Cézanne paintings that Cézanne's son wants to sell; discusses prices and commissions; saw the Cézanne works now in the Orangerie; asks if Etta Cone might be interested; missed Bing's visit to Paris. 4 pp., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Grusbach, Czechoslovakia, August 26, 1936: "You are one of the last surviving acquaintances who, in the study of art, have not gone over to irrelevant promiscuity"; discusses attribution of Goldman's Madonna; has begun writing "The Decline and Recovery of Form"; spent 6 weeks in Yugoslavia studying Roman remains and Byzantine frescoes. 4 pp

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, November 30, 1936: Read his article in the -- Virginia Quarterly -- ; he liked the photograph of Pach's fresco more than the article; tell Van Wyck Brooks he is welcome to visit when next in Florence; spent 5 weeks in Paris. 4 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, December 28, 1936: Eight months ago Lizou married a man who died of cancer a few days later; his books are not selling well; History of Art is unavailable and financing cannot be found for a new edition; saw an exhibit of Bonnard and Vuillard; considers mural work the only important current painting; recounts a visit to Spain; Rivera was wounded in Mexico; Rivera's recent silence may be the result of Faure's article. 4 pp., in French

From Herbert Eustis Winlock, Director, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., February 13, 1937: Winthrop will not loan his collection. 1 p

From Allen Tucker, Castine, Maine, May 30, 1937: "I wonder if Museums and concerts haven't stopped rather than helped our creative efforts"; is glad to be back in America; wrote to Moe; "the foundation likes to bet on the unknown instead of helping anyone who has shown they HAVE ability and have done the work"; congratulates Pach on continuing to paint despite other responsibilities; sorry to hear Sloan is unwell. 1 p

From Ernestine Ludolf, Florence, Italy, June 22, 1937: Pach is "a good and faithful friend"; his kind words about Egisto are like "a flower of remembrance on his grave"; wants to give him a small painting by Egisto, showing a corner of the Montmartre studio where he and Pach first met. 6 pp

From Ida E. Guggenheimer, Paris, France, September 13, 1937: Attended a conference in Paris; visited the Fountain of the Innocents; made a thorough tour of the exhibition with Villon. 3 pp

From Marcel Duchamp, Paris, France, September 28, 1937: Would like to see his painting -- Sad Young Man on a Train -- join related paintings in California and believes Arensberg would agree; requests a photograph of the painting to reproduce in an album he is compiling. 2 pp., in French

From Allen Tucker, New York, N.Y., November 1, 1937: Thanks Pach for the Delacroix book; congratulations on "another great contribution to civilization"; completed a "pretty good summer's work" before his illness. 2 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., November 18, 1937: Thanks Pach for the book on Delacroix; the introduction is "wholly satisfying." 2 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, New York, N.Y., November 23, 1937: Reads some of Delacroix each day; "I'm beginning to understand your feeling about him." Picture postcard ("Self Portrait by Francesco Goya. Frontispiece to Los Caprichos. Madrid, circa 1803")

From L. (Mme. Elie) Faure, Paris, France, November 30, 1937: Thanks Pach for writing to her; wants to carry out her husband's wishes to make his work publicly accessible; sends a list of Faure's unpublished articles; discusses financial matters relating to the Harper's contract. 4 pp., in French

From Royal Cortissoz, New York, N.Y., January 2, 1938: Thanks Pach for his book on Delacroix, "the work of an artist and man of letters." 3 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., November 2, 1938: "I'm glad to stand by that statement." Picture postcard ("Mountain landscape. Chinese, Ming Period, 15th century, after a design attributed to Ma Yiian (flourished 1190-1221)")

From Henry Watson Kent, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., November 3, 1938: Thanks Pach for the "kind letter about the Morgan exhibition." 1 p. (frame 589) and envelope

From Henry Watson Kent, New York, N.Y., November 8, 1938: Thanks Pach for the inscribed copy of his book; is proud to be associated with the book and to have Pach say kind things about him. 1 p

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., November 9 and 11, 1938: Read -- Queer Thing, Painting -- ; "I had better begin now by telling my few objections, in order to hand you later my full bouquet"; "you exaggerate the Villon connection"; "you exaggerate the ignorance of Italian art on the part of our forbears"; "you praise some collectors too highly," especially Morgan and John Quinn; "your memory of Yeats is suspect"; Pach has created a "permanent record and source-book" full of "wisdom." 14 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., November 15, 1938: Grants permission to quote From his previous letter; Pach's book is "tremendously important." 2 pp

From Kenneth Hayes Miller, New York, N.Y., November 15, 1938: Congratulations on -- Queer Thing, Painting -- ; the book has "permanent value." 1 p

From Louis Lombard, [place unknown], France, November 23, 1938: Thanks Pach for his letters; describes the horrors of life as a soldier; he reads Whitman to maintain good spirits. 4 pp., in French

From Henry Watson Kent, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., December 9, 1938: Advises Pach to distribute new cards to schools. 1 p. + 1 p. enclosure (suggested text for announcement of Pach's availability as a lecturer)

From W.S. Rusk, Wells College, Aurora-on-Cayuga, N.Y., December 21, 1938: "Thank you for the conference the other day in which we discussed the artist and the art critic." 1 p

From G. Masolle, Evian, France, December 31, 1938: Thanks Pach for the extract From his book, which she translated immediately; it showed perfect understanding of Jean's character; -- The Prisoners of the World -- is impossible to find; Jean Cocteau has not published Jean's first essays or poems. 2 pp., in French

From Ernestine Ludolf, Florence, Italy, February 20, 1939: Is "grateful" for the "lovely tribute" to her brother, Egisto Fabbri, that appeared in Queer Thing, Painting; she and her brother were students of J. Alden Weir; Pissarro advised them to study the Old Masters; details of the sale of 12 Cézanne paintings From Egisto's collection; sending a privately printed memoir of her brother; invites Pach to call on her and various relatives when he is in Florence. 4 pp

From Simonne Maubert, Paris, France, April 5, 1939: Thanks Pach for sending his book; she was happy to recognize herself in one of the chapters; her English is improving and one day she may be able to read the entire book. 4 pp., in French.

To Magdalene Pach From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., July 8, 1939: Is looking forward to the Pachs' visit. 2 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., December 29, 1939: The book is a "glorious achievement... by far your best book"; it "brought back all my gratitude to you for all that you have taught me about art." 4 pp

From Daniel Gregory Mason, New York, N.Y., March 15, 1940: Thanks Pach for the "great pleasure and stimulus" of Ingres; "one grows to feel something of the affection, respect, and admiration for Ingres that you show the way to." 1 p

From Don F. Dickson, Director, Dickson Mound Museum, Lewistown, Ill., March 28, 1940: Sends photographs of pipes that Pach found interesting. 1 p. + enclosures (4 photographs of ceremonial pipes: "Front view of a human effigy tobacco pipe From the Great Temple Mound in Oklahoma, Ceremonial type"; "Front view. Ceremonial type"; "Side view. Ceremonial type"; and "Back view of human effigy tobacco pipe From the Great Temple Mound in Oklahoma, Ceremonial type")

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, March 30, 1940: Was interested in the Ohio mound builders in his youth; "my writing days are over I fear, for one thing I feel afraid I have nothing to say that would not sound commonplace"; "too much absorbed" in what is going on in this part of the world." 8 pp

From Ernestine Ludolf, Florence, Italy, April 18, 1940: Ingres is "splendid"; sympathizes with the "difficulties" Pach encountered when organizing the World's Fair art exhibition. 6 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Boothbay Harbor, Maine, September 2, 1940: Pach has found "the only paragraph in the whole book (which after a dozen rewritings) left me unsatisfied." Postal card

From G. Masolle, Evian, France, October 14, 1940: Is happy that Jean's memoirs are in Pach's hands; awaits English victory; the French are suffering, but she is confident the country will survive. 2 pp., in French

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., April 9, 1941: "We missed you at the John Sloan dinner"; he won't write any more about expatriates. 3 pp

From Alfred Vance Churchill, Northampton, Mass., April 21, 1941: Congratulations on Ingres; recalls Pach's help in acquiring important paintings for the Smith College Museum of Art. 3 pp

From Art Young, New York, N.Y., May 9, 1941: Congratulations on -- Masterpieces of Art -- . 1 p., illustrated with drawing of a stooped man walking with a cane

From Hugo Robus, New York, N.Y., June 13, 1941: Was pleased by Pach's letter praising his marble at the Museum of Modern Art; Alfred Barr was "delighted" by Pach's comments; there is also a Robus bronze at the Museum of Modern Art; "I never dated my work and so the actual year of production is a pretty hazy matter." 2 pp

From Ruth A. Wilmot, Oak Bluffs, Mass., [postmarked] August 2, 1941: She and Donald are enjoying their vacation. Picture postcard ("Yacht Club and Harbor, Edgartown, Mass.")

From Kenneth Hayes Miller, New York, N.Y., August 7, 1941: Comments on paintings From the Louvre shown at the M[etropolitan] M[useum of Art]; he doesn't enjoy the country as Pach seems to. 2 pp

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, August 30, 1941: "I believe the entire Mississippi basin to its utmost reaches was flooded with Aztec influences"; requests photograph of a piece Pach mentioned seeing in Columbus, Ohio; "French art will rise again"; recalls his first acquaintance with Poussin's work. 2 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., September 4, 1941: "I am reacting against this whole conception of 'mankind' as 'rabble' "; his new book will expound on this. 2 pp

From Charles Cunningham, Assistant Curator of Paintings, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Mass., September 11, 1941: Requests additional information about Pach's Delacroix painting; shares information on works in the collection of George Reinhardt, Winterthur, and the Metropolitan. 2 pp

From Charles Cunningham, Assistant Curator of Paintings, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Mass., October 15, 1941: Sends summary of information compiled when cataloging the Museum's version of Delacroix's -- Christ on the Sea of Genesareth -- . 1 p. + 4 pp. enclosure (notes on 6 versions of the painting)

From William Mills Ivins, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] January 27, 1942: Thanks for his "warm approval of the Bulletin article." 1 p

From Van Wyck Brooks, Norwalk, Conn., [postmarked] February 3, 1942: Thanks for sending the brochure about Quidor. Picture postcard ("The Dance of Death. The Ploughman Woodcut by Hans Holbein the Younger. German, 1497-1543")

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., [postmarked] February 19, 1942: Thanks for the Quidor catalog; saw the show yesterday; "he's really a discovery." Picture postcard ("Saint George and the Dragon. Woodcut by Lucas Cranach the Elder. German, 1472-1553")

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., [postmarked] February 27, 1942: "What you say about the book makes me regret all the more that it has to be postponed." Picture postcard ("Rembrandt, Dutch, 1606-1669. Portrait of the Artist"), with annotation by Pach: "Book on American Art proposed to the American Philosophical Society."

From Fred M. Stein and Arthur Strasser, New York, N.Y., March 21, 1942: In "recognition of what you have meant to the [Schilling] Fund... [we] take great pleasure in sending you the enclosed." 2 pp

From M.M. Pochapin, Music Appreciation Record Corporation, New York, N.Y., May 6, 1942: Please sign and return a copy of the agreement. 1 p. + 1 p. enclosure (May 6, 1942, From M.M. Pochapin, New York, N.Y. Pach has been selected a Judge for the "Art Appreciation Movement. In this capacity you are to pass on the true value of paintings submitted.").

to Magdalene Pach From M.M. Pochapin, Managing Director, Art Appreciation Movement, New York, N.Y., May 13, 1942: Requests that she read the organization's pamphlet about the Art Appreciation Movement and complete the "lengthy Qualification Form"; "great artists will make their paintings available at these small Public Service prices." 2 pp

From M.I. Block, Art Appreciation Movement, New York, N.Y., May 27, 1942: Receipt for 5 oil paintings consigned. 1 p

From Reginald Poland, Director, Fine Arts Gallery, San Diego, Calif., 5 June 25, 1942: "We realize increasingly that, in the Caravaggio, we have a magnificent work of art"; "we have just acquired a glorious Titian Madonna, painted about 1514-- very strongly Giorgionesque." 1 p

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., [postmarked] July 8, 1942: "What happens to them [artists] when they are 'above' politics? Don't they in the end lead themselves to the politics that destroy them?" Postal card + clipping ("Guest Artists," Time)

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., July 15, 1942: "I won't agree with you about artists and politics"; "a certain breadth of interests and sympathy does not drain one's energy." 2 pp

From Raymond B. Humphrey, Brown, Crosby & Co., Inc., New York, N.Y., July 17, 1942: Discusses insurance and storage arrangements for Pach's property while he is in Mexico. 2 pp

From Jean Lipman, Editor, -- Art in America -- , Cannondale, Conn., July 17, 1942: Agrees to publish his article on Ingres. 1 p

From Raymond B. Humphrey, Brown, Crosby & Co., Inc., New York, N.Y., July 20, 1942: Sends "lost policy releases" and policy numbers. 1 p

From Jean Lipman, Editor, -- Art in America -- , Cannondale, Conn., August 4, 1942: Pach's article on Ingres will appear in the October issue. 1 p

From Gilbert R. Gabriel, Schneider-Gabriel Galleries, Inc., New York, N.Y., August 10, 1942: "Your article on the Ingres is a masterpiece"; discusses the price of a painting of Trinity Church. 2 pp. + enclosures (12 business cards and 4 handwriten notes containing names, addresses, and telephone numbers of Mexican acquaintances)

From Jean Lipman, Editor, -- Art in America -- , Cannondale, Conn., August 19, 1942: Pach's piece on Ingres will be the lead article; accepts his proposal for an article on the "Mexican primitive Bustos." 1 p

From Raymond B. Humphrey, Brown, Crosby & Co., Inc., New York, N.Y., September 3, 1942: Discusses overpayment of insurance premium. 1 p. + 4 enclosures (3 invoices and inventory of artwork in storage). [postmarked September 3, 1942] From John Strasser, New York, N.Y. 4218 703-705 September 4, 1942: Discusses "early Hispano-Mexican" Madonna; "Rosenberg has an attractive show." 3 pp

From John Sloan, Santa Fe, N.Mex., September 8, 1942: Is home From the hospital; his exhibition was in Chicago, Denver, and Santa Fe, and will go to Albuquerque next and then Fort Worth; received "enthusiastic notices"; sold 2 pieces. 2 pp

From Jacob M. Heimann, Beverly Hills, Calif., September 14, 1942: "I greatly appreciate the idea of making an exhibition in Mexico"; inquires about lighting and dimensions of the galleries; "the lack of interest and the ignorance as far as art is concerned here, is unbelievable." 1 p. + 1 p. enclosure (lists of numbers)

From Lasar Kipnis, New York, N.Y., September 18, 1942: "Considering risk expenses at present offer seven and half percent for next three years." 1 p

From Lasar Kipnis, New York, N.Y., September 21, 1942: Expenses will be high; recommends he establish a relationship with Mizracchi [ sic] before arriving in New York; show him some "really valuable" paintings as well as "less expensive works on the sale of which we may really count"; suggests a selection of "object d'art" From A la Vieille Russie; November is the best time for an exhibition in Mexico. 3 pp

From John Strasser, New York, N.Y., September 25, 1942: Pyramid of the Sun, as it appears in the photograph, is "dazzling"; discusses his search for a job. 2 pp

From Lasar Kipnis, New York, N.Y., September 29, 1942: Proposed exhibition may receive the cooperation of the president of Mexico and the king of Rumania; "we must and shall have a first class show"; mentions several works he intends to include. 1 p

From Jean Lipman, Editor, -- Art in America -- , Cannondale, Conn., October 5, 1942: The editor of Cuadernos must insert a notice stating the article was written for publication in Art in America and appears simultaneously in translation. 1 p

From M.M. Pochapin, President, Art Movement, Inc., New York, N.Y., October 8, 1942: Is deciding whether to continue the Art Movement; Marsh resigned; "my enthusiasm has never waned"; Sloan remains involved; plans to market paintings through department stores; work by Walter and Magda Pach is being shown in Philadelphia and Atlanta. 2 pp

From Diego Rivera, [place unknown], October 13, 1942: He and the editors extend thanks and enclose payment. 1 p., in Spanish

From Adrian Bourcart, [place unknown], Mexico, October 21, 1942: Had the pleasure of attending Pach's lectures on art; requests clarification of true art versus false art and live art versus dead art. 4 pp., in French

From Robert Lebel, New York, N.Y., October 22, 1942: Saw Misrachi; likes [filmed twice] Pach's idea for an exhibit in Mexico; Marcel Duchamp and André Breton organized a surrealist exhibition; Guggenheim was inaugurated with an ingenious exhibition; the Dutch show at Duveen's is successful; Rosenberg has a Léger show and is preparing a Cézanne exhibit; Rosenberg is interested in Marsden Hartley; Chagall, now an official member of the surrealist group, is exhibiting at Pierre Matisse; Goetz may exhibit Paul Klee. 1 p., in French

From Jean Lipman, Editor, -- Art in America -- , Cannondale, Conn., October 22, 1942: "I was delighted with your article on Bustos"; "unless the article appears in Art in America prior to publication elsewhere, we cannot print it." 2 pp

From John Strasser, New York, N.Y., November 13, 1942: Comments on Mexico painted by Velasco. 2 pp

From Marjorie D. Mathias, College Art Association of America, New York, N.Y., November 14, 1942: The State University at Bowling Green, Ohio, has inquired about engaging Pach for a lecture. 1 p

From Henry Allen Moe, Committee for Inter-American Artistic and Intellectual Relations, New York, N.Y., November 16, 1942: "We want our grantees to be able to do what they ought to do and live as they ought to live"; Pach should let them know his anticipated expenses and how much time he needs in Mexico. 1 p

From Carlos Merida, Denton, Tex., [postmarked] November 16, 1942: Air time was insufficient to broadcast Pach's full text: note inscribed on Section of Plastic Arts, Department of Fine Arts, Secretary of Public Education, "No. 202 Radio Bulletin for Saturday, November 21, 1942" (transcript of a feature story on José Hermenegildo Bustos abstracted From an article by Walter Pach). 4 pp., in Spanish

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., November 18, 1942: With the help of Eleanor and Kenyon, he has managed to read some of the Cuadernos Americanos Pach sent; "I like immensely its tone and elevated feeling"; "I envy your meetings with Diego Rivera, who has always seemed to me a very great painter"; is "shocked" that Lionello Venturi and William G. Constable don't share his opinion of Rivera; a "complicated family problem" keeps them From traveling; is working on -- The Age of Washington Irving -- . 4 pp

From Stephen Duggan, Director, Institute of International Education, New York, N.Y., November 30, 1942: Is glad that Pach's lectures were well received; hopes Pach can remain in Mexico. 1 p

From Alfonso Reyes, Colegio de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico, December 3, 1942: He is honored by Van Wyck Brooks's words and wants to correspond with him. 1 p., in Spanish

From Stephen Duggan, Director, Institute of International Education, New York, N.Y., December 7, 1942: Is "delighted to learn that Pach will receive a grant through Mr. Moe and 'his Committee.' " 1 p

From Lasar Kipnis, New York, N.Y., December 8, 1942: "Just returned From Johns Hopkins Hospital." Telegram

From José Clemente Orozco, [place unknown], December 10, 1942: Modern art in Mexico faces a powerful reaction that aims to end 20 years of academic work; looks forward to visiting Pach soon. 1 p., in Spanish

From Henry Allen Moe, New York, N.Y., December 11, 1942: "Your letter received but no word From the university." Telegram

From A.S. Baylinson, New York, N.Y., December 18, 1942: He and Constant were rejected by the jury of the "so called Victory exhibition"; reports the death of Michael Rosenthal. 2 pp

From George Constant, New York, N.Y., December 20, 1942: Is glad that Pach, a "fine painter," now has time to paint; the Artists for Victory exhibition at the Metropolitan is "lousy." 2 pp

From Henry Allen Moe, Committee for Inter-American Artistic and Intellectual Relations, New York, N.Y., December 21, 1942: Confirms that Pach is to receive a grant; a final report is due upon return. 1 p. + 2 enclosures (1 sheet of figures titled "Mex--New York" and copy of 1 p. letter to Rodulfo Brito Foucher, Rector, National University of Mexico, From Henry Allen Moe, New York, N.Y., announcing grant to the University for Pach's lectures)

From Pedro Henríquez Ureña, Buenos Aires, Argentina 4218 764-765 December 22, 1942: Sent photographs of the work of Attilio Rossi; Argentine critic, Julio Rinaldini, will send books. 1 p

From Lasar Kipnis, New York, N.Y., December 29, 1942: Asks Pach to write an article on new acquisitions by Mr. Poland's Museum; wants Pach lecture in San Diego; when a new catalog of the permanent collection is published, "we are sure the work will be entrusted to you." 2 pp

From Jean Lipman, Editor, -- Art in America -- , Cannondale, Conn., December 29, 1942: Robert Montenegro's book impressed him; hopes Montenegro will write on Estrada for Art in America; requests Pach's help in arranging it. 1 p

From Harry Miller Lydenberg, [place unknown], Mexico, December 29, 1942: Discusses origin of the phrase "biblia a-biblia." 1 p

From Marcel Duchamp, New York, N.Y., January 3, 1943: Fearing visa problems, he has decided not to go to Mexico; made several "suitcases"; the opening at Peggy's gallery was a big success; plans a surrealist show with Schiaparelli and Breton; Reynolds, just arrived in Madrid, requested that Pach extend greetings to Frida and Diego. 2 pp., in French

From Arthur Strasser, New York, N.Y., January 7, 1943: Congratulations on receiving a grant; "it is not to the Schilling Fund but to you personally, Walter, that our gift to the Metropolitan was the beginning of the belated recognition of Flannagan's genius"; Fred Stein would appreciate suggestions for the Schilling Fund award. 2 pp

From John Rewald, Weyhe Gallery, New York, N.Y., January 13, 1943: Is glad Pach liked his article on Bonnard; will send Pach a copy of his new book on Seurat. 2 pp., with postscript From Laura Canade: New York Public Library has purchased Pach's Self-Portrait

From John Strasser, New York, N.Y., January 16, 1943: "People who might have enjoyed the 'Victory' show 25 or 30 years back now unanimously dislike that accumulation of junk"; "read of your and Rivera's project for spreading Flannagan's reputation." 3 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, New York, N.Y., January 17, 1943: Saw Jacques Villon's "grand portrait" of Pach at the "Modern Museum." Picture postcard ("Illuminated initial From a South Italian ms. Valerius Maximus written about 1450")

From M.L. Stafford, American Consul, American Embassy, Mexico, January 22, 1943: Pach's registration of American citizenship was approved. 1 p

From Harry Miller Lydenberg, Biblioteca Benjamin Franklin, [place unknown], Mexico, January 23, 1943: Is sending a check in appreciation of the time and interest Pach contributed to their exhibition; wants to publish Pach's tribute to Bustos. 1 p

From Stephen Duggan, Director, Institute of International Education, New York, N.Y., February 3, 1943: Pach's observation about Mexican education interested him; he is "well informed concerning the anti-American attitude" in Mexico. 1 p

From Jean Lipman, Editor, -- Art in America -- , Cannondale, Conn., February 15, 1943: Thanks Pach for arranging to have Fernando Gambo write an article on Estrada; Pach's writings have stimulated interest in Mexican art; his review will not be published due to "paper restrictions." 1 p

From Van Wyck Brooks, New York, N.Y., March 9, 1943: Has "rediscovered" New York by living in the city temporarily; "I am especially happy to have got to know some of the new young writers"; wants more news of Diego Rivera. 3 pp

From Robert Lebel, New York, N.Y., March 15, 1943: Agrees with Pach that the Metropolitan's La Victoire exhibit resembles a Paris Salon of 30 years ago with the addition of a few abstract pieces; an exhibition commemorating the 30th anniversary of the Armory Show is possible; saw one of Pach's paintings at the Art Students League; Pierre Matisse exhibited his father's work; Matta and Miro made Pierre Matisse's last show, "Art and the War," interesting; the Mexican Room at the Museum of Natural History is being reorganized; recommends Charles Sterling's Gazette des Beaux-Arts article on French primitives; asks if Pach has seen VVV, the review headed by André Breton; no longer wishes to be involved in art sales. 2 pp., in French

From Georges Wildenstein, Director, Gazette des Beaux-Arts, [filmed twice] New York, N.Y., March 26, 1943: Wants to publish Pach's article; hopes he will agree to some minor changes. 1 p., in French

From Lyman Bryson, Conference on Science, Philosophy and Religion, New York, N.Y., March 26, 1943: Requests comments on a paper by Professor William Scott, Randolph-Macon Women's College. 1 p. + 2 pp. enclosure ("Conference on Science, Philosophy and Religion, Reply to Questionnaire of December 7, 1942 by Walter Pach")

From Paul J. Sachs, Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., April 8, 1943: Grenville L. Winthrop collection has been bequeathed to the Fogg Museum; wartime conditions have caused universities to curtail their art departments; "it is extremely important that able and understanding North Americans, such as yourself... should be our cultural ambassadors in Latin America"; suggests summer programs in the United States where Pach might teach; tells Pach to add his name to the speakers list maintained by the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs. 2 pp

From William N. Eisendrath Jr., Chairman, Exhibition Committee, Arts Club of Chicago, Chicago, Ill., April 26, 1943: Requests assistance in selecting works for a Rivera retrospective planned for February 1944. 1 p. + 1 p. enclosure (list of works by Rivera, "suggested by Mrs. Goodspeed, April 26, 1943," with notes by Walter Pach)

From Annette B. Cottrell, Director, Speakers Service Section, Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs, Washington, D.C., April 28, 1943: Thanks Pach for his "interest in inter-American affairs and desire to collaborate with the work of this office as a speaker." 1 p

From Robert Chester Smith, Director, Hispanic Foundation, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., April 30, 1943: Considers Pach "an historic figure, one of the first to call attention to the development of Mexican art"; this is not the right time for Pach's proposed publications and translations. 1 p

From Harry Miller Lydenberg, [place unknown], Mexico, May 8, 1943: Pach's "review of the Low study on the place of the Museum in our world today" is "admirable"; politically or economically motivated explanations of art will "fail"; he is less "pessimistic" than Pach on the role of public funding; public libraries are a good example. 2 pp

From Annette B. Cottrell, Director, Speakers Service Section, Coordinater of Inter-American Affairs, Washington, D.C., May 25, 1943: Pach will be included among the organization's available speakers. 1 p

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., May 28, 1943: El Hijo Prodigo and Cuadernos are "typographically delightful"; wishes he knew Spanish; would like to be able to contribute articles to Mexican periodicals; John Sloan is reported to be "very frail." 4 pp

From William N. Eisendrath Jr., Chairman, Exhibition Committee, Arts Club of Chicago, Chicago, Ill., June 4, 1943: Need to figure costs for Rivera exhibition before continuing negotiations for loans; Pach must supply further information. 1 p. + 2 pp. enclosure ("List of Rivera Paintings," June 3, 1943)

From Elias Lieberman, Associate Superintendent, Board of Education of the City of New York, Brooklyn, N.Y., June 7, 1943: Pach will be granted a "substitute license" to teach Spanish in the New York public schools. 1 p

From Raymond B. Humphrey, Director, Brown, Crosby & Co., Inc., New York, N.Y., June 18, 1943: Instructions for renewing war damage and fire insurance policies. 1 p

From James A. Porter, Washington, D.C., June 19, 1943: Thanks Pach for the "remarkable" introduction and subtitle suggestions for his book. 1 p.

to Maurice Block, Curator, Henry E. Huntington Art Gallery, San Marino, Calif., From Marjorie S. (Mrs. A.R.) Waybur, Kingsley Art Club, Sacramento, Calif.,June 20, 1943: Inquires about Pach's availability to lecture. 2 pp

From Ignacio Marquina, National Institute of Archaeology and History, Mexico City, Mexico., June 26, 1943: Gives Pach permission to export the 5 archaeological objects specified on the list attached. 1 p. + 1 p. enclosure (copy of form completed by Pach), in Spanish

From Frederick Lewis Allen, -- Harper's -- Magazine, New York, N.Y., August 27, 1943: Rejects 2 articles, "The Negro's Place" and "Your Ancestors of the Soil." 2 pp

From John Sloan, Santa Fe, N.Mex., August 31, 1943: Is recovering From surgery; feeling better, but still unable to travel. 1 p

From Charles A. Thompson, Department of State, Washington, D.C., September 7, 1943: Dr. Moe will contact Pach about writing a book, in Spanish, about "art resources of the United States." 1 p

From Ernst E. Clad, New York, N.Y., September 9, 1943: Outlines Pach's finances; advises specific investments. 3 pp. + 1 p. enclosure (copy of September 9, 1943 letter From Walter Pach to H.C. Wainwright & Co. authorizing sale of stocks)

From Laurence Duggan, Adviser on Political Relations, Department of State, Washington, D.C., September 17, 1943: Cannot assist with funding or promise to purchase his book; Dr. Moe is attempting to finance the project; "I think the preparation of the book would be a far more useful contribution to inter-American understanding than your acting as an unofficial Mexican cultural representative in the United States." 1 p

From René d'Harnoncourt, United States Department of the Interior, Indian Arts and Crafts Board, Washington, D.C., September 29, 1943: Read "Ancestors of the Soil" and was "impressed by the strength and depth of its argument"; "widest dissemination of this theme could be one of the strongest factors in building up Inter-American relations." 1 p

From Charles A. Thompson, Department of State, Washington, D.C. October 4, 1943: Is returning "Ancestors of the Soil"; "Mr. d'Harnoncourt expresses great interest." 1 p

From Eugenio de Anzorena, Secretary, Mexican Embassy, Washington, D.C., October 7, 1943: Brought Pach's letter to the attention of the minister; returns the enclosures. 1 p. + enclosures (letter, June 9, 1943, to Ezequiel Padella, Secretary of Exterior Relations, From Iñes Amor, Francesco Orozco Muñoz, Eduardo Villaseñor, Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, Alfonso Noriega Jr., and Octavio G. Barreda, Mexico: endorses Pach as a representative of Mexican culture, 5 pp., in Spanish; and letter, June 28, 1943, to Iñes Amor, Francesco Orozco Muñoz, Eduardo Villaseñor, Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, Alfonso Noriega Jr., and Octavio G. Barreda, From Ezequiel Padella, Mexico: recommendation of Pach, 1 p., in Spanish)

To Springmeier Shipping Co from J.O. Ellis, New York, N.Y., October 14, 1943: Notification of claim for items missing From shipment of Pach's possessions. 2 pp

From Houston Peterson, Head, Division of Social Philosophy, Cooper Union, New York, N.Y., October 15, 1943: Pach is "definitely on our list of favored speakers" for the second semester. 1 p. + enclosure (brochure for "Cooper Union Forum, first half 1943-1944")

From John Sloan, Santa Fe, N.Mex., December 30, 1943: Went out to his old house, "Sinagua," which reminds him of Dolly; still recuperating From surgery; needs to clean up his Chelsea studio; it is unlikely he can get to New York; read Pach's article on the "Eight"; the name was invented by an Evening Sun writer; "the 'chosen' of Robert Henri we were, not at all a mutual admiration group as I recall the time." 3 pp

From Art Young, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] December 30, 1943: New Year's greetings. Picture postcard ("28th Issue--Art Young's Annual Hello")

From Donald Carlisle Greason, Deerfield, Mass., April 8, 1944: The enclosed letter was sent in a "weak moment"; "is it not time you took up the mightier sword again; or have your ideas changed?" 1 p. + 1 p. enclosure (letter, April 6, 1944, to Hugo Gellert and Gentlemen of the [Exhibition and Competition] Committee, Artists for Victory, Inc., From Donald Carlisle Greason, Deerfield, Mass.: declines invitation to participate in the Artists for Victory exhibition; "I shyly deplore this undignified business of artists thumbing rides of the troop trains, of Patriotism for Publicity--and prizes!"; "did not Pach write the obituary of this [prizes] in his Ananias?")

From Henry Watson Kent, New York, N.Y., November 30, 1944: Hopes his notes on Pach's manuscript will be of use and interest. 1 p. + 7 pp. enclosure (notes, comments, and suggestions relating to Pach's manuscript)

From Ernst E. Clad, New York, N.Y., December 11, 1944: Information about Pach's 1944 taxes. 1 p. + enclosures (completed "Form for Computing Capital Gains and Losses," 1 p., and printed instructions, 5 pp.)

From George Ferdinand Of, [place unknown] Read both of Pach's articles and is returning one; "you must take me to see that charming Miss Roger's paintings."

From George Ferdinand Of, [place unknown], December 28, 1944: Read both of Pach's articles and is returning one; "you must take me to see that charming Miss Roger's paintings." Picture postcard ("'Chapeau de Faille' by Rubens")

From Donald Carlisle Greason, Deerfield, Mass., February 9, 1945: "I thought my annual letter of 'regrets' to the 'Artists for Defeat' might amuse you"; quotes remarks by Sinclair Lewis made when declining the Pulitzer Prize. 1 p

From Rufus E. Clement, Atlanta University, Atlanta, Ga., April 11, 1945: Sends photographs taken at the "art show"; mentions recent reviews of their exhibition. 1 p. + 2 photographs (Pach viewing the exhibition, and Pach speaking in the gallery)

From Viking Press, New York, N.Y., April 30, 1945: Royalty statement for Masters of Modern Art. 1 p

From Harper & Brothers Publishers, New York, N.Y., June 30, 1945: Royalty statement for Ingres and -- Queer Thing, Painting -- . 1 p

From Jacques Lipchitz, Paris, France, July 31, 1945: [Illegible due to show-through]. 2 pp., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, November 29, 1945: May continue work begun several years earlier on "Aesthetics and History"; working on "Decline and Recovery in the Figure Arts"; when in "hiding" he kept a diary, which he may publish. 2 pp

From Fred M. Stein and Arthur Strasser, Trustees of the Schilling Fund, New York, N.Y., February 8, 1946: Thank Pach for his work on behalf of the Schilling Fund; offer him a salary to continue as an adviser. 1 p., with annotation by Pach (on reverse), February 10, 1946, draft letter of acceptance, 1 p

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., June 23, 1946: Eleanor's leg had to be amputated; they will move to an apartment in New York in October. 2 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., August 26, 1946: "Eleanor's condition has taken a serious turn for the worse, and I fear it is only a question now of a very few weeks." 1 p

From Jacques Lipchitz, Paris, France, November 19, 1946: New York trip was postponed; describes a wonderful exhibit at Delacroix's studio; occasionally sees Jacques Villon, who has a painting in the Salon d'Automne. 2 pp., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, January 10, 1947: Pach's son and daughter-in-law visited him; publishers are not interested in his diary; Aesthetics and History will have to go to a university press. 2 pp

From Irma L. Richter, New York, N.Y., March 27, 1947: Is returning Pach's copy of ABC on Painting by Severini; "I wonder whether you have tried to follow his advice regarding technique." 1 p

From James Daugherty, Westport, Conn. [postmarked, March April 22, 1947]: Saw Pach's exhibition at Laurel Gallery; "your work has grown simpler and broader and more unified." 1 p

From Octavio G. Barreda, [place unknown], Mexico, October 9, 1947: Thought of Pach when visiting galleries in Italy and Paris; Paris, Rome, and Florence seem to have recovered From the war, but it wasn't the same without the old faces; in both art and literature it is the end of an era; young artists and writers do not know their message; family news; will visit New York and Havana. 4 pp., in Spanish

From Kurt Wolff, Pantheon Books, New York, N.Y., November 5, 1947: Asks Pach to accept all changes made by the editor. 1 p

From Kurt Wolff, Pantheon Books, New York, N.Y., December 4, 1947: Needs to clarify certain points; Pach must bear the cost of retyping. 1 p

From Kurt Wolff, Pantheon Books, New York, N.Y., January 29, 1948: The final pages of his manuscript must be condensed. 1 p.

To Kurt Wolff From Walter Pach, New York, N.Y., January 30, 1948: They never discussed, nor did he authorize, changes to the final pages of his book. 1 p

From Henry Watson Kent, New York, N.Y., February 21, 1948: Remarks on Pach's complimentary statement about him. 1 p

From Margarita Nelkin, Paris, France, September 1, 1948: Has heard From Pach through letters to Mlle. Burchardt; thanks Pach for supporting Spanish Republicans; is going to Rome for the Congres Interparlementaire and then to Brussels and Amsterdam to give a conference on Mexican art; in November she will leave for Mexico. 1 p., in French

From George Ferdinand Of, New York, N.Y., September 5, 1948: Thanks Pach for bringing pictures of his collection and explaining it personally; Pach has "persuaded" him to paint again. 3 pp

From Francis Hackett, Bethel, Conn., November 8, 1948: Pach is one of the "Old Guard"; his book, -- American Rainbow -- , will include "a lot in it about John Quinn"; his wife recently published a volume on Swedenborg. 2 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Cornwell, Conn., December 2, 1948: Thanks for the inscribed copy of his "enchanting" new book; glad Pach met Francis Hackett. 3 pp

From Pantheon Books, Inc., New York, N.Y., February 1, 1949: Royalty statement. 1 p

From Pantheon Books, Inc., New York, N.Y., July 1, 1949: Royalty statement. 1 p

From Pantheon Books, Inc., New York, N.Y., August 1, 1949: Royalty statement for The Art Museum in America. 1 p

From Anne Chase (Mrs. Arthur White) Sullivan, Glen Head, N.Y., November 3, 1949: Pach's lecture was "just right as a preliminary to the exhibition"; her father would have approved. 2 pp

From Mary Socard, Paris, France, December 13, 1949: Pach's young friend is making good progress learning French; discusses the student's appreciation of art and philosophy. 4 pp., in French

From Jimmy Stern, New York, N.Y., December 23, 1949: Even with "favorable 'press'," his book has not sold well; is "discouraged"; appreciated Pach's note. 1 p

From Pantheon Books, Inc., New York, N.Y., February 1, 1950: Royalty statement. 1 p

From François Puaux, Acting Consul General of France, New York, N.Y., March 7, 1950: Congratulates Pach on being awarded the cross of Chevalier of the Legion of Honor "for the services you have always rendered to the French cause." 1 p

to John Collier From Walter Pach, New York, N.Y., March 11, 1950: Hopes Professor Collier will want the thoughts expressed in Pach's manuscript "given to a wider audience." 1 p., annotated with reply, May 30, 1950: "This has been good reading for me!"

From Meyer Schapiro, Columbia University, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] March 27, 1950: "Comments on the first draft of W. P., Renoir." 3 pp

to Meyer Schapiro From Walter Pach, New York, N.Y., March 27, 1950: Responses to "Comments on the first draft of W.P., Renoir." 4 pp. draft + 4 pp. final copy

From Charles E. Slatkin, Art Book Guild of America, Inc., New York, N.Y., March 28, 1950: Invites Pach to become a member of the Art Book Guild's Advisory Board. 1 p

From Charles E. Slatkin, Art Book Guild of America, Inc., New York, N.Y., April 17, 1950: Acknowledges Pach's acceptance of appointment to the Advisory Board. 1 p

From Atlantic Monthly Company, Boston, Mass., April 20, 1950: "Assignment of Copyright" to Atlantic Monthly Corporation of Pach's article, "Art Must Be Modern." 1 p

From W.G. Constable, Department of Paintings, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Mass., May 30, 1950: Thanks Pach for assistance in securing the Portrait of Madame Villchelis for the museum; agrees that attribution to Gros is most likely; reports the death of Ned Holmes. 2 pp

From Mary Socard, Paris, France, June 20, 1950: The young student has left; he would have benefited From a longer stay but at least had an introduction to European culture; sympathizes with Pach's disappointment over having his prologue replaced by an analysis of painting construction. 3 pp., in French

From Pantheon Books, Inc., New York, N.Y., August 1, 1950: Royalty statement for -- The Art Museum in America -- . 2 pp

From Nanny (Mrs. Sigmund) Pollitzer, New York, N.Y., November 8, 1950: Sorry to learn of Magda's illness. 2 pp

From Nanny (Mrs. Sigmund) Pollitzer, New York, N.Y., November 11, 1950: Extends her sympathy; will try to attend the service. 2 pp

From Eufrosia A.W. Tucker, New York, N.Y., November 11, 1950: Sympathy on the death of Mrs. Pach. 2 pp

From Sarah d'Harnoncourt, New York, N.Y., November 13, 1950: Sympathy on the death of Mrs. Pach. 1 p

From Edith R. Abbot, New York, N.Y., November 13, 1950: Sympathy on the death of Mrs. Pach. 2 pp

From Fanny and Ralph Ellison, New York, N.Y., November 14, 1950: Sympathy on the death of Mrs. Pach. 1 p

From Robert L. Duffus, Westport, Conn., November 15, 1950: Sympathy on the death of Mrs. Pach. 1 p

From Roland Balay, New York, N.Y., November 20, 1950: Offers condolences on the death of Mrs. Pach. 1 p., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, September 23, 1951: Congratulates Pach on his recent marriage. 2 pp

From Mutual Benefit Health and Accident Association, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] November 23, 1951: "Official Receipt for Premium Due." Postal card

From [signature illegible], Athens, Greece, December 24, 1951: Carouzos will select photographs of the subjects that interest Pach; wants to see photographs of Pach's latest paintings. 4 pp

From Jacques Lipchitz, New York, N.Y., January 12, 1952: Pach is right that endings offer new beginnings; predicts that Pach will resume work soon. 1 p., in French

From Rufino Tamayo, [place unknown], Mexico, January 22, 1952: Appreciates Pach's stimulating critique; expects to spend the next year on a mural for the Palace of Fine Arts; congratulates Pach on his marriage. 2 pp., in Spanish

From Bernard Berenson, Ischia, Italy, May 29, 1952: "My indignation over distorted, abstract, non-representational art is that it can lead nowhere." 2 pp

From George Ferdinand Of, [place unknown], June 19, 1952: The Schilling Fund award is an "honor" he wishes to decline without offending anyone. Picture postcard ("Cézanne. 'Urtiel des Paris'")

From U.S. Treasury Department, Internal Revenue Service, New York, N.Y., August 8, 1952: "Adjustment of tax liability" and audit for calendar year 1950. 1 p. + enclosures (1 p. "Statement of Income Tax Due," and 4 pp. report)

From Bernard Berenson, [place illegible], September 23, 1952: Agrees with most of Pach's letter to the New York Times; "feeling for art is of the few and understanding for even fewer." 2 pp

From André Masson, Aix-en-Provence, France, May 2, 1953: Was considering canceling his New York exhibit before receiving Pach's encouraging and kind letter; hopes they will meet. 1 p., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, March 17, 1954: Comments on Pach's "poem to Greek art"; is working on a new edition of Italian Paintings; sends an article he wrote on Picasso. 2 pp

From George Ferdinand Of, Rome, Italy. Is in Rome; heading for Naples, [undated (prior to April 18, 1954)]: Picture postcard ("Roma-Foro Romano, veduto del Campidoglio")

From George Ferdinand Of, Padua, Italy, April 18, 1954: Saw Giottos; visited Ravenna, Naples, and Pompeii. Picture postcard ("Padova-Monumento al Generale Gattamelata")

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, April 25, 1954: He still does not accept the Metropolitan Museum's Madonna as an Antonello; "I remain an optimist" that culture will once again become "genial, creative and human." 2 pp

From Hendrik Willem van Loon, Riverside, Conn., [1955]: He is much better; they have a house near the water where friends are welcome. 1 p., in Dutch

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, April 21, 1955: "I agree with all you write about the present state of art appreciation"; read the book about Sloan by Van Wyck Brooks; not impressed by Sloan's work; wonders how much Pach influenced Brooks. 2 pp

From William Mills Ivins, Woodbury, Conn., July 17, 1955: Was disappointed to have missed a visit by Pach and Brooks; is living a solitary and quiet life. 2 pp

From Jacques Lipchitz, Beach Haven, N.J., August 7, 1955: After reading Pach's article, he wants to read the book; he no longer appreciates Maillol's sculpture; discusses Renoir's strong judgments of other artists; although Epstein has reached a dead end in Paris, he is a good artist. 3 pp., in French

From Jacques Lipchitz, Beach Haven, N.J., August 15, 1955: Thanks Pach for sending Epstein's book; considers Epstein a good portrait painter but not such a good sculptor; discusses his theory that Jews need to assert their identity. 1 p., in French

From Alfred Russell, Paris, France, September 27, 1955: Thanks Pach for the award; the modern Italian painters he once admired no longer interest him; he finds the sculptors a "revelation"; his exhibition drew "brutal and barbaric insults"; Paris is "the pivot of the universe." 2 pp

From Hendrik Willem van Loon, Riverside, Conn., October 17, [1955?]: "My sincere congratulations upon having finished these miles of paint." 1 p., with illustrated envelope (sailboats) + illustrated card (landscape with windmills)

From Carl Sandburg, Flat Rock, N.C., March 27, 1956: "Values" Pach's letter and plans to affix it to his copy of Faure's History of Art. 1 p

From Germain Seligman, New York, N.Y., April 15, 1957: Ingres's -- Study for the Iliad -- is in the permanent collection of the Art Gallery of Toronto. 1 p. + enclosures (2 pp. description of -- Study for the Iliad -- [Apotheosis of Homer], photograph of -- Study for the Iliad -- , and 2 pp. [photocopies] From Exposition Ingres catalog, 1921)

From Martin Baldwin, Director, Art Gallery of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, April 16, 1957: The gallery is conducting further research on Study for the Iliad; will share information when it becomes available. 1 p

From Lewis Mumford, Paris, France, April 27, 1957: Has reviewed his correspondence since 1920; Pach's letters are "real treasures" to be saved for historians; being in Paris made him recall Pach's "friendliness and hospitality in 1932"; has rediscovered Ingres now that his taste is mature. 2 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Bridgewater, Conn., January 4, 1958: Will study Howells' letters at the Harvard library; recommends novels by Howells. 2 pp

From Hans Christian, Rome, Italy, April 7, 1958: Is visiting Raymond and Ruth in Rome. Picture postcard ("Roma--Arco di Constantino"), in German
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.

Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Walter Pach papers, 1857-1980. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.pachwalt2, Series 2
See more items in:
Walter Pach papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw999db4dbe-6c32-4d1e-bcea-c83f9210d3d2
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-pachwalt2-ref33

Chronological Name and Subject Files

Collection Creator:
Hitchcock, Henry-Russell, 1903-1987  Search this
Extent:
21.9 Linear feet (Boxes 1-22)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1919-1987
Scope and Contents note:
Files consist of Henry-Russell Hitchcock's personal and professional correspondence, as well as subject files relating to academic research, teaching, curatorial interests, and professional associations. Subject files are comprised mainly of correspondence and printed material, with a small number of photographs that mostly relate to exhibitions and writings. After 1932, copies of Hitchcock's outgoing letters are almost always included, making the files from 1932-1987 almost complete.

The correspondence includes large numbers of letters from prominent architectural historians, architects, artists, preservationists, museum directors and curators. Also included is correspondence with students, friends, relatives, publishers, and representatives of organizations and institutions.

Among the correspondents of note are: Bernard Berenson, Eugene Berman, Leonid Berman, Lyonel Feininger, Brendan Gill, Robert Goldwater, George Howe, Lincoln Kirstein, J. J. P. Oud, Erwin Panofsky, Kingsley Porter, Paul J. Sachs, R. M. Schindler, Theodore Sizer, E. Baldwin Smith, Peter van der Meulen Smith, James Soby, Victor Spark, Harold Sterner, John Summerson, Virgil Thomson, Paul Vanderbilt, Theo Van Doesburg, Helmut von Erffa, and Gordon Washburn. Other important correspondents represented in a decade or more of correspondence include: Jere Abbott, Winslow Ames, Everett A. (Chick) Austin, Alfred H. Barr, Agnes Rindge Claflin, John Coddington, Walter Cook, John Coolidge, Henry (Harry) Sayles Francis, George Heard Hamilton, Ada Louise Huxtable, Philip C. Johnson, William Jordy, George N. Kates, Edgar Kauffmann, Jr., Richard Krautheimer, Phyllis W. Lehmann, Thomas J. McCormick, Agnes Mongan, Lewis Mumford, Nikolaus Pevsner, A. Kinglsey Porter, Willebald Sauerlander, Vincent Scully, Helen Searing, James Thrall Soby, Dorothy Stroud, John Summerson, Virgil Thomson, Emily Tremaine, Paul Vanderbilt, Rudolph Wittkower, and Frank Lloyd Wright.

See Appendix for a list of individuals, organizations, and subjects in Series 2
Arrangement note:
Files are arranged with a single alphabet for each year.
Appendix: Individuals, Organizations, and Subjects in Series 2:
Below is an index to individuals, institutions, organizations, and a small number of subject files, found in Series 2: Alphabetical Files. The index indicates the name and the alphabet year(s) in which each can be found.

Hitchcock did not follow strict alphabetical schema when organizing his files and filing eccentricities for the letters D, M, N, and V are explained below. The original arrangement has been left in place due to the difficulties and time involved in re-arranging the material within multiple alphabets.

Note on filing order for D's: Names beginning with the prefix "de" (e.g. De Cordova) are all filed before names beginning with the letters "de" e.g. Deerfield Academy.

Note on filing order for M's: Names beginning with the prefix "Mac" and "Mc" are all filed after names beginning with Ma. They are interfiled according to the first and subsequent letters following the prefix e.g. McIntyre, Mackay, McKean, MacLaren.

Note on filing order for N's: Proper names beginning with the word "new" (e.g. New American Library) are all filed before names incorporating the syllable "new" e.g. Newark Public Library.

Note on filing order for V's: Names beginning with the prefix "van" (e.g. Van Derpool) are all filed before names beginning with the syllable "van" e.g. Vancouver Hotel.

Missing Title

Aaron, Dan (1967)

Abbott, Etheldred (1946)

Abbott, Jere (1927, 1928, 1945-1947, 1949-1950, 1952-1955, 1958, 1968, 1982-1984, undated)

Abby, Elwina (1928)

Abraham, C. P. (1946)

Abrams, Al (1979)

Abrams, Inc. (1969, 1977-1978)

Abrams, Robert (1976)

Abramson, Louis Allen (1948, 1949)

Academy of Political Science (1952)

Achilles, Mrs. Theodore (1955)

Ackerman, James S. (1948, 1952-1955, 1960, 1964, 1966)

Ackworth, Angus (1945)

Adams, Anthony (1960)

Adams, Florence B. (1948)

Adams, Frances S. (1965)

Adams, Frederick (1949)

Adams, Henry (1974)

Adams, Nicholas (1976-1978)

Adams, Philip R. (1952)

Addis, Reid M. (1974-1975)

Addison Gallery of American Art (1953-1954)

Addison, John (1982, 1984)

Adler, David (1928)

Agtmaal, J. G. van (1958)

African Studies, International Congress of (1978)

Ahda Artzt Gallery (1964)

Air Ministry (1946)

Aitken, Dott and Son (1946-1947)

Akron (1948)

Alabama Polytechnic Institute (1955)

Aladdin Office Services (1957)

Albany Institute of History and Art (1966, 1969)

Albers, Joseph (1946)

Albrecht, Otto (1927)

Albright Art Gallery (1947)

Albright-Knox Art Gallery (1962)

Aldrich, Frances T. (1948)

Alexander, Robert L. (1951, 1956-1958, 1960-1961, 1963-1965, 1967-1968, 1975-1977, 1986)

Alexander, Dr. and Mrs. Samuel Allen (1958)

Alexander, William (1968)

Alfa (1958)

Alfieri, Bruno (1959, 1964-1965, 1968-1969)

Alfonsin, Anthony (1983)

Alford, John (1946, 1955)

Alford, Roberta (1961)

Alinari (1958)

Allen, Mr. and Mrs. Eliot D. (1953)

Allen, F. P. (1961)

Allen, W.G. Russell (1945, 1947, 1952-1953, 1956)

Allen and Unvin, Ltd. (1978, 1980)

Allert de Lange, C. V. (1956)

Allison, George E. (1948)

Allstate Insurance (1948)

Altree, Guy (1975)

Altschul, Frank (1952)

Alumnae Association [Smith College] (1952) ( -- see also -- : Smith College Alumnae Association)

Ambassadeurs Club (1946)

America-Italy Society (1958)

American Academy in Rome (1950, 1958-1959, 1983)

American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1953-1954, 1957-1958, 1961-1963, 1965, 1970, 1973, 1976, 1981)

American Antiquarian Society (1935, 1939, 1947, 1952, 1955)

American Architectural Books (1937, 1945, 1961)

American Association for State and Local History (1963)

American Association of Architectural Bibliographers (1958-1959, 1961, 1963-1964, 1966, 1970)

American Association of Museums (1952, 1955, 1962)

American Association of Schools of Architecture (1982)

American Association of University Professors (1948, 1981-1982)

American Association of University Women (1948, 1958)

American Automobile Association (1962)

American Collector -- (1947)

American Committee on Renaissance Studies (1954)

American Council of Learned Societies (1950, 1961, 1963, 1980)

American Embassy, London (1962)

American Express (1952, 1955)

American Federation of Arts (1942, 1947-1948, 1952, 1955, 1958, 1962, 1974)

American Friends Service Committee (1951)

American Historical Association (1942)

American Historical Review -- (1943, 1952)

American Institute of Architects (1942, 1945, 1948, 1950, 1952-1955, 1957, 1959, 1961-1962, 1964, 1969-1970, 1972-1973, 1978, 1980)

American Institute of Planners (1945)

American Life Foundation (1972)

American Museum in Britain (1961)

American National Theatre and Academy (1952)

American Peoples Encyclopedia -- (1953)

American Philosophical Society (1943)

American Quarterly -- (1949, 1952-1953, 1955)

American Science and History Preservation Society (1981)

American Scholar -- (1948, 1982)

American Society of Architectural Historians (1945-1947)

American Society of Planners and Architects (1946)

American State Capitols Research Project, Victorian Society in America ( -- see -- : Victorian Society in America, American State Capitols Research Project)

American Studies Association (1976)

American Unitarian Association (1941)

Amery, Colin (1982)

Ames, Eleanor D. (1968)

Ames, Winslow (1942, 1945-1947, 1950-1957, 1965, 1967-1968, 1970, 1976, 1978-1979, 1981)

Ames, Winslow and Anna (1973)

Amherst College (1967)

Amsterdam (1963)

Amulree, Basil (1946-1947, 1952)

Ancient Monuments Society (1957)

Anderson (1951)

Anderson and Castle, Ltd. (1959)

Anderson, Arthur J. (1955)

Anderson, P. G. (1946, 1955, 1958)

Anderson, Paul R. (1946)

Anderson Photographers (1952)

Anderson, Stanford (1979)

Andrews, Edward (1959)

Andrews, George F. (1959-1960)

Andrews, Wayne (1945, 1947, 1956, 1958, 1961-1964, 1968-1970, 1982)

Annan and Sons (1936, 1954, 1956, 1958)

Anson, Peter F. (1953, 1955)

Antheil Booksellers (1969)

Antiques (1981)

Antunes, Paulo (1958)

Appalachian Mountain Club (1946)

Appel, R. G. (1965)

Appleman, Philip (1957)

Appleton, William Sumner (1946)

Arango, Jorge (1955)

Archaeological Institute of America (1928, 1950, 1952-1955)

Archaeology -- (1952)

Archer, John (1964, 1976)

Architect and Building News -- (1949)

Architects Discussion Group (1966)

Architects for Peace (1982)

Architects Journal -- (1956)

Architects Yearbook -- (1946, 1955-1956)

Architectura -- (1969, 1971-1972)

Architectural Association (1946, 1956, 1962)

Architectural Design -- (1951, 1956-1957, 1967, 1978)

Architectural Digest -- (1980)

Architectural Forum -- (1945, 1954-1955, 1957, 1964, 1966-1969)

Architectural Heritage -- (1968)

Architectural History -- (1966)

Architectural History Association, Inc. (1976)

Architectural History Foundation, Inc. (1978-1987)

Architectural League of New York (1950, 1962, 1974-1975)

Architectural Press (1945-1951, 1954-1958, 1964, 1968, 1982)

Architectural Quarterly -- (1968)

Architectural Record -- (1928, 1936, 1937, 1946, 1948, 1950-1952, 1954-1959, 1963, 1966, 1969, 1976, undated)

Architectural Review -- (1927, 1945-1969, 1977, 1982-1983)

Architecture and Building (1959-1960)

Architecture Association (1950-1951, 1955, 1959)

Architecture Club (1952, 1956, 1958-1959, 1965)

Architecture Collaborative (1957)

Architecture: Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries -- (Pelican History of Art series) (1962-1968)

The Architecture of H. H. Richardson and His Times -- [reprint] (1961-1962)

Architecture Plus -- (1974)

Architektoniki -- (1959)

Archives Centrales Iconographiques d'Art National (1958)

Archives Centrales Photographiques (1956)

Archives of American Art (1960-1961)

Archon Books (1967, 1979)

Arcschavir, A. (1959)

Arizona State University (1960, 1962, 1969)

ARK (1955-1956)

Arkitektens Forlag (1962)

Arlington, Margaret (1962)

Armitage, Mrs. G. W. (1951)

Armitage, Merle (1956)

Armour, John (1954)

Arnasson, H. Harvard (1956)

Arnold, Frederic K. (1948, 1955)

Arnot Art Gallery Association (1958-1959)

Art and Technics -- (1950-1951)

Art Association of Indianapolis (1947)

Art Bulletin -- (1940-1941, 1943, 1945, 1948, 1950-1951, 1953, 1955-1961, 1966- 1967, 1969)

Art Gallery of Ontario (1970)

Art Gallery of Toronto (1950) (see also: Toronto, Art Gallery of)

Arthur, Eric (1956)

Artigas, Francisco (1955)

Art in America -- (1947, 1955-1960)

Art Institute of Chicago (1951, 1956, 1978, 1983) (see also: Burnham Library;

Chicago, Art Institute of; Ryerson and Burnham Libraries)

Art Journal -- (1977)

Art News -- (1948, 1953-1955, 1959, 1967)

Art Nouveau Exhibition (1960)

Art Quarterly -- (1953-1971)

Art Reference Bureau (1958, 1967, 1970-1971)

Arts -- (1928, 1963)

Arts and Architecture -- (1956)

Arts Club of Chicago ( -- see -- : Chicago, Arts Club of)

Arts Council of Great Britain (1955-1956, 1968)

Arts Review -- (1962)

Asam Brothers (1965)

Ash, Carla Caccamise (1978)

Ashton, Leigh (1953)

Asia (1928)

Askew, Constance (1945, 1947, undated)

Askew, Constance and R. Kirk (1941, 1948, 1961)

Askew, Pamela (1977)

Askew, R. Kirk (1950-1952, 1963)

Aslin, Elizabeth (1956, 1958, 1960, 1962-1964, 1968-1970, 1972-1974, 1979-1981, 1984-1985)

Association of Art Museum Directors (1952)

Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (1949, 1954)

Atelier -- (1951)

Athenaeum of Philadelphia (1969-1970, 1977-1978, 1980-1981, 1983, 1985)

Atkin, William Wilson (1958)

Atkinson, Fello (1950-1959, 1961-1967, 1969, 1971-1973, 1977-1978, 1980, 1982)

Atkinson, G. A. (1961, 1969)

Atkinson, George (1955)

Atomic Energy Commission of Canada ( -- see -- : Canada, Atomic Energy Commission of)

Auden, W. H. (1952-1953)

Aufsberg, Lala (1958, 1965-1967, 1971-1972)

Aurora Zanichelli (1955)

Austin, A. Everett [Chick] (1953, 1957, 1984)

Austin, A. Everett [Chick] and Helen (1952)

Austin Art Center (1965) ( -- see also -- : Trinity College)

Austin, David (1966)

Austin, Helen (1948, 1950, 1956, 1958, 1960, 1965-1968, 1970, 1973, 1986, undated)

Austin, Mollie (1961)

Austin, Sarah G. (1979)

Australian Journal of Art (1978)

Authors Club (1962)

Auzas, Pierre-Marie (1965-1967, 1979-1980)

Avenue -- (1985)

Avery, Elizabeth P. (l950)

Avery Library, Columbia University (1951, 1973-1974, 1977, 1981) (see also: Columbia University)

Avery, Peter (1965)

Avery Study Center, Columbia University (1982) ( -- see also -- : Columbia University)

Avis Rent-a-Car (1961)

Azelle, Robert (1955)

"B. 1955" (2 pocket calendars) (1955)

Bacon, Leonard Lee (1970)

Bacon, Mardges (1984)

Baga, Khalid (1979)

Baggage Declaration (1945)

Bailey, James and Gordon, Inc. (1957-1962, 1964)

Bailey's Studio (1946)

Baker (1957)

Baker, Joseph (1960)

Baker, Roger (1953)

Bakewell, Hester Adams (1970)

Baldinger, Wallace S. (1949)

Baldwin, Deborah (1985)

Baldwin, Raymond E. (1945)

Baldwin, Susan (1976)

Ball, Mr. and Mrs. William Burnham (undated)

Ballard, Mary (1974)

Ballman, Lucille (1949)

Balmoral Castle (1952, 1954)

Baltimore City Museum (1952) (see also: Peale Museum)

Baltimore Museum of Art (1948)

Baltimore Sun -- (1968) ( -- see also -- : Sun) (1968)

Banham, Reyner (Peter) (1956, 1959, 1961-1962, 1972-1973)

Banham, Reyner (Peter) and Mary (1958)

Banker, Douglas (1977)

Banking (1965-1966, 1970-1971)

Bannister, Turpin C. (1941, 1943-1945, 1947, 1950-1952, 1954-1956, 1958, undated)

Bantam Books (1962)

Bar, D. D. (1969)

Barbarosa, Jorge de Castro (1957)

Barber, Leila (1966)

Barclay, Jo (1953)

Barclay's Bank (1945-1948, 1950, 1952-1955, 1957-1958, 1960-1961, 1972)

Bardwell, Helen H. (1955)

Barley, M. W. (1952)

Barman, Christian (1951)

Barnard College (1954-1957, 1965)

Barnes, Anthony (1952)

Barnes, Charles D. (1968)

Barnes, Cynthia (1962)

Barnes, Henry (1952)

Barnlund, Mr. and Mrs. D. C. (1949)

Barnstone, Howard (1953, 1958, 1960-1961)

Baron, Docteur Lucien (1927)

Barr, Alfred H. (1928, 1930-1932, 1937, 1945, 1954, 1973, 1981, undated)

Barr, Marga (Daisy) (1957, 1959, 1961, 1978, 1983, 1985, undated)

Barrall, Xavier (1976)

Barrand, H. (1955)

Barrett, John (1956)

Barsee, L. (1976)

Barton, Eleanor (1949, 1955-1956, 1959, 1965)

Baskin, Leonard and Lisa (1969)

Batsford, Ltd. (1941, 1948-1953, 1955-1957)

Battle, Governor (1955)

Bauch, K. (1966)

Bauer, A. (1928)

Bauer, Catherine (1940)

Bauhaus Archiv (1963)

Baumann, Christopher (1946)

Baume, Henry B. (1956-1957)

Bayer, Adolf (1963)

Bayer, Herbert (1954)

Bayer, Julia (1945, 1952)

Bayley, J. B. (1946, 1952)

Bayley, John (1953)

Bayley, Stephen (1974)

Beardall Fenton and Co. (1969)

Beatty, C. J. P. (1962)

Beck, Andy (1976)

Beck, Haig (1979)

Beckwith (1964)

Bedenkapp, John (1952-1956, 1959)

Beeton, M. (1946)

Beggs, Thomas (1946)

Belding, Ann (1950-1951)

Bell, Herbert C. F. (1946, 1948-1949, 1957-1958)

Bell, Janet M. (1952)

Bellotto (1960)

Belluschi (1954-1956)

Beloit College (1945)

Belz, Carl (1972)

Benda, E. (1931)

Bender, Angela (1966)

Bendixson, T.M.P. (1961)

Benero, Herbert W. (1955)

Benes, Miroslava (1975)

Benesch, Otto (1946, 1956)

Benesch, Otto and Eva (1947, 1959)

Bennett, Gordon C. (1946)

Bennett Books (1950)

Bennett, Richard M. (1939)

Bennett, Mrs. Roger Williams (1962)

Bennington College (1953, 1957)

Benson, Elizabeth (1962)

Benson, John Howard (1952-1954)

Benson, Robert Alan (1968)

Benton, Charlotte (1978)

Benton, Tim (1974)

Berenson, Bernard (1931)

Bergdoll, Barry (1979-1982, 1984)

Berger, Maurice (1978)

Bergeron, Claude (1967)

Berlin (1956, 1964, 1975)

Berlin, Technische Universitat (1966)

Berman, Eugene (Genya) (1931-1932, 1945, 1969)

Berman, Leonide (1931, undated)

Bermudez, Luis (1955)

Bernett, Dick (1950)

Bernett, F. A. (1959, 1963-1965, 1968)

Bernett, Frederick (1961)

Bernett, P. A. (1967)

Bernier, Rosamond (1955)

Berrill, Maurice (1958, 1958)

Berry-Hill Galleries (1971, 1981)

Betjeman, John (1946, 1952, 1956)

Bett, Regina (1966-1967)

Bevan, Roger (1978)

Beyer, Klaus G. (1970-1971)

Bialostocki, Jan (1968, 1970-1971, 1973, 1985)

Bicknell, Minnette (1975)

Bicknell, Peter (1965)

Biederman, Charles (1978)

Bielfeld Kunsthalle (1968-1970, 1973-1975, 1985) ( -- see also -- : Kunsthalle Bielfeld)

Biennale (1959-1960)

Bier, Julius (1953)

Bildarchiv -- (1956)

Billcliff, Roger (1971)

Bills, Paid (1965-1970)

Binet, Ann (1955)

Birkhams, Martin (1960)

Birmingham Public Library (1946)

Birrell, J. P. (1963)

Birthday (1978, 1980, 1983, 1985)

Bischoff, Ralph F. (1946)

Bissell, Elaine (1951)

Bixley, Grace (1954)

Blach, Peter (1939)

Blackheath Society (1955)

Blackman, Audrey (1962-1963)

Blake, Sarah (1966)

Blanch, M. (1958)

Blanckenhagen, Peter H. von (1979)

Blau, Eve M. (1978-1984)

Bletter, Rosemarie (1981-1982)

Bliss, Eleanor (1945, 1947-1953, 1959-1960, 1963, 1967, 1972, 1974-1975, 1978, 1981, undated)

Bliss, Robert (1963)

Bliss, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Woods (1958)

Bloch, Stella Rubenstein (undated)

Blond, Anthony (1962)

Bloom, Florence and William (1964-1965)

Blue Cross/Blue Shield (1963, 1982, 1985) ( -- see also -- : Medicare/Blue Shield)

Blume, Marcia (1960-1961)

Blunt, Anthony (1946)

Blyth, R. Henderson (1947-1948)

Boardman, Jane Carrott (1969)

Boas, George (1954)

Boase, T.S.R. (1957)

Bobbs Merrill Co. (1966, 1968, 1971)

Bober, Harry (1955, 1957)

Bodine, Thomas R. (1973)

Boggs, Jean (1952, 1957, 1960, 1962)

Bohan, Peter J. (1957, 1963)

Bohdan, Carol (1971)

Boissonnas (1927)

Bollingen Foundation, Inc. (1956, 1960)

Bolschwig, Otto A. (1927) ( -- see also -- : Van Bolschwig, Otto A.)

Bolton and Fairhead, Ltd. (1946-1947)

Bond van Nederlandsche Architecten (1956)

Bonet Gari, Luis (1972-1973)

Bonn (1963-1964)

Bony, Jean (1956)

Bonython, John (1966)

Book Land (1963)

Boothby, Norman B. (1952)

Booziotis, Bill (1959)

Borgenecht Gallery (1961)

Borges, Max (1956)

Born, Ernest (1952)

Bornecque, Jacques-Henry (1955)

Borowski and Co. (1970)

Boschma, C. (1963)

Bose, Konrad (1953-1954)

Boston Albany Railroad (1963)

Boston Architecture Center (1949, 1966)

Boston Arts Festival (1954)

Boston Athenaeum (1950-1951)

Boston College (1975)

Boston, Municipal Court of (1966)

Boston, Museum of Fine Arts (1945, 1947-1950, 1967, 1969, 1975, 1982) ( -- see also -- : Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)

Boston Public Library (1955)

Boston Redevelopment Authority (1964, 1967)

Boston Society of Independent Artists (1950)

Boston University (1954, 1963, 1968)

Botz, H. (1969)

Bourgeois, Victor (1953)

Boutmy, P. de (1956)

Bouton, Margaret (1949)

Bouverie, David Pleydell (1945, 1950, 1952-1953, 1955, 1965, 1972-1973, 1975) ( -- see also -- : Pleydell-Bouverie, David)

Bowdin College (1973-1974)

Bowen, Carroll G. (1960)

Bowler, Fairchild (1955)

Boyd, Robin (1966)

Boyden, Mary (1952)

Boyer, Christine (1983)

Boyle, Michael (1970)

Brackett, Jeffrey R. (1935)

Bradley, John (1957)

Bradley, Prentice (1954)

Bramm, Vincent (1974)

Brandeis University (1961)

Brandl, Ernest H. (1946-1947, 1959-1961)

Brandon, Harvey (1970, 1981)

Brandon-Jones, John (1955-1956, 1960)

Branner, Robert (1964-1966)

Brasher, Louise Tharaud (1979)

Braxton, Anne (1968)

Brazil (1957)

Braziller, George (1959-1961, 1966, 1972)

Brena, Francisco (Paco) (1982-1983)

Brendel, Otto J. (1950)

Brentano Books (1941, 1946)

Brett, Lionel (1953, 1955)

Bretter, Ernest (1955)

Brewer, Charles (1961)

Brewer, Gussie (1946)

Brewer, Helen (1959)

Brewer, Joseph (1928, 1935-1938, 1940-1941, 1944-1961, 1964, 1967, 1969, 1971-1973, 1984)

Brewer, Warren and Putnam, Inc. (1932)

Brewster, E. W. (1946)

Brewster, Margaret F. (1946)

Briggs, Rose T. (1947, 1949-1954, 1963-1964, 1973, 1978, 1981)

Bright, William E. (1959)

Brighton Corp. (1958)

Brion-Guerry, L. (1971)

Bristol Society of Architects (1951)

Bristol, University of (1963, 1965-1967)

Britannica Encyclopedia (1953) ( -- see also -- : -- Encyclopedia Britannica -- )

British Book Center (1951-1952)

British Broadcasting Corporation (1955, 1969, 1974-1975)

British Committee for the Interchange of Teachers (1951-1952, 1955)

British Council (1960)

British Council in the Netherlands (1952)

British Information Services (1945, 1951)

British Ministry of War Transport (1945, undated)

British Museum (1950)

Britton, Coby (1972)

Broadfoot, Winston (1976-1977)

Brockhaus Fine Arts (1974)

Brocklebank, Mr. and Mrs. Charles (1986)

Brocklebank, Marcia Early (Mrs. Charles) (1966, 1973, 1977-1978)

Brockunier, S. H. (1952)

Broderick, Mosette Glaser (1974-1977, 1979-1981, 1985-1986)

Brodrick, Peter (1949-1957, undated)

Brokaw, Chloe (1961)

Brooklyn Museum (1945, 1963, 1967, 1977)

Brooks, H. Allen (1953, 1956, 1958-1983)

Brotz, Howard (1963-1964, 1966, 1979)

Brown, Betty (1960)

Brown, Charles H. (1958, 1962)

Brown, Donald H. (1955-1956)

Brown, Eric (1949)

Brown, Blanche (1972)

Brown, Elizabeth Miles (1977)

Brown, Mrs. Leonard M. (1967)

Brown, Margaret (1949, 1951)

Brown, Milton W. (1957, 1976)

Brown, Robert (1970, 1974-1975)

Brown, Theodore (1956)

Brown University (1982)

Brown, William E. (1955)

Browne, Mrs. Douglas (1952)

Brownstone Revival Committee of New York City (1969-1970)

Bruccoli, Matthew (1965)

Brun, Jean-Pierre (1973)

Brunet, Peirre (1956)

Brunner, Bob (1962)

Brussels (1972)

Bryan, John Albury (1970)

Bryan, Polly (1959)

Bryant, Helen P. (1962)

Bryn Mawr College (1973-1974)

Bucarelli, Palma (1965)

Bucher, Francois (1960)

Buchholz Gallery (1948)

Buchman, Joan (1968)

Buck, Robert L. (1982)

Buckley, Charles E. (1964, 1971)

Buckman, Louise (1950)

Buddensieg, Tilmann (1978)

Buell, Irwin A. (1948)

Buffalo Academy of Fine Arts (1939, 1982)

Buffalo Architectural Guidebook (1979, 1981-1982)

Building Design (1974)

Building Magazine (1951)

Built in the U.S.A. (1952)

Bull, Harry (1946)

Bulloch, O. M. (1956)

Bulloche, J. E. (1955)

Bullock (1978)

Bulloz (1958)

Bunce, John (1954)

Bunce, Nellie (1955, 1959, 1968, 1973, 1979-1980, 1986)

Bunschaft, Gordon (1956)

Bunting, Bainbridge (1967)

Burchard, John Ely (1947, 1951-1952, 1956, 1962)

Burden, William A. M. (1955)

Burdon-Muller, Rowland (1948-1952)

Burg, Hermann and Margaret (1946)

Burg, John (1958)

Burke, Anne (1962-1964, 1967-1970, undated)

Burke, Joseph (1954-1958)

Burnham, Alan (1942, 1937, 1956-1957, 1970)

Burnham, Frances B. ( 1953)

Burnham Library, Art Institute of Chicago (1945, 1971) ( -- see also -- : Ryerson and Burnham Libraries; Art Institute of Chicago; Chicago, Art Institute of)

Burns, Howard (1968)

Burns, John (1952, 1983)

Burroughs, T.H.B. (1967)

Burton, Christopher (1963)

Burton, Emily (1952)

Burton, Michael (1953, 1956)

Bush, Lucile (1965)

Bush, Martin H. (1963)

Bush-Brown, Albert (1952, 1956-1958, 1977)

Bush-Brown, Harold (1954, 1965)

Butler, Jeanne F. (1972)

Butler, L. D. (1967)

Butler, Ruth (1957)

Butterfield, Victor (1945, 1947)

Butterick, George F. (1978)

Cabral, Edward (1980)

Cadbury-Brown, John (1955)

Cadbury-Brown, H. T. (Jim) (1956, 1958)

Cahill, Fred V. (1957)

Cahn, Elizabeth (1977)

Calder, Sandy (1938, 1955-1956)

Caldwell, Ian (1975-1976)

Calendars (see: B.1955)

California (1965)

California Institute of Technology (1948-1949)

California Palace of the Legion of Honor (1950)

California, San Jose State University (1979)

California, University of (1951-1952, 1961, 1964, 1966-1967, 1971, 1973, 1976, 1980)

Callisen, Sterling A. (1941)

Callisen, Sterling A. and Sally (1945)

Cambridge [Mass.] Historical Society (1967)

Cambridge University (1962, 1964, 1966)

Campagnie Francaise d'Aeronautiques (1956)

Campanella, Gaspare (1970)

Campbell, Colin G. (1978)

Campbell, Malcolm (1975)

Canada, Atomic Energy Commission of (1973)

Canada Council (1971)

Canada, National Archives of (1956)

Canada, National Gallery of (1926, 1960)

Canada, Royal Architectural Institute of (1960)

Canfield, Abigail and Cass (1975)

Canner and Co. (1949)

Caples, Sara Elizabeth (1969-1970)

Car (European) (1965)

Car (1966)

Cardiff Public Library (1946)

Carey, Jane F. (1973)

Carey T. (1973)

Carlhian, Jean Paul (1952-1953, 1966, 1971, 1973)

Carling, E .B. (1947-1948)

Carlisle, Anna (1956)

Carlson, Ralph (1979)

Carnegie Book Shop (1952)

Carnegie Institute (1955, 1985)

Carnegie Institute of Technology (1947, 1954)

Carpenter, G. R. (1946)

Carpenters Company of Philadelphia (1973)

Carr, Gerald (1968)

Carre Gallerie (1947-1949)

Carrington, Robert (1953, 1970)

Carroll, Martha 1975

Carrott, Richard G. (1955-1956, 1959-1963, 1965, 1967-1969, 1971-1979, 1981-1986)

Carter, Amon E. (1960)

Carter Foundation (1961)

Carter, Lady Bonham (1956)

Carter, Edward C. (Bobby) (1926, 1944-1948, 1960)

Carter, Ernestine (1947, 1952, 1962-1963, 1968, 1978-1979, 1983) ( -- see also -- : Carter, John and Ernestine)

Carter, Gwendolyn (1952)

Carter, John 1941, (1946, 1948, 1952, 1954, 1959)

Carter, John and Ernestine (1936, 1945) ( -- see also -- : Carter, Ernestine)

Carter, Norman F. (1952, 1954, 1959)

Casabella-Continuita (1961, 1965)

Casanelles, Enric (1959)

Cascieri, Arcangelo (1954)

Case Western Reserve University (1972-1973)

Cassidy, Victor M. (1974)

Cassilly, Carolyn (1974)

Casson, Hugh (1948, 1955)

Cassy, Edmund J. (1964)

Cast Iron Architecture, Friends of (1970, 1973-1974)

Castano Galleries (1963)

Castro, Dicken (1955-1957, 1960-1961)

Catholic University of America (1963)

Catlin, Stanton L. (1952, 1956)

Catsoulis, Evangelos (1981, 1983)

Causey, Andrew (1983)

Cavanagh, Tom R. (1949)

Cement and Concrete Association (1954)

Center for Inter-American Relations (1969)

Central Corporate Library (1960)

Central Council for the Care of Churches (1955)

Central National Bank of Middletown (1946)

Central Office of Information (1955-1956)

Centrum (1963)

Century Association (1972-1973, 1975-1977, 1979-1980, 1982, 1984)

Cetto, Max L. (1960)

Chafee, D. S. (1984)

Chafee, Richard (1969, 1974, 1976-1978)

Chalfont, Randolph (1962-1963)

Chambers Encyclopedia -- (1946-1949, 1954, 1961-1963)

Chapin, Betty (1981)

Chapin, Betty and Schuyler G. (1975, 1982)

Chapman, Edward (1952-1953)

Chapman, Rosamund (1957)

Charette (1963)

Charney, W. Mick (1977)

Chattey, Paul W. (1983)

Cheek, Leslie (1946-1948, 1953, 1984)

Cheek, Richard (1978-1979)

Chelmsford and District Chapter, Society of Architects (1962)

Cheltham, Charles (1962, 1964)

Chermayeff, Serge (1939, 1946-1948, 1950, 1954)

Chernow, Barbara (1982)

Chesapeake and Ohio Railway Co. (1948)

Chevojon Freres (1956, 1958)

Chicago Architectural Landmarks, Commission on (1964)

Chicago Architectural Photographing Co. (1956, 1958, 1966)

Chicago, Art Institute of (1937, 1944, 1945, 1951, 1960, 1978) ( -- see also -- : Art Institute of Chicago; Burnham Library Ryerson; Burnham Libraries)

Chicago, Arts Club of (1951-1952)

Chicago Committee on Architectural Landmarks (1960)

Chicago Historical and Architectural Landmarks, Commission on (1969-1970, 1973, 1975)

Chicago School of Architecture Foundation (1967)

Chicago, University of (1947, 1953, 1957, 1961-1962, 1973, 1986) ( -- see also -- : University of Chicago)

Chickering, A. H. (1954)

Childs, Charles D. (1951-1952, 1955)

Childs, Maurice F. (1952, 1955)

Chittenden, A. J. (1947)

Christian Science Monitor -- (1948)

Christiansen, Erwin O. (1946)

Christmas Cards (1952, 1983, undated)

Church, Robert M. (1951-1952, 1954-1955)

Churchill, Agnes (1948)

Cincinnati (1969)

Cincinnati Art Museum (1955-1956, 1960-1961)

Cincinnati Astronomical Society (1935)

Cincinnati Modern Art Society (1948)

Cincinnati, University of (1966)

Cistercian Order (1958)

City Art Museum of St. Louis ( -- see -- : St. Louis, City Art Museum of)

City University of New York (1970, 1974-1976, 1978)

City [of Springfield, Mass.] Library Association (1954)

Ciucci, Giorgio (1970)

Claflin, Agnes Rindge (1948-1949, 1952, 1956, 1959, 1961, 1966, 1973, 1977-1978) ( -- see also -- : Rindge, Agnes)

Clapp, Verner W. (1953)

Clark Art Institute (1973, 1986)

Clark, G. R. (1946)

Clark, James (1973)

Clark, Orton Loring (1952)

Clark, Robert J. (1960, 1963-1971, 1974-1975, 1980)

Clark, Ronald W. (1956)

Clark, Susan (1975)

Clark, Willene B. (1976)

Clarke, M. L. (1962)

Clarke, Marian (1947-1948, 1950)

Clarke, Peter (1946)

Clausen, Meredith (1987)

Clayton, B. D. (1971-1972)

Clayton, Barry (1965)

Clerehan, Neil (1953)

Clews, Mrs. Henry (1955)

Clifton-Raymond Associates (1968)

Clifton-Taylor, Alec (1984)

Clinton [Conn.] Historical Society (1947)

Close, Elizabeth (1960)

Clough, R. T. (1959)

Club of Odd Volumes (1948-1950, 1952-1957, 1961-1965, 1968-1970)

Cochrane, Alexander S. (1947, 1951-1954)

Cochrane, Alexander and Cally (1950)

Cochrane, Mr. and Mrs. E. W. (1953)

Cochrane, Eric (1964)

Cochrane, Eric and Lydia (1956, 1983, 1985)

Cochrane, Lydia (1955, 1959, 1960-1963, 1965, 1967, 1970-1971, 1975, 1977-1978, 1980-1982, 1984, 1986)

Coddington, John (1945-1949, 1951, 1956-1957, 1959, 1961-1962, 1968-1970, 1977, undated)

Coe, Bill (1958)

Coe, R. E. (Ted) (1962)

Coe, Ralph T. (1953, 1955, 1974)

Coffin, David R. (1965, 1968, 1973)

Cogswell, Dorothy (1951, 1959, 1962)

Cohen, Alfred (1946)

Cohen, Joan L. (1954-1957, 1960, 1963-1965)

Cohn, David N. (1984)

Cohn, Suzanne (1968)

Colby College (1968)

Cole, Dorothy (1958)

Cole, Harry (1957)

Coletti, Joseph (1961)

Coletti, Paul (1957)

Colgate University (1976, 1978)

Colibris Editora Ltda. (1962, 1964-1965, 1967)

Colin, Mrs. Ralph F. ( 1955)

Collaborazione Culturale, Instituto per la (1962)

College Art Association (1940, 1946-1953, 1955-1959, 1961-1964, 1966, 1969-1971, 1973-1979)

Colliers Encyclopedia -- (1947-1949, 1958-1959)

Collins, Cecil (1956)

Collins, Colin (1955)

Collins, Elizabeth (1959)

Collins, George R. (1960-1961, 1964, 1968, 1975-1976, 1979, 1983)

Collins, Peter (1964-1965, 1967-1968)

Colonial Travel Bureau (1955)

Columbia Historical Society (1982)

Columbia University 1937, 1939-1941, 1945, 1947-1948, 1954-1956, 1958-1959, 1961, 1964-1969, 1971, 1973-1977, 1979-1983, 1985-1986 ( -- see also -- : Avery Library; Avery Study Center, Columbia University)

Columbia University, Temple Hoyle Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture (1984)

Columbus Gallery of Fine Arts (1948-1949)

Colvin, Howard M. (1959)

Colwell, Miriam (1976)

Combs, Tom (1975)

Comite Francais D'Historie de L'Art (1967)

Commercial Credit Corporation (1947)

Committee for the Centennial Exhibition of New England Architecture (1957)

Committee for the Preservation of Architectural Records (1979)

Committee on Education and Labor, U. S. Congress (1954)

Committee on Government and Art (see: Government and Art, Committee on)

Community Arts Center (1945)

Community Chest (1958)

Comparative Studies in Society and History -- (1958)

Conant, Kenneth G. (1946-1947, 1952, 1973)

Concrete Quarterly -- (1955)

Condit, Carl W. (1963)

Condolence Letters [on death of mother] (1952)

Conference Board of Associated Research Councils (1948, 1951)

Congress on the History of Art, Twentieth International (1960-1961)

Conlon, Kathleen M. (1969)

Connaissance des Artes -- (1959)

Connecticut Automobile Assigned Risk Plan (1946-1947)

Connecticut College (1938-1942, 1944, 1947, 1953, 1956, 1963, undated)

Connecticut Commission on the Arts (1968)

Connecticut, Department of Agriculture (1937)

Connecticut State Department of Consumer Protection (1986)

Connecticut, State of (1946, 1948)

Connecticut, University of (1952, 1963)

Connecticut Valley Historical Museum (1954)

Connors, Joseph (1984)

Constable, Olivia (1955)

Constable, W. G. (1952-1953)

Constantine, Mildred (1952, 1955, 1960-1961, 1963)

Contemporary Authors -- (1978)

Cook, R. V. ( 1946)

Cook, Ruth (1952, 1956)

Cook, Mrs. Sidney (1950)

Cook, Thomas (1956-1957)

Cook, Walter (1946-1947, 1949-1956, 1958)

Cooke, Howard Lester (1954-1955)

Cookson, Beatrice (1970)

Coolidge, Harold (1956)

Coolidge, John (1939-1941, 1944-1945, 1950-1951, 1953-1956, 1958, 1960-1962, 1966, 1968, 1973-1974, 1976, 1978-1979, 1983, undated)

Coolidge, John and Polly (1947-1949, 1969, 1977)

Coolidge, Polly (1952)

Cooper (1952)

Cooper, Douglas (1947, 1953, 1960)

Cooper-Hewitt Museum (1972-1973, 1975, 1979-1980, 1983)

Cooper Union (1946-1948, 1955, 1964-1965, 1968)

Copp, Philip (1979)

Copplestone, Lewin (1972)

Corcoran, Desmond (1981)

Corcoran, G. S. (1946)

Corcoran, Gerald (1952)

Cordes, Paul (1945)

Cordingley, Alan (1957, 1961)

Cordingly, Ann (1975)

Corke, Jean (1962)

Corkran, W. S. (1954-1955)

Cornell University (1946, 1964-1966, 1969, 1976)

Corning Glass Center (1952)

Cortetti, John (1952)

Costabel, Jorge (1956)

Costopoulos, Dorothy (1973-1975)

Cott, Perry B. (1946, 1949)

Country Life -- (1952-1954, 1956, 1958, 1962-1963)

Courtauld Institute of Art (1966)

Court House (1979)

Courtright, Margot (1978)

Covell, William King (1936, 1946, 1948-1952, 1958, 1962-1963, 1965, 1968)

Coventry Architecture and Planning Department (1955)

Cowdrey, Mary Bartlett (1951, 1952-1955, 1958-1965, 1968, 1973-1974)

Cowin, Ruth (1962)

Cowles, Mr. and Mrs. Gardner (1975)

Cowles, William S. (1952)

Cowling, Francis B. (1949-1950)

Cox, Harvey (1970)

Cox, Trenchard (1952, 1956)

Cox, Warren (1957)

Craig, Maurice James (1949)

Cranbrook Academy and Museum of Art (1982, 1984)

Crandall, Robert T. (1959)

Crane, Alexander (1949, 1951)

Crane, Tom (1980)

Crapanzano, Frank (1947)

Craven, Wayne (1962)

Crawford, Martha (1958)

Creative Art (1928)

Creese, Walter (1945, 1950-1954, 1956, 1960-1962, 1968-1969)

Criticism (1961)

Crivelli Galleria (1960)

Crook, Joseph Mordaunt (1975, 1981, 1983)

Crosby, Sumner (1951-1952, 1958-1959)

Crowe, R. N. (1956)

Crowell Co. (1967)

Crowell, Frederick (1962-1963)

Crystal Palace (1954)

Cubitt, James (1952, 1966)

Cucci, Ditta (1966)

Culpepper, Ralph (1966)

Cultural Center, New York (1974)

Cummings, Abbott Lowell (1947, 1951, 1956, 1964)

Cunard Lines (1949, 1973, 1976)

Cunill, Titit (1973, 1974)

Cunningham, Charles C. (1945, 1947-1948, 1957, 1962, 1964, undated)

Cunningham, Charles C. and Priscilla (1958, 1961, 1968)

Cunningham, E. (1963)

Cunningham, Priscilla (1959-1960, 1973) ( -- see also -- :

Cunningham, Charles C. and Priscilla)

Curjel, Hans (1952)

Curtis, L. P. (1952)

Curtis, Louis (1967)

Custom Shop (1946, 1953)

Customs 1947, (1948, 1952, 1958-1959)

Cutting, Gloria P. (1950)

Czech, Hermann (1969)

Dabrowski, Magdalena (1973)

Da Capo Press, Inc. (1974, 1976)

Dahl, Curtis (1975, 1978)

D'Amato, Alfonse M. (1986)

Dame, Bernard L. (1949)

Dane, William J. (1955, 1957)

Danes, Gibson (1947-1958, 1961, 1966, 1972)

Danish Architectural Press (1962)

Dannatt, Trevor (1952-1953, 1955)

D'Arcy Galleries (1961)

Dark, Frank (1955-1958, 1964)

Darmstadt, Technische Hochschule (1966)

Darr, William (1956)

Dartmouth College (1937, 1947, 1968, 1978)

Darwin, Dana (1957)

Dauber and Pine (1951, 1958, 1966)

Davidson, Eugene (1952)

Davidson, L. (1955)

Davidson, Rita 1947

Davidson, W. F. (1952)

Davies, Jane B. (1957, 1969)

Davies, Turner and Co. (1946-1947)

Davis (1959)

Davis, Dotsie (1984) ( -- see also -- : Davis, Samuel R. and Dotsie)

Davis, E. Holden (1969)

Davis, Elizabeth H. (1953)

Davis, Howland S. (1948)

Davis, Laura (1945)

Davis, Lavinia (1961)

Davis, Philip and Helen (1927)

Davis, Richard S. (1950, 1952, 1954-1955, 1957, 1959)

Davis, Robert G. (1954)

Davis, Robert Tyler (1948, 1950)

Davis, Rodman (1983)

Davis, Samuel R. (1969-1973, 1976, 1978-1979, 1981)

Davis, Samuel R. and Dotsie (1983) ( -- see also -- : Davis, Dotsie)

Davis, Wendell (1945-1946, 1949, 1953-1955, 1958)

Davis, William (1946, 1955)

Davison, George W. (1945)

Davison, Robert (1947)

Davy Car Hire (1953-1954, 1958)

Dawes, Horace (1946)

Dawes House (1954)

Dawson, Tom (1952-1953)

Dayton Art Institute (1953)

De Cordova and Dana Museum and Park (1949)

De Graaff, Jan (1940)

De Long, David (1973, 1979-1981, 1983-1984, 1986-1987)

De Mare, Eric (1956)

De Sales, Xavier (1956)

De Vaughan, Carol (1969)

De Witt, Dennis (1976)

De Witt, Mrs. Vergil B. (1947)

De Zurko, Edward R.(1951-1954, 1956-1957, 1959)

De la Faille, C. A. Baart (1952)

Dean, Margaret (1951, 1953-1954)

Dearstyne, Howard (1958-1959, 1972, 1974)

Deere and Co. (1965)

Deerfield Academy (1966)

Deerfield Village (1959)

Delafield, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Livingston (1962, 1965)

Delafield, Lawrence (1965)

Delafono, John (1952, 1955)

Delahoyd, Mary (1971)

Delaney, Beauford (1961)

Delaware, University of (1957, 1961, 1967, 1970, 1976)

Delftsch Bouwkundig Studenten Gezelschap (1963)

Delhaye, Jean (1960)

Dema, S. J. (1951)

Demithorne, Janet (1952)

Democrat Chronicle -- , Rochester, N.Y. (1936)

Dendy, William (1975)

Dening, C.F.W. (1946)

Department [Smith College Art Department] (1956) ( -- see also -- : Smith College)

Department of State (1952) ( -- see also -- : State Department; United States Department of State)

Des Grange, Jane (1960)

Deshmukh, C. D. (1965)

Design -- (1957)

Detroit Institute of Arts (1945, 1959)

Deul, C. A. (1956)

Deutsch-Amerikanisches Institut (1963)

Deutsche Bank (1965, 1967)

Deutscher Kunstverlag CMBH (1969, 1971)

Devinoy, Pierre (1948, 1952, 1956)

Dewald, Ernest (1951)

Di Blasi, Louise (1962)

Dick Travel Agency (1945, 1947-1949)

Dickey, John M. (1973)

Dickson, Harold E. (1951-1952, 1956)

Dictionary of American Biography -- (1955)

Dictionary of the Arts -- (1942)

Dillon, James L. (1956)

Dillon, Joan (1955)

Dinan Associates (1982)

Dingwall, Ronald J. (1947)

Dinnerstein, Lois (1961)

Dipsas Booksellers (1950)

Directory of American Scholars -- (1963)

Dix, George (1950)

Dodd, Mrs. Dexter (1961)

Dodd, E. Merrick 1961

Dodd, Eugene M. (1964-1965)

Dodd, Lamar (1956)

Dodd, Maurice (1946-1948)

Dodge Corp. (1954)

Doesberg, Theo V. (1930)

Dole, Philip (1962)

Dolker (1956)

Doll and Richards (1952)

Domitilla, O.S.B. (1969)

Donaldson, James R. (1970)

Donaldson, Norman V. (1952)

Donnell, Courtney G. (1972, 1974, 1980-1981)

Donnelly, Marian C. (1982)

Donnisfes, Sam (1975)

Dooley, William G. (1947)

Dorbey, Margaret (1957)

Dorfles, Gillo (1956)

Dormoy, Marie (1956)

Dorner, Alexander (1938-1939, 1942, 1952, 1954, undated)

Dorner, Lydia (1953)

Dorsch, George T. (1971-1972)

D'Orsi, Juliana (1955)

D'Orsi, Michael (1953)

Doubleday and Co. (1955, 1957)

Douglass Brokerage Corp. (1970)

Douglass College (1957)

Dovell, Peter (1954)

Dover Publications (1962-1963, 1969)

Dow, Mrs. Frank E. (1952-1954)

Dow, George (1946)

Dow, Marian (1950)

Downing, Antoinette F. (1949)

Downing, George E. (1961)

Downing, Mrs. George E. (1970)

Downs, Arthur Channing (1972, 1974)

Downtown Gallery (1945)

Dows, Olin (1941)

Doyle Stationery (1965-1968, 1972)

Drake Hotel (1950)

Drake, Lindsey (1946-1947, 1953)

Drake, Stuart (1979)

Drap, Al (1971)

Drawing Society (1965, 1967-1968, 1971, 1973-1975, 1977)

Drew, Jane (1946-1949, 1955, 1961)

Drew, Ralph (1953)

Drew-Bear, Lotte (1966)

Drew-Bear, Mrs. Robert (1951)

Drexler, Arthur (1956-1959, 1962, 1964, 1974, 1987)

Driscoll, Mrs. Philip (1963, 1964)

Dublin (1963)

Dublin Tour (1959)

Duell, Sloan and Pearce (1941, 1943-1945, 1947-1953, 1955, 1959-1961)

Duemling, Bob (1951-1955, 1957-1958)

Duhart, Emilio (1954-1955, 1960)

Duke University (1962, 1975)

Duncan, Hugh Dalsiel (1960)

Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art (1962)

Duncan, William (1978)

Duncan, Winston (1979)

Dunham, Elizabeth W. (1954)

Dunlap Society (1976-1977)

Dunn, Esther (1950, 1954)

Dunn, Helen (1979)

Dunnell, Mrs. W. W. (1946)

Dupres, Eddie (1938)

Durand, Patricia (1956)

Durham University, School of Architecture (1960)

Durlacher Brothers (1949, 1951-1952, 1963)

Dusenberg, Elsbeth (1955)

Dutch Gables Book [ -- Netherlandish Scrolled Gables... -- ] (1977-1979)

Dutchess County Department of Planning (1968)

Dutton and Co. (1965)

Early, James (1964)

Early, Marcia A. (1962-1963)

Early Victorian Architecture in Britain -- ( -- see -- : Victorian Paperback)

East Side Communities, Association of (1976)

East Sixty-Second Street Association (1970-1972, 1976, 1979)

Eastbourne Public Libraries and Museum (1946)

Eastman, L. R. (1960)

Eaton, Leonard K. (1960, 1968, 1970-1973)

Ebert, Elizabeth Roberts (1942, 1947)

Eccles Public Library (1962)

Ecole des Arts Decoratifs (1956)

Edgell, G. H. (1953)

Ediciones 3 (1962)

Edinburgh Architectural Association (1956)

Edinburgh, British Council in (1946)

Edinburgh, City of (1946)

Edmunds, Sheila (1962-1965)

Educational Broadcasting Co. (1963)

Edwards, David J. (1954)

Edwards, Folke (1954)

Edwards, Francis, Ltd. (1946)

Edwards, Jared (1971, 1973-1974)

Egan, Patricia (1961-1962)

Egbert, Donald (1945, 1951, 1953, 1956, 1959)

Eggers, Henry L. (1948)

Eidelberg, Martin (1969)

Eisenberg, Marvin (1966)

Eisenhower, Milton (1952)

Eisenman, Alvin (1952, 1954)

Eisenman, Peter (1964, 1976)

Eisler, Benita (1976)

Eisler, Colin (1964, 1975)

Electa Editrice (1968, 1976, 1980)

Electric Co. (1954)

Elek, Paul (1945, 1957-1958, 1968, 1970)

Elkington, Mary (1955-1958)

Elkington, Robert (1960)

Ellis, Connie (1969)

Ellis, Donald G. (1952)

Ellum, Wendy (1956)

Ellison, Clifford (1964)

Elmer, Maud V. (1958, 1962)

Elmhurst, Dorothy (1937)

Emery, Ruth (1950-1951, 1954, 1956-1957, 1960-1961, 1968, 1975, 1981)

Emil, Allan D. (1954)

Emmons, Mr. and Mrs. Donn (1947)

Employers Liability Insurance (1940, 1943)

Enciclopedia del l'Arte -- (1958)

Enciclopedia Italiana -- (1954)

Encyclopedia Britannica -- (1955, 1957-1959, 1970-1971) ( -- see also -- : Britannica Encyclopedia)

Encyclopedia of World Art -- (1958, 1961-1964, 1966)

Encyclopedia Universale Del l'Arte -- (1969)

Encyclopedia Universalis -- (1981)

Enggass, Robert (1961, 1963)

England, Robert (1968)

Engle Lecture (1965)

Engles, Charles (1948)

Epler, Robert (1966)

Erickson, John David (1948)

Ernst, Barbara (1979)

Ervin, John (1959, 1961)

Esherick, Joseph (1954)

Esposito, Joseph (1977-1978, 1980)

Essex Institute (1956, 1977)

Estrada, Rauel (1956)

Etherington, Edward (1968)

Etlin, Richard A. (1981)

Eton College Arts Society (1969)

Europe (1969, 1977)

Evans (1965)

Evans, Allan (1968)

Evans, David J. (1945)

Evans, James and Barbara (1952)

Evans, Janice (1974)

Evans, John (1950)

Evans, Kathleen Horne (1961)

Evans, Lydia (1945, 1968)

Evans, Rosamund (1945, 1954-1958)

Evershed, Emily (1966)

Ewart, Joy (1959)

Experiment (1963)

Ezequelle, Betty J. (1972)

Faber and Faber, Ltd. (1945, 1956)

Fahertyand Swartwood, Inc. (1970)

Fairbanks, G. (1946)

Fairbanks, Jonathan (1960, 1969, 1971-1976, 1980)

Fairhurst, P. G. (1955-1956)

Farleigh Dickinson University (1974)

Faison, S. Lane (1952-1955, 1962-1963, 1969, 1973-1974)

Fanelli, Giovanni (1969)

Farley, Margaret (1949)

Farnsworth, Edith B. (1951-1952)

Farnsworth, John (1952-1953)

Farthing, Cecil (1956, 1959)

Fast-Wengenmayer, Annemarie (1973)

Faulkner, Jean and Winthrop W. (1956)

Faulkner, Winthrop W. (1961)

Feddersen, Phil A. (1951)

Feder, Kathy S. (1972)

Feesender, De Witt H. (1953)

Fehm, Sherwood A. (1969)

Feinberg, Barry (1957, 1960)

Feingold, Jessica (1946)

Feininger, Lyonel (1930)

Feld, Stuart (1969)

Feriday, Peter (1964)

Ferry, Hawkins 1945

Ferry, W. H. (1947)

Fiat (1959)

Fickert Insurance (1965, 1970)

Fielden F. (1956, 1966)

Fife Memorial Fund (1951-1952)

Fifth Avenue Playhouse Group, Inc. (1928)

Film sur l'art (1957)

Fine Arts Agents (1946)

Finkel, Kenneth (1974)

Finsbury, Metropolitan Borough of (1946)

Fire Alarm Maintenance Co. (1957)

First National Bank of Northampton (1952)

First Presbyterian Church, Baltimore (1939)

Fischer Fine Arts, Ltd. (1972)

Fischer, H. R. (1962-1963)

Fischer, Wend (1974)

Fischer, Wolfgang (1973, 1980-1981)

Fisher, Howard T. (1930, 1957, 1976)

Fisher, Jutto (1962)

Fishl, Leslie (1960)

Fisker, Kay (1947-1953, 1956, 1960-1961)

Fitch, James Marston (1959, 1969, 1972, 1974, 1980)

Fitz-Gerald, Charles (1951, 1959)

Fitz-Gerald, Helen Louise (1963, 1966-1967, 1969, 1972, 1978)

Fitz-Gerald, Norman (1959)

Fitzgerald, D.V.J. (1971)

Fitzwilliam Museum (1951)

Flamm, Roy (1951)

Flanders, Ralph E. (1950, 1953)

Fleetwood-Hedreth, Peter (1970)

Fleming and Co. (1957)

Fleming, John (1963, 1965, 1969)

Fletcher Co. (1954)

Fletcher, J. S. (1924)

Fletcher, Norman (1951, 1953-1954, 1956-1957)

Flexner, James (1950)

Flint, C. (1966)

Florida State University (1949)

Florida, University of (1962)

Floyd, Margaret Henderson (1981)

Fodera, Leonardo (1960-1961)

Foeder, Barton (1950)

Fogel, Seymour (1952)

Fogg Art Museum (1945, 1948-1949, 1965, 1969, 1974, 1977)

Foley, Charles H. (1955)

Foley, J. B. (1963)

Foley, May E. (1955)

Fondersmith, John (1977)

Foote, E. J. (1975)

Forbes, Astrid and Kip (1975)

Forbes, John Douglas (1950, 1952, 1957-1958, 1962-1964)

Force, Juliana (1946)

Ford, Anne (1967)

Ford, Charles (1946)

Ford, Edith (1952-1953)

Ford, Edsel (1936)

Ford Foundation (1964)

Forman, Henry Chandlee (1957)

Forstman (1970)

Forstman, Theodore (1969)

Fort Wayne 1973

Forum Magazine -- (1950, 1957-1959)

Foster, Kathleen A. (1981)

Foster, Philip (1971-1975, 1978, 1986)

Foto Hutter (1966)

Foto Van Ojen (1958)

Foulkes, William George (1971-1972, 1978, 1986)

Fourth Avenue Booksellers (1983)

Foyle Ltd. (1947)

Franc, Helen (1947, 1951, 1953-1954, 1963, 1977, undated)

Francastle, Pierre (1956)

Francis, Dennis Steadman (1978)

Francis, Francis C. (1928)

Francis Henry (Harry) Sayles (1925-1932, 1945-1948, 1952-1953, 1955, 1959, 1961, 1963-1964, 1967-1970, 1972-1973, 1977-1981, 1983, undated)

Frank, Edward (1964-1965)

Frankbauser, Mary (1966)

Frankenstein, Alfred (1951)

Frankenstein, Mrs. Victor S. (1950)

Franklin, Cecil A. (1961)

Franklin, Danny (1975)

Franklin Institute (1963)

Franklin Square Subscription Agency (1965)

Franzen, Ulrich (1962)

Frary, I. T. (1957)

Frazer, Alfred (1957)

Fredericks, Mr. and Mrs. Marshall (1952)

Free Library of Philadelphia ( -- see -- : Philadelphia, Free Library of)

Freedman, Harry S. (1952)

Freeman, Donald (1972, 1976)

Freeman, Harrison B. (1937)

Freeman, Judy (1951)

Freer Gallery (1950)

Fregna, Roberto (1962)

Freiburg (1964)

Freidrich, Reinhard (1964)

French Line (1970)

French Railways, Ltd. (1956)

Frick Art Reference Library 1954

Friedman, B. H. (1962)

Friedman, Lee M. (1945)

Friedsam, M. (1926)

Friends of the Upper East Side Historic District (1986)

Frost, Eunice E. (1945, 1950, 1952, 1955)

Fry, E. Maxwell (1948)

Fuchs-Greven (1960)

Fulbright Fellowship (1951, 1959)

Funk and Wagnall's Encyclopedia -- (1957)

Furniture (1968)

Furry, C. I. (1941)

Futagawa, Yukio (1974)

Gaddis, Eugene R. (1982-1984, 1986)

Gagarin, Judy (1970)

Gallum, Barbie (1952)

Gale Research Co. (1964)

Galecki, Marta McBride (1977)

Games, Stephen (1983)

Gardner, Jean McClintock (1983)

Garfield, Leslie J. (1970, 1973, 1978, 1980-1981, 1984)

Garland, Peter (1958)

Garland, Peter and Mary (undated)

Garland Publishing, Inc. (1975-1977, 1979-1980, 1983-1984)

Garvan, Anthony N. B. (1948, 1955-1956)

Garvan, John (1952)

Garzanti, Aldo (1966)

Gaston, Godfrey (1952)

Gaudi, Amigos de (1956)

Gaudi Exhibition (1957-1958)

Gaunt, William (1952)

Gaus, John M. (1948)

Gayle, Margot (1971-1972, 1983-1984)

Gazette des Beaux-Arts -- (1953-1954, 1956)

Geary, Ronald (1952-1953)

Gebhard, David (1953, 1966, 1970, 1973-1974, 1977, 1981)

Gebhardt (1956)

Geddes, Robert L. (1974, 1981)

Geer, Ronald (1952)

Gehring, P. (1954)

Gelfand, Morris (1947)

Gelotte, Ernest N. (1954)

Gemeente Helversum, Publik Werken (1927)

General Adjustment Bureau (1951)

Georgia Institute of Technology (1949-1951, 1953-1954, 1962)

Georgia, University of (1975)

Gered Antiques, Ltd. (1959)

German Renaissance Architecture -- (1972, 1978-1982)

Germantown Historical Society (1972)

Gerold, William (1962-1966)

Gersheim, Helmut (1946, 1953, 1958)

Gerson, H. (1956, 1958)

Geske, Norman (1952, 1963-1964)

Gettier, Astrid E. (1966)

Getty Trust 1985

Gibb-Smith, C. H. (1954-1955)

Gibson, Cynthia (1970)

Giella, Barbara (1978-1979, 1986)

Giese, Delius [Fritz] (1948-1949)

Gift (1956) ( -- see also -- : Wesleyan University)

Gilbert, Creighton (1952, 1969, 1972-1975)

Gilchrist, Agnes (1945, 1951-1952, 1954-1957, 1961, 1968-1969)

Gilchrist, Brenda (1951-1953, 1957)

Gilkerson, Ann (1977)

Gill, Brendan (1970, 1972-1973, 1978, 1980, 1986)

Gilman's Old Books, Inc. (1947)

Girauden Photographic (1956)

Girourd, Mark (1961, 1975, 1983)

Gisser, Leon (1948)

Gittes, Lois Severini (1977)

Glaeser, Ludwig (1978, 1984)

Glasgow (1966)

Glasgow School of Architecture Club (1962)

Glasgow, University of (1967, 1972-1973)

Glaubiga, Merel (1977)

Gleason Brothers (1954)

Glick, William J. (1966)

Gobel, Laura (1965)

Goding, Stowell C. (1951)

Goeschel, Nancy (1969-1970, 1977-1978, 1980)

Goff, Bruce (1948)

Goldberg, Gary (1966)

Goldfinger (1955)

Goldsmiths and Silversmiths Co. (1946)

Goldsmith's Hall (1961-1962)

Goldstein, Malcolm (1979)

Goldstein, Stanley James (1954)

Goldthwaite, Richard A. (1970)

Goldwater, Robert (1965)

Gomes, Peter S. (1979)

Gomme, Andor (1963)

Goodall, Donald (1948-1950)

Goodall, John (1948, 1952)

Goodfellow, Gavin (1958)

Goodhue, H. Shippen (1953-1956, 1958, 1966, 1970, 1972, 1975, 1981-1982)

Goodhue, H. Shippen and Lydia (1973-1974)

Goodiery, Susan (1951)

Goodman, R. (1971)

Goodrich, Lloyd (1947-1949, 1951)

Goodspeed's Book Shop (1950-1951)

Goodwin, Genevive (1965)

Goodwin, Germaine (1958)

Goodwin, J. L. (1955)

Goodwin, James (1966)

Goodwin, Julie (1979)

Goodwin, Lubi (1974)

Goodwin, Philip (1939, 1945, 1947)

Gorbaty, Norman (1953-1954)

Gordon, David A. (1977)

Gordon, Douglas H. (1948, 1952-1953, 1966, 1971)

Gordon, Rae and Righter Travel (1965-1968)

Gorski, Taderisz A. (1953)

Gould, Cecil (1959)

Gouverneur, Elizabeth (1974)

Government and Art, Committee on (1950-1951, 1953, 1957)

Gowan, James (1962)

Gowans, Alan (1956, 1959-1960, 1962-1963, 1969)

Graduate Students (1956)

Grady, James (1956-1961, 1963-1964, 1966-1969)

Graeffe, Arnold Didier (1947)

Graf, Otto (1963)

Graham, F. Lanier (1970)

Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts (1961, 1973, 1978-1979, 1982)

Graham, Fred (1956)

Graham, John A. (1945)

Graham, Roy F. (1977)

Grannard, Harold (1928)

Grant, Leland (1975-1982, 1984)

Graves, Michael (1967)

Gray, Basil (1961)

Gray, Christopher (1977-1978, 1982)

Gray, Nicolete (1958)

Graybill, Sam (1951-1953, 1957)

Greater London Council (1985)

Greek Embassy (1958)

Green, E.R.R. (1962)

Green, J. Wilder (1951-1959, 1961-1962, 1977, 1981)

Green, Priscilla (1952, 1957)

Green, Samuel (1939, 1945, 1947, 1950-1958, 1960, 1962-1966, 1971, 1977)

Green, Samuel and Bunnie (1948)

Greenberg, Allan (1979, 1981)

Greenthal, Kathryn T. (1977, 1980)

Gregg Press Ltd. (1968-1969, 1972)

Gregory, E. C. (1947)

Grennard, Paul (1928)

Grey Art Gallery, New York University (1981)

Greystone Corp. (1962)

Grierson, Margaret (1952)

Griffiths, Peter Noyes and Lady (1956)

Grimes, Tammy (1972-1975, 1977-1979, 1981-1982, 1984)

Grinberg-Vinavert, Georges (1951)

Grippe, Peter (1952)

Grolier Club (1952, 1970-1973)

Grolier Encyclopedia -- (1961-1963)

Gropius House (1986)

Gropius, Walter (1947, 1950, 1952)

Grosser, Maurice (1951-1952, 1977, 1986)

Grove, Elsa Butler (1955)

Grow, Lawrence (1975)

Grube, Max (1968)

Gruen, Victor (1960)

Guevara, Max and Elisa (1959)

Guggenheim, Barbara 1976

Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (1945-1955, 1959-1961, 1963-1965, 1972, 1975-1982)

Guild for Religious Architecture (1969, 1971-1972)

Guildford, Glenn (1949-1950, 1958-1959)

Guildhall (1984)

Guilloton, Michael A. (1954, 1957)

Guinness, Desmond (1967)

Gundermann, Leo (1964)

Gunther, Nancy (1959)

Gutheim, Frederick (Fritz) (1946-1947, 1952, 1958-1959, 1965, 1969)

Gutman, John (1956)

Guy, James (1949)

Guy, Rice and Davis (1936, 1938, 1941-1942)

Guys, Gilbert (1928)

Haber, Francine (1965-1966)

Hack, Garrett (1969)

Hacker (1966)

Hacker Art Books (1971-1972)

Hadzi, Molly (1954, 1956, 1966)

Hadzi, Molly and Dmitri (1955, 1961, 1963)

Haessler, George (1978)

Hager, Louise (1956, 1966)

Hajer, Gerhard (1966)

Hale, William F. (1982)

Hall, J. A. (1946)

Hall, Louise (1948, 1951, 1954)

Hallmark, Donald Parker (1969)

Hallsborough Gallery (1965)

Hambright, Mrs. Joseph (1966)

Hamburg (1956)

Hammill and Barker (1947)

Hamilton, Charles E. (1969)

Hamilton, George Heard (1945-1950, 1954-1957, 1959-1960, 1965, 1968, 1972, 1980)

Hamilton, George Heard and Polly (1953)

Hamilton, Janet (1948)

Hamilton, Polly (undated)

Hamlin, Talbot F. (1945-1947, 1950, 1956)

Hamlyn, Paul (1963-1965, 1967)

Hammer, Karl (1969)

Hammond, Caffy (1958, 1961-1963, 1966-1968, 1973-1974)

Hammond, John (1968-1969)

Hammond, Walter (1954)

Hampshire Bookshop (1949-1952, 1960)

Hanks, David (1977, 1979)

Hanna, A. J. (1954)

Hannary, John (1973)

Hansen, Mr. and Mrs. Preben (1956)

Hanson, Bernard (1964)

Harbron, G. Dudley (1946-1949)

Harcourt, Brace and Co. (1933)

Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. (1971-1974, 1976-1977, 1979)

Harday, Jorge A. Ferrari (1969)

Hardenberg (1924)

Harling, Robert (1970)

Harnell and Co. (1967)

Harper Brothers (1955)

Harper's Magazine -- (1945)

Harrington, Elaine (1985)

Harrington, Richard (1958)

Harris Catalog (1968)

Harris, Eileen (1973)

Harris, Hamilton (1953)

Harris, John (1960-1965, 1967-1971, 1973, 1977, 1979-1980, 1983)

Harris, John and Eileen (1974)

Harris, Karsten (1972)

Harris, Margaret (1972)

Harris, Paul S. (1951)

Harris, Roger (1961)

Harris, Tom (1946)

Harris, Upham and Co. (1955)

Harrison, M. (1946)

Harrison, Wallace K. (1953)

Hartford (1964, 1972)

Hartford, Huntington (1963)

Hartford Magazine -- (1974)

Hartman, William E. (1962)

Hartneck, Timothy W. (1979)

Hartt, Frederick (1956, 1960-1961)

Harvard Architecture Review -- (1978)

Harvard Club (1963)

Harvard Fund (1947)

Harvard Magazin -- e (1978-1979, 1982-1983)

Harvard University (1923-1924, 1927-1928, 1939, 1942, 1946-1951, 1953-1958, 1961, 1965-1967, 1973-1974, 1976-1979, 1981-1982)

Harvey, Katharine (1970, 1976)

Harvey and Lewis (1945)

Hasbrouck, W. R. (1961, 1963-1964, 1969)

Hasbrouck, William (1967)

Haskell, Arthur C. (1955)

Haskell, Douglas (1945, 1951-1952, 1954-1955, 1958)

Haskell, Henry C. (1946)

Haskell, Rosamund (1966)

Hasler, Charles (1962)

Hasselmann, Dorothy S. (1945)

Hatch, J. D. (1948-1949)

Hatchards Booksellers (1963-1964)

Hatje, Gerd (1959-1965, 1980)

Hattis, Phyllis (1966)

Hauf, Harold (1951)

Haupt, Otto (1963)

Hausen, Marika (1965-1966)

Haverkamp-Bergman, Egbert (1971, 1973)

Havinden, Ashley (1948, 1952, 1961)

Havinden, Margaret 1946, 1953

Havinden, Margaret and Ashley (1950)

Hawksmoor Committee (1962)

Hawthorne Books (1979)

Haydon, Harold (1961)

Hayes, Bartlett (1954)

Hayes, Marian (1954-1955, 1959, 1962, 1968, 1970)

Heath and Co. (1961)

Heaton, E. W. (1959)

Hecht, Jean (1956)

Hecht, Lynn S. (1962-1964, 1966)

Heckel, Louise (1960)

Hecksher, Morrison (1970, 1973-1974)

Hedge, Alice Payne (1948, 1953-1954, 1956, undated)

Hedge, E. Russell (1959-1963)

Hedge, Henry R. (1954, 1956-1958)

Hedge, Mrs. Henry R. (1953)

Hedge, Mrs. William R. (1947, 1953)

Hedrich, E. T. (1956)

Hedrich, J. O. (1969)

Heil, Bernard (1958)

Heilkamp, Detlef (1971)

Heimsath, Clovis B. (1952)

Heine, Georgette (1970)

Heintzelman, Arthur W. (1956)

Heinz, Thomas A. (1978-1981)

Heinzel, Brigitte (1967, 1969)

Heiser, Bruce E. (1953-1954)

Heisner, Beverly F. (1967)

Held, Mr. and Mrs. Julius (1965)

Heleniak, Kathryn Moore (1975)

Helm, Francis and Mary (1948)

Hemmenway, Mary (1948-1950, 1954)

Henderson, Pat Milne (1957, 1964) ( -- see also -- : Milne-Henderson, Pat)

Henderson, M. (1958)

Hendricks, Gordon (1967)

Henley, Helen B. (1941)

Hennessey, William J. (1975-1977)

Hennings, John (1955)

Henry (1973)

Henry, Anne Wythe (1972, 1975)

Henry, Barklie [Buzz] (1959)

Hentrich, Helmut (1957, 1959-1960, 1963-1976, 1978-1981, 1985)

Hentschel, Walter (1969)

Herald Tribune -- (1945)

Herbert, Gilbert (1970)

Herget, John T. (1960)

Hergert, Elizabeth (1963)

Heron, Patrick (1952-1954, 1956, 1979)

Herrmann, George (1960)

Herschman, Judith (1979)

Hersey, George L. (1959-1963, 1967-1968, 1971-1972, 1975

Hershberger, Howard (1960, 1961, 1963)

Herve, Lucien (1956-1957)

Herzog, Marion Rawles (1967, 1970)

Hesketh, Peter Fleetwood (1969)

Hesse (1956)

Hessler, Herman (1971)

Heyl, Bernard (1959-1963)

Hibbard, Don J. (1976)

Hibbard, Howard (1962, 1968)

Highest, Gilbert (1954)

Hill, Draper (1960)

Hill, Frederick and May (1968)

Hill, Oliver (1946, 1949, 1955)

Hiner, Walter (1946)

Hines, Thomas S. (1967, 1972, 1981)

Hirschl and Adler Galleries (1968)

Historic American Buildings Survey (1973)

Historical Society of Pennsylvania ( -- see -- : Pennsylvania, Historical Society of) -- History News -- (1963)

Hitchcock, Alice Davis [mother, Mrs. Henry Russell] (1925, 1940, 1942-1943, 1946-1950)

Hitchcock, Mr. and Mrs. Carl (1955)

Hitchcock, Charles D. (1940, 1971)

Hitchcock, Harriet (1963)

Hitchcock, Dr. and Mrs. Henry Russell [parents] (1928-1929, undated)

Hitchcock, June (1979-1980)

Hitchcock, Mrs. Peter S. (1964)

Hoag, John D. (1952, 1955-1956, 1959, 1961-1965, 1967-1968, 1970-1971, 1976)

Hochman, Elaine S. (1973, 1976)

Hodge, Alan (1957)

Hodge, Philip G. (1951)

Hodgkinson, Ianthe (1966)

Hofer, Philip (1945-1947, 1949, 1951-1952, 1959, 1961, 1968)

Hoffman, Donald L. (1964, 1969-1970, 1978)

Hoffmann, Werner (1956)

Hofstra College (1952)

Hogan, Austin (1940)

Hojer, Gerhard (1967, 1970, 1973)

Holcomb, Donald M. 1956

Holderbaum, James (1962, 1964, 1966, 1968)

Holdet, L. A. (1946)

Holdin, Harrison (1976)

Holiday Inn (1972)

Holland (1964, 1967)

Holland-America Line (1958, 1971)

Holman, William G. (1981)

Holmegaards Glasvaerk (1960)

Holmes, J. P. (1953)

Holser, Clifford B. (1952)

Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1972)

Holzbog, Tom (1967)

Homolka, Larry J. (1965-1967)

Hooker, Arthur (1952)

Honour, Hugh (1966)

Hood, Graham (1971)

Hooker, John (1953)

Hooper, S. C. (1954)

Hoover, Donald (1952)

Hoover, Kathleen O'Donnell (1948-1949, 1951)

Hope, Henry R. (1943, 1945-1950, 1954, 1957, 1959, 1962)

Hopping, D.M.C. (1955-1956)

Hordczak, Theodore (1956)

Horn, Estelle (1950)

Horn, Milton (1946, 1949, 1951-1952)

Horn, Walter (1958)

Horne, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard S. (1955)

Hornsey, Borough of (1946)

Horsburgh, Patrick (1952-1955)

Horta Committee (1960)

Hosken, Franziska Porges (1963)

Hotel Grande Bretagne (1961)

Hotel Inghilterra (1961)

Housend, Brian (1956)

House Beautiful -- (1928)

Housing (1945)

Houston (1959, 1967)

Houston, University of (1953-1954)

Howard, Charles (1956)

Howard, Tom (1945)

Howard University (1961-1962)

Howarth, Thomas (1953-1957, 1959-1960, 1962-1963, 1966)

Howe, George (1945, 1949, 1951, 1953)

Howe, Hester (1954, 1956)

Howe, Lawrence (1955)

Howe, Mrs. Lawrence (1945)

Howe, Stewart S. (1954)

Howe, Thomas C. (1953, 1954)

Howlett, D. Roger (1965)

Howland, Richard H. (1952-1954, 1959, 1961)

Hoyle, Henry D. (1969)

Hoyt, Deming (1960)

Hoyt, Natalie (1947, 1949-1951, 1956, 1959, 1963)

Hoyt, Nelly (1968)

Hubbard, L. Kent (1937)

Hubbard, R. J. (1959)

Hubbard, Ray (1978)

Hubbard, Russell (1949)

Huber, Erna (1963-1964, 1966, 1970-1971)

Huber, Erna and Charlie (1983)

Hudnut, Claire (1948)

Hudnut, Helen (1947-1948)

Hudnut, Joseph (1945, 1951)

Hudson River Conservancy Society, Inc. (1945)

Huemer, Frances (1955)

Huff, William S. (1958, 1965)

Hughenden Manor (1950)

Hughes, Richard (1953-1954)

Hughes, Talmadge C. (1945)

[Hugnet?], Georges (undated)

Hulst, Roger d' (1973)

Hulton Press (1957)

Hundertmark, Dieter (1960)

Hunn, Robert (1970)

Hunter, Anna C. (1955)

Hunter, Bob (1954)

Huntington, C. (1955)

Huntington, Constant (1952)

Huntington, David C. (1961, 1963-1965, 1967-1968, 1971)

Huntington, J. D. (1951)

Huntington, James L. (1954-1955, 1957-1959, 1963-1965)

Huntington, John (1955)

Huntington, Trudy (1952)

Huse, Norbert (1975)

Hussey, Alfred R. (1949)

Hussey, Mary (1954, 1962)

Huxley Brothers (1951, 1954)

Huxtable, Ada Louise (1947, 1950, 1957-1958, 1961-1962, 1969, 1971, 1982-1983)

Hyams, N. (1948)

Hyde Hall, Inc., Friends of (1965)

Hyman, Isabelle (1977)

Iber, Howard John (1972, 1974)

Illinois Institute of Technology (1950, 1954)

Illinois, University of (1947, 1949, 1965, 1979)

Ilmanen, William (1954, 1956)

Imperial Institute (1956)

Inaya, Beata (1956)

In the Nature of Materials -- (1968-1969) ( -- see also -- : Wright, Frank Lloyd)

Income Tax (1956-1957, 1972)

India International Center (1964-1965)

Indiana University (1948, 1953, 1966)

Indiana, University of (1945, 1961)

Indianapolis, Art Association of (1948)

Information Agency, U.S. (1955)

Information Service, U.S. (1961)

Inghilterra Hotel (1960)

Inglis, F. C. (1954)

Ingraham, David (1941)

Ingraham, Henry A. (1945, 1947)

Innendekoration (1963)

Inspector of Foreign Dividends (1956)

Inscoe, Eva Jane (1983)

Institute for Advanced Studies (1963)

Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies (1975)

Institute of Contemporary Art (1948-1949, 1953-1954, 1956, 1961, 1963-1964, 1976)

Institute of Fine Arts, New York University (1949, 1956-1957, 1960, 1967) ( -- see also -- : New York University)

Institute of International Education (1955)

Institute of Landscape Architects (1952)

Instituto di Storia dell'Arte (1961)

Instituto Italiano di Cultura (1958)

Instituto per la Collaborazione Culturale (1965) ( -- see also -- : Collaborazione Culturale, Instituto per la)

Insurance (1970)

Insurance Company of America (1963)

Intercultural Publications, Inc. (1953)

International Architecture Students Conference (1949)

International Congress of African Studies (see: African Studies, International Congress of)

International Encyclopedia of Architecture, Engineering, and Urban Planning -- (1976-1977)

International Design Conference (1955)

International Information Administration (1952)

International Publications, Inc. (1954)

International Union of Architects, Sixth Congress (1960)

International University of Art (1970)

Ireland, Royal Institute of Architects of (1962)

Irving, Robert Grant (1968)

Irvy, Benjamin (1981)

Isham, Gyles (1954)

Isis -- (1961, 1964)

Isley, Natelle (1956)

Italian Institute (1956)

Ivins, William M. (1936)

Jack, William A. Park (1936)

Jackson, Esther (1953)

Jacobi, Frank (1952)

Jacobs Antiques (1948-1949)

Jacobs, Robert A. (1965)

Jacobs, Stephen (1966)

Jacobus, John [Jake] (1957-1962, 1964-1966, 1969-1971, 1980-1981)

Jacobus, John [Jake] and Marion (1963)

Jaffe, Michael (1952-1956, 1958-1964, 1966, 1968, 1973, 1977, 1986)

Jaffe, Ronald (1952)

James, Evan (1946)

James, George (1952)

James, Philip (1952, 1958)

Jamieson, K. I. (1953)

Janis Gallery (1949)

Janis, Sidney (1950)

Jansen, Dick (1953-1954, 1961-1962)

Jansen, Dick and Ellen (1955)

Janson, H. W. (1959-1962, 1972, 1975, 1977, 1983)

Janson, Peter (1978, 1982)

Jarrett, James (1958-1959, 1981)

Jeannert, Marie-Louise (1982)

Jefferson National Expansion Memorial (1947)

Jemma, Manuela (1965)

Jenkins, Frank I. (1955-1956, 1958, 1960-1961, 1964-1967)

Jennings, Nancy Gillespie (1970)

Jerome Hotel (1955)

Jerome, T. T. (1947)

Jersey City, N. J. (1981)

Jewell, Jim (1953, 1956)

Joedicke, Jurgen (1963)

Johanneson, Eric (1969)

John, Dorothy (1954)

Johns Hopkins University (1952, 1965, 1967-1971, 1973-1975)

Johnson Art Collection (1926-1927)

Johnson, Buffie (1948)

Johnson, Donald Leslie (1977)

Johnson Gallery, Museum of Modern Art (1984)

Johnson, J. R. (1969)

Johnson, J. Stewart (1968, 1976)

Johnson, James R. (1946-1951, 1953-1954, 1958-1959, 1966, 1978, 1983)

Johnson, Laura (1945)

Johnson, Margaret (1952)

Johnson, Peter 1977, 1979

Johnson, Philip C. (1934, 1945-1967, 1969, 1973, 1975, 1978-1979, 1981-1983, undated) ( -- see also -- : -- Nineteenth Century American Architects -- [with Philip Johnson])

Johnson Reprint Corp. (1973)

Johnson, Robert H. (1947)

Johnson, Thomas (1973)

Johnson, W. (1958)

Johnson, Wendell (1961-1966, 1973, 1980, 1982-1984)

Johnson-Marshall, Percy and April (1960) ( -- see also -- : Marshall, Percy Johnson)

Johnsson, Ulf C. (1965)

Johnston, Norman (1952)

Jonals Co. (1958)

Jones, Cranston (1958)

Jones, Douglas (1966)

Jones, Ernest (1957-1958)

Jones, Mrs. Fred (1941)

Jones, Howard M. (1958-1959)

Jones, Martin R. (1956-1959, 1962)

Jones, Ralph (1958)

Jones Real Estate (1970)

Jones, Robert 1959

Jones, Ronald F. (1946)

Jordy, William (1950-1962, 1964, 1968-1970, 1972-1973, 1976, 1978, 1981, 1983, undated)

Joselit, David (1981)

Journal of the History of Ideas -- (1955)

Joyce, Henry (1980)

Judkins, Winthrop (1971)

Judson (1978)

Judson, H. Richard (1965)

Jules, Mervin (1962-1963, 1965, 1970)

Kahn, Albert (1945-1946)

Kahn, Charles (1978)

Kahn, David M. (1975)

Kahn, Louis I. (1960)

Kahn, Moritz (1938)

Kaiga Bunka Chuokyoku (1954)

Kalamazoo Institute of Arts (1961)

Kalec, Donald Gordon (1974-1976)

Kallman, G. M. (1948)

Kallman, Gerhard (1969)

Kamys, Walter (1957, 1962)

Kane, Amanda (1962)

Kansas City Star -- (1964)

Kansas State College (1955)

Kapp, Helen (1956)

Kantor, Sibyl (1980, 1982)

Kardan, Sel (1985)

Karl-Ernst-Osthaus-Museum (1956)

Karlsruhe (1956, 1963)

Karner, L. C. (1959)

Karolik, Maxim (1952)

Karpel, Bernard (1969)

Karpinski, Caroline (1970)

Karshner, Joseph H. (1957)

Kates, George N. (1923, 1926-1928, 1930, 1945, 1948-1949, 1956, undated)

Katz, Ruth B. (1953)

Katzenellenbogen, Mrs. Adolph (1950)

Kaufman, Emil (1953)

Kaufmann, Edgar, Jr. (1942, 1944, 1947, 1952, 1960-1963, 1968, 1970, 1974-1978, 1981-1984, 1986)

Kauter, Mat (1947)

Keacer (1961)

Kearns, G. W. (1953)

Keating, Mary (1978)

Keefe, John W. (1970)

Keefe and Keefe 1985

Keener, John P. (1947-1948)

Keeney, Barbara (1955)

Keiiti, Taira (1962)

Keiser, George C. (1929, 1945, 1947, 1953, 1956)

Keisern, George C. and Nancy (1948, 1951-1952, 1955)

Keiser, Nancy (1957, 1962, 1970, 1972, 1974, 1976, 1979, 1983)

Keith, Lucy (1953)

Kelley, Charles H. (1979)

Kelly, Burnham (1953-1954, 1964)

Kennedy, Clarence (1972)

Kennedy Fund (1963) ( -- see also -- : Smith College)

Kennedy, John F. (1953)

Kennedy, Robert W. (1949-1950)

Kennedy, Roger G. (1967)

Kennedy, Ruth L. (1955-1956, 1958, 1961-1968, undated)

Kentucky Engineer -- (1955)

Kentucky, University of (1969)

Kenyon Corn Meal Co. (1959)

Kepes, George (1948)

Kermacy, Martin S. (1956)

Kerr, Chester (1951-1952)

Kersting, A. F. (1971)

Kestenbaum, Joy M. (1979, 1984-1985)

Ketchum, Phillips (1949)

Kettell, Russell (1954)

Keyes, Margaret (1975)

Kidney, Walter C. (1957, 1972-1973, 1983)

Kihlstedt, Folke T. (1971, 1974, 1980)

Killian, Tom (1983)

Kimball, Fiske (1938, 1953-1955)

Kinehardt, Sibley (1968)

King and Chusman Insurance (1948)

King, A. Rowden (1952)

King, Anthony (1962-1963)

King, May Abigail (1968)

Kings College (1962)

Kingston School of Art (1961)

Kingzett, Richard (1961)

Kirstein, Coco (1928)

Kirstein, Lincoln (1928-1929, 1945, undated)

Kissin, Meredith (1973)

Kitchen (1960-1961)

Kizar, John (1979)

Klapper, Paul (1947)

Kleinbauer, Eugene (1962)

Klemm, Heinz (1964)

Klinger, Timothy C. (1973)

Knoedler and Co. (1951, 1955, 1968-1970)

Knorre, Eckhard van (1971, 1973)

Knowledge Publications (1966)

Knowlton, John H. (1974)

Knox, Brian (1981)

Knox, Bruce (1972)

Knoxville (1978)

Koch, Carl (1947)

Koch, Edward (1983)

Koch, Robert (1958-1959)

Kochen (undated)

Koenig, Philip (1951)

Kohn, Geraldine (1961)

Koike, Shinji (1951-1952, 1955)

Kolper, Fred (1956)

Kommer, Bjorn (1964)

Konsthistorisk Tidskrift (1937)

Kootz, Samuel (1948)

Kopcke, Guenter (1976)

Korn, Thomas H. (1952)

Kornegay, Bill (1961, 1963, 1969-1970, 1974, 1982-1983)

Kornwolf, James D. (1977-1979)

Kostof, Spero (1976)

Kowsky, Francis (1978-1981)

Kozlow, Robert D. (1951-1954, 1957)

Kramer, Ellen (1950-1955, 1957-1958, 1960-1961, 1964, 1967-1969, 1971-1972, 1975)

Kramer, Estel Thea (1976)

Krautheimer, Richard (1945, 1947, 1950, 1952, 1957, 1961, 1963, 1965-1967, 1969, 1971, 1982)

Krautheimer, Richard and Trude (1952)

Kredler, Jack (1927)

Kremer, Eugene (1965, 1967)

Kremers, David Edward (1974)

Krinsky, Carol Herselle (1981)

Krom, Martha (1980)

Kruft, Hanno-Walter 1984

Kubler, George A. (1945-1946, 1949-1950, 1954-1957)

Kuhn, Ethel (1964)

Kultermann, Udo (1965)

Kunhardt, Mr. and Mrs. (undated)

Kunin, Jack Henry (1969)

Kunstakedmiets Bibliotek (1956)

Kunsthalle Bielfeld (1983) ( -- see also -- : Bielfeld Kunsthalle)

Kunstwerk -- (1957)

Kwan, Michael (1972, 1975, 1977)

Labo, Mario (1961)

Lacoste, Gerald (1956)

La Farge, Henry A. (1950, 1955)

Lain, Alan K. (1946, 1977)

Lamb, Deborah (1951)

Lamb, Robert J. (1976)

Lambert, Jean (1963-1966)

Lambert, Phyllis (1974-1976, 1982, 1984)

Lambert, R. J. (1960-1961)

Lambert, Sam (1955)

Lambs, S. R. (1952)

Lamont, Corliss (1953)

Lamont, Ruth (1960)

Lancashire Society of Architects 1(962)

Lancaster, Clay (1951-1953)

Lancaster, Margaret (1949-1950)

Land, Terre (1955)

Landau, Sarah (1974-1986)

Landesamt fur Denkmalpfleg Nord-Rhein-Westfalen (1956)

Landmarks Conservancy, New York (1977, 1983)

Landmarks Preservation Commission, City of New York (1970-1971, 1973, 1975, 1982, 1985)

Landmarks Preservation Foundation, New York (1985)

Landor, Walter (1940)

Landy, Jacob (1957-1959, 1961-1963, 1966, 1970)

Lane, Barbara Miller (1976-1977)

Lane, Gilman (1941)

Lane, Stephen (1948)

Lang, S. (1956)

Lang, Samuel (1970)

Langenskiold, Eric (1960)

Langrock Co. (1949-1950)

Langsam, Walter E. (1966, 1968-1969)

Langston, Jane (1978)

Lanmon, Lorraine (1974)

Larkin, Oliver (Pete) (1946-1947, 1949, 1951-1952, undated)

Larkin, Oliver (Pete) and Ruth (1950)

Larsen, Susan (1972)

Lasdun, Denys (1940, 1954, 1958-1959, 1961-1962)

Laskin (1981)

Laskin, Myron (1974)

Laskin, R. (1964-1965)

Lasko, Peter (1982)

Lasko, Viola (1955)

Laubs, E. R. (1953)

Lauder, Standish (1963, 1966)

Laughlin, Clarence J. (1955)

Laughlin, James (1953)

Launder, Victor (1950)

Laurent, Marge and Paul (1950)

Law, Graham C. (1949-1951)

Lawrence, Leslie (1943, 1945)

Lazzaro, G. di San (1967)

Lebold, Joan (1954-1955)

Lebovich, Bill (1977)

Leconte, Andre (1958)

Le Corbusier (1936)

Ledermann, P. (1958)

Lee, Antoinette Josephine [Toni] (1975, 1982)

Lee House (1948)

Lee, Renselaer (1947)

Lee, Sherman (1959)

Leeb, Mr. and Mrs. Brian P. (1954)

Leeds (1946)

Leeds Architecture Students Association (1955)

Leeper, John Palmer (1957)

Leeuwen, Tom von (1974-1975, 1977)

Lefevre Gallery (1982)

Legge, Christopher (1953)

Lehman, Arnold (1970)

Lehmann, Karl (1952-1953)

Lehmann, Karl and Phyllis (1955-1956)

Lehmann, Phyllis W. (1949, 1951-1952, 1956, 1959-1960, 1965, 1968-1969, 1973, 1978, 1981)

Lehmbruck, Manfred (1964)

Leib, Norbert (1967)

Leibner, Gernard (1973)

Leibowitz, Herbert (1976)

Leicester, University of (1963, 1966-1968, 1970)

Leided, Rykstuniversiteit te (1966)

Leigh, Roger ( 1955)

Lemon, Sally (1954-1955, 1957)

Lenn, Lottie H. (1951)

Leonard, A. O. (1951)

Leonard, J. C. (1957)

Lerski, Hanna (1978)

Lescaze, William E. (1928, 1937, undated)

Levassor (1956)

Lever House (1983)

Lever, Jill 1986

Levine, Neil (1972, 1976-1977, 1983)

Levine, Seymour J. (1951)

Levion, Sally (1954)

Levy, Julien, Gallery (1946)

Levy, S. Dean (1973, 1982)

Lewine, Milton (1967)

Lewis, David (1946)

Lewis, Mrs. David (1945)

Lewis, Lesley (1946, 1952)

Lewis, Stanley T. (1952)

Lewis, Virginia 1958

Lewis, Wilmarth Sheldon (1948-1952, 1954, 1963)

Li, Sue Yung (1956)

Library (1968-1969)

Library Company of Philadelphia ( -- see -- : Philadelphia,

Library Company of)

Library of Congress (1940-1942, 1944, 1947)

Lichebeelden Institute (1956-1958)

Licht, Fred (1963)

Liddell, Janet (1953)

Lieb, Norbert (1971-1973)

Liebert, Herman (1947, 1951)

Lieberthal, Mary (1976)

Lienhardt, Robert C. (1963)

Life Magazine -- (1945-1946)

Lilliput Magazine -- (1947)

Limerick, Jeff (1974)

Lincoln, Alfred W. (1961)

Lincoln, Dick (1959)

Lindekee, Mary Proal (1951)

Lindley, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel (1955)

Lindsay, G. Carroll (1955)

Lindsay, Ian G. (1957)

Lindsay, Joan R. (1949)

Line, Ralph Marlow (1953)

Linn, Janet Denithorne (1970)

Lipman, Jean (1971)

Lipman, Jonathan (1980)

Lipstadt, Helene Rebecca (1976)

Lisker, Albert (1953)

Lisker and Lisker (1954)

Liskowski, Bohdan (1961)

Lissam, Simon (1965)

Little and Ives Co. (1960)

Little, Bertram (1960)

Little, Sidney W. (1953-1955)

Liverpool School of Architecture (1949, 1958, 1962-1963)

Liverpool University Architecture Society (1955)

Locchead, Kenneth (1952)

Locke, Margaret E. (1949)

Lockwood-Matthews Mansion (1973)

Lo Curzio, Massimo (1965)

Lodge, Henry Cabot (1950)

Lodge, Sprucewold (1954)

Loeb, Hermann (1946)

Loeb, John (1974-1976, 1983)

Loftstrom, Edward V. (1963)

Logan, Ann M. (1955)

London (1963)

Long Island Antiquities, Society for the Preservation of (1969)

Long, Susie (1949)

Longhi, David (1959, 1974)

Look Magazine -- (1962)

Lord Travel Agency (1952, 1954)

Loren, Erle (1955)

Los Angeles (1972)

Los Angeles County Museum (1955, 1958)

Lotus (1964, 1970)

Louisiana State University (1955, 1958)

Louisville, J. B. Speed Art Museum (1952)

Louisville, University of (1975)

Louw, H. J. (1977)

Love, Iris (1965)

Lowd, Dana (1951)

Lowe, David (1951-1954, 1975)

Lowe, John (1955)

Lowell, Isabel (1923)

Lowenthal, Esther (1961, 1964, 1968-1969)

Lowenthal, Helen (1951-1952, 1955-1956)

Lowry, Bates (1966, 1972)

Lubbock, Jules (1980)

Lubetkin, Bertholde (1936, 1945-1946, undated)

Lucas, Clive (1974)

Lucas, Jannette (1948, 1950-1952)

Luckhurst, K. W. (1951, 1955-1956)

Luginbuhl, Viola (1962)

Lukas, Gabriel (1969)

Lukomski, George (1956)

Luman, Thomas (1938)

Lunn Travel (1962)

Lurcat, Andre (1928, 1930, undated)

Luty, Alan (1963)

Luzuriaga, Carlos (1949)

Lym, G. R. (1978)

Lyman Allen Museum (1942, 1947, 1949, 1958)

Lyman, Charles (1965)

Lyman, Dwight C. (1955, 1973)

Lynes, Russell (1973)

Maas and Co. (1962)

Maas, John (1957, 1966, 1969-1971)

McAndrew, John (1940, 1945, 1949, 1953, 1957, 1969, 1978, 1981)

McArthur, Shirley (1985)

McAuley, Theodora (1962)

McBreen (1949)

McBride, Henry (1947)

McCall's Magazine -- (1946)

McCallum, Ian (1956, 1958-1959, 1963-1964)

McCay, Mrs. A. B. (1948)

McComb, Arthur (1945)

McCormick, Margaret (1978)

McCormick, Thomas J. (1948-1987, undated)

McCosher, Delphina (1964)

McCoubrey, John W. (1967)

McCoy, Esther (1956, 1960)

McCray, Porter (1956, 1969)

McCullough, Jane Fiske (1966, 1968)

McDonald (1978)

McDonald, Thoreau (1949)

McDonald, William L. (1955, 1963, 1982-1983)

MacDougall, Elisabeth B. (1980)

McGehee, Mary (1955)

McGraw Hill Co. (1957, 1959,-1966)

McGuire, Diane Kostial (1963)

McGuire, William (1972)

McIlhenny, Henry P. (1955, 1971)

McIntyre, Ruth A. (1962)

Mackay Brothers and Co. (1947)

Mackay, David (1965-1966)

Mackay-Smith, Alexander (1952-1953, 1962) ( -- see also -- : Smith, Alexander Mackay)

McKean, A. G. (1953)

McKenna, Rosalie Thorne (Rollie) (1949-1958)

McKibbin, David (1949, 1956, 1959, 1961)

McKinley (1956)

McKinley, Hazel G. (1964, 1979, 1981)

Mackintosh Society (1963-1964)

McLanathan, Richard B. K. (1958)

MacLaren, Alistair (1960, 1962-1964, 1966, 1968, 1970)

McMillan Co. (1953)

Macmillan Encyclopedia of Architects -- (1980, 1982)

Macmillan Publishers, Ltd. (1984)

McNair, Andrew (1975)

McNamara, Ellen 1974, 1976

Macomber, C. Clark (1951)

Macomber, Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. (1955)

Macomber, Gail (1953)

McQuade, Walter (1960)

McReynolds, George (1952)

Magazine of Art -- (1947-1953)

Magaziner, Henry J. (1971-1973)

Magee, John J. (1970)

Magill, Peter (1951, 1955)

Magruder, Charles (1957)

Mahard, Francis M. (1968)

Maher, Billy (undated)

Maher, James T. (1981)

Maher, William P. (1938)

Maison du Libre (1951)

Manchester Society of Architects, Student Association (1955)

Mancini, Lillian (1951)

Mancoff, Debra (1978)

Mandell, Mrs. M. Hussey (1952)

Mandell, Richard (1968)

Mandelsohn, Louise (1955)

Mang, Karl (1974)

Manitoba, University of (1958-1959)

Manning, Eileen (1952)

Mansell Collection (1956-1958)

Manson, Grant (1941, 1952, 1957-1958)

Manuzio (1962)

Maple and Co. (1946)

Mar, Arxiu (1958)

Marcus, Stanley (1962)

Marden, Philip S. (1951)

Marder, Tom (1979-1981)

Marenco, Vittoria (1964)

Mark, Edward L. (1966-1967)

Markowitz, Arnold (1970)

Mark Twain Memorial (1966-1970, 1975, 1977)

Marlborough Fine Arts Ltd. (1962)

Marlor, Clark S. (1969)

Marmo (1962)

Marquis, Alice (1986)

Marquis Co. (1947- 1948)

Marr, Harriet (1952)

Marre, Robert de La (1927)

Marsanas, Luis (1963-1964)

Marshall, Percy Johnson (1959, 1963) ( -- see also -- : Johnson-Marshall, Percy)

Martienssen, Heather (1962)

Martin, J. L. (1946-1947, 1952)

Martin, J. R. (1965)

Martin, Leslie (1954, 1957, 1959, 1962-1963)

Martin, Thomas P. (1947)

Martindale, Katharine (1960)

Maryland Center for Public Broadcasting (1978)

Maryland Historical Society (1957)

Maryland State Library (1939)

Marzoli, Carla C. (1954, 1956, 1958, 1964, 1968)

Mas, Arxiu (1956)

Masheck, Joseph (1970, 1973, 1977)

Mason, Clark (1963-1964)

Mason, Francis S. (1961-1965, 1967, 1979)

Mason, Howard (1962)

Massachusetts, Commonwealth of (1952, 1954)

Massachusetts Hospital Service, Inc. (1954)

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1946-1952, 1954, 1958, 1962-1963, 1965-1973, 1975-1981)

Massachusetts Motor Vehicle Assigned Risk Pool (1955)

Massachusetts Review -- (1969)

Massachusetts State Association of Architects (1954, 1957)

Massachusetts Turnpike Authority (1959)

Massachusetts, University of (1951, 1969)

Massey, James C. (1963, 1966)

Matheson, Donald W. (1980)

Matheson, Martin (1966)

Mattingly, Garrett (1946)

Maufe, Edward (1960)

Maunoury, Jean (1948)

Maxant, Harriett (1967)

Maxon, John (1961)

Maxtone-Graham, John (1974)

Maxwell, Clifford (1975, 1977, 1981)

Maxwell Mansion (1971)

May, John S. (1955)

Mayer, Grace M. (1953)

Mayflower Descendants, Society of (1944-1945, 1947-1950, 1952, 1954, 1956, 1959, 1963, 1966-1968, 1970, 1973-1975)

Mayher, Phil (1952)

Mayne, Jonathan (1962)

Mead, Katherine (1964, 1967)

Medicare/Blue Shield (1971-1972, 1985) ( -- see also -- : Blue Cross/Blue Shield)

Meehan, Patrick J. (1984)

Meeks, Carroll (1944-1966, undated)

Meigs, Walter (1954)

Meijburn, Herm. van der Kloot (1927)

Meiss, Millard (1952, 1960, 1962- 1963)

Melbourne, University of (1958)

Mellon, Tom (1962)

Mellquist, Jerome (1955-1956, 1958)

Mendelsohn, Eric (1953)

Mendelsohn, Frances (1959)

Mendenhall (1964)

Menges, Axel (1986)

Meredith Press (1962)

Meriden Gravure Co. (1960)

Merkel, Jayne (1967)

Merrill, David O. (1960)

Mesevery, Robert (1956)

Metcalf Printing (1973)

Metcalf, Priscilla (1956-1957, 1962-1963, 1966-1968, 1977)

Metropolitan Museum of Art (1951, 1968-1970, 1972-1973, 1979-1980, 1982)

Meyer, B. A. (1946)

Meyer, Charles (1961)

Miami, University of (1972)

Michalski, Thomas (1976)

Michigan, University of (1928, 1947-1948, 1965-1966, 1970)

Microcard Committee (1951)

Microcard Foundation (1948)

Middlesex Hospital (1938, 1941, 1945)

Middlesex School Alumni Bulletin -- (1952)

Middleton, Robin (1956-1961, 1963-1967, 1969, 1971-1972, 1978)

Middletown Press (1945)

Mies van der Rohe (1947)

Miles, H. (1961)

Miles, Hamish (1965, 1966)

Miles, James (1946)

Miles, Jean (1960)

Millar, John F. (1980-1983)

Millar, Olive (1952)

Millech, Knud (1930, 1956)

Miller Co. (1945, 1947-1952, 1955)

Miller, Dorothy (1961)

Miller, Herman (1963)

Miller, Janet (1978)

Miller, Meredith (1958-1959)

Miller, R. Craig (1973-1978, 1981-1984, 1986)

Miller, Mrs. Russ (1958)

Miller, Stephen R. (1976- 1977)

Millett, Fred B. (1949, 1963)

Millon, Henry A. (1956, 1964, 1966-1967, 1978, 1980-1981, 1983)

Millon, Henry A. and Judy (1973)

Millon, Judy (1982, 1984)

Milne-Henderson, Pat (1960, 1962) ( -- see also -- : Henderson, Pat Milne)

Milwaukee Art Center (1977)

Milwaukee Public Library (1952)

Minard, Ralph (1963)

Mindlin, Henrique E. (1955)

Minneapolis City Planning Department (1969)

Minneapolis Institute of Arts (1941, 1956, 1959)

Minnesota Society of Architects (1958)

Minnesota, University of (1944, 1946-1947, 1949-1950, 1955, 1958, 1961-1962, 1969, 1972, 1985)

Minnick, Margaret (1979-1981)

Minton, Lee R. (1973)

Mississippi State College for Women (1947)

Mitchell, Allen (1963)

Mitchell, Anthon (1952)

Mitchell, Charles (1962, 1974)

Mitchell, Herbert (1969, 1975)

Mitchell, Robert D. (1970)

Mitchell, Shirley Spratt (1968)

Mock, Betty (1947, 1949-1951)

Modern Age (1962)

Modern Architecture (1943, 1945)

Modern Architecture Symposium (1962, 1964, 1966)

Moe, Henry Allen (1953, 1963, 1968)

Moeller, Achim F. (1973)

Moholy-Nagy, Sibyl (1969, 1971)

Mohr, Elizabeth Heaton (1963)

Moise, Howard (1951)

Moller, C. F. (1956)

Moltke, J. W. (1971)

Mongan, Agnes (1944-1948, 1950-1955, 1963, 1969, 1973)

Mongan, Elizabeth (1945)

Monkhouse, Christopher P. (1982)

Monks Hall Museum (1964)

Montgomery, Charles F. (1955, 1959)

Montrose (1952)

Moog, Helen C. (1948)

Moore, Asher (1940-1941, 1943, 1945-1954, 1958-1961, 1981)

Moore, C. A. (1953)

Moore, Charles (1952)

Moore, Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Frazes (1951)

Moore, Henry (1955)

Moore, Hugh (1965)

Moore, Lamont (1951)

More, Hermon (1948)

Morea, Alberto (1957, 1959)

Moret, O.J.V. (1955)

Morgan, Charles H. (1965)

Morgan, Keith N. (1980-1981)

Morgan, William N. (1957)

Morgas, Antonio de (1956)

Morison, Samuel E. (1951)

Morley, Grace L. McCann (1937)

Morra (1958)

Morris, Mrs. E. Huckins (1959)

Morris, Ellen (1980)

Morris, Laura B. S. (1962)

Morris Society (1965)

Morris, Mrs. V. C. (1951)

Morrison, Hugh (1935-1936, 1940-1941, 1945, 1947-1953, 1956, 1970)

Morrison, Mary Lane (1977)

Morrissey, Rita (1957-1961, 1966-1967, 1969-1975, 1980, 1982, 1985-1986)

Morse, John D. (1946- 1947)

Morton, James P. (1976)

Morton, John and Flossie (1941)

Morton, M. M. (1960)

Moss, Richard (1959)

Mount Holyoke College (1942, 1947, 1949, 1951-1952, 1957, 1963, 1970)

Mount Vernon Ladies Association (1955)

Moynihan, Daniel Patrick (1986)

Mumford, Lewis (1927-1930, 1945-1946, 1948, 1951, 1979, 1982)

Munich (1956)

Municipal Art Society of New York (1957, 1978-1981, 1983)

Munson Williams Proctor Institute (1951, 1962, 1966-1967)

Munsterberg, Hugo (1946)

Munz, Heinrich (1958)

Munz, Ludwig (1956)

Murphy, Francis (1967)

Murray, Edward (1971)

Murtagh, William J. (1979-1980)

Museo Internazionale di Architettura Moderna (1961-1963)

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (1962) ( -- see also -- : Boston, Museum of Fine Arts)

Museum of Modern Art (1936, 1939, 1941, 1943-1962, 1964-1969, 1971, 1973, 1975, 1982, 1984, undated)

Museum of the City of New York (1956-1958)

Musgrave, Clifford (1956)

Music Press (1949)

Myers, Denys P. (1963)

Mylonas, Paul M. (1956)

Mystic Seaport (1974)

Nachmani, Cynthia (1977)

Nagel, Charles (1954-1955)

Nagle, Priscilla C. (1963)

Nairn, Ian (1956)

Napoli, Univesita degli Studi di (1978)

Napper, J. H. (1961)

Nash, Roy (1949-1950)

Nash, Suzanne (1952)

Nation -- (1957)

National Academy of Design (1962)

National Archives of Canada ( -- see -- : Canada, National Archives of)

National Buildings Record -- (1942, 1947, 1949)

National Buildings Register (1942-1943, 1954, 1956, 1958, 1960)

National Council on the Arts and Government (1957)

National Cyclopedia of American Biography -- (1961, 1970-1971)

National Endowment for the Humanities (1969-1970, 1973, 1975-1976, 1978-1979)

National Foundation for Arts and Humanities (1970-1971)

National Galleries of Scotland (1946)

National Gallery (London) (1964)

National Gallery of Art (1950, 1962, 1964, 1968, 1975, 1980-1982)

National Gallery of Canada (see: Canada, National Gallery of)

National Institute of Arts and Letters (1956)

National Monuments Record (1971)

National Park Service (1965, 1970)

National Registration Identity Card (Great Britain) (1946)

National Science Foundation (1968)

National Trust (1950, 1952)

National Trust for Historic Preservation (1955, 1958, 1961-1962, 1964-1966, 1969-1970, 1976-1978)

National Trust for Scotland (1953)

Navy League (1946)

Naylor, Edith M. (1944)

Nebraska, University of (1955)

Nelson, Paul D. (1928)

Nesbin, Esther W. (1950)

Netherlandish Scrolled Gables... -- ( -- see -- : Dutch Gables Book)

Netsch, Walter (1961)

Neuburg Staatsarchiv (1973)

Neuman, Hartwig (1985)

Neutra, Richard (1928, 1940-1941, 1954, 1969, undated)

Neville, Elizabeth (1964)

Neville, Richard G. (1958)

Neville, Harriett Elizabeth (1966)

New American Library (1952)

New Amsterdam Casualty Co. (1948)

New England Antiquities, Society for the Preservation of (1972-1973) ( -- see also -- : Preservation of New England Antiquities, Society for the; Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities)

New England Architecture, Committee for the Centennial Exhibition of (1957)

New England Quarterly -- (1955)

New Gallery (1963)

New Haven Festival of Arts (1959)

New Haven Preservation Trust (1964, 1966-1969)

New Jersey Historical Society (1962)

New Jersey Society of Architects (1957)

New Liberty (1952)

New London (1976)

New Mexico, University of (1957)

New Watson Hotel (1955)

New York Central Railway (1956)

New York City (1972)

New York City, Art Commission of (1983)

New York City Planning Commission (1972)

New York Graphic Society (1970

New York Herald Tribune -- (1947)

New-York Historical Society (1950-1951, 1961-1962, 1969)

New York State Association of Architects (1949)

New York State, Temporary Commission on the Restoration of the Capitol (1980-1981)

New York, State University of (1952)

New York Times -- (1947-1948, 1957, 1960-1961)

New York University (1945-1949, 1951-1954, 1958, 1960-1961, 1968-1986) ( -- see also -- : Gray Art Gallery; Institute of Fine Arts) New York University Seminar (1977, 1980)

New Yorker -- (1926, 1946)

Newark Public Library (1969)

Newbegin's Bookshop (1947)

Newberry, S. W. (1958)

Newcastle (1956)

Newcastle on Tyne, University of (1970)

Newcomb College (1961)

Newcomb, Rexford (1946-1947)

Newhall, Beaumont (1947, 1950, 1952, 1955-1958, 1967)

Newhan Book Shop (1947)

Newhouse, S. I., Jr. (1982)

Newhouse, Victoria (1980-1982, 1984)

Newman, Robert B. (1952, 1954-1955)

Newmeyer, Alfred (1959-1960)

Newnham College (1962)

Newnes, Ltd. (1946)

Newport Co. [Rhode Island], Preservation Society of (1952) ( -- see also -- : Preservation Society of Newport Co. [Rhode Island])

Newport Historical Society (1968)

Newton, Roger Hale (1946, 1953)

Nicholette, Manfredi (1955)

Nichols, Fred (1956-1960)

Nicholson, Ben (1946, 1950-1953)

Niebling, Howard V. (1973)

Niemeyer, Oscar (1955-1956)

Nijmegan (1969)

Nineteenth Century American Architects -- [with Philip Johnson] (1932)

Nismonger, Estelle (1948)

Noble, Michael (1972)

Nodena Foundation (1952)

Noehles, Karl (1956)

Nordt, Janis M. H. 1981

North Carolina, University of (1941, 1960, 1969)

North Dakota Agricultural College (1953)

North Easton (1968)

North Easton Historic District, H. H. Richardson Tour (1975)

Northampton Historical Society (1952)

Northwest College Lectures and Concerts Association (1959)

Northwestern University (1968-1971, 1977-1978, 1985)

Norton and Co. (1965-1967, 1970, 1978-1979, 1981-1982)

Norton, Paul H. (1952-1953, 1957-1960, 1963, 1966-1968)

Notre Dame, University of (1965)

Novotny (1959)

Noyes, S. R. (1947)

Nutt, Richard S. (1959)

Oak Park (1969)

Oak Park, Landmarks Commission of (1978)

Oakes Ames Memorial Hall (1970)

Oberhuber, Konrad (1965)

Oberlin College (1947, 1950)

Obesity Diet (1945)

O'Brien, Wendy (1962)

Observer -- (1953)

O'Callaghan, John (1970-1971, 1974)

Ochsner, Jeffrey Karl (1972, 1975, 1979-1987)

O'Connor, R. B. (1962)

O'Gorman, James F. (1970, 1974, 1977)

Ogunquit Museum of Art (1965)

Ohio Historical Society (1956)

Ohio State University (1952, 1959, 1962, 1967)

Ohle (1956)

Ojeda, Luis (1949)

Oklahoma, University of (1949)

Olana (1964, 1966)

Old Print Shop, Inc. (1951)

Olds, Irving S. (1952)

O'Leary, Pat (1956-1957)

Olfanos (1970)

Ollinger, G. Batchelder (1970)

Olmstead, Lorena Ann (1951)

Olpp, William H. (1948)

Olsen, Karolyn (1954-1955)

Olson, Charles (1965-1966)

Olson, Joan H. (1964)

O'Malley, Rev. J.M.E. (1960)

O'Malley-Williams, A. C. (1961) ( -- see also -- : Williams, A. C. O'Malley)

Omoto, Sadayoski (1951)

O'Neal, William B. (1961, 1967, 1970, 1978)

O'Neil, Kathleen (1946)

One World (1946)

Onot, Etta S. (1973)

Open University (1981)

Oppeille (1946)

Oppenheimer, Herbert (1975-1977)

Oppositions -- (1974)

Opus Musicum -- (1964)

Oregon, University of (1953, 1960-1962)

Orfanos, Patricia (1982)

Orth, Myra (1971, 1973)

Ortner, Evelyn (1970)

Ortner, Everett H. (1975)

Osmun, Bill (1959)

Osterreichische Nationalbibliothek (1956, 1958)

Osterstrom, Marta (1966)

Ostrow, Stephen (1957)

Osuhowski, Carol (1955)

Ott, Orville (1956)

Otto, Christian F. (1965-1966, 1968, 1970-1972, 1975, 1979-1982)

Oud, J.J.P. (1928-1929, 1948, 1950, undated)

Oudheidkunding Genootschap (1962)

Owings, Nathaniel (1961)

Overby, Osmund (1968, 1971, 1973, 1976-1977)

Owens, Dean (1981)

Owens, Jean (1976)

Oxford University (1935, 1953)

Ozinga, M. D. (1953, 1961-1964, 1966)

Pacific Historical Review -- (1970)

Padovic, James Farrell (1952, 1955)

Paffrath Gallery (1960-1961)

Pagano Foundation (1963)

Page, Evelyn (1950, 1954)

Page, Gertrude W. (1931)

Page, H. (1952)

Page, Robert (1975)

Paget, Paul (1971)

Paige, Maude Steinway (1969)

Paint Journal -- (1956)

Palestrant, Stephen (1963)

Pallottino, Massimo (1961)

Palmer, James E. (1952)

Palmer, Richard (1946)

Palmes, James C. (1957)

Palsgrove, James L. (1948, 1953)

Panofsky, Erwin (1940, 1945, 1952-1953, 1956, 1961)

Park, Helen O'B. (1975)

Park, Rosemary (1954)

Paris, Barbara (1949)

Parker, Barbara (1954)

Parkhurst, Charles (1952, 1954-1955, 1961, 1968)

Parkin, John C. (1959-1960, 1962, 1964, 1968)

Parks, Robert O. (1955-1956, 1961-1962)

Parmentier, Douglas (1945)

Parsons, Katharine (1952-1953, 1960, 1963)

Parsons School of Design (1947)

Partovi, Zahra (1985)

Partridge, Margaret (1973)

Passediot Gallery (1949)

Passport (1945, 1954, 1968)

Pastuhov, Vladimir Dimitrievitch (1961)

Paterson, A. B. (1953)

Patterson, John (1942, 1947)

Pattison, Walter (1947)

Paul, Adaline (1952-1953)

Paul, Jacques (1966)

Paul, Jurgen (1965, 1971, 1973-1974)

Paul Memorial Library (1954)

Paulsson, Gregor (1956)

Paxton Drawings (1951)

Peabody Institute of Baltimore (1938)

Peabody Museum (1948, 1951)

Peale Museum (1952-1953, 1956) ( -- see also -- : Baltimore City Museum)

Pearlman, Jill (1985-1986)

Pearson Fund (1977)

Pearson, Marjorie (1972, 1978-1980)

Pearson, Norman H. (1952)

Peat, Wilbur (1955)

Peck, F. Taylor (1954)

Pegge, Denis (1962)

Pei, I. M. (1962)

Pelican Books (1971, 1979)

Pelligrini and Cudahy, Inc. (1948)

Pelzer, Dorothy (1948)

Pendleton, Ralph (1955)

Penguin Books (1945-1946, 1953, 1955, 1957-1979, 1981- 1982, 1984)

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (1950-1951, 1972-1973)

Pennsylvania, Historical Society of (1942, 1953, 1958)

Pennsylvania Railroad Co. (1956-1957)

Pennsylvania State College (1949-1950, 1952)

Pennsylvania, University of (1955-1957, 1970, 1973, 1976-1978)

Pennsylvania, University of, Architecture Society (1952-1953)

Penrose Annual -- (1956)

Penshorn, Everett (1973)

Pentland, W. T. (1957)

Perkin, George (1960)

Perkins, Elizabeth (1966)

Perkins, Holmes (1952-1953, 1956, 1960-1961)

Perry, Judy (1956)

Perspecta -- (1957, 1959-1960, 1963-1964, 1970, 1981)

Perspectives U.S.A. -- (1952)

Perstel Verlag (1972)

Peters, Susan Dodge (1978)

Peterson, Bob (1961)

Peterson, Charles E. (1936, 1947-1948, 1950-1954, 1956, 1966, 1974)

Peterson, Jon (1964)

Peterson, Joyce (1952-1953)

Petersson, Robert (1956)

Petrick (1950)

Petrides, Andreas (1980)

Pettingil, George E. (1956-1957, 1978)

Pevsner Festschrift (1966-1969)

Pevsner Memorial Library (1986)

Pevsner, Nikolaus (1941-1942, 1945, 1947-1979, 1983-1984, undated)

Pfistermeister, Ursula (1971)

Phaidon Press, Ltd. (1967, 1969, 1970-1973)

Phelps, Kevin (1977)

Phi Beta Kappa (1948, 1954, 1958)

Philadelphia Award (1960)

Philadelphia, Free Library of (1944)

Philadelphia, Library Company of (1980)

Philadelphia Museum of Art (1945, 1951, 1954-1955, 1974-1975, 1982)

Phillips, Cecil L. (1946)

Phillips, John (1946)

Phillips, Wildger John (1952)

Phoenix Indemnity Co. (1955)

Photographie Giraudon (1958)

Pickard of Leeds, Ltd. (1954)

Pickens, Buford L. (1941, 1945, 1960, 1968, 1978)

Picture Post Library (1952-1955)

Pidgeon, Monica (1955)

Pierson, Jewel (1965)

Pierson, William (1948, 1953)

Pilgrim Society (1945-1954, 1956-1958, 1960-1986)

Piper, Marion K. (1971)

Pitt and Scott Ltd. (1956)

Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation (1967)

Pittsburgh, University of (1928, 1956-1957)

Placzek, Adolph K. (1965-1967, 1973-1974, 1976, 1979)

Plagemann, Volker (1969)

Planning Committee [Birkenhead Co., England] (1954)

Plaut, James S. (1946, 1953)

Pleasants, Frederick K. (1948, 1954)

Plenum Publishing Corp. (1969-1972)

Pleydel, H. Cliquet (undated)

Pleydell-Bouverie, David (1965, 1971, 1977-1978, 1983, undated) ( -- see also -- : Bouverie, David Pleydell)

Plimouth Plantation, Inc. (1950, 1953, 1955)

Plishke, E. A. (1954)

Plymouth Antiquarian Society (1952, 1960, 1962-1963, 1970, 1973-1974, 1976, 1983)

Plymouth Five Cents Savings Bank (1961)

Plymouth National Bank (1945, 1955)

Poe, Anthony (1955)

Poland (1973)

Polish Academy of Sciences (1972)

Polish Embassy (1970)

Pollard, Phyllis (1958)

Polshek, James Stewart (1980)

Polytechnic School of Architecture, Surveying, and Building (1955)

Pommer, Richard (1965, 1967, 1971, 1974-1975)

Pomona College (1946, 1963)

Pope-Hennessy, John (1959, 1962, 1964, 1966, 1971-1973, 1978)

Poppeliers, John C. (1968)

Porter, A. Kingsley (1923-1925, 1927-1931)

Porter, Lucy (1930, 1936, 1945-1946, 1949-1954, 1956-1957, 1963, undated)

Porter-Phelps-Huntington House, Inc. (1953, 1955-1957)

Porter-Phelps-Huntington Foundation (1962-1964, 1967)

Portnoy, Martin (1986)

Portsmouth Priory (1949)

Posener, Julius (1964-1966, 1968-1969)

Postmaster, Western District, London (1956)

Potter, Brooks ( 1956)

Potter, Inc. (1969)

Powell, Herbert ( 1963)

Powell, Philip (1952)

Powell, Philip and Moya (1954)

Praeger, Inc. (1962-1963, 1967-1971, 1973)

Prairie School Press (1963, 1966, 1968, 1970)

Prakapas, Eugene J. (1974, 1985)

Prats, Joan (1956)

Pratt and Whitney Aircraft (1945)

Praz, Mario (1955-1956)

Prentice-Hall, Inc. (1962)

Pre-Raphaelite Decorative Arts Exhibition (1971)

Preservation League of New York (1981)

Preservation of New England Antiquities, Society for the (1956, 1963, 1966) ( -- see also -- : New England Antiquities, Society for the Preservation of; Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities)

Preservation Society of Newport Co. [Rhode Island] (1948, 1955) ( -- see also -- : Newport Co. [Rhode Island], Preservation Society of)

Prestel Verlag (1975)

Preston, James (1963)

Preusser, Robert (1957)

Prey, Pierre du (1968-1969)

Preziosi, Donald (1981)

Price, Eric J. (1946)

Price, Paton (1949)

Priest, Allen (undated)

Primex Trading Co. (1950)

Prince, Charlotte (1969)

Princeton University (1945-1947, 1951-1952, 1955, 1957-1958, 1963, 1972, 1974-1978, 1985)

Prior, Harris K. (1947-1949, 1951, 1954-1956, 1962)

Pritzker Architecture Prize (1982)

Prochnik, Wit-Olaf (1956)

Producers' Council (1961-1962)

Program (1964)

Progressive Architecture -- (1948, 1953-1954, 1956-1958, 1960-1961, 1965-1967, 1969, 1971, 1977)

Propylaen Verlag Berlin (1975)

Providence Preservation Society (1960-1961)

Providence Public Library (1969)

Ptasnik, Mieczyslaw (1970)

Pugin's "Contrasts," Introduction to (1968)

Pulitzer, Mrs. Ralph (1954)

Putnam, George (1941)

Putnam, Natalie (1953)

Quadrangle Books (1969)

Quantrill, Malcolm (1956-1963, 1967, 1983, 1985)

Quaritch Ltd. (1953)

Queens College (1947)

Quinan, John (1972, 1980)

Quincy, Edmund (1959-1962)

Quincy Society of Fine Arts (1965-1966)

Raab, Martin D. (1954)

Rabinovich, Guillermo (1962)

Radcliffe College (1962)

Radice, E. A. (Ted) (1946, 1953-1954)

Raider, Nancy (1985)

Rainer, Roland (1956)

Rambusch, Catha Grace (1980-1981, 1983)

Ramsey, Ronald Lanier (1972)

Rand, Marvin (1959)

Randall, John D. (1958, 1973, 1981, 1984)

Randall, Richard R. (1966)

Randolph Hotel (1958)

Randolph Macon Women's College (1955)

Random House (1963)

Ransom, David (1977)

Rapson, Carin (1961)

Rapson, Ralph (1954, 1958-1959)

Rat fur Formgebung (1956)

Rathbone, Perry (1951-1952)

Rathbun, Mary C. (1947)

Rauch, Basil (1954, 1956)

Rava, Rebzi (1957)

Rawles Ltd. (1953)

Rebhuhn, Anne (1941)

Redfern Gallery (1946)

Reed, L. B. (1948-1950, 1952-1953)

Reed, Susan Welsh (1965)

Reeves and Son (1946)

Reform Club (1955)

Regensburg Stadt Museum (1973)

Regina College (1952)

Regional Planning Office [Australia] (1953)

Reiach, Alan (1954, 1956-1957)

Reid, Alexander (1946)

Reiff, Robert (1959)

Reinauer, B. Franklin (1985)

Reinberger, Mark (1982)

Reiner, Jan (1952)

Reinhardt, Phyllis A. (1953-1955, 1960-1961, 1967-1968)

Reinhold Books (1957, 1959)

Reinhold Publishing Co. (1954)

Reinink, A. W. (1964, 1966-1967, 1969-1972)

Renaissance Conference (1945)

Renaissance Quarterly -- (1970)

Renaissance Society of America (1954, 1956-1958, 1961)

Renascence (1955)

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (1947, 1986)

Research Publications (1970-1971)

Residenz Verlag (1968)

Revista de Occidente Argentinia -- (1949)

Rewald, John (1977)

Rewald, S. (1976)

Rheinisches Museum (1958)

Rheinland Landschaftsverband (1956)

Rhode Island (1968)

Rhode Island Architecture -- (1939, 1968)

Rhode Island School of Design (1949-1950, 1952, 1956, 1982-1983)

Rhoads, William B. (1969)

Ribner, Jonathan (1979)

Rice, Davis and and Daley (1946-1949)

Rice Institute (1958)

Rice, Norman (1966)

Rich, Daniel Catton (1981)

Rich, Frances (1966)

Richards, Brian (1955)

Richards, Charles R. (1928)

Richards, Jim (1950, 1956)

Richards, Jim and Kit (1955)

Richards, John M. (1946, 1947, 1952, 1954, 1965)

Richardson (1956)

Richardson, A. E. (1945, 1954)

Richardson, Douglas (1971-1972, 1974-1976)

Richardson, Douglas Scott (1966)

Richardson, E. P. (Ted) (1953, 1955)

Richardson, H. H. (1974, 1978, 1982)

Richardson, Joseph P. (1973)

Richmond (1947, 1965)

Ricketson, John H. (1963)

Rickey, George W. (1961)

Rider, Fremont (1950)

Rietveld (1963)

Rijksmuseum (1956)

Rindge, Agnes (1930, 1945, 1947) ( -- see also -- : Claflin, Agnes Rindge)

Ringling Museum of Art (1948-1949, 1952)

Riopelle, Chris (1979-1982, 1984)

Ripley, Dillon (1958)

Ritter, John C. (1962)

Riverside, University of California at (1966)

Robb, David M. (1945, 1953, 1959)

Roberts, Abby B. (1941)

Roberts, Laurance (1959)

Robertson, Jacques (1955)

Robertson, Nancy (1959)

Robie House, Committee for the Preservation of the (1962-1965, 1967)

Robinson and Cleaver (1960-1961)

Robinson, Cervin (1962)

Robinson, Franklin W. (1981)

Roche, Kevin (1966, 1974-1975)

Rochester (1967)

Rochester Memorial Art Gallery (1949)

Rochester, Print Club of (1949-1950)

Rochester, University of (1970)

Rockefeller, Mr. and Mrs. David (1967)

Rockefeller, Mr. and Mrs. John D., 3rd (1955)

Rockefeller, Winston (1957)

Rococo Architecture in Southern Germany -- (1967-1968)

Rodman, Selden (1949)

Roe, Albert S. (1961)

Rollins, Clara B. (1950)

Romaine, Lawrence B. (1941, 1946-1953, 1955, 1958, 1961)

Rome (1959)

Roop, Ellen (1967)

Roos, Frank J. (1938, 1947)

Roosevelt University (1957-1958)

Rorimer, James J. (1955)

Roscoe, Field (1952)

Rose, Francis (1947, 1949-1954, 1956, 1964, undated)

Rose, Frederica (1955)

Rose, Laura (1976)

Rosebery, Earl of (1952)

Rosenberg, Arthur M. (1951)

Rosenberg, Eugene (1956)

Rosenberg, George (1976)

Rosenberg, Jim (1954)

Rosenblum, Robert H. (1952-1953, 1956-1969, 1972, 1982)

Rosenthal, Julius (1948)

Rosenwald, Lessing J. (1948)

Rosett, Francis (1957-1958)

Rosever, Kenneth M. (1952)

Ross, Marian Dean (1941, 1947, 1952-1954, 1956, 1960-1962, undated)

Ross, Marvin C. (1957, 1962)

Ross, Robert W. (1925, undated)

Roth, Leland (1970, 1973-1974, 1976, 1978, 1982)

Rothenberg, Jacob (1952)

Rowaan, H. (1963)

Rowe, Barbara C. (1958)

Rowe, Brian and Colin (1952)

Rowe, Colin (1953-1956, 1960-1961, 1964, 1977)

Rowland, Browse and Delbanco (1952)

Rox, Henry (1953, 1945)

Royal Archaeological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland (1955)

Royal Architectural Institute of Canada ( -- see -- : Canada, Royal Architectural Institute of)

Royal Automobile Club (1956)

Royal College of Art (1953)

Royal Institute of British Architects (1936, 1946-1957, 1959, 1962, 1968, 1970, 1975, 1981,1986)

Royal Society of Arts (1950, 1953, 1955-1956, 1959-1962, 1964, 1966-1967, 1969-1970, 1972, 1975-1976, 1978-1980, 1983, 1985-1986)

Royal Vangorcum Ltd. 1965

Rub, Timothy (1978-1982, 1986-1987)

Rubin, Don (1970)

Rubin, Joan Carpenter (1980)

Rudd, J. William (1961, 1963, 1966)

Rudisill, Richard (1964)

Rudolph, Paul (1950, 1952-1954, 1963-1964, undated)

Rueger, Charles (1954)

Rufford Travel (1954-1955)

Ruggie Agency (1949-1950, 1952-1955, 1961)

Rusch, Basil (1955)

Rusk, W. S. (1935)

Ruskin Society of America (1951, 1953)

Russell, A. LeBaron (1947)

Russell, Beverly (1975)

Russell, Christopher A. (1953)

Russell, Gordon (1956)

Russell, Mr. and Mrs. William G. (1954)

Russian Review -- (1955)

Rutgers University (1955, 1972-1973, 1982, 1985)

Rutledge, Anna Wells (1951, 1955, 1957, 1962, 1966)

Ryan Studios (1958)

Ryder, Arthur (1949)

Ryerson and Burnham Libraries, Art Institute of Chicago (1949) ( -- see also -- : Burnham Library; Art Institute of Chicago; Chicago, Art Institute of)

Saarinen, Aline B. (1962)

Saarinen, Eero (1957, 1963-1964)

Sabin Coal Co. (1954-1955)

Sachs, Paul J. (1925-1926, 1928, 1951-1952, 1955)

Saint, Andrew (1982, 1986)

St. George's Gallery Books (1959, 1964-1965, 1968, 1970, 1977-1978)

St. James Press (1978)

St. John's University (1961)

St. Louis, City Art Museum of (1961, 1966)

Salmon and Son (1954)

Salto Liberia (1962)

Saltonstall, Gladys (1928)

Saltonstall, Leverett (1953)

Salzberg Seminar in American Studies (1959)

Salzburg (1953)

Samoset Garage (1946)

Samson, Miles D. (1984)

Samuel, Godfrey (1948, 1952, 1956, 1959)

San Antonio Fine Arts Forum (1958)

Sanborn, Herbert J. (1960)

San Jose State University ( -- see -- : California, San Jose State University)

Santacroce, Valeria A. (1959-1960)

Sarton, May (1953)

Satterwaithe, Margaret (1970)

Sauer, David (1958)

Sauerlander, Willebald (1961-1966, 1969, 1971-1974)

Sauermost, Heinz Jurgen 1969

Savage, Charles C. (1972-1977, 1979, 1983, 1986)

Savage, Henry (1973)

Saville Club (1946)

Sawelson-Gorse, Naomi (1986)

Sawyer, Charles H. (1947, 1952-1953)

Sawyer, H. Keith (1983)

Scalvini, Maria Luisa (1983)

Scanlan, Stuart J. (1954)

Scarmuzza, Jack (1952)

Schaack, Margaret C. D. (1974)

Schaefe, Madeline (undated)

Schaeffer, Bertha (1955)

Schaeffer, John (1946)

Schafran, Lynn (1970)

Schalk, Dorothy (1957)

Scheper, H. (1956)

Scheu-Riesze, Helene (1959)

Schindler, R. M. (1930)

Schlee (1973)

Schmidt, Erwin (1958)

Schmitt, Robert (1962-1967, 1970)

Schmoller, Hans (1958)

Schmuzer Article (1965)

Schnabel, Henry H. (1964, 1967, 1969)

Schneider, Donald D. (1961, 1966, 1975, 1976)

Schneiderman, Stephen (1962)

Schnell, Hugo (1966-1967)

Schoener, Allan (1953)

School Service Bureau (1950, 1957)

Schorske, Elizabeth (1953)

Schorske, Elizabeth and Carl (1948, 1954)

Schraack, Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. (1975)

Schreider, Louis (1971)

Schulze, Franz (1986)

Schwarz, Heinrich (1952)

Schwinn, Walter K. (1976)

Scientific American -- (1952)

Scott, Geoffrey (1928)

Scott, Hayden (1952, 1958)

Scribner's Sons (1948, 1950, 1960, 1966-1967, 1969, 1979)

Scully, Arthur (1982)

Scully, Vincent (1948, 1950-1956, 1962, 1971-1972, 1977)

Scutt (1963)

Seagram and Sons U. S. Bicentennial Project (1976-1978)

Seale, William (1973, 1975, 1980-1981, 1984, 1986)

Searing, Helen (1962-1963, 1967, 1971, 1973, 1975-1976, 1979, 1983-1984)

Seaver, Esther (1948-1949, 1952)

Seeger, Mia (1956)

Segre, Maria (1963)

Seiberling, Frank (1952, 1955-1956, 1958, 1963)

Sekler, E. F. (1953)

Sekler, Edward F. (1976)

Sekler, Edward L. (1960, 1965-1967)

Seligman, Georges E. (1950)

Sellin, David (1972)

Selz, Peter (1959-1960)

Senie, Harriet (1976, 1979, 1981)

Senter, Terance A. (1972, 1974)

Serynyk, Peter (1966, 1973)

Sert, Jose Luis (1954, 1956)

Seven Arts Book Society (1957)

Severini, Lois (1978-1979, 1982-1984)

Seymour, Anne Halle (1966)

Seznec, Jean (1955)

Shaker Community, Hancock, Mass. (1962)

Shapira, Nathan, H. (1961)

Shapiro, Ellen R. (1977)

Shapiro, Meyer (1961)

Shaw, Thomas S. (1966)

Shawe-Taylor, Desmond (1946)

Shawmut Bank (1954)

Shea, Mrs. John L. (1954)

Shear, John K. (1956)

Sheffield, Margaret (1974)

Shelter Publications (1973)

Shepley, Bullfinch, Richardson and Abbott (1961, 1981)

Shepley, Henry (1948)

Sheraton Hotel (1952, 1968)

Sheridan, Friede (1956-1959, 1961)

Sherwood, Mrs. John R. (1952)

Shillaber, Caroline (1957, 1972)

Shipley, Brown (undated)

Shipman, Mary (1965)

Shipman, Mary and Arthur (1956)

Shoe String Press, Inc. (1965, 1979)

Shokokusha Publications (1961)

Shore, James R. (1962)

Shores, Ken (1962)

Sias, Garrett K. (1959)

Sidles, Mrs. Frank C. (1963)

Sihriu, Omico (1955)

Silsby, Peter (1961)

Silverman, Jill Anne (1975)

Silvermine Publications (1965)

Simpson, Charles (1968)

Simpson, Mrs. Kenneth F. (1950)

Simpson, Marc (1977)

Simpson, P. L. (1973)

Sims, W. S. (1946)

Simson, Otto G. (1954)

Singelenberg, Pieter (1962-1963, 1970-1971, 1974)

Singleton, W. A. (1956)

Sinnen, Jean (1964)

Sise, Hazen (1969)

Sitwell, Gilbert (1952)

Sizer, Theodore (1933, 1945-1946, 1950-1952, 1956, 1963)

Skempton, A.W. (1961)

Skidmore, Owings and Merrill (1960-1963, 1979)

Skopek, Thomas (1949)

Sky, Alison (1975)

Slater Memorial Museum (1950)

Sleepy Hollow Restorations (1957)

Slive, Seymour (1958)

Slive, Zoya (1965)

Sloan, Joseph C. (1959)

Sloane, Joseph C. (1958)

Small, Philip L. (1928)

Smartt, Donald (1981)

Smith, Alexander Mackay (1949) ( -- see also -- : Mackay-Smith, Alexander)

Smith and Sons (1953)

Smith, Anna L. (undated)

Smith, Betty (1928-1929)

Smith College (1946-1964, 1966-1973, 1975-1976, 1978, 1981-1982) ( -- see also -- : Department; Kennedy Fund)

Smith College Alumnae Association (1954) ( -- see also -- : Alumnae Association)

Smith, E. Baldwin (1946-1947, 1953)

Smtih, Edith (1928-1929)

Smith, Fred S. (1928)

Smith, Mrs. Frederick (1945)

Smith, G. E. Kidder (1957, 1961, 1963, 1965)

Smith, George Walter Vincent Museum (1961)

Smith, Gertrude D. (1972)

Smith, Hinchman and Grulls Associates, Inc. (1976)

Smith, Kathryn (1976-1980, 1983, 1986)

Smith, Linn (1947)

Smith, Meg (1972, 1974)

Smith, Patricia Anne (1950)

Smith, Peter van der Meulen (1927-1928)

Smith, Robert C. (1950-1952, 1956)

Smith, Sidney (1947)

Smith, Vincent (1971)

Smith, William and Son (1949)

Smithson, Peter (1966)

Smithsonian Associates (1975)

Smithsonian Institution (1967, 1976, 1979)

Smyser, H. M. (1965)

Smyth, Craig Hugh (1951-1952, 1956, 1983)

Snow, Florence (1955)

Snow, Wilbert (1945)

Snowden, Ernest (1927-1928)

Snyder, John (1974)

Soby, James Thrall (1945-1950, 1954-1955, 1957-1958, 1960-1961, 1968, 1977, 1979)

Soby, Nellie (1951-1953)

Societe Editions de France (1958)

Society for the Preservation of Long Island Antiquities ( -- see -- : Long Island Antiquities, Society for the Preservation of)

Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities (1948, 1972, 1975) ( -- see also -- : New England Antiquities, Society for the Preservation of; Preservation of New England Antiquities, Society for the)

Society of Architectural Historians (1949-1985, 1987)

Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain (1958-1980, 1983-1986)

Society of Mayflower Descendants ( -- see -- : Mayflower Descendants, Society of)

Solomon, Arthur and Marny (1975)

Solomon, Pringle (1948)

Somerset Co. [N.J.] Park Commission (1970)

Somerwil, J. (1962)

Sommer, Clifford C. (1958)

Sommer, Frank (1970)

Sonne, Fi (1955-1956)

Sonnenberg, Benjamin (1972)

Sorem, Lucia (1961)

Soria, Martin (1958)

Sotheby Parke Bernet, Inc. (1971, 1982)

Southern California, University of (1966, 1968)

Southern Regional Education Board (1966)

Spaeth, John W. (1945-1946)

Spark, Victor (1948, 1971)

Spear, Dorothea (1955)

Speed Art Museum ( -- see -- : Louisville, J. B. Speed Art Museum)

Speed, Herbert (1946)

Speirs, Bruce (1982)

Spence, Basil (1963-1964)

Spence, Eleanor (1954)

Spencer, Brian (1973-1974)

Spencer, Stephen (1956)

Spencer, Walter L. (1975-1976, 1978)

Sperling, Harry G. (1955)

Speyer, Darthea (1952)

Spokes, P. S. (1955)

Sprague, Joan Forrester (1960)

Sprague, Paul (1973, 1980, 1983)

Springarn, J. E. (1938)

Springfield [Mass.] (1980-1981)

Springfield [Mass.] City Planning Department (1971)

Springfield [Mass.] Museum of Fine Arts (1949, 1954)

Springfield [Mass.] Republican (1944-1945)

Springfield [Miss.] Art Museum (1949)

Staatsarchiv (1966)

Stabile, Elizabeth (1963)

Stadt Koln (1957)

Stahl, Frederick A. (Tod) (1969-1970)

Staib, Hermann (1966, 1968-1969, 1974)

Staley, Karl A. (1953)

Stamm, Gunther (1979)

Stamp, Gavin (1978, 1985)

Stanford University (1985)

Stanton, Phoebe B. (1952-1954, 1958, 1965, 1968, 1970)

Staples Press (1950)

Starr, Mrs. Nathan C. (1952)

State Department, U. S. (1955, 1956, 1958) ( -- see also -- : Department of State; United States Department of State)

State Department, U.S. Information Agency (1957)

State Historical Society of Wisconsin ( -- see -- : Wisconsin, State Historical Society of)

Stebbins, Theodore E. (1965-1969, 1972-1973, 1977-1978)

Steegman, John (1950-1952, 1955-1956)

Steele, Geoffrey (1946, 1948, 1953)

Steen Hasselbalchs Forlag (1962)

Stein, Donna (1973-1974, 1978-1979)

Stein, Joseph A. (1947)

Stein, Margaret (1949)

Stein, Roger B. (1960)

Steiner, Johannes (1966)

Steinway and Sons (1946)

Steinway, Cassie (1960-1961, 1976, 1979, 1983-1985, undated)

Steinway, Cassie and Federick (1954)

Steinway, Frederick (1974)

Steinway, Lydia (1952-1953)

Steinway, Ruth (1928, 1945, 1947, 1949-1950, 1955-1956, 1958-1963, 1965-1968, 1970-1971, 1973-1974, 1978)

Steinway, Ruth and Theodore D. (1952-1954)

Steinway, Theodore D. (1982)

Steliaros, Mary (1974)

Stephens, Sherrie L. (1962)

Stern (1979)

Stern, Edgar (1977)

Stern, Edgar and Bita (1975)

Stern, Robert (1964, 1975, 1984-1985)

Sterner, Harold (1947)

Sternfeld, Fred and Sophia (1946-1957, 1959-1964, 1966, 1968, 1978, 1985-1986)

Sternfeld, Sophia (1970)

Stetson, Eugene W. (1965)

Stevens and Brown (1946)

Stevens, Sam (1964)

Stevens, Samuel (Thomas) (1953-1954)

Steyer, Glenn (1978)

Stiles, Florence Ward (1949-1950)

Sting, Hellmut (1966)

Stirling, James (1953)

Stockwell, E. Sidney (1960)

Stoddard and Talbot (1941, 1950, 1953, 1956, 1975)

Stoddard, Whitney (1952, 1054)

Stoedtner, Franz (1956-1958, 1964, 1970)

Stoller, Ezra (1956-1957, 1960)

Stone and Downer (1946)

Stony Point Folk Art Gallery (1957)

Stora Co. (1949)

Storrer, William Allin (1971-1978, 1980)

Stott, Eric (1982)

Stout, George L. (1953)

Stowe-Day Foundation (1965)

Stowell, Robert F. (1949)

Strache, Wolf (1963)

Strachey, John (1945)

Straight, Stephen M. (1966, 1970)

Straka, Paul (1974)

Strand, Janann (1976)

Stratton, Julius Adams (1963)

Strauss, Irma (1982)

Strickland, Charles R. (1938, 1948, 1955, 1957, 1959, 1961, 1963, 1966-1967, 1979)

Stroheim and Romann (1965)

Stroock, Paul A. (1969)

Stroud, Dorothy (1949-1953, 1955-1964, 1966-1967, 1971, 1973, 1978, 1983, undated)

Struck, Paul (1948)

Stubbins, Hugh (1952, 1960)

Stubblebine, James H. (1959, 1967-1968)

Stubbs, Mr. and Mrs. (1986)

Studio Books (1960-1961)

Studio Publications (1927-1928)

Stulz, Dale W. (1981)

Sturbridge Village (1966-1976)

Sturges, W. K. (1952)

Sturges, Walter Knight (1969-1970)

Sturm, Martha (1967)

Stuttgart (1956, 1963)

Suffness, Rita (1977)

Summerson, John (1936-1937, 1939, 1941, 1945-1949, 1952-1954, 1956, 1958, 1960-1962, 1966-1967, 1969-1970, 1980, 1982)

Sun [Baltimore] 1952 ( -- see also -- : -- Baltimore Sun -- )

Sunderland, Elizabeth (1946)

Sunderland, John (1953)

Sutherland, A. M. (1962)

Sutton, Mrs. Harvey P. (1941)

Swan, C. P. (1954)

Swarthmore College (1928, 1939, 1945)

Swayze, H. (1959)

Sweeney, James Johnson (1954, 1960)

Sweeney, Mr. and Mrs. James Johnson (1967)

Sweeney, John (1949, 1952-1953)

Sweeney, Robert L. (1976, 1980)

Sweet Briar College (1953)

Sweet, Frederick A. ( 1946, 1948, 1954)

Sweet, Victoria M. (1968)

Sweetland Photographers (1950)

Swets and Zeitlinger (1960)

Swetzoff Gallery (1951)

Swetzoff, Hyman (1952)

Swinton, George (1954-1955, 1957, 1964)

Swiss Review of World Affairs -- (1962)

Sylvester, David (1955)

Syracuse University (1976)

Syrkus, Szymon (1929)

Szambien, Werner (1977)

Tafel, Edgar (1962, 1971, 1973-1975, 1979-1980)

Tait, Alan (1966-1967)

Talbot, Harry (1952)

Talbott, Page (1976)

Talkington, Melinda (1969)

Tallmer, Jerry (1954)

Tamms, Frederick (1971)

Tannenbaum, Lily (1969)

Tanennbaum, Samuel (1952-1953)

Tate, Vernon (1947)

Tatum, George B. (1966, 1970, 1973, 1976)

Taube, Ivan (1975)

Taxes (1955)

Taylor, Fred M. (1954)

Taylor, Helen-Louise (1936-1938, undated)

Taylor, Lisa (1984)

Taylor, Nicholas (1962, 1966)

Taylor, Richard (1971)

Taylor, Walter (1953)

Tchelitchew, Paul (1952)

Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association (1946, 1948, 1954, 1956, 1962)

Technische Hochschule, Darmstadt ( -- see -- : Darmstadt, Technische Hochschule)

Technology Christian Association (1949)

Teel, William E. (1955)

Teichmann, Maurice (1956)

Teitelbaum Holdings, Ltd. (1982)

Tembo, Allan (1952)

Temple Hoyle-Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture, Columbia University ( -- see -- : Columbia University, Temple Hoyle-Buell Center...)

Temple University, Tyler School of Art (1962)

Tendler, Max (1962)

Tenko, Allen (1963)

Terrestris Greenhouses (1970)

Terry, Laurence (1952)

Texas Co. (1954)

Texas, University of (1968)

Thames and Hudson, Ltd. (1961, 1967-1968, 1970, 1972)

Thevoz, Michel (1970, 1974)

Thirteen, WNET (1978)

Thom, Mary (1955-1956)

Thomas, Downing (1949)

Thommasini, Anthony (1984)

Thompson, Francis (1946)

Thompson, K. (1954)

Thompson, Luther (1946-1948, 1950)

Thompson, Margaret and Randall (1948, 1956)

Thompson, Molly (1949)

Thompson, Paul (1968)

Thompson, R. S. (1960)

Thomson, Virgil (1927-1928, 1937, 1945-1948, 1950-1952, 1955, 1959, 1963, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1971-1972, 1974, 1979-1981, 1983, 1986, undated)

Thornburrow, David A. (1958)

Thornton Society of Washington (1943)

Ticeand Lynch (1946-1947)

Time -- (1959, 1967)

Time-Life (1946)

Times Literary Supplement -- (1967)

Tiranti, John, Ltd. (1949-1950)

Tirion, P.D.J. (1949)

Tobias and Co. (1946)

Toe, Abby N. (1970)

Toledo Museum of Art (1951, 1955)

Tomlinson, Mrs. (1951)

Tomlinson, Juliette (1975, 1977)

Tonetti, Joseph (1963)

Tongue, Sukru (1955)

Tonny, K. (1932)

Topeka City Beautification Association (1955)

Torbert, Donald R. (1956, 1959, 1961)

Toronto (1957)

Toronto, Art Gallery of (1950-1951, 1958-1960, 1974, 1977) ( -- see also -- : Art Gallery of Toronto)

Toronto, University of (1957-1960, 1976)

Town and Country -- (1946)

Trachtenberg, Martin (1976)

Trager, Philip (1983-1984)

Trans-World Shipping Co. (1960)

Trapp, Frank (1953)

Trappes-Lomax, Michael (1954)

Traversa de Dalt (1956)

Treasury Department, United States ( -- see -- : United States Treasury)

Trehearne and Norman (1959-1960)

Tremaine, Dee (1950)

Tremaine, Emily (1951-1957, 1962, 1965, 1969)

Trenton (1973)

Triennale de Milano (1959)

Trinity College ( -- see also -- : Austin Art Center) (1961, 1964, 1965, 1967, 1972-1973)

Trojan, Alina (1971)

Truex, Van Day (1946-1947)

Tselos, Dmitri (1943, 1946, 1956, 1958, 1961)

Tucker and Sons, Ltd. (1954)

Tunick, Susan (1982)

Tunnard, Christopher (1945, 1949-1951, 1958, 1965, undated)

Tunnard, Christopher and Lydia (1946-1948, 1975, 1981)

Tunnard, Lydia (1956, 1963)

Turl, Victor (1946, 1956)

Turner, Evan (1958)

Turner, Paul (1970, 1977, 1985)

Tuttle Co. (1952)

Twitchell, Ralph S. (1953)

Twiss, Richard E. (1979)

Tyler School of Art ( -- see -- : Temple University)

Ufford, James K. (1958)

UNESCO (1953)

Union College (1966, 1969)

Union Internacional de Arquitectos (1963)

Unitarian Association (1950)

Unitarian Congregational Society (1945)

Unitarian Universalist Church (1963)

United Engineering Trustees (1947)

United Kingdom Income Tax (1978)

United Press Association (1955)

United States Cultural Center, Berlin (1967)

United States Department of the Interior (1938, 1962)

United States Department of State ( -- see -- : Department of State; State Department, U. S.)

United States Congress, Committee on Education and Labor ( -- see -- : Committee on Education and Labor, U. S. Congress)

United States Information Service (1946, 1961)

United States Treasury (1945, 1969)

Unity Temple (1970)

Universal Transcontinental Corp. (1947)

Univesita degli Studi di Napoli ( -- see -- : Napoli,

Universita degli Studi di) (1978)

Universita Internazionale dell'Arte (1970)

University of Bristol ( -- see -- : Bristol, University of)

University of California at Riverside ( -- see -- : Riverside, University of California at)

University of California, San Jose State ( -- see -- : California, San Jose State University)

University of Chicago (1941, 1942) ( -- see also -- : Chicago, University of)

University of Cincinnati ( -- see -- : Cincinnati, University of)

University of Delaware ( -- see -- : Delaware, University of; Winterthur Program, University of Delaware)

University of Georgia ( -- see -- : Georgia, University of)

University of Glasgow ( -- see -- : Glasgow, University of)

University of Massachusetts ( -- see -- : Massachusetts, University of)

University of Melbourne ( -- see -- : Melbourne, University of)

University of Minnesota ( -- see -- : Minnesota, University of)

University of Nebraska ( -- see -- : Nebraska, University of)

University of New Mexico ( -- see -- : New Mexico, University of)

University of Notre Dame ( -- see -- : Notre Dame, University of)

University of Oklahoma ( -- see -- : Oklahoma, University of)

University of Oregon ( -- see -- : Oregon, University of)

University of Pennsylvania ( -- see -- : Pennsylvania, University of)

University of Pittsburgh ( -- see -- : Pittsburgh, University of)

University of Texas ( -- see -- : Texas, University of)

University of Toronto ( -- see -- : Toronto, University of)

University of Wisconsin ( -- see -- : Wisconsin, University of)

University of Witwatersrand ( -- see -- : Witwatersrand, University of)

University of York ( -- see -- : York, University of)

University Prints (1956-1959, 1962, 1964)

Unnitzer, Petra (1983)

Upjohn, Everared M. (1953)

Upton, Eleanor S. (1953)

Usonia (1983)

Utrecht, Kunsthistorische Instituut (1962)

Utrecht, Ryksuniversiteit te (1968)

Valentine and Sons Ltd. (1954)

Van Agtmaal (1958)

Van Bolschwig, Otto A. (1954) ( -- see also -- : Bolschwig, Otto A. Van)

Van der Berg, H. M. (1962)

Van der Poel, Priscilla (1949-1950, 1952, 1955-1956, 1958, 1960, 1962-1964, 1966, 1968-1969)

Van Derpool, James G. (1954-1956, 1959)

Van Eyck, Aldo (1956, 1963)

Van Fleet, Frederick A. (1946)

Van Gent, Arie (1957)

Vann, James Allen (1973)

Van Ojen (1958)

Van Ravensway, Charles (1939, 1963, 1966)

Van Tassel, Peter (1952-1953, 1966)

Van Trump, James D. (1957-1959, 1961, 1965, 1969)

Van Zanten, David T. (1965-1970, 1972-1973, 1975-1979, 1983, 1985)

Vancouver Hotel (1954)

Vanderbilt, Paul (1928-1930, 1941, 1945-1946, 1948-1950, 1952-1954, undated)

Vandersall, Amy (1966, 1971-1972)

Vanity Fair -- (1982)

Varley, Lee (1946, 1948, 1954, 1979)

Vassar College (1927, 1944-1946, 1961, 1965-1966, 1975, 1977)

Vaughan College (1962)

Venezuela, Universidad Central de (1967)

Venice (1975)

Venturi, Robert (1961, 1972)

Verlag Schnell and Steiner (1967, 1969)

Veronen, L. (1966)

Victoria and Albert Museum (1946, 1948-1949, 1953, 1955-1956, 1958)

Victorian Exhibition (1972)

Victorian Paperback [ -- Early Victorian Architecture in Britain -- ] (1966)

Victorian Society (1958, 1960-1966, 1968-1970, 1972-1980, 1985)

Victorian Society in America (1968, 1971-1986)

Victorian Society in America, American State Capitols Research Project (1971-1977)

Victorian Studies -- (1956-1959, 1962, 1967, 1969, 1971, 1973-1974)

Viereck, Florence (1955)

Viereck, Peter (1949-1950, 1952-1953, 1956, 1961)

Viereck, Peter and Anya (1955)

View Magazine -- (1945)

Villanueva, A. (1956)

Villanueva, Carlos Raul (1955, 1957-1959, 1961)

Villanueva, Marcel (1965)

Viollet, Brian (1958)

Viollet, H. Roger (1959)

Virginia, Commonwealth of (1953, 1957)

Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (1954, 1957)

Virginia Quarterly Review -- (1960)

Virginia, University of (1928, 1962, 1969-1970)

Visson, Assia R. (1946-1947)

Visual Publications Ltd. (1961)

Vogt, Adolf Max (1975)

Voice of America (1960, 1967)

Volpe, Anne R. (1974)

Von Erffa, Helmut (1948, 1952, 1955-1956, 1958, 1963, 1968)

Von Groschwitz, Fran (1970)

Von Groschwitz, Gustav [Von] (1945-1948, 1951-1952, 1961-1962, 1965, 1968, 1972, 1978)

Von Klemperer, Betty (1961, 1968)

Von Moschzisker, Berthe (1945, 1947-1951)

Vorenkamp, A.P.H. (1952)

Vorobiov, Mary (1954)

Vose Galleries (1960)

Vose, Robert C. (1949)

Vose, S. Morton (1952)

Vygen, Willy (1928)

Wachs, W. C. (1937)

Waddy, Patricia (1976)

Wade, John (1954)

Wade, Karen Graham (1974-1975, 1977, 1982)

Waddington Galleries (1956)

Wadsworth Athenaeum (1928, 1941, 1946-1948, 1958, 1963)

Wadsworth, Cleome (1945)

Wadsworth, Julius and Clarice (1959)

Wagner, Gunter (1983)

Wagner, Mary-Louise (1954)

Walch, Nicole (1972)

Wald, Alan (1977)

Walker Art Center (1944-1945, 1948, 1952, 1958-1959)

Walker, John (1928, 1965, 1977)

Walker, Robert (1959)

Walker, William (1946)

Wallace, Michael Lee (1959)

Walsh, Alice M. (1970)

Walter, Gayle (1953)

Walter Parrish International, Ltd. (1977)

Walters Art Gallery (1949)

Walters, Walter H. (1971)

Warburg Institute (1946, 1948)

Ward, Clarence (1943, 1945, 1947, 1952)

War Department (1948)

Ward, James (1980-1985)

Warn, Robert (1972, 1974)

Warner Burns Toan Lund (1982)

Warners, Albert (1963)

Warnoff, Deborah (1974)

Warren, Geoffrey (1936)

Warren, Richard (1974)

Warren and Whetmore (1957)

War Service Appointment (1942-1943)

Wasch, William (1983)

Washburn College (1938)

Washburn, Gordon B. (1945, 1948-1949, 1953-1954, 1965, undated)

Washington, Associated Students' University of (1965)

Washington Memorial Library (1954)

Wasmuth Antiquariat (1963-1968, 1970, 1972-1974, 1979)

Wasserman, Mrs. Amha (1959)

Wasserman, Jack (1961-1964)

Waterhouse, Ellis (1952)

Watkin, David A. (1965, 1973, 1981)

Watrous, James (1960-1961)

Watson, Peter (1946)

Watson, Steven (1985-1986)

Watts, Sarah Miles (1985)

Waugh, Arthur (1951-1953)

Way Forum (1963)

Weade, Katharine H. (1947)

Weakley, Joan (1980-1981)

Weatherby, Mrs. J. H. (1952)

Webb, Brian (1949-1950)

Webb, Geoffrey (1956)

Webb, James H. (1955)

Webb, Ltd. (1948)

Webber, Elroy (1949)

Weber, Harvey A. (1939, 1952)

Weber, Roland (1976)

Webster, J. Carson (1941, 1949, 1954, 1966, 1970, 1972-1974)

Webster, Sara (1983)

Wedgewood (1954, 1958-1959, 1961-1962)

Weese, Harry (1956)

Weill, Betsy (1977)

Weinberg, H. Barbara (1970, 1974, 1978, 1980)

Weinberg, Herbert (1954)

Weinrab, Ben (1966)

Weinreb Ltd. (1965)

Weirick, James (1974)

Weisberger, Bernard A. (1979)

Weiser, Walter (1956)

Weisman, Winston (1951-1957, 1960-1963, 1966, 1968, 1973-1975)

Weissburger, Herbert (1961)

Welch and Forbes (1956-1957, 1959, 1961, 1970, 1982, 1985)

Welch and Goodhue (1986)

Weller, Allen S. (1955)

Wellesley College (1945, 1947, 1952, 1954, 1958, 1969)

Wellington, Ohio (1973)

Wells College (1965)

Wells, Mason B. (1957-1958)

Wells, Ruth (1949)

Welsh College of Advanced Technology (1962-1963, 1966)

Wensinger, Arthur Stevens (1956, 1967)

Wenzinger, Jerry (1961)

Werkkunstschule Krefeld (1964-1965)

Wesley, Richard (1980)

Wesleyan College [Macon, Ga.] (1945)

Wesleyan University (1935, 1937-1943, 1945-1950, 1952, 1962-1963, 1967, 1973-1979, 1981-1982, 1987) ( -- see also -- : Gift)

West, J. (1952)

West-Taylor, John P. (1960, 1962)

Westbrook, Shirlee (1973-1974)

Western Reserve University (1952, 1958)

Weyhe, E. (1928, 1941, 1949, 1952-1953)

Wheaton College (1949, 1971)

Wheelock, Phyllis (1958)

Wheldon, Rupert (1927)

Whiffen, Marcus (1950-1966, 1968,-1969, 1971, 1978, 1980)

White House (1981, 1986)

White, Keith E. (1959)

White, Norval (1961)

White, Patricia (1975)

Whitechapel Art Gallery (1956)

Whitehead, Philip B. (1946)

Whitehill, Walter Muir (1951-1953, 1955, 1966, 1976)

Whitlock and Sons (1946)

Whitney Museum of American Art (1949-1950)

Whitson, Jim (1948)

Whitson Publishing Co. (1979)

Whittesley, Julian (1949)

Whittier, Charles H. (1970, 1973)

Who's Who -- (1946-1947, 1952, 1958, 1961, 1975, 1982)

Wichman, Douglas J. (1973)

Wick, Peter A. (1973)

Wickey, Thomas (1952)

Wickiser, Ralph L. (1955)

Wicksteed, O. H. (1956)

Wiebenson, Dora (1965-1966, 1968-1972, 1977, 1979, 1980)

Wiedenhoeft, Ron (1969)

Wilbraham Place (1953, 1955, 1957, 1959-1962)

Wildenstein, Georges (1953)

Wiley and Sons (1948, 1966)

Wilk, Christopher (1976, 1978)

Wilkie, David (1951-1955, 1957-1958)

Wilkinson (1956)

Wilkinson, Catherine M. (1963, 1965-1966)

Willard, Helen (1950)

Willett, Frederick W. (1969)

Williams, A. C. O'Malley (1961) ( -- see also -- : O'Malley-Williams, A. C.)

Williams, Arthur G. A. (1955)

Williams, B. (1957, 1964, 1967-1968)

Williams, Buck (1958)

Williams College (1940, 1946, 1948-1949, 1953, 1975-1976)

Williams College Museum of Art (1963)

Williams, Eda Carter (1958)

Williams, Edgar I. (1952)

Williams, David (1975)

Williams, Gail (1979)

Williams, J. Ronald (1967)

Williams, Marjory (1951)

Williams, Richard B. (1985)

Williams, Richmond (1960-1961, 1963)

Williams, Ronald (1973)

Williams, Stanley T. (1950)

Williams, Talcott (1940)

Williamsburg (1956-1957, 1961, 1972)

Williamson, L. S. (1962)

Willis, L. S. (1941)

Willis, Peter (1964-1965)

Wills, Royal Barry (1957)

Willson, Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Van Vranken (1953)

Wilmerding, John (1966, 1968)

Wilson, A. F. Johnson (1950)

Wilson, Arnold (1962)

Wilson, Daphne (1951)

Wilson, H. L. McG. (1950)

Wilson, J. P. (1956)

Wilson, Jean (1950, 1955)

Wilson, Joan R. (1969)

Wilson, John H. (1980-1984)

Wilson, Richard G. (1971, 1973)

Wilson, Suzanne (1975, 1978)

Wilson, Thomas J. (1955)

Wimpfheimer, Greta (1950)

Winchester, Alice (1953)

Wind, Edgar (1945-1946)

Wingerter, Wolfgang (1981)

Winnipeg Art Gallery Association (1959)

Winslow House (1944-1945)

Winslow, Philip N. (1961)

Winslow, Ralph E. (1947)

Winter, Robert W. (1959)

Wintersteen, Bonnie (1952)

Winterthur Museum (1952-1953, 1955-1957, 1959, 1961, 1964, 1969, 1983)

Winterthur Program, University of Delaware (1954-1955)

Winthrop and Co. (1926)

Wichnitzer, Rachel (1951)

Wischnitzer, Ruth (1964)

Wisconsin State Conservation Commission for Historic Preservation (1972)

Wisconsin, State Historical Society of (1960)

Wisconsin, University of (1946-1947, 1963, 1967, 1977)

Wisner, John B. (1970-1971)

Wittamer, L. (1961, 1962)

Wittenborn and Co. (1947, 1949-1950, 1955)

Wittenborn, George (1967-1968)

Wittkower Fellowship Fund (1974)

Wittkower, Rudolph (1945, 1949, 1951-1954, 1947, 1959, 1966-1968)

Wittler, Leila (1947, 1950)

Wittmann, Otto (1952, 1964)

Witwatersrand, University of the (1948-1950)

WNET, Channel Thirteen ( -- see -- : Thirteen, WNET)

Woburn Public Library (1936)

Wofsy, Alan (1982)

Wolf, Gertrude (1952)

Wolf, J. Robert (1962)

Wolf, Peter M. (1965, 1970)

Wolf, Reva (1980)

Wolfe, Christopher (1977)

Wolfe, R. (1963)

Wolff, Michael (1957)

Wollman, Henry (1971, 1973, 1976-1978)

Wood, Barbara L. (1950)

Wood, Charles B. (1971, 1974)

Wood, W. L. (1941)

Wood, Welby Carter (1970)

Woodbridge, Henry (1949)

Woodhouse, Lawrence M. (1965, 1984)

Woodring, Carl (1971)

Woodrow Wilson Foundation (1969-1970)

Woodside, Joan (1974-1980, 1983-1984, 1986)

Woolf, Virginia (1927)

Worbs, Dietrich (1982-1983)

Worcester Art Museum (1947, 1981)

World Construction Program (1957)

World Crossroads of Learning, Inc. (1965)

World Publishing Co. (1952, 1967)

World Writing (1953)

Wortman, Julie (1974)

Wrenn, George (1959)

Wright, Benjamin F. (1949, 1951)

Wright, David (1950-1952)

Wright, Frank Lloyd (1937, 1942-1943, 1945, 1947, 1950-1953, 1957-1958, 1978, 1980, 1982-1983, undated)

Wright, Mrs. Frank Lloyd (1959)

Wright, Frank Lloyd, Home and Studio Foundation (1977, 1984)

Wright, Frank Lloyd, and -- In the Nature of Materials -- (1941)

Wright, John Lloyd (1968)

Wriston, Barbara (1952-1953, 1956, 1960, 1962, 1967)

Wurm, Heinrich (1966)

Wurster, William W. (1943-1944, 1946,-1948, 1950, 1951-1957, 1959, 1961)

Wurster, William W. and Catherine 1945

Wyoming, University of (1975)

Xenakis, Jason (1958)

Yale Review -- (1966-1968, 1970)

Yale University (1947-1960, 1962-1963, 1965-1979, 1982, 1986)

Yardley, Michael (1975-1978)

Yeon, John (1954)

York City Art Gallery (1958)

York Institute of Architectural Study (1957-1959, 1961)

York, University of (1962, 1970)

Yorke, R.F.S. (1952)

Youell, William (1948)

Young, E. A. (1947)

Young, Elaine (1962)

Young, Elizabeth (1961)

Young, Paul E. (1949)

Young, Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred B. (1954-1955)

Youritzin, Glenda Green (1974)

Zacchwatowicz, Jim (1963)

Zador, Anna (1970, 1972)

Zarnecki, George (1953)

Zaroff, Anne T. (1975)

Zawisa, Bernard J. (1952-1953, 1956)

Zenith Corp. (1969-1970)

Zenobi Sarto (1963)

Zerkowitz, A. (1957)

Zevi, Bruno (1952)

Zewicher, Mrs. Victor K. (1950)

Zimmerman Brothers (1963-1966, 1969)

Zimmerman, Mrs. Isadore (1952)

Zodiac Revue -- (1959-1969)

Zorn, Kate (1979)

Zubarec, Michael (1956-1957)

Zwemmer, A. (1946-1948, 1955, 1959)
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Henry-Russell Hitchcock papers, 1919-1987. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.hitchenp, Series 2
See more items in:
Henry-Russell Hitchcock papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9aefa2954-020f-4994-a846-4bbdfc1c99a6
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-hitchenp-ref1065

Scrapbooks

Collection Creator:
Macbeth Gallery  Search this
Extent:
3.3 Linear feet (Boxes 120-130 )
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1892-1952
Scope and Contents:
The 19 scrapbooks in this series are the collection's main source of Macbeth Gallery exhibition catalogs and related news clippings. Although incomplete, the scrapbooks provide fairly comprehensive coverage of the gallery's history and include material on day-to-day events at the gallery as well as important occasions such as the gallery's fortieth, fiftieth and sixtieth anniversaries, news of the art world in general and some photographs. Some of the scrapbooks also contain printed material related to art, exhibitions and events elsewhere. Many of the exhibition catalogs found here are annotated with prices and other notes. Notably missing is the catalog for the 1908 exhibition, The Eight.

See Appendix for a list of Macbeth Gallery exhibitions documented in Series 5: Scrapbooks.
Arrangement:
As some of the dates of the scrapbooks overlap, they were numbered 1-19 for clarity. The scrapbook cover for #3 is housed in Box 120, and the contents are housed in Box 122.
Appendix: Macbeth Gallery Exhibitions Documented in Scrapbooks:
This chronological list of Macbeth Gallery exhibitions is extensive, but incomplete. While an attempt has been made to establish the accuracy of the information provided here, dates and titles of exhibitions are not guaranteed to be accurate. Most of the exhibitions listed here are documented in the scrapbooks through exhibition catalogs and/or invitations, lists of artwork and news clippings. The list is annotated with AAA microfilm reel and frame numbers to assist researchers in locating material on specific exhibitions.

Scrapbook 1, 1892-1901

Dec. 7-21, 1892 -- Water Colors by American Artists (NMc1: 273-275)

Jan.23-Feb.11, 1893 -- Landscapes in Oil (NMc1: 276-277)

Feb. 27-Mar. 18, 1893 -- Landscapes in Oil by William Keith (NMc1: 278-279)

Mar. 20-Apr. 8, 1893 -- Watercolors by Dutch Artists (NMc1: 281-282)

Nov. 8-29, 1893 -- Second Annual Exhibition of Watercolors by American Artists (NMc1: 283-285)

Dec. 2-16, 1893 -- Drawings in Watercolors and in Black and White by C. R. Grant and Wilson De Meza (NMc1: 287-290)

Jan. 20-Feb. 3, 1894 -- Pictures and Sketches by Anton Mauve (NMc1: 291-292, 311-313)

Feb. 6-17, 1894 -- Paintings by Henry W. Ranger (NMc1: 295-296)

Feb. 23-Mar. 8, 1894 -- Paintings by Gaylord Langston Truesdel (NMc1: 299-300)

Mar. 16-29, 1894 -- Figure Subjects by Seven American Artists (NMc1: 302-303)

Apr. 13-May 6, 1894 -- Landscapes by American Artists (NMc1: 304-305)

Dec. 1-22, 1894 -- Paintings and Drawings by D.A.C. Artz (NMc1: 315-316)

Feb. 2-16, 1895 -- Paintings and Sketches by Theodore Robinson (NMc1: 318-319)

Mar. 15-30, 1895 -- Pictures and Sketches by Anton Mauve (NMc1: 321-323)

Feb. 17-29, 1896 -- Paintings in Oil by Philip Zilcken (NMc1: 329-330)

Mar. 9-21, 1896 -- Paintings by Arthur B. Davies (NMc1: 329-331)

Mar. 6-20, 1897 -- Paintings by Robert C. Minor (NMc1: 343-344)

Apr. 24-May 8, 1897 -- Paintings by Arthur B. Davies (NMc1: 348-349)

Jan. 17-29, 1898 -- Portrait Drawings in Pastel and Chalk by Sergeant Kendall (NMc1: 356-357)

Jan. 31-Feb. 12, 1898 -- Expressions of New England Landscape by Leonard Ochtman (NMc1-358-359)

Jan. 9, 1898 -- Exhibition of Pictures and Sketches by Anton Mauve (NMc1: 362)

Nov. 7, 1898 -- Exhibition of Watercolors by Mr. Ozawa of Tokyo, Japan (NMc1: 363)

Jan. 9-21, 1899 -- Paintings by Willbur A. Reaser (NMc1: 366-367)

Feb. 1-14, 1899 -- Paintings by H. M. Rosenberg (NMc1: 368-369)

Feb. 17-Mar. 9, 1899 -- Paintings by Charles Walter Stetson (NMc1: 370-371)

Jan. 8-20, 1900 -- Twenty-seven Drawings by Childe Hassam (NMc1: 376-377)

Mar. 9-24, 1900 -- Watercolors and Monotypes in Color by Maurice B. Prendergast (NMc1: 379-380)

Nov. 19-Dec. 1, 1900 -- Pictures by Rosina Emmet Sherwood (NMc1: 383-384)

Jan. 21-Feb. 2, 1901 -- Pictures and Portraits by Wilbur A. Reaser (NMc1: 385)

Feb. 25-Mar. 9, 1901 -- Frederick Ballard Williams (NMc1: 394-395)

Feb. 4-16, 1901 -- Landscapes by Alexander H. Wyant and George Inness (NMc1: 390-391)

May 9-31, 1901 -- Paintings by Arthur B. Davies (NMc1: 400-402)

Nov. 29-Dec. 14, 1901 -- Watercolors, Color Prints from Wood Blocks and Etchings Printed in Color by Helen Hyde (NMc1: 405-406)

Scrapbook 2, 1893-1898

Primarily news clippings.

Scrapbook 3, 1902-1910

Feb. 3-15, 1902 -- Private Collection of American Pictures (NMc1: 2-5)

Mar. 17-29, 1902 -- Some Phases of London When the Lamps Are Lighted, Done in Pastel by Fernand Lungren (NMc1: 10-13)

Mar. 31-Apr. 5, 1902 -- Group of Pictures by Sidney Starr (NMc1: 13)

Apr. 1-12, 1902 -- Pictures by Robert Henri (NMc1: 15-16)

Apr. 14-26, 1902 -- Drawings by Jane Erin Emmet (NMc1: 21-22)

Apr. 28-May 11, 1902 -- Landscapes by W. L. Lathrop (NMc1: 20)

Jan 19-31, 1903 -- Drawings and Sketches by Homer D. Martin, 1836-1897 (NMc1: 27)

Jan. 27-Feb. 11, 1905 -- Pictures by William Sartain (NMc1: 37-39)

Feb. 23-Mar. 8, 1905 -- Paintings by Arthur B. Davies (NMc1: 62-64)

May 1-6, 1905 -- Oil Paintings by American Artists from the Macbeth Gallery (at the Galleries of George D. Brodhead, Rochester, NY) (NMc1: 69-72)

Jan 29-Feb. 10, 1906 -- Abbot H. Thayer and Gladys Thayer (NMc1: 77-78)

Feb. 19-Mar. 3, 1906 -- Pictures by Charles H. Davis (NMc1: 79-80)

Mar. 10-24, 1906 -- Stephen Parrish (NMc1: 81-82)

Nov. 9-24, 1906 -- A Group of American Paintings (NMc1: 91-92)

Jan. 11-26, 1907 -- Paintings by William Sartain (NMc1: 100-101)

Feb. 1-16, 1907 -- Paintings by Paul Dougherty (NMc1: 105-106)

Feb. 23-Mar. 9, 1907 -- Paintings by Charles H. Davis (NMc1: 107-108)

Mar. 11-23, 1907 -- Portraits by Ellen Emmet (NMc1: 112-113)

Mar. 28-Apr. 3, 1907 -- Paintings by William Keith (NMc1: 115-117)

Nov. 11-23, 1907 -- Paintings by Augustus Vincent Tack (NMc1: 124-125)

Nov. 27-Dec. 12, 1907 -- Paintings by John La Farge (NMc1: 127-131)

Jan. 6-18, 1908 -- Paintings by Jerome Myers (NMc1: 133-134)

Jan. 20-Feb. 1, 1908 -- Paintings by Paul Dougherty (NMc1: 137-138)

Feb. 3-15, 1908 -- Exhibition of Paintings by Arthur B. Davies, William J. Glackens, Robert Henri, Ernest Lawson, George Luks, Maurice B. Prendergast, Everett Shinn, John Sloan (NMc:142-143 Catalog missing from scrapbook)

Feb. 19-Mar. 7. 1908 -- Forty Selected Paintings by Living American Artists (NMc1: 147-149)

Mar. 11-24, 1908 -- Paintings by a Group of American Artists (Deceased), Copley to Whistler (NMc1: 151-152)

1908 -- Kwaunon Meditating on Life by John La Farge (NMc1: 155)

Nov. 10-25, 1908 -- Paintings by Howard Pyle (NMc1: 158-159)

Nov. 27-Dec. 10, 1908 -- Paintings by Charles Melville Dewey (NMc1: 161-162)

Dec. 15-31, 1908 -- Bronzes by a Group of American Artists (NMc1: 165-166)

Jan. 7-21, 1909 -- Forty Selected Paintings by Living American Artists (NMc1: 168-169)

Jan. 22-Feb. 4, 1909 -- Paintings by Henry W. Ranger (NMc1: 171-172)

Feb. 5-18, 1909 -- Paintings by Paul Dougherty (NMc1: 176

Feb. 19-Mar. 4, 1909 -- Arthur B. Davies (NMc1: 178)

Mar. 5-Mar. 18, 1909 -- Paintings by Charles H. Davis, N.A. (NMc1: 183-184)

Mar. 19-Apr. 1, 1909 -- A Group of Figure Subjects by Blendon Campbell, Charles W. Hawthorne, Robert Henri, George Luks, Kenneth Miller (NMc1: 186-187)

Apr. 2-15, 1909 -- Paintings by Louis Loeb (NMc1: 188-189)

Apr. 16-29, 1909 -- Paintings by a Group of Boston Artists (NMc1: 191-192)

May 10-22, 1909 -- Paintings by American Artists from the Macbeth Galleries, New York [at Findlay Art Co., Kansas City, MO] (NMc1: 195-197)

Nov. 18-Dec. 4, 1909 -- Paintings by Albert P. Lucas (NMc1: 203-205)

Dec. 7-24, 1909 -- Watercolors and Pastels by American Artists (NMc1: 207-210)

Dec 7-24, 1909 -- Second Annual Exhibition of Bronzes by American Sculptors (NMc1: 211-212)

Jan. 6-19, 1910 -- Sixteen Paintings of the Cornish Coast by Paul Dougherty (NMc1: 213-215)

Jan. 20-Feb. 2, 1910 -- Paintings by Mary Curtis Richardson of San Francisco (NMc1: 218-220)

Jan. 20-Feb. 2, 1910 -- First Exhibition of Paintings by Ben Foster (NMc1: 216-218)

Feb 3-16, 1910 -- Landscapes and Figures by Frederick Ballard Williams (NMc1: 227-229)

Feb. 3-16, 1910 -- Spanish Paintings by F. Luis Mora (NMc1: 225-227)

Feb. 17-Mar. 2, 1910 -- The Fur Jacket by J. McNeill Whistler (NMc1: 231-232)

Feb. 17-Mar. 2, 1910 -- Paintings by William Sartain (NMc1: 233-235)

Mar. 3-16, 1910 -- Fourteen Landscapes by Charles H. Davis (NMc1: 237-239)

Mar. 3-16, 1910 -- Recent Portraits by Cecilia Beaux (NMc1: 239-240)

Mar. 17-30, 1910 -- Paintings by Hermann Dudley Murphy (NMc1: 244-246)

Mar. 17-30, 1910 -- Figure Paintings by Charles W. Hawthorne (NMc1: 242-244)

Mar. 31-Apr. 13, 1910 -- Paintings of Baily's Island by Frederick J. Waugh (NMc1: 249-251)

Mar. 31-Apr. 13, 1910 -- Nineteen Landscapes by Chaucey F. Ryder (NMc1: 247-249)

Apr. 14-27, 1910 -- George B. Luks (NMc1: 253-255)

Apr. 30-May 14, 1910 -- The Woman's Art Club of New York, Exhibition of Works in Oil and Sculpture (NMc1: 259-262)

Scrapbook 4, 1907-1913

Primarily news clippings.

Scrapbook 5, 1910-1915

Nov. 3-16, 1910 -- Recent Paintings by Charles W. Hawthorne (NMc2: 1-2)

Nov. 17-30, 1910 -- The Navajo Country in Watercolors by Frederick J. McComas (NMc2: 4-6)

Dec. 6-24, 1910 -- Watercolors, Pastels and Small Bronzes (NMc2: 7-14)

Jan. 5-18, 1911 -- Portraits by Ellen Emmet (NMc2: 15-16)

Jan. 19-Feb. 1, 1911 -- Paintings by Henry B. Snell (NMc2: 17-24)

Feb. 2-22, 1911 -- A Group of Thirty Selected Paintings (NMc2: 25-28)

Feb. 23-Mar. 8, 1911 -- A Group of Forty Selected Paintings (NMc2: 29-32)

Mar. 9-22, 1911 -- Paintings by Charles H. Davis, Paul Dougherty, Daniel Garber, William Sartain, F. Ballard Williams (NMc2: 33-35)

Mar. 23-Apr. 5, 1911 -- A Group of Paintings by Ben Foster, Albert L. Groll, Leonard Ochtman, Chauncey F. Ryder, Gardner Symons (NMc2: 36-38)

Apr. 8-22, 1911 -- The Woman's Art Club of New York, Exhibition of Works in Oil and Sculpture (NMc2: 39-42)

Nov. 16-29, 1911 -- Landscapes, Marines and Wood Interiors by Robert Henri (NMc2: 45-48)

Dec. 6-30, 1911 -- Small Bronzes by American Sculptors (NMc2: 49-52)

Jan. 3-16, 1912 -- Thirty Paintings by Thirty Artists (NMc2: 53-55)

Jan. 17-30, 1912 -- Paintings by Frederick C. Frieseke (NMc2: 56-58)

Jan. 31-Feb. 13, 1912 -- Paintings by Elihu Vedder (NMc2: 59-63)

Feb. 14-Mar. 2, 1912 -- Paintings by Charles H. Davis, Paul Dougherty, Ben Foster, William Sartain, Gardner Symons, F. Ballard Williams (NMc2: 64-66)

Mar. 4-16, 1912 -- Paintings by Emil Carlsen (NMc2: 67-69)

Mar. 6-19, 1912 -- Memorial Exhibition of a Collection of Paintings by Joseph R. Woodwell (NMc2: 71-75)

Mar. 18-30, 1912 -- Paintings by Arthur B. Davies (NMc2: 71, 76)

Apr. 1-10, 1912 -- Paintings by Richard E. Miller (NMc2: 77-79)

Apr. 15-27, 1912 -- A Group of Selected Paintings by American Artists (NMc2: 80-85)

Nov. 4-18, 1912 -- Frederick Ballard Williams (NMc2: 80-97)

Nov. 19-30, 1912 -- First Annual Exhibition of Painters of the Far West (NMc2: 99-103)

Dec. 3-16, 1912 -- Paintings by William Baxter Closson (NMc2: 99, 104)

Dec. 4-16, 1912 -- Marbles and Bronzes by Chester Beach (NMc2: 99, 105-114)

Dec. 30-Jan. 13, 1913 -- Lawrence Mazzanovich (NMc2: 116-119)

Jan 14-27, 1913 -- Paintings by Guy C. Wiggins (NMc2: 120-122)

Jan. 14-27, 1913 -- Paintings by Charles A. Hawthorne (NMc2: 120, 122-124)

Jan. 28-Feb. 10, 1913 -- Paintings by Paul Dougherty (NMc2: 125-127)

Feb. 11-24, 1913 -- Paintings by Gardner Symons (NMc2: 128-130)

Feb. 15-Mar. 1, 1913 -- Annual Exhibition of The Woman's Artclub (NMc2: 131-136)

Feb. 25-Mar. 10, 1913 -- Paintings by F. C. Frieseke (NMc2: 137-138)

Mar. 4-17, 1913 -- Paintings by Charles Morris Young (NMc2: 137-142)

Mar. 11-24, 1913 -- Landscapes by F.K.M. Rehn, N.A. (NMc2: 143-147)

Mar. 18-31, 1913 -- Paintings by John Carlson (NMc2: 148-151)

Mar. 25-Apr. 7, 1913 -- A Selected Group of Paintings (NMc2: 148, 152-154)

Apr. 15-28, 1913 -- A Selected Group of American Paintings (NMc2: 155-158)

Apr. 15-28, 1913 -- Paintings and Pastels by Blendon R. Campbell (NMc2: 155, 159)

Oct. 14-27, 1913 -- Paintings by Katherine S. Dreier (NMc2: 161-163)

Oct. 28-Nov. 10, 1913 -- A Group of Selected Paintings by American Artists (NMc2: 164-166)

Nov. 17-24, 1913 -- Thirty Paintings by Thirty Artists (NMc2: 167-169)

Dec. 2-15, 1913 -- Second Exhibition by the Society of Men Who Paint the Far West (NMc2: 172-176)

Jan. 1914 -- Drawings of Game Birds by Frank W. Benson (NMc2: 179-180)

Jan. 6-19, 1914 -- Paintings by Emil Carlsen, Paul Dougherty, Frederick C. Frieseke, Childe Hassam, Willard L. Metcalf, Kenneth H. Miller, J. Alden Weir (NMc2: 179, 181-183)

Jan. 27-Feb. 16, 1914 -- Recent Sculpture by Chester Beach (NMc2: 185-186)

Jan. 27-Feb. 16, 1914 -- Paintings by Charles H. Davis, Daniel Garber, Richard E. Miller, Chauncey F. Ryder, Gardner Symons (NMc2: 185, 187)

Feb. 17-Mar. 2, 1914 -- Sculpture by Chester Beach, Abastenia St. L. Eberle, Mahonri Young (NMc2: 188-191)

Feb. 17-Mar. 9, 1914 -- A Group of Selected Paintings by American Artists (NMc2: 188, 192-193)

Mar. 10-30, 1914 -- Sketches in Passing by Frederick J. Waugh (NMc2: 195, 208-209)

Mar. 11-30, 1914 -- A Collection of Paintings by Deceased American Artists (NMc2: 195-207)

Mar. 31-Apr. 20, 1914 -- A Group of Selected Paintings by American Artists (NMc2: 212-217)

Apr. 21, 1914 -- A Group of Selected Paintings by American Artists (NMc2: 219-224)

Oct. 27-Nov. 16, 1914 -- A Group of Selected Paintings by American Artists (NMc2: 226-227)

Nov. 17-Dec. 7, 1914 -- Portrait Heads in Terra Cotta by Janet Scudder (NMc2: 233)

Nov. 17-Dec 7, 1914 -- Recent Paintings by Robert Henri (NMc2: 235-237)

Dec. 8-28, 1914 -- Exhibition of Home Pictures (NMc2: 243-247)

Jan. 5-25, 1915 -- A Group of Selected Paintings (NMc2: 243, 248-249)

Jan. 26-Feb. 15, 1915 -- Thirty Paintings by Thirty Artists (NMc2: 251-254)

Jan. 26-Feb. 15, 1915 -- Parisian Sketches by Lester D. Boronda (NMc2: 251)

Feb. 2-15, 1915 -- Our Untrodden Empire: A Collection of Paintings Executed in South Central Alaska by Robert V. Sewell (NMc2: 257-260)

Feb. 16-Mar. 8, 1915 -- Paintings by Deceased American Artists (NMc2: 262, 265)

Feb. 16-Mar. 8, 1915 -- Small Paintings by Guy C. Wiggins (NMc2: 261)

Feb. 16-Mar. 8, 1915 -- Paintings by Colin Campbell Cooper (NMc2: 261-264)

Scrapbook 6, March 1915-January 1918

Mar. 10-30, 1915 -- The Dance As Interpreted in Marble and Bronze by American Sculptors (NMc2: 267)

Mar. 30-Apr. 19, 1915 -- Paintings by Twelve Landscape Painters (NMc2: 274-277)

Sept. 27-Oct. 17, 1915 -- Paintings and Sculpture by Woman Artists for the Benefit of the Woman Suffrage Campaign (NMc2: 279-283)

Oct. 30-Nov. 19, 1915 -- Oils and Water Colors by Hayley Lever; Recent Paintings by Randall Davey (NMc2: 294-296

Dec. 4-31, 1915 -- Third Exhibition of the Society of Men Who Paint the Far West (NMc2: 300, 302-305)

Feb. 1916 -- Decorations by Elmer Mac Rae (NMc2: 318-319)

Jan. 4-18, 1916 -- Recent Paintings by F. C. Frieseke (NMc2: 306-307)

Jan. 4-18, 1916 -- Paintings by John F. Carlson (NMc2: 306, 309-310)

Jan. 19-Feb. 1, 1916 -- Paintings by Emil Carlsen, Helen M. Turner, Daniel Garber (NMc2: 313)

Jan. 19-Feb. 1, 1916 -- Decorative Panels of Flowers, Birds and Animals by F. S. Church (NMc2: 311,317)

Feb. 2-15, 1916 -- Paintings by Jules Guerin (NMc2: 318-321)

Feb. 16-29, 1916 -- Annual Exhibition of Thirty Paintings by Thirty Artists (NMc2: 323-326)

Mar. 1916 -- Group of High Fire Porcelains by Adelaid Alsop Robineau of Syracuse, NY, recently shown at the Panama-Pacific Exposition (NMc2: 322)

Mar. 8-21, 1916 -- Paintings by Charles H. Davis, Paul Dougherty, Kenneth H. Miller, Chauncey F. Ryder, William Sartain (NMc2: 329-330)

Mar. 22-Apr.4, 1916 -- Recent Water Colors by Charles Hovey Pepper (NMc2: 333)

Mar. 22-Apr. 4, 1916 -- Paintings, Drawings and Sculpture by Arthur B. Davies, Walt Kuhn, Jules Pascin (NMc2: 332, 334)

Apr. 6-27, 1916 -- Paintings by American Artists Past and Present (NMc2: 338-341)

Oct. 31-Nov. 13, 1916 -- The Whalers of New Bedford: Paintings by Clifford W. Ashley (NMc2: 346-348)

Oct. 31-Nov. 14, 1916 -- Special Exhibition by Painter Friends (NMc2: 346)

Nov. 14-27, 1916 -- Memorial Exhibition of Paintings by the Late Roger Donoho (NMc2: 349-353)

Nov. 28-Dec. 11, 1916 -- Paintings by Randall Davey (NMc2: 356-357)

Nov. 28-Dec. 11, 1916 -- Paintings by Kenneth Hayes-Miller, Benjamin D. Kopman and J. M. Block (NMc2: 356)

Dec. 13-Jan. 15, 1917 -- Watercolors by Paul Dougherty (NMc2: 358-362)

Jan. 16-Feb. 5, 1917 -- Thirty Paintings by Thirty Artists (NMc2: 366-368)

Feb. 8-26, 1917 -- Loan Exhibition of Paintings by Charles W. Hawthorne (NMc2: 370-379)

Feb. 27-Mar. 12, 1917 -- Paintings by Charles H. Davis, Richard E. Miller, Chauncey F. Ryder (NMc2: 381-382)

Mar. 13-26, 1917 -- Paintings by Arthur Crisp, Florence W. Gotthold, Martha Walter (NMc2: 384-385)

Mar. 28-Apr. 10, 1917 -- Pictures in Tempera of the St. Andrew's Golf Links by William R. O'Donovan (NMc2: 386-387)

Summer, 1917 -- Summer Exhibition (NMc2: 388-391)

Oct. 1917 -- Opening Exhibition of Our Second Quarter-Century (NMc2: 393-396)

Nov. 3-17, 1917 -- Portraits by Louis Betts (NMc2: 400-403)

Nov. 13-26, 1917 -- Paintings by Arthur Crisp, Florence W. Gotthold, Martha Walter (NMc2: 384-385)

Nov. 22-Dec. 5, 1917 -- Paintings and Small Bronzes of New York (NMc2: 407-410)

Dec. 1917 -- Pastels by Lillian Crittenden (NMc2: 411)

Dec. 6-24, 1917 -- Small paintings and Pastels by Frederick C. Frieseke, Nancy M. Ferguson, Lilian Crittenden (NMc2: 411)

Jan. 2-31, 1918 -- In Aid of Men Blinded in Battle: Retrospective Loan Exhibition of Arthur B. Davies (NMc2: 412-416)

Scrapbook 7, February 1918-January 1922

Feb. 5-20, 1918 -- Watercolors by Gifford Beal (NMc2: 433-434)

Feb. 5-20, 1918 -- Intimate Paintings Moderately Priced (NMc2: 435-436)

Mar. 1918 -- Group of Paintings by American Artists (NMc2: 441-442)

Mar. 6-27, 1918 -- Thirty Paintings by Thirty Artists (NMc2: 438-439)

Mar. 27-Apr. 18, 1918 -- Paintings by Charles H. Davis, Ben Foster, Willard L. Metcalf (NMc2: 441, 443-444)

Apr. 18-May 10, 1918 -- Group of Paintings by Charlotte B. Coman (NMc2: 446)

Apr. 19-May 9, 1918 -- Paintings by Emil Carlsen, Childe Hassam, J. Alden Weir (NMc2: 446-447)

Oct. 23-Nov. 13, 1918 -- Opening Exhibition: Group of Selected Paintings (NMc2: 449-451)

Dec. 1918 -- Second Exhibition of Intimate Paintings (NMc2: 453-458)

Jan. 7-29, 1919 -- John H. Twachtman (NMc2: 460-470)

Jan. 27-Feb. 8, 1919 -- Paintings by Charles H. Davis and Paul Dougherty (NMc2: 473-474)

Feb. 17-Mar. 1, 1919 -- Thirty Paintings by Fifteen Artists (NMc2: 476-477)

Mar. 6-22, 1919 -- Paintings by Louis Ritman (NMc2: 480-483)

Mar. 6-29, 1919 -- Thirty Paintings by Thirty Artists (NMc2: 484-491)

Apr. 7-19, 1919 -- Paintings by Felicie Waldo Howell (NMc2: 496-497)

Apr. 7-19, 1919 -- Fifteen American Paintings (NMc2: 499-500)

May 1919 -- Comparative Exhibition of American Paintings (NMc2: 501-506)

Oct. 5-Nov. 8, 1919 -- Fifteen Paintings by Fifteen Artists (NMc2: 510-511)

Nov. 10-Dec. 6, 1919 -- Third Exhibition of Intimate Paintings (NMc2: 512-518)

Dec. 10-31, 1919 -- Loan Exhibition of Paintings by Emil Carlsen (NMc2: 520-527)

Dec. 3-20, 1919 -- Paintings by William Baxter Closson (NMc2: 520)

Jan. 9-31, 1920 -- Thirty Paintings by Thirty Artists (NMc2: 531-536)

Feb. 2-21, 1920 -- Paintings by Charles H. Davis, Frederick C. Frieseke, Richard E. Miller (NMc2: 539-541)

Mar. 20-Apr.10, 1920 -- Paintings by Hayley Lever (NMc2: 542-545)

Apr. 5-24, 1920 -- Group of Paintings by Felicie Waldo Howell (NMc2: 546)

Apr. 5-24, 1920 -- Paintings by Maurice Fromke (NMc2: 546-548)

Oct. 18-Nov. 8, 1920 -- Paintings of the Orient by Hovsep Pushman (NMc2: 550-554)

Oct. 18-Nov. 8, 1920 -- Group of Paintings by Ben Foster, Robert Henri, Hayley Lever, Gardner Symons (NMc2: 555-558)

Nov. 9-29, 1920 -- Paintings by Frank W. Benson and Willard L. Metcalf (NMc2: 559-562)

Nov. 30-Dec. 31, 1920 -- Fourth Exhibition of Intimate Paintings (NMc2: 564-570)

Jan. 3-17, 1921 -- Recent Landscapes by Chauncey F. Ryder (NMc2: 573-576)

Jan. 3-17, 1921 -- Old Salem Doorways Painted Last Summer by Felicie Waldo Howell (NMc2: 577-581)

Jan. 18-Feb. 7, 1921 -- Thirty Paintings by Thirty Artists (NMc2: 583-588)

Feb. 9-28, 1921 -- An American Summer in Watercolors by F. Luis Mora (NMc2: 596-599)

Feb. 9-28, 1921 -- The East Side in Sculpture by Abastenia St. L. Eberle (NMc2: 600)

Feb. 9-28, 1921 -- Recent Paintings by Emil Carlsen (Br14: 623; NMc2: 589-594)

Mar. 1-21, 1921 -- Connecticut Landscapes by Charles H. Davis (NMc2: 603-606)

Mar. 1-21, 1921 -- Paintings of Cornwall and Elsewhere by W. Elmer Schofield (NMc2: 607-610)

Mar. 1-21, 1921 -- Annual Exhibition, Society of Animal Painters and Sculptors (NMc2: 611-616

Mar. 22-Apr. 11, 1921 -- Paintings by F. C. Frieseke and Albert L. Groll (NMc2: 621-624)

Mar. 22-Apr. 11, 1921 -- Paintings by Jonas Lie (NMc2: 617-620)

Mar. 22-Apr. 11, 1921 -- Portraits and Landscapes by Gladys Thayer (NMc2: 625-628)

Apr. 12-May 7, 1921 -- Loan Exhibition of Paintings by J. Francis Murphy, 1853-1921 (NMc2: 629-637)

Oct. 11-30, 1921 -- Opening Exhibition, Season of 1921-1922: Group of Selected Paintings (NMc2: 640-641)

Nov. 1-19, 1921 -- West Indian Marines by Frederick J. Waugh (NMc2: 642-645)

Nov. 21-Dec. 12, 1921 -- Fifth Exhibition of Intimate Paintings (NMc2: 646-655)

Dec. 13-Jan. 2, 1922 -- Paintings of Glacier National Park by Charles Warren Eaton (NMc2: 660, 664-666)

Dec. 13-Jan. 2, 1922 -- Oils, Pastels, and Watercolors by George Alfred Williams (NMc2: 660-663)

Scrapbook 8, January 1922-March 1923

Jan. 3-23, 1922 -- Paintings of South America by E. W. Deming (NMc2: 669-670)

Jan. 3-23, 1922 -- New England Streets by Felicie Waldo Howell (NMc2: 671-674)

Jan. 3-23, 1922 -- California Landscapes by F. Ballard Williams (NMc2: 677-680)

Jan. 24-Feb. 13, 1922 -- Paintings by Elliot Torrey (NMc2: 681-684)

Jan. 24-Feb. 20, 1922 -- Thirty Paintings by Thirty Artists (NMc2: 685-692)

Feb. 14-Mar. 6, 1922 -- Third Annual Exhibition, Society of Animal Painters and Sculptors (NMc2: 694-698)

Mar. 7-27, 1922 -- Paintings by Edmund Greacen (NMc2: 704-707)

Mar. 7-27, 1922 -- Paintings by Gardner Symons (NMc2: 700-705)

Mar. 28-Apr. 17, 1922 -- Paintings by Charles H. Davis (NMc2: 707-717)

Apr. 27-May 20, 1922 -- Paintings by Frederick C. Frieseke Hayley Lever and Malcolm Parcell (NMc2: 721-726)

Apr. 27-May 20, 1922 -- Paintings by Malcolm Parcell (NMc2: 722)

Oct. 31-Nov. 20, 1922 -- Paintings by Alice Worthington Ball (NMc2: 731-735)

Oct. 31-Nov. 20, 1922 -- Recent Paintings and Figure Compositions by Charles W. Hawthorne (NMc2: 731-735)

Nov. 21-Dec. 11, 1922 -- Sixth Exhibition of Intimate Paintings (NMc2: 738-747)

Nov. 21-Dec. 11, 1922 -- George Wharton Edwards (NMc2: 748-749)

Dec. 12-30, 1922 -- Imaginitive Landscapes by W. G. Krieghoff (NMc2: 751-752)

Dec. 12-30, 1922 -- Watercolors of New York by Joseph Pennell (NMc2: 751, 753-755)

Jan. 2-22, 1923 -- Paintings and Studies by Orland Campbell (NMc2: 758-761)

Jan. 2-22, 1923 -- Recent Landscapes by Daniel Garber (NMc2: 758, 762-764)

Jan. 2-22, 1923 -- Decorative Paintings by Spencer Nichols (NMc2: 765, 769)

Jan. 2-22, 1923 -- Figure Compositions by Ivan G. Olinsky (NMc2: 765-768)

Jan. 23-Feb. 12, 1923 -- The Canadian Rockies in Paintings by Belmore Browne (NMc2: 772, 778)

Jan. 23-Feb. 12, 1923 -- Thirty Paintings by Thirty Artists (NMc2: 772-777)

Jan. 23-Feb. 12, 1923 -- Decorative Panels by Felicie Waldo Howell (NMc2: 778-782)

Feb. 13-Mar. 5, 1923 -- Paintings by Ruth A. Anderson and Elizabeth C. Spencer (NMc2: 783, 788-790)

Feb. 13-Mar. 5, 1923 -- Landscapes by Chauncey F. Ryder (NMc2: 783-786)

Feb. 13-Mar. 5, 1923 -- Paintings of the West by Maynard Dixon (NMc2: 783, 787)

Mar. 6-26, 1923 -- Recent Paintings by Emil Carlsen (NMc2: 792-794)

Mar. 12-31, 1923 -- Watercolors by J. Olaf Olson (NMc2: 795-796)

Scrapbook 9, March 1923-December 1924

Mar. 27-Apr. 16, 1923 -- Paintings by John J. Enneking (NMc3: 1-4)

Apr. 17-May7, 1923 -- Paintings by Maurice Braun (NMc3: 5-8)

Apr. 17-May 7, 1923 -- Recent Paintings by Catharine Wharton Morris (NMc3: 5, 9)

Oct. 9-29, 1923 -- Opening Exhibition, Season 1923-1924 (NMc3: 17-22)

Oct. 30-Nov. 19, 1923 -- Paintings by Emil Carlsen, Theodore Robsinson, J. Alden Weir (NMc3: 24-27)

Nov. 20-Dec. 10, 1923 -- Seventh Exhibition of Intimate Paintings (NMc3: 30-35)

Nov. 20-Dec. 11, 1923 -- South American Sketches by Rachel Hartley (NMc3: 37-42)

Dec. 11-31, 1923 -- Scenes about Provincetown by Charles W. Hawthorne; Flowers by Marion C. Hawthorne (NMc3: 37, 43)

Dec. 11-31, 1923 -- Recent Paintings by Douglas Parshall (NMc3: 44)

Dec. 1923 -- Collection of Paintings from the Macbeth Gallery, Halaby Galleries, Dallas (NMc3: 47-54)

Jan. 2-21, 1924 -- Paintings by Robert Henri and Grace Ravlin (NMc3: 56-57)

Feb. 7-25, 1924 -- Thirty Paintings by Thirty Artists (NMc3: 62-68)

Feb. 26-Mar. 17, 1924 -- Paintings by Victor Higgins (NMc3: 68, 72-74)

Feb. 26-Mar. 17, 1924 -- Paintings by Frank Duveneck (NMc3: 68-69)

Mar. 18-Apr. 7, 1924 -- Paintings from Tusayan by Maynard Dixon (NMc3: 76-79)

Apr. 8-28, 1924 -- Paintings of the Orient by Hovsep Pushman (NMc3: 80-82)

Apr. 8-28, 1924 -- The Canadian Rockies in Paintings by Belmore Browne (NMc3: 80, 84)

Sept. 23-Oct. 6, 1924 -- Paintings of the French West Indies by Christiana Moron (NMc3: 86-87)

Oct. 7-27, 1924 -- Selected Group of Paintings by Thirty American Artists (NMc3: 86, 88)

Nov. 4-17, 1924 -- Recent Paintings by Chauncey F. Ryder (NMc3: 90-91)

Nov. 18-Dec. 8, 1924 -- A Group of Paintings by Frederick C. Frieseke (NMc3: 92-93)

Dec. 9-29, 1924 -- Retrospective Exhibition of Paintings by Louis Comfort Tiffany (NMc3: 95-97)

Scrapbook 10, January 1925-November 1927

Dec. 30-Jan. 19, 1925 -- Montauk by Childe Hassam (NMc3: 104-112)

Jan. 20-Feb. 9, 1925 -- George Inness Centennial Exhibition, 1825-1894 (NMc3: 117-123)

Feb. 10-Mar. 2, 1925 -- Water Colors of Egypt and Jerusalem by Taber Sears (NMc3: 126, 129-130)

Feb. 10-Mar.2, 1925 -- The New England Year in Paintings by Charles H. Davis (NMc3: 126-128)

Mar. 3-23, 1925 -- Paintings by E. W. Redfield (NMc3: 131-133)

Mar. 24-Apr. 13, 1925 -- Paintings by Daniel Garber (NMc3: 135-138)

Apr. 14-May 4, 1925 -- Recent Paintings by Robert Henri (NMc3: 140-143)

Apr. 14-May 4, 1925 -- C. W. Hawthorne: Watercolors of Bermuda (NMc3: 139)

Oct. 13-26, 1925 -- Collection of American Masters Loaned for Exhibition (NMc3: 152-154)

Oct. 27-Nov. 16, 1925 -- Memorial Exhibition of Paintings by the Late William Sartain (NMc3: 155-158)

Nov. 7-23, 1925 -- Paintings by Contemporary American Artists Loaned by the Macbeth Galleries, New York, Engaged by the Muncie Art Students' League, Muncie, Indiana (NMc3: 147-148)

Nov. 17-Dec. 7, 1925 -- Paintings by DeWitt and Douglass Parshall (NMc3: 159-162)

Dec. 4-31, 1925 -- Easel Paintings by American Artists, Loaned by Macbeth Galleries to the Springfield Art Association (NMc3: 205, 207)

Dec. 8-Jan. 4, 1926 -- Watercolors by Distinguished American Artists (NMc3: 163-166)

Jan. 5-25, 1926 -- Recent American Portraits (NMc3: 168, 172-173)

Jan. 5-18, 1926 -- American Society of Miniature Painters, 27th Annual Exhibition (NMc3: 168-171)

Jan. 26-Feb. 15, 1926 -- Paintings by Jonas Lie (NMc3: 176-179)

Jan. 26-Feb. 15, 1926 -- First Exhibition of Paintings by John Huffington (NMc3: 176, 180-181)

Feb. 7-Mar. 17, 1926 -- Exhibition of Oil Paintings by American Artists Lent by the Macbeth Galleries to the Utica Public Library Art Gallery (NMc3: 205-206)

Feb. 16-Mar. 8, 1926 -- New Paintings by Charles W. Hawthorne (NMc3: 186-189)

Feb. 16-Mar. 8, 1926 -- Chauncey F. Ryder (NMc3: 184)

Feb. 16-Mar. 8, 1926 -- Sculpture by Gleb Derujinsky (NMc3: 186-189)

Mar. 9-29, 1926 -- Modern Landscapes by Guy Wiggins (NMc3: 191-194)

Mar. 9-29, 1926 -- Etchings and Drawings by Emil Fuchs (NMc3: 191, 195-197)

Mar. 30-Apr. 19, 1926 -- The Affairs of Anatol by Robert Reid (NMc3: 198-201)

Apr. 20-May 3, 1926 -- Pastels Done in Spain by A. Sheldon Pennoyer (NMc3: 202)

June 1-25, 1926 -- Pictures Selected from the Brooklyn Museum Exhibition of the National Association of Women Painters and Sculptors (NMc3: 204)

Summer, 1926 -- Summer Exhibition (NMc3: 199-201)

Oct. 11-18, 1926 -- Paintings Selected by Louis Bliss Gillet (NMc3: 210-212)

Oct. 19-Nov. 8, 1926 -- Paintings by Stanley M. Woodward (Br14: 671; NMc3: 213-214)

Nov. 9-22, 1926 -- Ernest Haskell, 1876-1925, Memorial Exhibition (NMc3: 215-222)

Nov. 23-Dec. 6, 1926 -- Porto Rico and St. Thomas: Exhibition of Paintings by Rachel Hartley (NMc3: 226-229)

Nov. 23-Dec. 6, 1926 -- Recent Landscapes and Marines by Jay H. Connaway (NMc3: 226, 230)

Dec. 1926 -- Watercolors and Etchings by American Artists (NMc3: 231-233)

Dec. 28-Jan. 10, 1927 -- Recent Paintings by a Group of Mystic, Conn., Artists (NMc3: 235-238)

Jan. 11-31, 1927 -- Thirty Paintings by Thirty Artists (NMc3: 239-244)

Jan. 18-31, 1927 -- Watercolors by John Lavalle of Boston (NMc3: 253-255)

Jan. 22-Feb. 7, 1927 -- Crapo Gallery Opening Exhibition: Thirty Paintings by Thirty Artists assembled by Macbeth Gallery at Swain School, New Bedford, Mass. (NMc3: 245-249)

Feb. 1-14, 1927 -- Recent Paintings by Frank W. Benson (NMc3: 259-262)

Feb. 2-14, 1927 -- American Society of Miniature Painters, 28th Annual Exhibition (NMc3: 253, 256-258)

Feb. 8-26, 1927 -- Works by American Artists Selected by the Associated Dealers in American Paintings, Inc. at Anderson Galleries (Macbeth Gallery one of nine participants (NMc3: 263, 265-271)

Feb. 15-28, 1927 -- New Paintings by Chauncey F. Ryder (NMc3: 278-281)

Mar. 1-14, 1927 -- Watercolors by Aiden L. Ripley (NMc3: 282, 286)

Mar. 1-14, 1927 -- Paintings by a Group of Members of the Guild of Boston Artists (NMc3: 282-285)

Mar. 15-28, 1927 -- Paintings by Malcolm Parcell (NMc3: 287-290)

Mar. 15-28, 1927 -- Recent Pastels of Chartres by Carl Schmidt (NMc3: 287)

Mar. 29-Apr. 18, 1927 -- Thirty-fifty Anniversary Exhibition, Retrospect and Prospective (NMc3: 291-294)

Apr. 19-May 9, 1927 -- Frank A. Brown, Watercolors (NMc3: 296, 302-303)

Aug. 22-Sept. 5, 1927 -- American Art Exhibition arranged for Eastern Long Island by the Macbeth Gallery at Southampton, NY (NMc3: 297-301)

Oct. 18-29, 1927 -- American Art Exhibition, Art League of Fort Worth, Assembeled by the Macbeth Gallery (NMc3: 304, 306-311)

Oct. 18-31, 1927 -- Etchings by Walter Raymond Duff (NMc3: 313-315)

Oct. 18-31, 1927 -- Paintings by Max Bohm (NMc3: 313-315)

Nov. 1-14, 1927 -- Yankee Whalers by Clifford W. Ashley (NMc3: 316-317)

Scrapbook 11, November 1927-June 1930

Nov. 15-28, 1927 -- Paintings of Mallorca by Bernhard Gutmann (NMc3: 319-320)

Nov. 15-28, 1927 -- Paintings of Flowers by Carle J. Blenner (NMc3: 319, 321)

Nov. 29-Dec. 12, 1927 -- The Bathers , Paintings by William S. Horton (NMc3: 322-325)

Nov. 29-Dec. 12, 1927 -- Sidewalks of New York, Chalk Drawings by H. Devitt Welsh (NMc3: 326-327)

Dec. 13-31, 1927 -- Joint Exhibition of Paintings by Daniel Garber and Stanley Woodward (NMc3: 328)

Jan. 3-16, 1928 -- Portrait Drawings by Edith Leslie Emmet (NMc3: 329, 331)

Jan. 3-23, 1928 -- Recent Paintings by Jonas Lie (NMc3: 329-330)

Jan. 24-Feb. 13, 1928 -- Watercolors by John Lavalle (NMc3: 332-334)

Jan. 24-Feb. 13, 1928 -- Walter Ufer: Pictures from Taos (NMc3: 332, 334)

Jan. 24-Feb. 6, 1928 -- American Society of Miniature Painters, 29th Annual Exhibition (NMc3: 337-340)

Feb. 7-21, 1928 -- Small Pictures of Mountain and Sea by Jay Connaway (NMc3: 342)

Feb. 14-27, 1928 -- The Canadian Rockies by Belmore Brown (NMc3: 342-343)

Feb. 14-27, 1928 -- Sculpture by Gleb Derujinsky (NMc3: 342-344)

Feb. 21-Mar. 5, 1928 -- Watercolors of Venice, Spain and Brittany by Frank A. Brown (NMc3: 351-356)

Feb. 21-Mar. 10, 1928 -- Works by American Artists Selected by the Associated Dealers in American Paintings, Inc., at Anderson Galleries; Macbeth Gallery one of sixteen participants (NMc3: 346-352)

Feb. 25-Mar. 17, 1928 -- The Macbeth-Milch Circuit Exhibition of Contemporary American Paintings at Grand Rapids Art Gallery (NMc3: 385-387)

Feb. 28-Mar. 12, 1928 -- Paintings by Frank L. Schenk, 1856-1927 (NMc3: 357-358)

Feb. 28-Mar. 19, 1928 -- Thirty Paintings by Thirty Artists (NMc3: 357, 359-363)

Mar. 20-Apr. 2, 1928 -- Lanscapes of Italy by A. Sheldon Pennoyer (NMc3: 366, 368)

Mar. 20-Apr. 9, 1928 -- Recent Landscapes, Switzerland and Other Subjects by Carl Lawless (NMc3: 366-367)

Apr. 2-15, 1928 -- Water Colors by Earl Winslow (NMc3: 355)

Apr. 10-30, 1928 -- St. Ives by Hayley Lever (NMc3: 369)

Apr. 29-May 20, 1928 -- The Macbeth-Milch Circuit Exhibition of Contemporary American Paintings at the University of Wyoming (NMc3: 385-386)

Spring, 1928 -- American Painting for Home Decoration (NMc3: 370-377)

Oct. 16-29, 1928 -- The Canadian Rockies in Watercolors by J. Olaf Olson (NMc3: 389-392)

Nov. 7-24, 1928 -- Etchings by Sears Gallagher (NMc3: 393)

Nov. 13-26, 1928 -- Sand Dunes and Flowers by Frederick Lowell (NMc3: 393-394)

Nov. 26-Dec. 17, 1928 -- Etchings by Carlton T. Chapman (NMc3: 395)

Nov. 27-Dec. 10, 1928 -- Portraits by Ernest L. Ipsen (NMc3: 396-397)

Dec. 4-31, 1928 -- Etchings by Margery A. Ryerson (NMc3: 395)

Dec. 11-24, 1928 -- Landscapes in Watercolor and Gouache by H. Anthony Dyer and Character Studies in Watercolor and Pastel by Nancy Dyer (NMc3: 398-400)

Jan. 2-14, 1929 -- Figures and Landscapes by the Late J. Alden Weir, 1852-1929 (NMc3: 401-402)

Jan. 15-28, 1929 -- Paintings by H. Dudley Murphy; Watercolors by Nellie Littlehale Murphy (NMc3: 404-405)

Jan. 15-28, 1929 -- Portraits by William James (NMc3: 406-407)

Feb. 4-18, 1929 -- Twenty-five Etchings by Harold Denison (NMc3: 410, 416-417)

Feb. 5-18, 1929 -- Paintings by Emil Carlsen and Dines Carlsen (NMc3: 408-409)

Feb. 19-Mar. 4, 1929 -- Thirty Paintings by Thirty Artists (NMc3: 410-415)

Mar. 5-18, 1929 -- Marine Paintings by Stanley W. Woodward (NMc3: 419-423)

Mar. 19-Apr. 1, 1929 -- Watercolors by Frederick C. Frieseke (NMc3: 424-425)

Mar. 19-Apr. 1, 1929 -- Pastels of Louisiana by Will H. Stevens (NMc3: 424)

Apr. 1929 -- Paintings by Childe Hassam (NMc3: 433-438)

Apr. 2-15, 1929 -- Paintings by Arthur Meltzer (NMc3: 431)

Apr. 2-15, 1929 -- Watercolors by Earle B. Winslow (NMc3: 431)

June, 1929 -- Old Mill Afternoon by Childe Hassam, Ainslie Galleries, Inc., Detroit in collaboration with Macbeth Gallery (NMc3: 465-467)

Oct. 1-14, 1929 -- Portraits in Oil and Pastel by Paul Swan (NMc3: 472-473)

Oct. 15-28, 1929 -- Exhibitions from the Summer Colonies: No. 1, Lyme (NMc3: 476-477)

Oct. 19-29, 1929 -- Milch-Macbeth Exhibition of Prints and Paintings by American Artists at the High Museum under the auspices of the Atlanta Art Association (NMc3: 462)

Oct. 20-Nov. 11, 1929 -- Memorial Exhibition of Paintings by John Huffington (NMc3: 476-479)

Nov. 12-25, 1929 -- Exhibition from the Summer colonies: No. 2, Selections from the North Shore Arts Association of Gloucester (NMc3: 480-481)

Nov. 26-Dec. 3, 1929 -- Recent Landscapes by Charles H. Davis (NMc3: 482-483)

Dec. 10-Dec. 23, 1929 -- Watercolors by J. Olaf Olson (NMc3: 484-486)

Dec. 24-Jan. 6, 1930 -- Exhibitions from the Summer Colonies: No. 3, Mystic (NMc3: 487-488)

Jan. 7-20, 1930 -- Paintings of Wyoming Days and Nights by Ogden N. Pleissner (NMc3: 490, 492)

Jan. 21-Feb. 3, 1930 -- Landscapes by Aldro T. Hibbard (NMc3: 490-491)

Feb. 4-17, 1930 -- Thirty Paintings by Thirty Artists (NMc3: 493-498)

Feb. 4-18, 1930 -- Monotypes in Black and White by Seth Hoffman (NMc3: 500-502)

Feb. 18-Mar. 3, 1930 -- Decorative Pastels by Wilbur A. Reaser (NMc3: 503-504)

Feb. 18-Mar. 3, 1930 -- Landscapes by John F. Carlson (NMc3: 503, 505

Mar. 4-17, 1930 -- Art of the Cartoon by Clare A. Briggs (NMc3: 507)

Mar. 4-17, 1930 -- Watercolors by Gladys Brannigan (NMc3: 507)

Mar. 18-31, 1930 -- Landscapes by Chauncey F. Ryder (NMc3: 508-509)

Apr. 1-14, 1930 -- Landscapes by Harry Leith-Ross (NMc3: 510-511)

Apr. 15-29, 1930 -- The Soviet Union as Seen by Eliot O'Hara (NMc3: 512-513)

Spring 1930 -- Spring/Summer Exhibition (NMc3: 514-516)

Scrapbook 12, September 1930-December 1932

Oct. 1930 -- Opening Exhibition, 1930-1931 Season (NMc3: 517-519)

Oct. 14-Nov. 4, 1930 -- Etchings by Thomas Handforth (NMc3: 523-524)

Nov. 1930 -- Paintings of Museum Importance (NMc3: 521)

Nov. 4-25, 1930 -- Monotypes in Black and White by Seth Hoffman (NMc3: 522, 524

Dec. 1930 -- Paintings by Young Americans (NMc3: 525)

Dec. 1930 -- Etchings and Lithographs by Edward Haskell (NMc3: 526-527)

Jan. 6-31, 1931 -- Brittany and Other Recent Paintings by Jonas Lie (NMc3: 528-531)

Feb. 2-8, 1931 -- Group Exhibition of Important Paintings (NMc3: 535)

Feb. 9-21, 1931 -- Brackman (NMc3: 536)

Feb. 24-Mar. 7, 1931 -- Paintings by Paul Dougherty and Mahonri Young (NMc3: 539)

Mar. 9-28, 1931 -- Recent Paintings by Daniel Garber (NMc3: 540)

Mar. 30-Apr. 11, 1931 -- Brittany Subjects by Jay Connaway, Landscapes by Arthur Meltzer, Pastel Impressions by J. H. Guest (NMc3: 545-549)

Apr. 13-May 2, 1931 -- Paintings and Drawings by Abbot H. Thayer (NMc3: 545-549)

May, 1931 -- Selected Paintings and Etchings by American Artists (NMc3: 552-553)

Oct. 1931 -- October Show (NMc3: 355)

Oct. 1931 -- October Watercolor Exhibition (NMc3: 556)

Nov. 4-30, 1931 -- Fifteen New Paintings from the Artists Studios (NMc3: 558-559)

Nov. 11-Dec. 31, 1931 -- Lithographs by Stow Wengenroth (NMc3: 560-566)

Dec. 1-19, 1931 -- Small Paintings by Ivan Olinsky and Cecil Chichester (NMc3: 562-563)

Dec. 8-31, 1931 -- Wood Engravings by Thomas Nason (NMc3: 564)

Dec. 21-Jan. 9, 1932 -- Maine Coast Towns by C. K. Chatterton (NMc3: 565-566)

Jan. 11-23, 1932 -- Landscapes, Figures, Still Life Subjects Painted in Vermont by Herbert Meyer (NMc3: 564)

Jan. 11-23, 1932 -- Paintings by Lily Cushing (NMc3: 569, 571)

Jan. 25-Feb. 13, 1932 -- Hudson River School (NMc3: 573-576)

Feb. 15-27, 1932 -- Paintings by James Chapin (NMc3: 589)

Feb. 15-Mar. 1, 1932 -- Monotypes in Black and White by Seth Hoffman (NMc3: 590-591)

Feb. 29-Mar. 10, 1932 -- Sanford Ross: 16 Wash Drawings of 16 New Jersey Landmarks (NMc3: 598-599)

Feb. 29-Mar. 12, 1932 -- George Fuller, 1822-1844 (NMc3: 593-596)

Mar. 14-26, 1932 -- Winter Landscapes and Other Subjects by F. C. Frieseke (NMc3: 600-601)

Mar. 28-Apr. 9, 1932 -- Recent Paintings by Jonas Lie (NMc3: 603)

Apr. 11-30, 1932 -- Forty Years of American Art (NMc3: 605-610)

May 2-14, 1932 -- Paintings by a Group of Younger Artists (NMc3: 616-618)

June 1932 -- June Exhibition (NMc3: 619)

Sept. 26-Oct. 15, 1932 -- Paintings from the Summer Colonies (NMc3: 621-622)

Oct. 17-Nov. 7, 1932 -- Special Sale Exhibition (NMc3: 626-628)

Oct. 17-Nov. 7, 1932 -- Etchings and Lithographs by Mons Breidvik (NMc3: 626-627)

Nov. 9-26, 1932 -- Paintings by Max Bohm, Eugene Higgins, Jerome Myers, John Noble (NMc3: 630)

Nov. 14-Dec. 5, 1932 -- Lithographs by Stow Wengenroth (NMc3: 630)

Nov. 29-Dec. 12, 1932 -- Vermont Watercolors by Henry Holt (NMc3: 632-633)

Dec. 6-19, 1932 -- Lights of New York by Felicie Waldo Howell (NMc3: 634-635)

Dec. 14-Jan. 3, 1933 -- Paintings by Robert Strong Woodward (NMc3: 636)

Scrapbook 13, 1932

Scrapbook of 40th Anniversary of Macbeth Gallery, 1932.

Scrapbook 14, 1930-1934

Jan. 1-29, 1933 -- Forty Years of American Painting assembled by the Macbeth Gallery at Montclair Art Museum (NMc4: 263-268)

July 9-25, 1933 -- American Landscapes assembled by the Macbeth Gallery at Four Fountains, Southampton, NY (NMc4: 290-295)

Scrapbook 15, January 1933-February 1935

Jan. 1933 -- Watercolors Made by Americans, Assembled by the College Art Association (NMc3: 639-641)

Jan. 3-16, 1933 -- Drawings by J. Louis Lundean (NMc3: 643)

Jan. 17-30, 1933 -- Paintings of Flowers by C. G. Nelson (NMc3: 644)

Jan. 31-Feb. 13, 1933 -- Intimate Paintings (NMc3: 645)

Feb. 21-Mar. 6, 1933 -- Group Exhibition (NMc3: 646)

Mar. 1933 -- Paintings and Etchings by Living American Artists (NMc3: 647-648)

Mar. 7-20, 1933 -- Paintings by Robert Henri (NMc3: 649)

Mar. 21-Apr. 3, 1933 -- Watercolors by Sanford Ross (NMc3: 652)

Mar. 21-Apr. 10, 1933 -- Brackman (NMc3: 652-653)

Apr. 4-17, 1933 -- Opportunity Exhibition (NMc3: 661)

Apr. 4-18, 1933 -- Drawings by Adolf Dehn (NMc3: 661)

Apr. 11-24, 1933 -- The Sea at Monhegan by Jay Connaway (NMc3: 662)

Apr. 18-May 1, 1933 -- Watercolor Exhibition (NMc3: 663)

Apr. 25-May 8, 1933 -- Paintings by A. T. Hibbard, Hayley Lever and Ivan G. Olinsky (NMc3: 664)

May 2-22, 1933 -- Mono-Etchings by Bernard Sanders (NMc3: 664)

May 9-29, 1933 -- Child Portraits by Margery Ryerson (NMc3: 669)

May 16-29, 1933 -- Exhibition of Figures and Still Lifes, Macbeth Gallery Extension (NMc3: 669)

June 1933 -- American Art Past and Present (NMc3: 671)

Oct. 17-30, 1933 -- Paintings and Watercolors by a Group of American Artists Under 35 (NMc3: 672)

Oct. 31-Nov. 13, 1933 -- Drawings by Robert Henri (NMc3: 673)

Oct.-Nov. 1933 -- Mexico as Seen by American Printmakers (NMc3: 674)

Nov. 4-27, 1933 -- Brackman Portraits: Figures in Pastel (NMc3: 675, 678)

Nov. 4-27, 1933 -- American Sport and Other Subjects by Percy Crosby (NMc3: 675-677)

Nov. 28-Dec. 11, 1933 -- Paintings by Ogden M. Pleissner (NMc3: 684, 686)

Nov. 28-Dec. 11, 1933 -- Figures and Fantacies by Ralph Rowntree (NMc3: 684-685)

Nov. 28-Dec. 11, 1933 -- Paintings by Horace Day (NMc3: 681)

Nov. 28-Dec. 11, 1933 -- Drawings by Jerome Myers (NMc3: 682-683)

Dec. 12-23, 1933 -- Paintings by Janet Scudder (NMc3: 687)

Dec. 12-23, 1933 -- The New York Scene in Watercolor by Hamilton A. Wolf (NMc3: 688-689)

Dec. 26-Jan. 8, 1934 -- Group Exhibition, Members of the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation (NMc3: 692)

Jan. 9-27, 1934 -- Paintings by Herbert Meyer (NMc3: 692)

Jan. 24-Feb. 6, 1934 -- Oils, Watercolors, Drawings, Etchings by Harrison Cady (NMc3: 696-697)

Jan. 30-Feb. 19, 1934 -- Paintings and Drawings by Lintott (NMc3: 699-700)

Feb. 20-Mar. 12, 1934 -- Paintings by C. K. Chatterton (NMc3: 703-704)

Feb. 27-Mar. 12, 1934 -- Golinkin (NMc3: 707-708)

Mar. 6-20, 1934 -- Drawings by Meyer Bernstein (NMc3: 709)

Mar. 13-36, 1934 -- Paintings by Jonas Lie (NMc3: 710)

Mar. 20-Apr. 2, 1934 -- Watercolors of South America by Eliot O'Hara (NMc3: 712)

Mar. 27-Apr. 16, 1934 -- Memorial Exhibition, Paintings by Charles H. Davis, 1856-1933 (NMc3: 715-722)

Apr. 3-16, 1934 -- Drawings by Hetty Beatty, Sculptor (NMc3: 726)

Apr. 10-23, 1934 -- Oils and Watercolors by Gertrude Schweitzer (NMc3: 726)

Apr. 17-May 1, 1934 -- Monhegan Marines by Jan Connaway (NMc3: 727)

May 1-14, 1934 -- Watercolors and Pastels by H. Amaird Oberteuffer and Karl Oberteuffer (NMc3: 728)

May 1-21, 1934 -- Review of the Season (NMc3: 729)

May 7-14, 1934 -- Paintings by John C. E. Taylor, William Luther King, Stuyvesant van Veen (NMc3: 730)

May 1934? -- Third Exhibition and Sale of American Paintings at $100 (NMc3: 731)

June 4-15, 1934 -- Our Glorious Navy: Paintings by Arthur Beaumont, Lieut. U.S.N.R. (NMc3: 732-733)

Oct. 1-15, 1934 -- Opening Exhibition, Season of 1934-1935, Paintings by Nelson A. Moore, 1924-1902 (NMc3: 735-736)

Oct. 16-30, 1934 -- Collectors Examples of American Painting (NMc3: 739-740)

Nov. 7-19, 1934 -- Greenland and Other Subjects by Rockwell Kent (NMc3: 742-743)

Nov. 20-Dec. 3, 1934 -- Southern New Mexico: Drawings and Lithographs by Peter Hurd (NMc3: 748-749)

Nov. 20-Dec. 11, 1934 -- Brackman (NMc3: 742-743)

Dec. 4-31, 1934 -- Lithographs and Drawings of Stow Wengenroth (NMc3: 750)

Dec. 11-31, 1934 -- Robert Hallowell, Mostly Portraits (NMc3: 751-752)

Jan. 2-14, 1935 -- Leopold Seyffert, Subjects from Guatemala and Flowers (NMc3: 754-755)

Jan. 22-Feb. 4, 1935 -- Group of Paintings by Younger Artists (NMc3: 756)

Apr. 10-30, 1935 -- After St. Ives by Hayley Lever (NMc3: 761-762)

date unknown -- Mr. Jonas Lie: Brittany and Other Recent Paintings (NMc3: 764)

Sept. 30-Oct. 7, 1930 -- Watercolors by Carolyn G. Bradley and Marion L. Simmons (NMc3: 764-765)

March 28-April 19, 1932 -- Small Paintings of Museum Importance on Exhibition (NM3: 764-767)

Scrapbook 16, February 1935-January 1938

Feb. 5-19, 1935 -- Robert Strong Woodward, "Landscapes of New England" (NMc4: 401-402)

Feb. 19-28, 1935 -- Portraits by Leonebel Jacobs (NMc4: 404)

Mar. 5-18, 1935 -- Loan Exhibition (NMc4: 408-409)

Apr. 23-May 13, 1935 -- Still Lifes by Emil Carlsen, 1853-1932 (NMc4: 411-413)

May 14-June 3, 1935 -- Watercolors and Pastels (NMc4: 414)

Summer 1935 -- Summer Exhibition (NMc4: 415)

Oct. 8-21, 1935 -- Recent Paintings by Frederick C. Frieseke (NMc4: 416-417)

Nov. 19-Dec. 3, 1935 -- Drawings by Lintott (NMc4: 418-419)

Dec. 3-31, 1935 -- Drawings and Lithographs by Stow Wengenroth (NMc4: 420)

Dec. 9-31, 1935 -- Oils, Watercolors, Drawings by Gertude Schweitzer (NMc4: 421)

Jan. 14-Feb. 3, 1936 -- Herbert Meyer (NMc4: 422-423)

Feb. 1936 -- Group Exhibition (NMc4: 429)

Feb. 1936 -- Drawings by Eastman Johnson (NMc4: 430)

Feb. 4-17, 1936 -- Homer D. Martin, 1836-1897, Centennial Exhibition (NMc4: 426-427)

Mar. 10-23, 1936 -- Contemporary Americans (NMc: 430)

Mar. 10-23, 1936 -- Watercolors by Steven Donahos (NMc4: 430)

Mar. 24-Apr. 16, 1936 -- Brackman (NMc4: 431)

Apr. 7-27, 1936 -- Paintings and Watercolors by C. K. Chatterton (NMc4: 433-434)

Apr. 28-May 11, 1936 -- Group Exhibition (NMc4: 435)

Apr. 28-May 11, 1936 -- Watercolors by Mary S. Powers (NMc4: 435)

May 19-June 1, 1936 -- Drawings by Richard Guggenheimer (NMc4: 436)

May 27-June 3, 1936 -- Pastel Portraits by Frank Root McCreery (NMc4: 437-438)

Oct. 5-26, 1936 -- Opening Exhibition, 45th Season, New Paintings by Fourteen American Painters (NMc4: 447-448)

Nov. 4-16 1936 -- Paintings by Elliot Orr (NMc4: 444-445)

Nov. 17-30, 1936 -- Recent Paintings by Ogden M. Pleissner (NMc4: 447-448)

Dec. 1936 -- Lester D. Boronda: Paintings from Mason's Island (NMc4: 449)

Dec. 15, 1936-Jan. 18, 1937 -- An Introduction to Homer (NMc4: 451-460)

Jan. 19-Feb. 1, 1937 -- Exhibition of Portraits by Stuart, Copley, West, Allston, Badger, Jarvis, Morse, Sully, Peale, Smibert and Waldo (NMc4: 478-479)

Jan. 19-Feb. 1, 1937 -- Group of Watercolors (NMc4: 480)

Feb. 2-15, 1937 -- John C. E. Taylor: Flower Arrangements and Other Oils (NMc4: 481)

Feb. 16-Mar. 1, 1937 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Horace Day (NMc4: 482)

Mar. 2-15, 1937 -- Hayley Lever, Paintings New and Old (NMc4: 485)

Mar. 2-15, 1937 -- Paintings by Josef Presser (NMc4: 485)

Mar. 16-Apr. 5, 1937 -- Recent Work by Jon Corbino (NMc4: 487-490)

Apr. 13-26, 1937 -- Memorial Exhibition of Paintings, Crayon Drawings and Dry Points by the late Alexander Shilling (NMc4: 499)

Apr. 30-May 17, 1937 -- Edna Reindel (NMc4: 503)

Oct. 5-19, 1937 -- American Paintings Dedicating the Art Gallery Woman's Club Art Building, Montana State University (NMc4: 505-514)

Oct. 6-18, 1937 -- Opening Exhibition, Paintings by a Group of Contemporary Artists (NMc4: 517)

Oct. 19-Nov. 1, 1937 -- First Exhibition, Watercolors by Andrew Wyeth (NMc4: 518-519)

Nov. 2-15, 1937 -- Marine and Other Subjects from the Canary Islands by Cadwallader Washburn (NMc4: 524-525)

Nov. 16-29, 1937 -- Paintings by Lorenzo James Hatch (NMc4: 524-525)

Nov. 30-Dec. 14, 1937 -- Monhegan Island, Maine, Marines by Jay Connaway (NMc4: 527)

Jan. 4-17, 1938 -- "The Eight" Thirty Years Later (NMc4: 529-530)

Scrapbook 17, January 1938-July 1941

Jan. 18-Feb. 1, 1938 -- Paintings by Dale Nichols (NMc4: 538-540)

Feb. 8-21, 1938 -- Vermont in Watercolors by Stanford Stevens (NMc4: 541-542)

Feb. 8-21, 1938 -- Modern American Interior: Prizewinning Design and Selected Drawings from a Competition Sponsored by James H. Blauvet and Associates, Interior Designers (NMc4: 543)

Feb. 23-Mar. 7, 1938 -- Herbert Dickens Ryman (NMc4: 546)

Mar. 1-14, 1938 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Anne Goldthwaite (NMc4: 546-547)

Mar. 8-21, 1938 -- Recent Watercolors of Woodstock, Charleston, New England by John W. Taylor (NMc4: 548-549)

Mar. 22-Apr. 11, 1938 -- Jon Corbino (NMc4: 554-561)

Apr. 12-25, 1938 -- Paintings by Ohio Artists (NMc4: 580-571)

Apr. 26-May 9, 1938 -- Paintings by Furman Joseph Finck (NMc4: 572-573)

May-June 1938 -- Winslow Homer: Watercolors and Early Oils from the Estate of Mrs. Charles S. Homer and Other Sources (NMc4: 574-579)

Oct. 4-28, 1938 -- Opening Exhibition (NMc4: 581)

Nov. 1-23, 1938 -- Dale Nichols, Watercolors and Tempera of Alaskan Subjects (NMc4: 582-583)

Nov. 29-Dec. 19, 1938 -- Sea Island Country Watercolors by Horace Day (NMc4: 584)

Jan. 10-30, 1939 -- Herbert Meyer (NMc4: 588-589)

Feb. 7-27, 1939 -- American Watercolors Past and Present (NMc4: 592-597

Mar. 7-Apr. 3, 1939 -- Monhegan by Jay Connaway (NMc4: 602-603)

Apr. 5-24, 1919 -- Oils and Watercolors by Ogden M. Pleissner (NMc4: 606-607)

May 2-22, 1939 -- Paintings by Francis Chapin, Antonio P. Matino, and Moses Soyer and Drawings by Jon Corbino (NMc4: 609-611)

Oct. 10-30, 1939 -- Andrew Wyeth (NMc4: 614)

Nov. 1-30, 1939 -- Americana Paintings, Watercolors, Prints, Drawings (NMc4: 616-617)

Dec. 5-30, 1939 -- In the Georges Islands, Maine: Paintings by N.C. Wyeth (NMc4: 618)

Dec. 5-30, 1939 -- Dry Brush Drawings by Stow Wengenroth (NMc4: 618-619)

Jan. 2-27, 1940 -- Brackman (NMc4: 623-624)

Jan. 30-Feb. 19, 1940 -- Paintings by Moses Soyer (NMc4: 630-631)

Feb. 20-Mar. 11, 1940 -- Watercolors by Emil J. Kosa, Jr. (NMc4: 637)

Mar. 12-30, 1940 -- Paintings by Edna Reindel (NMc4: 636)

April 1940 -- Paintings and Drawings by Jon Corbino (NMc4: 639-640)

May 7-18, 1940 -- "Star Boat Races," by Gerald Foster (NMc4: 640)

Summer 1940 -- Summer Exhibition (NMc4: 641)

Oct. 1940 -- October Exhibition (NMc4: 642)

Nov. 12-Dec. 2, 1940 -- Paintings by Antonio P. Martino (NMc4: 645)

Dec. 10-30, 1940 -- Monhegan Paintings and Sketches by Jay Connaway (NMc4: 648)

Dec. 31, 1940-Jan. 13, 1941 -- Oils and Watercolors by Contemporary Artists (NMc4: 649)

Jan. 14-Feb. 3, 1941 -- Paintings and Drawings by Augustus Vincent Tack (NMc4: 650-651)

Feb. 4-24, 1941 -- Recent Paintings by Peter Hurd (NMc4: 652)

Feb. 18-Mar. 3, 1941 -- Earl Gross Watercolors (NMc4: 654-655)

Feb. 25-Mar. 16, 1941 -- Recent Paintings by Herman Maril (NMc4: 656-657)

Mar. 18-Apr. 5, 1941 -- Joseph de Martini Gouache Paintings (NMc4: 656)

Mar. 25-Apr. 7, 1941 -- Men of Moment: Drawings by Ivan Opffer (NMc4: 660)

Apr. 8-28, 1941 -- Paintings by Orland Campbell (NMc4: 661-662)

Apr. 29-May 12, 1941 -- Small Paintings by Moses Soyer (NMc4: 667-668)

May 1941 -- Group Exhibition (NMc4: 667)

May 13-24, 1941 -- The 1941 Showing of Blauvelt Interiors (NMc4: 669-671)

May-June 1941 -- Group Exhibition (NMc4: 669)

Scrapbook 18, July 1941-October 1945

Sept. 1941 -- Group Exhibition: Oils (NMc4: 682)

Oct. 7-27, 1941 -- Third Exhibition of Watercolors by Andrew Wyeth (NMc4: 685)

Oct. 28-Nov. 17, 1941 -- Recent Oils and Watercolors by Ogden M. Pleissner (NMc4: 685-686)

Oct. 28-Nov. 17, 1941 -- Watercolors by Merrill A. Bailey (NMc4: 685)

Nov. 18-Dec. 1, 1941 -- Drawings and Watercolors by Carl Newland Werntz (NMc4: 688-689)

Nov. 18-Dec. 1, 1941 -- Hymn to the Sun: A Sculpture in Bronze by Emily Winthrop Miles (NMc4: 688)

Dec. 1941 -- Group Exhibition (NMc4: 690)

Dec. 2-22, 1941 -- Original Dolls by Edith Flack Ackley and their Portraits in Watercolor by Telka Ackley (NMc4: 690)

Jan. 5-24, 1942 -- Paintings by Furman Joseph Finck (NMc4: 694)

Jan. 5-24, 1942 -- Watercolors of Maine and Florida by Maurice Becker (NMc4: 694-695)

Jan. 19-Feb. 14, 1942 -- Watercolors, Pastels, Drawings by Jerome Myers, 1867-1940 (NMc4: 696)

Feb. 16-28, 1942 -- Watercolors by Cory Kilvert (NMc4: 697-698)

Feb. 16-Mar. 7, 1942 -- Paintings by Deceased American Masters (NMc4: 697-698)

Mar. 9-28, 1942 -- Paintings by Marsden Hartley (NMc4: 700-701)

Mar. 9-28, 1942 -- Watercolors by Karl Mattern (NMc4: 700)

Apr. 13-30, 1942 -- Fiftieth Anniversary Exhibition, 1892-1942 (NMc4: 703-704)

May 4-29, 1942 -- Group Exhibition (NMc4: 707)

June 1942 -- June Exhibition (NMc4: 708)

June 15-27, 1942 -- War Bond Exhibitions of Contemporary American Art (NMc4: 708)

Sept. 1942 -- September Exhibition (NMc4: 709)

Nov. 16-28, 1942 -- Watercolors by Jean Paul Slusser (NMc4: 710)

Nov. 24-Dec. 12, 1942 -- T. Chambers, First American Modern (NMc4: 711-714)

Dec. 1-14, 1942 -- Watercolors by Red Robin (NMc4: 715-716)

Dec. 15, 1942-Jan. 2, 1943 -- Leaves From a Soldier's Sketchbook by Pvt. Olin Dows, U. S. Army (NMc4: 717)

Jan. 4-23, 1943 -- Paintings by Sprinchorn (NMc4: 717-718)

Feb. 1-13, 1943 -- Group Exhibition (NMc4: 719)

Feb. 15-Mar. 6, 1943 -- Small Paintings by Moses Soyer (NMc4: 720)

Mar. 15-27, 1943 -- Ellen du Pont Wheelwright (NMc4: 721)

Mar. 15-27, 1943 -- Watercolors by Cory Kilvert (NMc4: 721)

Mar. 29-Apr. 17, 1943 -- Recent Paintings by Joseph De Martini (NMc4: 722)

Mar. 29-Apr. 17, 1943 -- Watercolor Exhibition (NMc4: 722)

Apr. 19-May 1, 1943 -- Corp. Herman Maril (NMc4: 728)

Apr. 19-May 8, 1943 -- Theodore Robinson (NMc4: 723-725)

May-June 1943 -- Group Exhibition (NMc4: 729)

Sept. 1943 -- Group Exhibition (NMc4: 731)

Oct. 11-30, 1943 -- Watercolors by Henry Gasser (NMc4: 723-733)

Nov. 1-20, 1943 -- Tempera and Watercolors by Andrew Wyeth (NMc4: 735-736)

Nov. 22-Dec. 4, 1943 -- Portraits of Children by Barnard Lentott (NMc4: 741-742)

Dec. 1943 -- Group Exhibition (NMc4: 741)

Dec. 6-24, 1943 -- Rural Vermont: Watercolors by Sylvia Wright (NMc4: 743-744)

Jan. 3-15, 1944 -- Watercolors of War by Red Robin (NMc4: 743-744)

Jan. 31-Feb. 19, 1944 -- Loan Exhibition, Worthington Whittredge, 1825-1910 (NMc4: 745-746)

Feb. 21-Mar. 11, 1944 -- Paintings by Constance Richardson (NMc4: 749-750)

Mar. 13-Apr. 1, 1944 -- Watercolors by Vanessa Helder (NMc4: 751, 753)

Mar. 13-Apr. 1, 1944 -- Temperas and Watercolors by Peter Hurd (NMc4: 751-753)

Apr. 3-22, 1944 -- American Paintings of the Early 19th Century (NMc4: 754-755)

Apr. 24-May 13, 1944 -- Brackman (NMc4: 756-757)

May 15-June 3, 1944 -- Two Vermont Artists: Clay Bartlett and Arthur K. D. Healy (NMc4: 758-759)

June 5-24, 1944 -- Women at War by Edna Reindel (NMc4: 760)

July 1944 -- Group Exhibition (NMc4: 762)

Sept. 25-Oct. 15, 1944 -- Group Exhibition (NMc4: 763)

Oct. 16-Nov. 4, 1944 -- Paintings by Felicia Meyer (NMc4: 764-765)

Nov. 15-Dec. 2, 1944 -- The Aleutian Air Force: Paintings by Ogden M. Pleissner (NMc4: 766-767)

Dec. 4-23, 1944 -- Paintings by John W. Taylor (NMc4: 769-770)

Jan. 8-27, 1945 -- Paintings by Carl Gaertner (NMc4: 771-772)

Jan. 29-Feb. 10, 1945 -- Contemporary American Watercolors (NMc4: 772)

Feb. 19-Mar. 10, 1945 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Maurice Becker (NMc4: 773-774)

Mar. 12-31, 1945 -- Some Early 19th Century Americans (NMc4: 777-778)

Apr. 2-21, 1945 -- Paintings by Joseph De Martini (NMc4: 778-779)

Apr. 23-May 12, 1945 -- Gouaches by Herman Maril (NMc4: 781)

Apr. 23-May 12, 1945 -- Paintings by Molly Luce (NMc4: 781-782)

May-June 1945 -- Group Exhibition: Contemporary Oils and Watercolors (NMc4: 783)

July, Sept., 1945 -- Group Exhibition (NMc4: 783)

Oct. 1-7, 1945 -- Group Exhibition (NMc4: 784)

Scrapbook 19, October 1945-November 1949

Oct. 26-Nov. 17, 1945 -- Tempera and Watercolors by Andrew Wyeth (NMc4: 787-788)

Nov. 26-Dec. 15, 1945 -- Marsden Hartley: Paintings and Drawings (NMc4: 791-792)

Dec. 1945 -- Christmas Exhibition (NMc4: 793)

Jan. 7-26, 1946 -- New York in Watercolors by James Lechay (NMc4: 794)

Jan. 28-Feb. 16, 1946 -- Herbert Meyer (NMc4: 795)

Feb. 18-Mar. 19, 1946 -- Ary Stillman (NMc4: 797-798)

Mar. 11-30, 1946 -- Watercolors by Arthur K. D. Haley (NMc4: 800-801)

Apr. 1-20, 1946 -- Albert P. Ryder (NMc4: 802-805)

Apr. 22-May 11, 1946 -- Paintings by Constance Richardson (NMc4: 809-810)

May 13-31, 1946 -- Furman Jospeh Finck (NMc4: 811-812)

June 1946 -- Group Exhibition (NMc4: 813)

July 1946 -- Group Exhibition (NMc4: 813)

Sept. 1946 -- Group Exhibition (NMc4: 814)

Sept. 30-Oct. 19, 1946 -- Gouaches by Charles Schucker (NMc4: 815)

Oct. 2-Nov. 9, 1946 -- Watercolors and Drawings by Olin Dows (NMc4: 816-817)

Nov. 4-30, 1946 -- Ogden M. Pleissner (NMc4: 818)

Dec. 2-28, 1946 -- Oils and Watercolors by Emil J. Kosa, Jr. (NMc4: 819-820)

Jan. 6-26, 1947 -- Carl Gaertner (NMc4: 821-822)

Jan. 27-Feb. 15, 1947 -- Carl Sprinchorn (NMc4: 823)

Mar. 3-22, 1947 -- Dorothy Hoyt (NMc4: 825-826)

Mar. 24-Apr. 12, 1947 -- Joseph De Martini (NMc4: 827-828)

Apr. 14-May 10, 1947 -- Whistler Loan Exhibition (NMc4: 828-834)

June-July, 1947 -- Summer Exhibition (NMc4: 840)

Sept. 1947 -- Group Exhibition (NMc4: 841)

Oct. 13-Nov. 1, 1947 -- Paintings by Allen Tucker (NMc4: 842-844)

Nov. 3-22, 1947 -- Watercolors by Henry Gasser (NMc4: 846-847)

Nov. 24-Dec. 13, 1947 -- James Lechay (NMc4: 849-850)

Dec. 15, 1947-Jan. 3, 1948 -- Watercolor Exhibition (NMc4: 851)

Jan. 5-24, 1948 -- Clay Bartlett (NMc4: 852-853)

Jan. 26-Feb. 14, 1945 -- Exhibition (NMc4: 854)

Jan. 26-Feb. 14, 1948 -- Oils and Watercolors by Contemporary Artists (NMc4: 854)

Feb. 16-Mar. 6, 1948 -- Herman Maril (NMc4: 855-856)

Mar. 22-Apr. 3, 1948 -- American Art: A Multiple Exhibition arranged by the Associated Dealers in American Art (NMc4: 857-858)

Apr. 5-24, 1948 -- Raphael Gleitsmann (NMc4: 866-867)

Apr. 26-May 15, 1948 -- Oils and Watercolors by John La Farge (NMc4: 864)

May-Sept. 1948 -- Group Exhibitions (NMc4: 867)

Oct. 4-23, 1948 -- Watercolors by Charles Culver (NMc4: 869-870)

Oct. 26-Nov. 13, 1948 -- Ogden M. Pleissner (NMc4: 872)

Nov. 15-Dec. 4, 1948 -- Andrew Wyeth (NMc4: 874-875)

Nov. 21-Dec. 4, 1948 -- Oils and Gouaches by Charles Schucker (NMc4: 332-333)

Dec. 6-31, 1948 -- Watercolors and Drawings by Hermann Gross (NMc4: 877-878)

Jan. 4-22, 1949 -- Electra Bostwick (NMc4: 879, 882)

Jan. 27-Feb. 19, 1949 -- Paintings by Edna Reindel (NMc4: 880-881)

Feb. 28-Mar. 19, 1949 -- Thomas Doughty (NMc4: 885-887)

Mar. 21-Apr. 9, 1949 -- Watercolors by Arthur K. D. Healy (NMc4: 889)

Apr. 12-30, 1949 -- Drawings by Olin Dows (NMc4: 890)

May 1949 -- Group Exhibition (NMc4: 894)

Oct. 10-29, 1949 -- Clay Bartlett: Paintings of North and South America (NMc4: 895-896)

Nov. 1-19, 1949 -- Watercolors by Henry Gasser (NMc4: 897-898)

Scrapbook 20, 1949-1952

Nov. 21-Dec. 10, 1949 -- Oils and Gouaches by Charles Shucker (NMc4: 332-333)

Dec. 1949 -- Watercolor Exhibition (NMc4: 334)

Jan. 3-21, 1950 -- Carl Gaertner (NMc4: 335-356)

Jan. 23-Feb. 11, 1950 -- Constance Richardson (NMc4: 337-338)

Mar. 6-25, 1950 -- John Taylor (NMc4: 339-340)

Apr. 1950 -- Joseph De Martini (NMc4: 341)

May 8-27, 1950 -- Carl Sprinchorn (NMc4: 342-343)

Summer 1950 -- Summer Exhibition (NMc4: 345)

Oct. 9-28, 1950 -- Caseins by James Lechay (NMc4: 345-346)

Oct. 31-Nov. 18, 1950 -- Ogden M. Pleissner: Paris and the Provinces (NMc4: 347-348)

Nov. 21-Dec. 9, 1950 -- Andrew Wyeth (NMc4: 349-350)

Jan. 2-20, 1951 -- Nat Koffman (NMc4: 356-357)

Jan. 22-Feb. 10, 1951 -- Watercolors by Hermann Gross (NMc4: 358)

Feb. 12-Mar. 3, 1951 -- Watercolors (D55:390-391; NMc4: 359)

Mar. 5-24, 1951 -- Paintings by Francis Colburn (NMc4: 360)

Mar. 27-Apr. 14, 1951 -- Paintings by Herman Maril (NMc4: 361)

Apr. 16-May 5, 1951 -- Raphael Gleitsmann (NMc4: 362-363)

Summer 1951 -- Summer Exhibition (NMc4: 364)

July 7-Aug. 4, 1951 -- Paintings and Drawings by Andrew Wyeth (NMc4: 364-381)

Nov. 26-Dec. 15, 1951 -- Watercolors by Arthur K. D. Healy (NMc4: 387)

Feb. 4-Mar. 1, 1952 -- Italian Landscapes by George Inness (NMc4: 388-389)

June-July, Sept. 1952 -- Summer Exhibition (NMc4: 392)

Nov. 6-29, 1952 -- Andrew Wyeth (NMc4: 391-392)
Restrictions:
Fragile original scrapbooks are closed to researchers. For more information, please contact Reference Services.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Macbeth Gallery records, 1838-1968, bulk 1892 to 1953. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.macbgall, Series 5
See more items in:
Macbeth Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw92653096a-424e-4227-a661-9a1b02109acc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-macbgall-ref13377

Asawa, Ruth

Collection Creator:
Ankrum Gallery  Search this
Container:
Box 4, Folder 22
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1960-1963
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Ankrum Gallery records, circa 1900-circa 1990s, bulk 1960-1990. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Ankrum Gallery records
Ankrum Gallery records / Series 5: Artists' Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw912de4ff0-e92b-4521-93ca-c9d535ee272e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-ankrgall-ref100
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  • View Asawa, Ruth digital asset number 1

Charles Lang Freer Papers

Creator:
Freer, Charles Lang, 1856-1919  Search this
Extent:
131 Linear feet (29 architectural drawings)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Diaries
Financial records
Correspondence
Photographs
Place:
China
Syria
Egypt
India
London (England)
Japan
Boston (Mass.)
Detroit (Mich.)
Washington (D.C.)
Kandy (Sri Lanka)
Sri Lanka
Anuradhapura (Sri Lanka)
Date:
1876-1931
Summary:
The personal papers of Charles Lang Freer, the industrialist and art collector who founded the Freer Gallery of Art. The papers include correspondence, diaries, art inventories, scrapbooks of clippings on James McNeil Whistler and other press clippings, and photographs.
Scope Content:
The personal papers of Charles Lang Freer, the industrialist and art collector who founded the Freer Gallery of Art. The papers include correspondence, diaries, art inventories, scrapbooks of clippings on James McNeil Whistler and other press clippings, financial material, architectural drawings, and photographs.

Correspondence, circa 1860-1921, includes Freer's correspondence, 1876-1920, with artists, dealers, collectors, museums, and public figures; letterpress books contain copies of Freer's outgoing letters, 1892-1910; correspondence collected by Freer of James McNeill Whistler, and his wife Beatrix, 186?-1909, with Lady Colin Campbell, Thomas R. Way, Alexander Reid, Whistler's mother, Mrs. George W. Whistler, and others; correspondence of Whistler collector Richard A. Canfield, 1904-1913, regarding works in Canfield's collection; and correspondence of Freer's assistant, Katharine Nash Rhoades, 1920-1921, soliciting Freer's letters from his associates, and regarding the settlement of his estate.

Also included are twenty-nine pocket diaries, 1889-1890, 1892-1898, 1900-1919, recording daily activities, people and places visited, observations, and comments; a diary kept by Freer's caretaker, Joseph Stephens Warring, recording daily activities at Freer's Detroit home, 1907-1910. Inventories, n.d. and 1901-1921, of American, European, and Asian art in Freer's collection, often including provenance information; vouchers, 1884-1919, documenting his purchases; five volumes of scrapbooks of clippings on James McNeill Whistler, 1888-1931, labeled "Various," "Peacock Room," "Death, etc.," "Paris, etc.," and "Boston...London" ; three volumes of newsclippings, 1900-1930, concerning Freer and the opening of the Freer Gallery of Art.

Correspondence regarding Freer's gift and bequest to the Smithsonian Institution, 1902-1916; and photographs, ca. 1880-1930, of Freer, including portraits by Alvin Langdon Coburn and Edward Steichen, Freer with others, Freer in Cairo, China and Japan, Freer's death mask, and his memorial service, Kyoto, 1930; photographs of artists and others, including Thomas Dewing, Ernest Fenollosa, Katharine Rhoades taken by Alfred Stieglitz, Rosalind B. Philip, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Abbott H. Thayer, Dwight Tryon, and Whistler; and photographs relating to Whistler, including art works depicting him, grave and memorial monuments, works of art, the Peacock Room, and Whistler's memorial exhibition at the Copley Society.
Organization of the Papers:
This collection is organized into twelve series.

Series 1: Genealogical and Biographical Data

Series 2: Correspondence

Series 3: Diaries

Series 4: Freer Colleague Materials

Series 5: Art Inventories

Series 6: Financial Materials

Series 7: Exhibition Loan Files

Series 8: Biblical Manuscripts and Gold Treasure Files

Series 9: American School of Archaeology in China

Series 10: Printed Material

Series 11: Outsize Material

Series 12: Photographs
Biographical Note:
1854 February 25 -- Born in Kingston, New York

1873 -- Appointed accountant and paymaster of New York, Kingston and Syracuse Railroad by Frank J. Hecker (1846-1927)

1876 -- Moves to Indiana to work, with Hecker, for the Detroit and Eel River and Illinois Railroad

1880 -- Moves to Detroit, participates in organization of the Peninsular Car Works with Hecker

1883 -- Becomes vice president and secretary of Peninsular Car Company when it succeeds Peninsular Car Works

1883 -- Begins collecting European prints

1884 -- Peninsular Car Company constructs plant on Ferry Avenue

1887 -- Meets Howard Mansfield (1849-1938)

1887 -- Acquires proofs of 26 etchings, Venice, Second Series(1886), by James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903)

1887 -- Purchases a small Japanese fan attributed to Ogata Korin(1658-1715)

1887 -- Buys land on Ferry Avenue

1889 -- Meets Frederick Stuart Church (1826-1900) and Dwight William Tryon (1849-1925) in New York

1890 -- Commissions Wilson Eyre (1858-1944) to design house on Ferry Avenue, Detroit, Michigan

1890 -- On first trip to London, meets James McNeill Whistler(1834-1903)

1892 -- Moves to Ferry Avenue house

1892 -- Tryon and Thomas Wilmer Dewing (1851-1938) undertake decoration of reception rooms

1893 -- Lends American paintings to World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago

1893 -- Purchases first piece of Chinese art, a small painting of white herons by an anonymous Ming dynasty (1368-1644) artist

1894 -- Begins yearlong trip around the world, which includes visit to the Whistlers in Paris and first trip to Asia, stopping in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), India, China, and Japan

1896 -- Meets Matsuki Bunkyo (1867-1940) in Boston

1899 -- Takes part in consolidation of railroad-car building companies then retires from active business

1900 -- Attends Exposition International Universelle in Paris

1900 -- Buys villa in Capri with Thomas S. Jerome

1901 -- Meets Siegfried Bing (1838-1905) in Paris and Ernest Fenollosa(1853-1908), who visits Freer in Detroit

1902 -- Meets Dikran Kelekian (1868-1951)

1902 -- Spends summer in Britain building Whistler collection

1902 -- Views Whistler's, Harmony in Blue and Gold: The Peacock Room

1904 -- Purchases Whistler's Peacock Room

1904 -- Offers his art collections and funds to build a museum in which to house them to the Smithsonian Institution

1905 -- Smithsonian committee visits Freer in Detroit

1906 -- United States government formally accepts Freer's gift on January 24

1906 -- Freer signs Deed of Gift to Smithsonian Institution on May 5

1907 -- On second tour of Asia, meets Hara Tomitaro 1868-1939) in Yokohama, Japan

1908 -- Takes third trip to Asia, specifically to West Asia to study Rakka ware

1909 -- Tours Europe to study art museums

1909 -- On fourth trip to Asia, attends memorial ceremony for Fenollosa (d.1908 September) at Miidera, Japan, and meets Duanfang (1861-1911) in China

1910 -- On last trip to Asia, visits Longmen Buddhist caves in China

1911 -- Suffers stroke

1912 -- Lends selection of objects for exhibition at Smithsonian Institution

1913 -- Meets Eugene (1875-1957) and Agnes E. (1887-1970) Meyer

1913 -- Commissions Charles Adams Platt (1861-1933) to design museum building in Washington

1914 -- Meets Katharine Nash Rhoades (1885-1965) in Detroit

1915 -- Settles in New York City

1915 -- Site of future Freer Gallery of Art is determined

1916 -- Platt's plans for Freer Gallery are approved by Smithsonian Regents and Commission of Fine Arts and ground is broken in September

1918 -- After falling ill in Detroit, Freer travels to New York for treatment

1918 -- Work on the museum building is delayed by the war

1919 -- Freer appends codicil to will permitting acquisitions of Asian, Egyptian, and Near Eastern (West Asian) art

1919 -- Dies in New York City on 25 September and is buried in Kingston, New York

1919 -- Construction of Freer Gallery completed

1920 -- John Ellerton Lodge (1876-1942) is appointed director of the Freer Gallery

1923 -- Freer Gallery opens to the public on May 9

1930 -- Memorial ceremony for Freer is held at Koetsuji, Kyoto

Charles Lang Freer was an American industrialist who founded the Freer Gallery of Art. He was a well-known collector of Asian art, and strongly supported the synthesis of Eastern art and Western art. One of his most famous acquisitions was James McNeill Whistler's Peacock Room.
Index:
Index to cross-referenced correspondents in the series Charles Lang Freer correspondence

Beal, Junius E. -- See: -- Warring, Joseph Stephens

Black, George M. -- See: -- Saint-Gaudens, Augustus

Board of Education (Kingston, New York) See: Michael, M. J.

Bonner, Campbell See: University of Michigan

Boughton, George H. See: Yardley, F. C.

British Museum See: Binyon, Laurence; Hobson, R. L.

Brown, Harold H. See: Art Association of Indianapolis

Buchner, Evelyn B. See: Knoedler, M., and Company

Buckholder, C. H. See: Art Institute of Chicago

Butler, S. B. See: Unidentified correspondents

Carnegie Institute See: Balken, Edward Duff; Harshe, Robert B.

Carpenter, Newton H. See: Art Institute of Chicago

Caulkins, Horace James See: Pewabic Pottery

Chao, Shih-chin See: Gunn, Chu Su

Chicago & North Western Railway Co. See: Hughett, Marvin

Clark, Charles Upson See: Clark, Arthur B.

Cleveland Museum of Art See: Whiting, Frederic Allen

Columbia University See: Braun, W. A.; Gottheil, Richard; Hirth, Friederich

Commission of Fine Arts See: Moore, Charles

Corcoran Gallery of Art See: Minnigerode, C. Powell

Crocker, Anna B. See: Portland Art Association

Dannenberg, D. E. See: Karlbeck, Orvar

De Menoncal, Beatrice See: Lien, Hui Ch'ing Collection

De Ricci, Seymour See: Ricci, Seymour de

Defnet, William A., Mrs., See: Franke, Ida M.

DeMotte See: Vigouroux, J.

Detroit Institute of Arts See: Detroit Museum of Art

Detroit Publishing Company See: Livingstone, W. A.

Detroit School of Design See: George Hamilton; Stevens, Henry

DeVinne Press See: Peters, Samuel T.; Witherspoon, A. S.

Dyrenforth, P. C. See: Philip, Rosalind Birnie

Eddy, Arthur J. See: Philip, Rosalind Birnie

Eggers, George Williams See: Art Institute of Chicago

Farr, Daniel H. See: Robinson and Farr

Farrand School (Detroit) See: Yendall, Edith

Field Museum of Natural History (Chicago) See: Laufer, Berthold

Flagg, Frederick J. See: Allen, Horace N.

Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University See: Forbes, Edward; Pope, Arthur Upham; Sachs, Paul J.

French, M. R. See: Art Institute of Chicago

Fu, Lan-ya See: Pang, Lai-ch'en

Fujii, Yoshio See: Yoshio, Fujii

Gerrity, Thomas See: Knoedler, M., and Company

Goupil Gallery See: Marchant, William

Gray, William J. See: Barr, Eva

Great Lakes Engineering Works See: Hoyt, H. W.

Grolier Club See: Philip, Rosalind Birnie

Heinemann, W. See: Philip, Rosalind Birnie

Holden, Edward S. See: West Point, U. S. Military Academy

Hudson, J. L. See: Weber, William C.

Hutchins, Harry B. See: University of Michigan

Hutchins, Charles L. See: Art Institute of Chicago

Kelekian, H. G. See: Kelekian, Dikran G.

Kent, H. W. See: Metropolitan Museum of Art

Lee, Kee Son See: Li, Chi-ch'un

Levy, John See: Schneider, A. K.

Library of Congress See: Rice, Richard A.; Wright, Helen

Louvre (Paris, France) See: Midgeon, Gaston

Matsuki, Z. See: Matsuki, Kihachiro

McKim, Mead and White See: White, Stanford

Mills, A. L., Colonel See: Saint-Gaudens, Augustus

Miner, Luella See: Lien, Hui Ch'ing Collection

Minneapolis Institute of Arts See: Breck, Joseph; Van Derlip, John R.

Monif, R. Khan See: Rathbun, Richard

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston See: Lodge, John Ellerton

Naser, Katen & Nahass See: Katen, K.

Nordlinger, Marie, Miss See: Meyer-Riefstahl, Marie

Panama Pacific International Exposition See: Moore, Charles C.; Trask, John E. D.

Peabody Museum See: Morse, Edward Sylvester

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts See: Trask, John E. D.

Perry, Mary Chase, Miss., See: Pewabic Pottery

Philip, Ronald M. See: Philip, Rosalind Birnie

Pope, G. D. See: Barr, Eva

Reinhart, A. G. See: Gottschalk, E.

Reitz, Sigisbert Chrétien Bosch See: Bosch-Reitz, Sigisbert Chrétien

Rutgers College See: Van Dyke, John C.

Saint-Gaudens, Augusta H. See: Saint-Gaudens, Augustus

Saint-Gaudens, Homer See: Saint-Gaudens, Augustus

Samurai Shokai See: Nomura, Yozo

San Francisco Art Association See: Laurvik, J. Nilsen

Scribner's, Charles, Sons See: Van Dyke, John C.

Shaw, Wilfred B. See: University of Michigan

Shirae, S. Z. See: Yamanaka and Company

Smith College See: Clark, Arthur B.

Smithsonian Institution See: Holmes, William Henry; Rathbun, Richard; Ravenel, Walcott, Charles D.

Society of Arts and Crafts (Detroit) See: Plumb, Helen

Societe des Beaux-Arts See: Reid, Alexander

Stevens, George W. See: Toledo Museum of Art

Stratton, Mary Chase Perry See: Pewabic Pottery

Tanaka, Kichijiro See: Yamanaka and Company

Tuttle, William F. See: Art Institute of Chicago

Union Trust Company (Detroit) See: Philip, Rosalind Birnie

United States Military Academy See: West Point, U. S. Military Academy

University of Chicago See: Zug, George Breed

University of Pennsylvania, Univ. Mus. See: Gordon, George Bryon

Ushikubo, D. J. R. See: Yamanaka and Company

Wallis & Son See: Barr, Eva; Thompson, C. Croal Ward, Clarence See: Oberlin College

Warren, Edward K. See: Philip, Rosalind Birnie

Warring, Stephen See: Warring, Joseph Stephens

Watkin, Williams R. T. See: Philip, Rosalind Birnie

Watson, Margaret, Miss See: Parker, Margaret Watson

Whistler, Anna See: Stanton, Anna Whistler

Whiting, Almon C. See: Toledo Museum of Art

Williams College See: Rice, Richard A

Wright, F. G. See: Orbach and Company

Yatsuhashi, H. See: Yamanaka and Company
Index to cross-referenced correspondence in the series Whistler correspondence

Bell, William See: Unidentified correspondents

Brown, Ernest See: Painter Etchers' Society, Committee

Cowen, John T. See subseries: Charles Lang Freer Correspondence

Ford, Sheridan See: Reid, Alexander

Haden, Francis Seymour See: Painter Etchers' Society, Committee

Haden, Francis Seymour, Lady See: Haden, Deborah Whistler

Leighton, Frederick, Baron See: Campbell, Lady Colin

Moore, Albert See: Reid, Alexander

Morley, Charles See: Pall Mall Gazette

Morris, Harrison S. See: Reid, Alexander

Pennell, Joseph See: Miscellaneous typescripts

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts See: Reid, Alexander

Prange, F. G. See: Reid, Alexander

Societe des Beaux-Arts See: Reid, Alexander

Society of Portrait Painters See: Reid, Alexander

Stevens Fine Art See: Reid, Alexander

Studd, Arthur See: Miscellaneous typescripts

[Vanderbilt?], George, Mrs. See: George, Mrs.

Whistler, William McNeill, Mrs. See: Whistler, Nellie

Whistler Memorial Committee See: Miscellaneous typescripts
Related Material:
The Archives of American Art microfilmed portions of the Freer papers in 1992. The microfilm is available at the Archives of American Art's Washington D.C. office, the Freer Gallery of Art Library, and through interlibrary loan.
Provenance:
Gift of the estate of Charles Lang Freer.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art, American -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Art, Asian -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Architecture -- Asia  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diaries
Financial records
Correspondence
Photographs
Citation:
Charles Lang Freer Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Gift of the estate of Charles Lang Freer.
Identifier:
FSA.A.01
See more items in:
Charles Lang Freer Papers
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/dc3f1a0e3e0-630c-48d4-ba28-485946b1d615
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a-01
Online Media:

Curators' Annual Reports

Extent:
49 cu. ft. (98 document boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
1881-1964
Descriptive Entry:
The administration of the United States National Museum required curators to submit regular reports on the activities of the departments, divisions, and sections. Prior to about 1900 these reports were often made monthly and semiannually as well as annually. The reports were traditionally submitted to the Director of the National Museum to be used in preparing the published Annual Report of the United States National Museum. The individual reports, however, were not reproduced in their entirety in the published Annual Report and generally contain more information than is to be found in the published version.

Reports were stored by the Office of Correspondence and Reports (later known as the Office of Correspondence and Documents), and then by the Office of the Registrar.

Includes reports submitted to the Director of the United States National Museum by curators and administrators.
Topic:
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 158, United States National Museum, Curators' Annual Reports
Identifier:
Record Unit 158
See more items in:
Curators' Annual Reports
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0158
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  • View Curators' Annual Reports digital asset number 1

World of Man, The, Vol. 1: His Work

Producer:
Courlander, Harold, 1908-1996 (liner notes)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Asch, Moses  Search this
Distler, Marian, 1919-1964  Search this
Folkways Records  Search this
Extent:
1 Phonograph record (analog, 33 1/3 rpm, 10 in.)
Type:
Archival materials
Phonograph records
Date:
195x
Contents:
Vol. 1: His work: Hunting calls and animal cries (The Congo, Brazil, Hudson Bay); Cattle calls (the Philippines, Norway) -- Brush and timber clearing (Liberia, the Philippines); Lumbering (southern United States); Housebuilding (the Cameroons); Stonecutting (Japan) --Celebrating the new house (Honduras); Silversmithing (the Navajo); Spinning (Japan); Cloth-shrinking (the Hebrides) --Roadbuilding (Haiti); River transport (Equatorial Africa); Corn-grinding (Haiti) --
Local Numbers:
FW-ASCH-LP-0379

FLP.40636

FLP.40636 ;.Folkways.731
Publication, Distribution, Etc. (Imprint):
New York Folkways 195x
General:
Narrated by the author with dubbings of recorded folk music.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. No duplication allowed listening and viewing for research purposes only.
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for additional information.
Topic:
World music anthologies  Search this
World music  Search this
Collection Citation:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.ASCH, Item FW-ASCH-LP-0379
See more items in:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection
Moses and Frances Asch Collection / Series 9: Audio Recordings / LP
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk57d5f525b-7ea8-497d-b45d-4d3aa81f7423
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-asch-ref16225

Sam DeVincent Collection of Illustrated American Sheet Music, Series 4: Songwriters Volumes I and II

Creator:
DeVincent, Sam, 1918-1997  Search this
Extent:
251 Boxes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1847-1975
Summary:
Sam DeVincent loved music and art and began collecting sheet music with lithographs at an early age.

Series 4: Songwriters: A "songwriter" for this series is defined as a composer, a lyricist, or both.

An overview to the entire DeVincent collection is available here: Sam DeVincent Collection of Illustrated American Sheet Music.
Scope and Contents note:
A "songwriter" for this series is defined as a composer, a lyricist, or both. The songwriters included in this online finding aid are arranged alphabetically in the Biography of Songwriters section and alphabetically in the Name and Select Title Index.

The song sheets associated with each songwriter in this series are generally arranged in the following order: General Songs; Ethnic Songs; Armed Conflict Songs or other Topical Headings; Ragtime; Instrumental; Musical Theater Production Songs; Motion Picture Production Songs; Specialized Song Sheets/Editions; Professional/Artist Copy Song Sheets; and Folios/Volumes. Songs of four or more editions (multiple editions) are usually placed in individual folders and listed separately under the appropriate category, i.e., General Songs, Topical songs, etc. Copyright dates listed in the Container List represent the latest date on any given song sheet, i.e., a song originally published in 1906, but copyrighted in 1946, will show the date 1946.

In the Container List the word "Contains" in a descriptive entry identifies a folder that contains only the song sheet titles specified. For example, Subseries 4.1, folder B "contains" three song sheets and only those three are contained in that folder. The word "Includes" in a descriptive entry identifies a folder that holds not only the song sheet title(s) named but also other song sheet title(s) not specified in the Container List. For example, folder E of subseries 4.1 "includes" (or specifies) three song sheets ("Magic Moments," "Sad Sack," and "Warm and Tender"), but, in addition, folder E contains fourteen other song sheets that are not specified.

Variations in the size of the sheet music in this series may indicate its publication date. Large song sheets-approximately 11" x 13"- were superseded in April 1919, when publishers adopted a new "standard" or "regular" size for song sheets-9 1/4" x 12 1/4"-as recommended by the National Association of Sheet Music Dealers. The probable motivation was that smaller song sheets were cheaper to produce--a conservation effort prompted by World War I.

Titles of Musical Theater Production Songs and Motion Picture Production Songs are in capital letters. Individual song titles are within quotation marks. Portraits of the artist or artists that contributed to a song's success are featured on many song sheets. Songs are filed alphabetically, by title, within each folder.

Dates after the songwriter's name in the Biography of Songwriters section of this Register refer to the songwriter's birth and death dates. Dates after a songwriter's name in the Container List of this Register refer to the dates of the song sheets in this collection for that songwriter. Where two or more songwriters were a notable team over an extended period of time, their collaboration is noted in the Biography of Songwriters and included in the Container List.

The dates in the Container List represent the latest copyright year on the song sheets. The dates are not necessarily the same as the year of the productions. Copyright dates in the Container List represent the latest date on any given piece of sheet music, i.e., a song originally published in 1906, but re-copyrighted in 1946, will show the date 1946.
Arrangement note:
Arranged alphabetically

4.1 - 4.217

4.218: Ephemera
Biographies of Song Writers:
4.42 ADAMS, STANLEY -- (8/14/1907-1/27/1994). Lyricist. Former President of ASCAP; was a leader in the successful effort for Congressional revision of copyright law. Best known song is "What a Diff'rence a Day Made."

4.43 AGER, MILTON -- (10/6/1893-5/6/1979). Composer, publishers, pianist, arranger, vaudeville accompanist, stage entertainer for silent movies. First hit was "Everything is Peaches Down in Georgia," sung by Al Jolson.

4.44 AHLERT, FRED E. -- (9/19/1892-10/20/1953). Composer, publisher. Arranger for Fred Waring. One of first songwriters to quit Tin Pan Alley for Hollywood. First hit was "I'll Get By."

4.45 AKST, HARRY -- (8/15/1894-3/31/1963). Composer. Professional pianist as a teenager. Met Berlin at Camp Upton, worked for him as staff pianist. Hits include: and "Baby Face" and "A Smile Will Go a Long, Long Way."

4.46 ALLEN, STEVE -- (12/26/1921- ). Composer, author, pianist, comedian. Toured with parents in vaudeville; worked in radio; founder and first host of NBC-TV's Tonight Show. Composed the theme from PICNIC.

4.47 ARLEN, HAROLD -- (2/15/1905-4/23/1986). Composer, author, pianist, vocalist. Played professionally at age 15. Signed by The Cotton Club to write with Ted Koehler, producing many hits. Also teamed with Yip Harburg. Write "Get Happy," "Stormy Weather," and the score for THE WIZARD OF OZ.

4.48 ARMSTRONG, HARRY W. -- (7/22/1879-2/28/1951). Composer, vocalist, pianist, producer, prize fighter. Hits include "I Love My Wife, But Oh You Kid" and "Sweet Adeline."

4.49 ASH, PAUL -- (2/11/1891-7/13/1958). Composer, author, conductor, pianist. Led his first band in 1910; became very successful bandleader. Wrote "I'm Knee Deep in Daisies."

4.50 AUSTIN, GENE -- (6/24/1900-1/24/1971). Composer, author. Sang in vaudeville, radio, films, and TV. Established as a recording star with "My Blue Heaven." Wrote "When My Sugar Walks Down the Street."

4.1 BACHARACH, BURT F. -- (5/12/1928- ). Composer and pianist. Collaborated with lyricist Hal David on a number of film scores (e.g., BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID) and popular songs, many of which were recorded by Dionne Warwick.

4.51 BALL, ERNEST R. -- (7/21/1878-5/3/1927). Composer, pianist. Began as pianist in vaudeville, performing with his wife Maude Lambert; then worked as a song demonstrator. Successful songs include "Let the Rest of the World Go By"and "Mother Machree."

4.52 BARGY, ROY -- (7/31/1894-1/15/1974). Composer, pianist. Arranger for Paul Whiteman; led several radio show bands. Edited, played, arranged, and composed piano rolls; composed rags. From 1943-1963 was music director for Jimmy Durante.

4.53 BAXTER, PHIL -- (9/5/1896-11/21/1972). Composer, pianist, lyricist, vocalist. Bandleader in 20's and 30's. Wrote "Have a Little Dream on Me" and "I'm a Ding Dong Daddy from Dumas."

4.54 BAYES, NORA -- (1880-3/19/1928). Vocalist, composer, lyricist. Was a top performing star; known as "The Wurzberger Girl" after her first hit. The first edition of Cohan's "Over There" featured Bayes on the cover. Bayes and husband Jack Norworth wrote "Shine on Harvest Moon."

4.55 BERLE, MILTON -- (7/12/1908- ). Comedian, vocalist, lyricist, composer. Began performing in silent movies at age 5; worked in vaudeville; was a MC in clubs and theaters. Was the first big TV star. Wrote "Sam, You Made the Pants Too Long."

4.2 BERLIN, IRVING -- (5/11/1888-9/22/1989). Composer and lyricist. One of the most versatile and popular songwriters of the 20th century. Wrote songs for some of the most successful Broadway musicals and Hollywood films. Best songs were sentimental ballads performed in unique ragtime or popular styles.

4.56 BERNIE, BEN -- (5/30/1891-10/20/1943). Bandleader, composer. Was a monologist in vaudeville; played violin until he formed his own dance band in early 20's. Known as The Old Maestro. Wrote "Sweet Georgia Brown."

4.57 BRAHAM, DAVID -- (1834-4/11/1905). Composer. Born in London; moved to New York at age 18. Was orchestral leader and composer for minstrel shows, Tony Pastor's, Theatre Comique. THE MULLIGAN GUARD was the first of many collaborations with Ned Harrigan.

4.58 BREUER, ERNEST -- (12/6/1886-4/3/1981). Composer, pianist. Born in Germany, moved to US in youth. Vaudeville pianist. WWII interpreter and entertainer. Wrote "Does the Spearmint Lose Its Flavor on the Bedpost Overnight?"

4.59 BROOKS, SHELTON -- (5/4/1886-9/6/1975). Composer. Parents American Indian/African American. Pianist in Detroit cafes; moved to Chicago. Composed rages; worked as a mimic in vaudeville. Wrote "Darktown Strutters' Ball" and "Some of These Days."

4.60 BROWN, A. SEYMOUR -- (5/28/1885-12/22/1947). Author, composer, actor. Worked in vaudeville. Composed "Oh You Beautiful Doll."

4.61 BROWN, GEORGE -- ...

4.3 BROWN, LEW -- (12/10/1893-2/5/1958). Lyricist. Achieved success with a number of songs in collaboration with composer Albert Von Tilzer, and later as member of the Ray Henderson and Buddy DeSylva songwriting team on Broadway.

4.62 BROWN, NACIO HERB -- (2/22/1896-9/28/1964). Composer. First toured as piano accompanist; worked as a tailor and realtor before first successes in early 20's. One of the movies most important composers during early sound years and many years thereafter. Wrote "Singin in the Rain" and "You Are My Lucky Star."

4.63 BROWN, NACIO HERB, JR. -- (2/27/1921- ). Composer, author, publisher. Son of Nacio Herb Brown. Professional manager of publishing firms; manager of music catalogs. Songs include "Who Put That Dream in Your Eyes."

4.64 BUCK, GENE -- (8/8/1885-2/25/1957). Lyricist. Chief aide to Ziegfeld; wrote book for some of his shows. Pioneer designer of sheet music covers. Songs include "Hello Frisco" and "Tulip Time."

4.65 BULLOCK, WALTER -- (5/6/1907-8/19/1953). Lyricist. Wrote screenplays and songs for movies. Hits include "This Is Where I Came In" and "When Did You Leave Heaven?"

4.66 CAESAR, IRVING -- (4/4/1895-12/17/1996). Lyricist, composer. Wrote mostly for New York stage but began working for films in 30's. Wrote message-bearing songs for children. Wrote "Count Your Blessings" and "Tea for Two."

4.4 CAHN, SAMMY -- (6/18/1913- ). Lyricist. Wrote many successful songs for Hollywood films, notably for Frank Sinatra, and in collaboration with Charlie Chaplin, Jimmy Van Heusen, and Jule Styne.

4.67 CALLAHAN, J. WILL -- (3/17/1874-11/15/1946). Vocalist, lyricist. Started as an accountant, then singer of illustrated songs. Wrote "Smiles."

4.5 CARMICHAEL, HOAGY -- (11/22/1899-12/27/1981). Composer, lyricist, bandleader, pianist, and singer. Abandoned law profession to pursue career in songwriting. Contributed songs to a number of very popular motion pictures.

4.68 CARROLL, EARL -- (9/16/1893-6/17/1948). Composer. Produced and directed many revues. Built two theaters in New York and had a restaurant in Hollywood. Produced movies. Hits include "Give Me All of You" and "So Long Letty."

4.69 CARROLL, HARRY -- (11/28/1892-12/26/1962). Composer. Pianist in movie theaters, cafes and vaudeville. Wrote for Winter Garden productions; wrote several Broadway stage scores. Hits include "I'm Always Chasing Rainbows" and "Trail of the Lonesome Pine."

4.70 CHAMINADE, MME. CECILE -- (born in Paris. Pianist, composer. Toured the US in 1908.

4.71 CLARIBEL (CHARLOTTE ALLINGTON BARNARD) -- (1830-1869) Composer, lyricist. English. Enormously popular in her time. Her "Come Back to Erin" is often regarded as an Irish folk song.

4.72 COBB, GEORGE L. -- (8/31/1886-12/25/1942). Composer. Began as composer of rags. Wrote for Melody magazine. First hit was "All Aboard for Dixieland."

4.6 COHAN, GEORGE M. -- (7/4/1878-11/5/1942). Composer, lyricist, actor, playwright, and producer. Best remembered for elaborately choreographed dance music, flag-waving songs, and songs for musical comedies and vaudeville. Best known for his patriotic songs, "Over There" and "Yankee Doodle Dandy."

4.73 COLUMBO, RUSS -- (1908-9/2/1934). Composer; primarily a singer, featured in Gus Arnheims band. Theme song for own band was "You Call It Madness." Also wrote "Too Beautiful for Words."

4.74 CONFREY, ZEZ -- (4/3/1895-11/22/1971). Pianist, bandleader, composer. Cut many piano rolls. Solo piano pieces have become standards: "Dizzy Fingers" and "Kitten on the Keys."

4.75 CONN, CHESTER -- (4/14/1896- 4/4/1973). Composer. Manager of publishing companies before owning own firm of Bregman, Vocco & Conn. Hits include "Don't Mind the Rain."

4.76 CONRAD, CON -- (6/18/1891-9/28/1938). Composer, pianist. Worked as theater pianist and in vaudeville; wrote for stage and movies. Had publishing firm. Wrote "The Continental," first film song awarded an Oscar; also wrote "Ma" and "Margie."

4.77 CONVERSE, CHARLES CROZAT -- (10/7/1832-4/8/1918). Composer. Studied in Europe; practiced law upon return. Composed partriotic overtures and cantatas, vocal quartettes. Wrote on philosophical and philological subjects under pen name Karl Redan. Wrote "What a Friend We Have in Jesus."

4.78 COOTS, J. FRED -- (5/2/1897-4/8/1985). Composer, pianist. Accompanied vaudeville acts; worked as song plugger; composed for Schuberts shows but returned to club dates in composing independently. Wrote "Love Letters in the Sand" and "You Go to My Head."

4.79 COSLOW, SAM -- (12/27/1902). Composer, lyricist, vocalist. Wrote for Broadway and movies; co-partner in music publishing; co-founded Soundies, song-movie shorts for coin machines. Hits include "Cocktails for Two" and "Was It a Dream?"

4.80 COWAN, LYNN -- (6/8/1888- ). Composer, actor, director, vocalist, pianist. Worked in vaudeville and as a film actor. Composed background scores for early sound film, and songs for LADIES MUST LOVE. Manager of Castle Terrace Club in Okinawa. Wrote "Kisses."

4.80 COWAN, RUBEY -- (2/27/1891-7/28/1957). Composer. Pianist in film theaters at age 13. Co-founded publishing company; wrote first show for Paramount Theater in New York; headed NBCs radio talent dept. then Paramounts radio dept. Wrote "You Can Expect Kisses from Me."

4.80 COWAN, STANLEY -- (2/3/1918- 12/13/1991). Composer, author, director, publicist. Wrote special material for orchestras, musicals, films; Produced shows for USAF during WWII. Joined father's (Rubey Cowan) firm, Rogers and Cowan. Wrote "Do I Worry."

4.81 COWARD, NOEL -- (12/16/1899-3/26/1973). Composer, lyricist, actor, playwright, producer. Born in England; began professional career at age 11. Best known of many popular songs are "I'll Follow My Secret Heart" and "I'll See You Again."

4.82 CRUMIT, FRANK -- (9/26/1889-9/7/1943). Composer, author, singer, actor. Vaudeville and stage performer. Had radio series with Julia Sanderson. Known for novelty numbers such as "Abdul Abulbul Amir."

4.83 CUGAT, XAVIER -- (1/1/1900- 10/27/1990). Bandleader, composer. Born in Spain; moved to Cuba when young; studied in Berlin; gave concert tours. Worked as a caricaturist for the LA Times. Led orchestra specializing in Spanish and Latin American music. Wrote "My Shawl," his theme song.

4.84 DANIELS, CHARLES N. -- (4/12/1878-1/21/1943). Composer, publisher. Pseudonym: Neil Moret. One of most significant ragtime entrepreneurs. Wrote first motion picture title song: "Mickey." Other songs include "You Tell Me Your Dream," "Moonlight and Roses," and "Chloe."

4.85 DANKS, HART PEASE -- (4/16/1834-11/20/1903). Composer. Singer and conductor in New York churches and concert stages. Published sacred and choral works; collaborated on three operettas. Best known for popular songs such as "Silver Threads Among the Gold."

4.86 DAVIS, BENNY -- (8/21/1895- 12/20/1979). Lyricist, vocalist. Performed in vaudeville as a child. Toured with Benny Fields as accompanist to Blossom Seeley. Hits include "Baby Face" and "Margie."

4.87 DEKOVEN, REGINALD -- (4/3/1859-1/16/1920). Composer, conductor, music critic. America's first significant composer of operetta: ROBIN HOOD the first American operetta to be performed in London. Founded the Philharmonic Orchestra in Washington, D.C. in 1902. Best known song is "Oh Promise Me."

4.88 DELEATH, VAUGHN -- (9/26/1896-5/28/1943). Vocalist, pianist, composer, lyricist. Reportedly the first woman on radio, sometimes credited with originating crooning. Played vaudeville, performed on Broadway, and recorded frequently. Hits include "At Eventide" and "Ducklings on Parade."

4.89 DEMING, MRS. L. L. -- (may be wife of Legrand L. Deming, born in Connecticut 10/29/1812.

4.7 DeROSE, PETER -- (3/10/1900-4/24/1953). Composer. Formed a radio team, The Sweethearts of the Air, with May Singhi Breen, whom he subsequently married. His most famous piece, "Deep Purple," became a commercial hit when lyrics were added.

4.3 DeSYLVA, BUDDY -- (1/27/1895-7/11/1950). Lyricist. Produced a number of hit songs with George Gershwin and particularly for the singer, Al Jolson. Also worked with Jerome Kern, Victor Herbert, and later as member of the Ray Henderson-Lew Brown songwriting partnership.

4.90 DILLON, HARRY -- (1866- 2/5/1916). Brother of John and Will. Started performing career on minstrel shows.

4.90 DILLON, JOHN -- (12/5/1882-9/2/1953). Brother of Will and Harry. Followed brother Harry into ministrel shows; first vaudeville engagement was at Tony Pastor's; toured. Operated grocery store in hometown, Cortland, NY, after retirement.

4.90 DILLON, WILLIAM AUSTIN -- (11/6/1877-2/10/1966). Composer, author, actor, businessman. Worked in vaudeville, medicine and minstrel shows; toured with Harry Lauder. Successes include "All Alone" and "I Want a Girl Just Like the Girl That Married Dear Old Dad."

4.91 DIXON, HAROLD -- ...

4.8 DONALDSON, WALTER -- (2/15/1893-7/15/1947). Composer. Hired in 1919 as staff writer for Irving Berlin Inc. Wrote songs throughout the 1920s that made him one of the most popular composers of the decade. Had many collaborations, the most successful with Gus Kahn.

4.9 DRESSER, PAUL -- (4/22/1858-1/30/1906). Composer, lyricist, performer and publisher. One of the first American performers to enter the music publishing trade. Wrote songs for burlesque and vaudeville stage shows. Considered the leading American writer of sentimental ballads of the late 19th century. Best-known song: "My Gal Sal."

4.92 DUBIN, AL -- (6/10/1891-2/11/1945). Lyricist. Served overseas in entertainment unit in WWI. Biggest song successes when teamed with Harry Warren. Hits include "I Only Have Eyes for You" and "Tiptoe Through the Tulips."

4.10 EDWARDS, GUS -- (8/18/1879-11/7/1945). Composer, lyricist, impresario, and singer. Collaborated with lyricist Will D. Cobb producing several hit songs introduced in Broadway reviews, notably Ziegfeld's Follies of 1907 and 1910. Best-known songs include "School Days" and "By The Light Of The Silvery Moon."

4.93 EDWARDS, LEO -- (2/22/1886-7/12/1978). Composer, author, producer. Brother of Gus Edwards. Worked in vaudeville; was staff writer for music publishing firms; cabaret producer. Hit songs include "Isle d'Amour," "Inspiration," and the official Boy Scout song "Tomorrow's America."

4.94 EMMET, JOSEPH KLINE -- (3/13/1841-1892). Actor, composer. Performed in a minstrel company using a broken German dialect that made him famous. Several plays starring his 'Fritz' character were written for him. Successful songs were "Emmet's Lullaby" and "Sweet Violets."

4.95 ERDMAN, ERNIE -- (10/23/1879-11/1/1946). Composer. Was pianist in the Original New Orleans Jazz Band. Worked on professional staff of Chicago music publishers. Songs hits include "Nobody's Sweetheart" and "Toot, Toot, Tootsie, Goodbye."

4.96 FAIN, SAMMY -- (6/17/1902- 12/6/1989). Composer, vocalist, pianist. Was a self-taught pianist; began composing songs while in grammar school. Very successful partnership with Irving Kahal writing songs for movies. Hits include "Dear Hearts and Gentle People," "I'll Be Seeing You," and "That Old Feeling." Nominated for the Oscar 10 times; won twice.

4.97 FEIST, FELIX -- (Wrote "Can't You See Im Lonely."

4.97 FEIST, LEO -- (1/3/1869-6/1/1930). Publisher, lyricist. When early songs didnt sell well Feist partnered with Joe Frankenthaler to start what became one of the leading publishing firms. His successes include "Those Lost Happy Days" and "Smokey Mokes."

4.98 FIELD, EUGENE -- (9/3/1950-11/4/1895). Author. Newspaper columnist for Chicago Morning News. His poems were set to music.

4.99 FIELDS, DOROTHY -- (7/15/1905-3/28/1974). Author, lyricist. At age 15 sang in an amateur show by Rodgers and Hart; worked with brother Herbert as co-librettist on several Broadway shows. Most successful collaboration was with Jimmy McHugh. Wrote "I Can't Give You Anything But Love" and "I'm in the Mood for Love." Won an Oscar with Jerome Kern for "The Way You Look Tonight."

4.100 FIORITO, TED -- (12/20/1900-7/22/1971). Composer, conductor, pianist. Began as a song demonstrator. First hit song was "Toot, Toot, Tootsie, Goodbye." Formed band in early 20's and continued to lead an orchestra in the 60's. Other hits include "Alone at Last" and "Charley, My Boy."

4.101 FISHER, FRED -- (9/30/1875-1/14/1942). Composer, lyricist. Immigrated from Germany at age 25 but soon assimilated popular music idioms. Early success was "Come, Josephine, in My Flying Machine." Started composing for films in late 20's. Hits include "Dardanella" and "Your Feets Too Big."

4.11 FOSTER, STEPHEN -- (7/4/1826-1/13/1864). Composer and lyricist of popular household, plantation, and minstrel songs of the 19th century. Produced over 200 songs of two main types: sentimental ballads of hearth and home, and songs for the famous Christy's Minstrels.

4.102 FRANKLIN, DAVE -- (9/28/1895-2/3/1970). Composer, lyricist, pianist. Pianist in publishing house at age 13; vaudeville accompanist; played nightclubs in New York and European cities. Hits include "The Anniversary Waltz" and "When My Dream Boat Comes Home."

4.62 FREED, ARTHUR -- (9/9/1894-4/12/1973). Lyricist, producer. Wrote for vaudeville; managed theater in Los Angeles; produced shows. Began writing for movie musicals in 1929. Many hits include "After Sundown," "All I Do Is Dream of You," and "Singin' in the Rain."

4.103 FRIEDMAN, LEO -- (7/16/1869-3/7/1927). Composer. Studied in Chicago and Berlin. Two biggest hits were "Let Me Call You Sweetheart" and "Meet Me Tonight in Dreamland."

4.104 FRIEND, CLIFF -- (10/1/1893-6/27/74). Composer, lyricist, pianist. Wrote for Broadway and movies; was a pianist for vaudeville performers in US and England. Also worked as a test pilot. Hits include "Give Me a Night in June" and "The Merry-Go-Round Broke Down."

4.12 FRIML, RUDOLF -- (12/7/1879-11/12/1972). Composer and pianist. One of the principal exponents of traditional operetta and early musical comedy in the United States. Collaborated with Oscar Hammerstein II and others to produce the most popular American musicals of the 1920s.

4.105 FROST, JACK -- (11/25/1893-10/21/1959). Composer, lyricist. Writer with Chicago music company; wrote special material for Eva Tanguay and Trixie Friganza; worked in advertising. Hits include "When You and I Were Young Maggie Blues."

4.106 GARBER, JAN -- (11/5/1897-10/4/1977). Violinist, bandleader, composer. Played violin in Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra; formed dance band in early 20's; still conducting into the 60's. Wrote his theme song, "My Dear."

4.107 GAY, BYRON -- (8/28/1886-12/23/1945). Composer, author, explorer. Educated at US Navel Academy and was on 1933 Byrd Expedition. Successful songs include "The Little Ford Rambled Right Along" and "The Vamp."

4.108 GILBERT, L. WOLFE -- (8/31/1886-7/12/1970). Lyricist. Started as a singer in New York clubs, writing parodies of popular songs for entertainers such as Al Jolson. Moved to Hollywood where he wrote for films and the Eddie Cantor radio show. Had his own publishing firm. Hits include "Lucky Lindy" and "Waiting for the Robert E. Lee."

4.13 GERSHWIN, IRA -- (12/6/1896-8/17/1983). Lyricist. Collaborated with various composers throughout his life, at times using pseudonym, Arthur Francis. He collaborated with brother George from 1924 until the latter's death in 1937. Their first musical comedy together was LADY, BE GOOD.

4.13 GERSHWIN, GEORGE -- (9/26/1898-7/11/1937). Composer, conductor, and pianist. Composer of Broadway shows and one of America's most famous composers of popular concert music. Brought jazz and classical styles together in concert pieces, African American folk music and opera, e.g. PORGY AND BESS.

4.109 GILLESPIE, HAVEN -- (2/6/1888-3/14/1975). Lyricist. Left job as journeyman printer and began writing songs in the mid-20's. Wrote for film, theater and radio. Awarded Freedoms Foundation Award for "God's Country." Hits include "Santa Claus Is Comin' to Town" and "You Go to My Head."

4.110 GLOVER, CHARLES W -- (1806-3/23/1863). Composer. English. Violinist in orchestras of Drury Lane and Covent Garden; musical director of Queen's Theatre. "Do They Think of Me at Home" was one of his greatest successes in the USA.

4.111 GLOVER, STEPHEN -- (mid 1812-1870). Composer. English. One of his most popular songs was "What Are the Wild Waves Saying?"

4.112 GOETZ, E. RAY -- (6/12/1886-6/12/1954). Composer, lyricist, producer. Contributed to many Broadway musicals. Hits include "For Me and My Gal" and "Yaaka Hula Hickey Dula."

4.113 GOODHART, AL -- (1/26/1905-11/30/1955). Composer, pianist. Early career as radio announcer, vaudeville pianist, special material writer. With USO during WWII. Hits include "Auf Wiedersehen, My Dear," "I Apologize," and "Who Walks in When I Walk Out?"

4.114 GORDON, MACK -- (6/21/1904-3/1/1959). Lyricist, vocalist. Boy soprano in minstrel shows; comedian and singer in vaudeville. Hits include "Chatanooga Choo-Choo," "Time on My Hands," and "You'll Never Know" which won an Academy Award.

4.115 GREEN, JOHN W. -- (10/10/1908- 5/15/1989 ). Composer, arranger, pianist, ` bandleader. Accompanied various singers; formed own band. On many radio shows in New York then moved to Hollywood. MGM musical director for many years. Scored and conducted three Academy Award films. Hits include "Body and Soul" and "I Cover the Waterfront."

4.116 GUEST, EDGAR -- ( 8/20/1881-8/5/1959). Poet, Newspaperman for Detroit Free Press. Poems Syndicated in nearly 300 papers; 17 volumes of poetry published. Apeared on national radio for many years.

4.117 GUMBLE, ALBERT -- (9/10/1883-11/30/1946). Composer, pianist for publishers. Entertained troops during WWII. Hits include "Are You Sincere?" and "How's Every Little Thing in Dixie?"

4.118 HALL, WENDELL WOODS -- (8/23/1896-4/2/1969). Composer, author, singer, ukelele player. Known as "The Red-Headed Music Maker." Played the ukelele on radio and in vaudeville; made world radio tour in 20's. Worked as advertizing executive. Successful songs include "Underneath the Mellow Moon" and "Whispering Trees."

4.14 HAMMERSTEIN, OSCAR, II -- (7/12/1895-8/23/1960). Lyricist, librettist, producer, and publisher. Produced and wrote some of the most successful Broadway musicals in collaboration with composer Richard Rodgers and Jerome Kern. Many of his works later appeared in Hollywood films.

4.14 HAMMERSTEIN, OSCAR, I -- (5/8/1846-8/1/1919). Composer. An impresario who wrote several works, including orchestral pieces for use before or as intermezzi in his productions, a ballet, MARGUERITE (1896), and the operettas, SANTA MARIA (1896) and THE KOHINOOR (1893).

4.119 HANLEY, JAMES F. -- (2/17/1892-2/8/1942). Composer, pianist. Accompanist in vaudeville. Produced WWI army show TOOT SWEET. Wrote for early sound movie shorts. Hits include "Second Hand Rose" and "Zing! Went the Strings of My Heart."

4.57 HARRIGAN, EDWARD -- ...

4.15 HARRIS, CHARLES K. -- (5/1/1865-12/22/1930). Composer, lyricist, and music publisher. Known principally as a successful publisher of popular music. First publisher to use an illustration of a performer on a song sheet cover. Most successful song: "After the Ball." Cofounder of ASCAP.

4.120 HARRISON, ANNIE FORTESQUE -- (Lady Arthur Hill)(1851-1944). Composer. Best known songs include "In the Gloaming."

4.14 HART, LORENZ -- (5/2/1845-11/22/1913). Lyricist and librettist. Collaborated with composer Richard Rodgers on the scores of several successful Broadway musicals and Hollywood productions.

4.121 HAYS, WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE. -- (7/19/1837-7/22/1907). Began writing songs at age 19. Very popular because of charming melodies, easy execution of music, and lyrics that projected authentic feelings.

4.122 HEMANS, MRS FELICIA DOROTHEA -- (1794-1835). Very prolific and popular English poet. Composer for some of the songs was her younger sister Harriet Mary Browne.

4.3 HENDERSON, RAY -- (12/1/1896-12/31/1970). Composer. Collaborated extensively with lyricists Lew Brown and Buddy DeSylva. Wrote many of the hit tunes of the 1920s and 1930s. Produced music of wide popular appeal performed by Al Jolson and others on stage and in films.

4.16 HERBERT, VICTOR -- (2/1/1859-5/26/1924). Composer, cellist, and conductor. Successful particularly as composer of American operettas, of which forty (40) were written between 1894 and 1924, mostly romantic and having happy endings.

4.123 HILL, DEDETTE LEE -- (11/2/1900-6/5/1950). Collaborated with her husband, Billy Hill, and later with Johnny Marks.

4.123 HILL, BILLY -- (7/14/1899-12/24/1940). Also used nom de plume George Brown. Composer, author, pianist, violinist, conductor. Worked as a cowboy and surveyors assistant in the west. Led first jazz band in Salt Lake City. Best known songs include "In the Chapel in the Moonlight" and "The Last Roundup."

4.124 HILLIARD, BOB -- (1/28/1918-2/1/1971). Lyricist. Wrote scores for Broadway. Successes include "Our Day Will Come" and "They've Got an Awful Lot of Coffee in Brazil."

4.113 HOFFMAN, AL -- (9/25/1902-7/21/1960). Composer, lyricist, drummer. Bandleader in hometown, Seattle; drummer in NY night clubs; songwriter early 30's through 50's. Hits include "Black Coffee" and "Mairzy Doats."

4.125 HOWARD, JOSEPH E. -- (2/12/1878-5/19/1961). Composer, author, actor, singer, producer, director. Boy soprano in vaudeville; wrote Broadway stage scores; also produced and directed on Broadway. Entertainer in night clubs, radio, TV. Hits include "Goodbye, My Lady Love" and "I Wonder Who's Kissing Her Now."

4.126 INGRAHAM, HERBERT -- (7/7/1883-8/24/1910) Music Director of touring theater companies. Led own orchestra. Staff composer for Shapiro Bernstein Publishing Co. Brother of Roy.

4.126 INGRAHAM, ROY -- (12/6/1893-?) Composer, author, singer. First song published at age 17. Had own orchestra; toured in vaudeville. Wrote for several motion pictures; radio broadcaster. Wrote special material for Sophie Tucher and others. Brother of Herbert.

4.17 JACOBS-BOND, CARRIE -- (8/1861-12/1946). Composer, lyricist, and music publisher. Called "the Riley of the Music World," her songs, such as "A Perfect Day," and "I Love You Truly," are beloved by many.

4.127 JENKINS, GORDON -- (5/12/1910-5/1/1984). Composer, author, conductor, arranger. Played organ in movie theater at age 10; quit high school to play piano in speakeasy. Pianist, arranger for leading bands; Broadway radio conductor. Grammy Award for arrangement of "It Was a Very Good Year" as recorded by Frank Sinatra. Hits include "P.S. I Love You" and "When a Woman Loves a Man."

4.128 JENTES, HARRY -- (8/28/1897-1/19/1958). Composer, pianist. Successes include "He May Be Old But He Has Young Ideas" and "Put Me to Sleep with an Old-Fashioned Melody."

4.18 JOHNSON, CHARLES L. -- (12/3/1876-12/28/1950). Composer and ragtime pianist. Known for his most popular ragtime piece, "Dill Pickles" (1906); also, piano pieces that evoked American Indian culture.

4.129 JONES, ISHAM -- (1/31/1894-10/19/1956). Composer, bandleader, pianist. Formed and led outstanding dance band, touring U.S. and Europe. Many radio appearances and recordings. Equally well known as composer. Two standards are "It Had to Be You" and "I'll See You in My Dreams."

4.19 KAHN, GUS -- (11/6/1886-10/8/1941). Lyricist. Writer of lyrical material for vaudeville performances and Hollywood film musicals. Collaborated with such leading composers as Donaldson, Gershwin, Romberg, Whiting, and Van Alstyne.

4.130 KALMAR, BERT -- (2/16/1884-9/18/1947). Lyricist, publisher. Worked in tent shows and vaudeville as a child. Wrote scores for Broadway and songs for movies; wrote screenplays. Hits include "I Wanna Be Loved by You," "Three Little Words," and "Who's Sorry Now?"

4.131 KASSEL, ART -- (1/18/1896-2/3/1965). Composer, author, vocalist, saxophonist, lyricist and bandleader. Early radio and TV appearances as bandleader after service in World War I. Composed his two theme songs, "Doodle Doo Doo" and "Hells Bells."

4.132 KENNEDY, HARRY -- (circa 1800-1894). Minstrel; ventriloquist who used two dummies simultaneously. Brother William H. Kennedy was his publisher and occassional collaborator.

4.133 KENNY, NICK -- (2/3/1895- ? ). Lyricist, newspaper reporter, produced early amateur radio show; radio editor of New York Daily Mirror. Successes include "Love Letters in the Sand" and "Gone Fishin'."

4.133 KENNY, CHARLES -- (6/23/1898- ? ). Composer, violinist, author. Collaborated with brother Nick.

4.20 KERN, JEROME -- (1/27/1885-11/11/1945). Composer. Considered the most prolific composer of Broadway musicals. He extended the popularity of the musical play form by introducing songs and themes, avoiding operatic styles, and using jazz rhythms and chords instead to characterize the dramatic demands of plot.

4.134 KING, ROBERT A. -- (9/20/1862-4/14/1932). Composer. Wrote under several noms de plume including Mary Earl ("Beautiful Ohio"), R. A. Wilson, and Mrs. Ravenhall. Staff composer for music publishers. Appeared in vaudeville. Hits include "I Scream, You Scream, We All Scream for Ice Cream."

4.135 KIPLING, RUDYARD -- (12/30/1865-1/18/1936). Author, poet. Best remembered for his celebrations of British imperialism, his tales and poems of British soldiers in India and Burma, and his children's stories. He won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1907.

4.136 KLICKMANN, F. HENRI -- (2/4/1885- ? ). Composer, pianist, violinist; arranger for Broadway musicals, music publishers, dance bands, and performers. Professional violinist, pianist, and accordianist. Successes include "Sing Me the Rosary" and "Sweet Hawaiian Moonlight."

4.137 KOEHLER, TED -- (7/14/1894-1/17/1973). Lyricist. Began music career as pianist for nickelodeon, silent film theaters. Wrote for Cotton Club, other stage shows, and films. Most successful collaboration with Harold Arlen ("Stormy Weather"). Also wrote "I Love a Parade" and "I've Got the World on a String."

4.138 KRAMER, ALEX -- (9/13/1893-8/25/1955). Composer, arranger; cellist in theater orchestras; arranger for vaudeville and muscial comedy singers. Compiled and arranged many music folios. Collaborated with wife, Joan Whitney. Hits include "High on a Windy Hill" and "Candy."

4.139 KUMMER, CLARE (Clare Rodman Beecher) -- (1/9/1888-4/21/1958). Composer, playwright. Wrote scores and librettos for Broadway. Successes include "Bluebird."

4.140 LAWNHURST, VEE -- (11/24/1905- 5/16/1992). Pianist, singer, composer. Arranged piano rolls. Original member of Roxy's Radio Gang. Successful songs include "Sunday Go to Meetin' Time."

4.141 LAWRENCE, JACK -- (4/7/1912- ? ). Composer, lyricist. Organized bands for the armed services. Wrote "Tenderly," and English Lyrics for "Ay, Ay, Ay" and "Cielito Lindo."

4.142 LEONARD, EDDIE, -- (10/18/1875-7/29/1941). Composer, author, singer, actor; professional baseball player. Performed in minstrel shows, sang in variety shows. Fought in the Spanish American War. Wrote "Ida, Sweet as Apple Cider."

4.143 LESLIE, EDGAR -- (12/31/1885-1/20/1976). Lyricist, author, publisher. Wrote special material for performers and films. Hits include "For Me and My Gal" and "Moon over Miami."

4.144 LEWIS, AL -- (4/18/1901-4/4/1967). Composer, lyricist; became a music publisher later in career. Hits include "Now's the Time to Fall in Love."

4.145 LEWIS, SAM M. -- (10/25/1885-11/22/1959). Lyricist. Started as runner in a brokerage house. Sang in cafes; wrote material for self and other performers, also for stage and movies. Hits include "Dinah," "Five Foot Two, Eyes of Blue," and "How Ya Gonna Keep' Em Down on the Farm?"

4.146 LIEBER, JERRY -- (4/25/1933- ). Lyricist. Grew up in Baltimore hearing R&B. Struggled with acting in Hollywood when met and teamed with Mike Stoller to write many hits, including "Searching."

4.147 LITTLE, JACK -- (5/28/1900-4/9/1956). Pianist, composer, lyricist, vocalist, bandleader. Had a popular radio porgram in 20's. Led a band in the 30's. Successes include "In a Shanty in Old Shanty Town."

4.148 LOESSER, FRANK -- (6/29/1910-7/28/1969). Composer, lyricist, publisher. Wrote songs for college shows and later for Army shows. Worked as newspaper reporter and caricaturist in vaudeville. Became leading writer for Broadway and Hollywood musicals. Founded own publishing company. Won Oscar and Tony Awards and the Pulitzer Prize. Among many hits are "Two Sleepy People" and "On a Slow Boat to China."

4.149 LOGAN, FREDERICK KNIGHT -- (10/15/1871-6/11/1928). Composer. Wrote sentimental ballads in collaboration with his mother, Viginia. Wrote "Missouri Waltz."

4.149 LOGAN, VIRGINIA K. -- (1800's). Mother of Frederick Knight Logan.

4.150 LOMBARDO, CARMEN -- (7/16/1903-4/17/71). Arranger and composer in brother Guy Lombardo's dance band for forty years. Played sax with heavy vibrato and sang most vocals.

4.151 LYMAN, ABE -- (8/4/1897-10/23/1957). Composer, author, singer. Led own dance orchestra, The Californians.

4.69 MacDONALD, BALLARD -- (10/15/1882-11/17/1935). Lyricist. Began writing material for vaudeville after attending Princeton. Lyricist, librettist for Broadway musicals.

4.152 MANCINI, HENRY -- (4/16/1924-). Composer. Very popular composer of songs and themes for film ("Moon River" and "The Days of Wine and Roses") and TV ("Peter Gunn" and "Mr Lucky"). Began career in Pittsburgh dance bands pre-WWII.

4.153 MARKS, EDWARD B. -- (11/28/1865-12/17/1945). Publisher. Started company with focus on popular music but added the more serious composers. Bought the Cohan Publishing Company; and was the agent for Polish and English companies. His own early song success was "The Little Lost Child."

4.154 MASTERS, FRANKIE -- (4/12/1904- ). Composer, bandleader. Led hotel and ballroom bands in New York and Chicago; on the West Coast circuit in 30's and 40's; TV shows in the 50's. Active in the midwest into the 70's.

4.155 McGLENNON, FELIX -- ...

4.156 McHUGH, JIMMY -- (7/10/1894-5/23/69 ). Composer. Early fame with score for BLACKBIRDS OF 1928. Popular composer for movies during 30's-40's. Important collaboration with many songwriters, especially Dorothy Fields. Hits include "I'm in the Mood for Love" and "When My Sugar Walks Down the Street."

4.157 McKINLEY, MABEL -- (1879?-6/7/1937) Pseudonym: Vivian Grey. Daughter of President McKinley's youngest brother, Abner. Married Dr. Hermanus Baer of Reading, PA.

4.21 MERCER, JOHNNY -- (11/18/1909-6/25/1976). Composer and lyricist with a gift for incorporating southern vernacular speech and images of country settings into songs. Wrote lyrics for Broadway musicals and words and music to many popular songs.

4.158 MERRILL, BLANCHE -- (7/23/1895-10/5/1966). Author, lyricist. Wrote special material for Eva Tanguay, Fanny Brice, and other prominent singers; also wrote for musicals. Successes include "Jazz Baby."

4.159 MERRILL, BOB -- (5/17/1921- 2/17/1998). Composer, lyricist. Leading writer of novelty songs in the 50's, including "How Much Is That Doggie in the Window" and "If I Knew You Were Comin' Id've Baked a Cake."

4.145 MEYER, GEORGE W. -- (1/1/1884-8/28/1959). Composer of many popular songs during the first half of the 20th Century, including "For Me and My Gal," "Tuck Me to Sleep in My Old Tucky Home," and "Sittin in the Corner."

4.160 MILLARD, HARRISON -- (11/27/1829-9/10/1895). Composer. Singer early in career, studied in Italy and toured England and the Continent. Returned to U.S.; wounded in the Civil War. Wrote about 350 songs and many church works. Set UNCLE TOM'S CABIN to music.

4.161 MILLARD, MRS. P. -- ...

4.73 MILLER, NED -- (8/2/1899-1/26/1990)

4.22 MILLS, KERRY -- (2/1/1869-12/5/1948). Composer and music publisher. Specialized in ragtime songs and instrumental pieces. His ragtime cakewalks and the non-ragtime piece, "Meet Me in St. Louis," popularized by Judy Garland, were particularly successful.

4.162 MOHR, HALSEY -- ...

4.163 MOORE, THOMAS -- (6/28/1779-2/26/1852). Irish poet, composer, lyricist, musician.Provided words and music to a selection of Irish songs and did much to kindle an interest in little known Irish tunes. As poet, he appealed to a wide range of tastes.

4.23 MONACO, JAMES V. -- (1/13/1885-12/17/1945). Composer. Earned reputation as a Tin Pan Alley composer playing rag music in cabarets and nightclubs. Contributed several song hits to Broadway and Hollywood musical productions, among which is the song, "You Made Me Love You," made famous by Judy Garland in 1937.

4.164 MORGAN, CAREY -- (12/25/1885-1/6/1960). Composer. Wrote special material for vaudeville and scores for Broadway. Hits include "Rain" and "My Own Iona."

4.165 MORGAN, RUSS -- (4/19/1904-8/8/1969). Bandleader, composer. Arranger for Victor Herbert, Fletcher Henderson, Louis Armstrong, Chick Webb, among many others. Developed muted wha-wha trombone style with Freddy Martin. Wrote songs for Cotton Club Revues. Musical driector for Brunswick Records.

4.166 MORSE, THEODORA -- (7/11/1890-11/10/1953). Lyricist. Wrote under pseudonyms D. A. Esrom, Dorothy Terriss, and Dolly Morse. Most famous songs written in collaboration with husband Theodore Morse: "Three O'Clock in the Morning" and "My Wonderful One."

4.167 MORSE, THEODORE -- (4/13/1873-5/24/1924). Composer. Collaborated with several lyricists including his wife, Theodora. Successes include "M-O-T-H-E-R" and "Blue Bell."

4.168 MUIR, LEWIS F. -- (1884-1/19/1950). Composer. Ragtime pianist. Hits include "Take Me to That Swanee Shore" and "Waiting for the Robert E. Lee."

4.169 NELSON, STEVE -- ( ? ). Hits include "Frosty the Snowman."

4.169 NELSON, EDWARD G. -- (3/18/1885-3/30/1969). Composer, conductor; pianist in nightclubs and cabarets; orchestra leader. Wrote material for vaudeville and songs for movies. Successes include "Peggy O'Neil."

4.169 NELSON, EDWARD G., JR. -- (3/26/1916-). Composer, author. Served with Special Services during WWII.

4.24 NEVIN, ETHELBERT -- (11/25/1862-2/17/1901). Composer. Wrote songs and short piano pieces, sometimes overly sentimental but expressive of gentler and amorous moods.

4.170 NOBLE, RAY -- (12/17/1903- ). Composer, pianist, bandleader. Established as outstanding leader of dance bands in England and then in USA after emigrating. Radio work including Burns & Allen show. Successes include "Good Night Sweetheart" and "The Very Thought of You."

4.54 NORWORTH, JACK -- (1/5/1879-9/1/1959). Vocalist, Composer, lyricist. Entertainer in vaudeville and Broadway; blackface comedian in minstrel shows. Performed and collaborated with wife Nora Bayes. Their most famous song "Shine on Harvest Moon." Wrote lyrics to "Take Me Out to the Ball Game."

4.171 OLMAN, ABE -- (12/20/1888-1/4/1984). Composer, publisher. Started as a song demonstrator; established LaSalle Music Company. Wrote for early movie musicals. Hits include "Oh, Johnny Oh" and "Down Among the Sheltering Palms."

4.172 PALEY, HERMAN -- (5/5/1879-11/4/1955). Composer, publisher, radio executive. Studied music professionally. Worked as staff composer, then executive with music publishing companies. Director of New York Stage Door Canteen shows; talent scout and composer for Fox Films.

4.173 PARISH, MITCHELL -- (7/10/1900-4/2/1993). Lyricist. Attended Columbia and NYU. Staff writer for music publisher; began writing lyrics in 20's. Among the most famous songs are "Deep Purple," "Moonlight Serenade," and "Star Dust."

4.174 PETRIE, H. W. -- (3/4/1857-5/25/1925). Composer, vocalist. Performed in minstrel shows. Successes include "Asleep in the Deep" and "I Dont Want to Play in Your Yard."

4.175 PIANTADOSI, AL -- (7/18/1884-4/8/1955). Composer, pianist; accompanist in vaudeville. Popularized ragtime when touring US, Europe, and Australia. Worked for NY publishing house. Hits include "Pal of My Cradle Days."

4.25 PORTER, COLE A. -- (6/9/1891-10/15/1964). Composer and lyricist. One of the most thoroughly trained popular songwriters, whose theatrically elegant, sophisticated, and musically complex songs contributed to America's most popular music of the 20th century.

4.176 POWELL, W. C. -- (Pseudonym: Polla)

4.114 REVEL, HARRY -- (12/21/1905-11/3/1958). Composer and pianist. Born in London, had early classical piano training. Moved to USA and accompanied Mack Gordon in vaudeville. They started writing for Ziegfeld but were in Hollywood by 1933. The team broke up in 1939. He founded Realm Music Co., a publishing house, in 1949. Successes include "Did You Ever See a Dream Walking?"

4.177 ROBERTS, LEE S. -- (11/12/1884-9/10/1949). Composer, pianist. Worked in piano manufacturing business. Developed QRS artist-recorded music rolls and catalogs. Pianist on radio. Hits include "A Little Birch Canoe and You" and "Patches."

4.178 ROBINSON, J. RUSSEL -- (7/8/1892-9/30/1963). Composer, lyricist, pianist. Began performing and composing as a teenager. Played with Original Dixieland Band; wrote songs for London revues; made piano rolls; accompanied singers. Pianist and vocal coach for radio show CHILDRENS HOUR. Hits include "Margie."

4.179 ROBISON, WILLARD -- (9/18/1894-6/24/1968). Composer, lyricist, pianist, vocalist, bandleader. Radio performer most active in 20's and 30's. Formed Deep River Orchestra; often featured African American folk music and spirituals. Radio shows "Deep River Music" and "Plantation Echoes." Hits include "Cottage for Sale."

4.14 RODGERS, RICHARD -- (6/26/1902-12/30/1979). Composer. Collaborated with Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein II, whose partnership led to a series of musicals that enjoyed unprecedented artistic, critical, and financial success in both Hollywood and Broadway in the 1930's and 1940's.

4.26 ROMBERG, SIGMUND -- (7/29/1887-11/9/1951). Composer and conductor. Composed musical scores in the traditional style of the operetta of the 1920s. Proved to be more flexible than rival Rudolph Friml in adapting to the new tastes and musical styles emerging in American music of the 1930's.

4.180 ROONEY, PAT -- (7/4/1880-9/9/1962). Composer, vocalist. Dancer-singer in vaudeville and on Broadway, first with sister, then with wife Marion Brent. Successes include "You Be My Ootsie, I'll Be Your Tootsie."

4.27 ROOT, FREDERICK W. -- (6/13/1846-?). Composer and music teacher. He was the son of George Frederick Root. One of the country's most active and successful singing teachers, F. W. Root's School of Singing describes the first of his many singing methods.

4.27 ROOT, GEORGE F. -- (8/30/1820-8/6/1895). Composer and music educator. Pseudonym: G. Friedrich Wurzel. Best known for his songs of sentiment and patriotism published during the Civil War era. Also composed over 30 hymns and gospel songs rivaling Stephen Foster in number and popular success.

4.28 ROSE, BILLY -- (9/6/1899-2/10/1966). Lyricist and producer. Provided the lyrics to some of the most successful popular songs of the 1930's and 1940's. Also produced several Broadway musicals and perhaps known more for his editing, polishing, and promoting of songs than as a lyricist.

4.181 ROSE, VINCENT -- (6/13/1880-5/20/1944). Composer, pianist, vocalist, bandleader. Early training in Italy. Formed orchestra 1904. Successes include "Whispering."

4.182 ROSENFELD, MONROE H. -- (1861-12/13/1918). Pseudonyms: F. Heiser and F. Belasco. Composer, journalist. Credited with coining the term 'Tin Pan Alley.' Wrote more than 1,000 songs.

4.183 ROSSITER, WILL -- (3/15/1867-6/10/1954). Composer, publisher. Pseudonyms: Cleve Williams and W. R. Williams. Immigrated to USA from England in 1881. Appeared at Tony Pastor's. Very successful publisher of popular music; initiated innovative marketing techniques for sheet music. Wrote "I'd Love to Live in Loveland with a Girl Like You."

4.130 RUBY, HARRY -- (1/27/1895-2/23/1974). Composer. Professional pianist at age 16; song plugger for Tin Pan Alley publishers; vaudeville performer. Had many collaborators; partnership with Bert Kalmar produced many hits including score for Marx Brothers' ANIMAL CRACKERS; wrote theme for TV series THE REAL McCOYS.

4.130 RUBY, HERMAN -- (3/15/1891-7/31/1959). Composer. Older brother of Harry Ruby. Hits include "My Sunny Tennessee" and "Cecelia."

4.184 RUSSELL, HENRY -- (12/24/1812-12/8/1900). English. Composer, pianist; sang with children's opera troupe; studied composition in Italy. Came to US, worked as organist and choirmaster, then toured as one of the few major singers of his time to present unassisted entertainment. Wrote "The Old Arm Chair" and "Woodman! Spare That Tree!"

4.185 SANDERS, JOE -- (10/15/1896-5/15/1965). Composer, pianist, vocalist, arranger, bandleader. Co-leader of the Coon-Sanders Orchestra in 20's and 30's. Known as The Old Lefthander from early days as amateur baseball pitcher. Hits include "Got a Great Big Date with a Little Bitta Girl."

4.186 SCHWARTZ, JEAN -- (11/4/1878-11/30/1956). Composer, pianist. Prolific leading composer from turn of century. Pianist in cafes, publishing houses. Teamed with William Jerome on Broadway shows and performed with him in vaudeville. Successes include "Hello Central, Give Me No Man's Land."

4.140 SEYMOUR, TOT -- ( 10/23/1889-8/31/1966). Lyricist of the 30's. Worked for New York publishing house. Wrote special material for Fanny Brice, Belle Baker, Sophie Tucker, Mae West; also songs and scripts for raido shows.

4.187 SHAND, TERRY -- (10/1/1904- 11/11/1988). Composer, lyricist. Pianist in silent movie theaters early in career. Pianist/vocalist in 30's; later had own band. Hits include "Dance with a Dolly."

4.188 SHAY, LARRY -- (10/10/1897- 2/22/1988). Composer, arranger, pianist. WWI military service. Musical director for MGM; program director for NBC radio in New York. Hits include "Get Out and Get Under the Moon."

4.144 SHERMAN, AL -- (9/7/1897-9/15/1973). Composer, lyricst. As pianist provided mood music for silent movies; pianist for publishing house. Successes include "On a Dew-Dew-Dewy Day."

4.144 SILVER, ABNER -- (12/28/1899- 11/24/1966). Composer, lyricist, pianist. Dance band pianist; worked for publishing house. Song publisher. Composed many popular songs from 1920 into 60's, including songs for Elvis Presley movies JAILHOUSE ROCK, KING CREOLE, and G.I. BLUES.

4.189 SIMONS, SEYMOUR B. -- (1/14/1896-2/12/1949). Composer, lyricist, bandleader. Wrote Michigan Union operas while attending the University. In AAF during WWI, and with USO in WWII. Wrote material for revues in London and Paris early 20's, then led dance band in US. Later record company executive. Hits include "Breezin Along with the Breeze" and "All of Me."

4.190 SKYLAR, SUNNY -- (11/11/1913- ). Composer, lyricist, author; band singer with Abe Lyman, Paul Whiteman, and others; also worked as a single act. Wrote band material for Betty Hutton and others. Hits include "Besame Mucho."

4.191 SMITH, HARRY B. -- (12/28/1860-1/2/1936). Lyricist. Librettist-lyricist of Broadway musicals 1887-1932, one of most prolific. Brother of Robert B. Smith. Collaborated with DeKoven on first American comic opera. Music and drama critic for Chicago newspapers. Adaptations of French and German operettas. Successes include "The Sheik of Araby."

4.192 SMITH, LEE OREAN -- (1874-?)

4.191 SMITH, ROBERT B. -- (6/4/1875-11/6/1951). Lyricist. Reporter for Brooklyn Eagle. Publicity for Casino Theater, wrote material for shows there. Collaborated with brother Robert B. Smith in Broadway shows. Adapted some stage shows to musicals. Successes include "All the World Loves a Lover."

4.193 SNYDER, TED -- (8/15/1881-7/16/1965). Composer, lyricst, pianist. Early career pianist in cafes and publishing houses. Hired Irving Berlin as staff pianist for his publishing company; collaborated in early songs; Berlin later became partner. Successes include "Whos Sorry Now?"

4.194 SOLMAN, ALFRED -- (5/6/1868-11/15/1937)

4.29 SOUSA, JOHN PHILIP -- (11/6/1854-3/6/1932). Composer, bandleader, and writer. Known as the "March King" and as the most important figure in the history of American bands and band music. His contributions to band brass instrumentation includes the sousaphone and a bass tuba with bells, built in the 1890's.

4.195 SPENCER, HERBERT -- (5/27/1878-8/26/1944). Composer, arranger, singer. Studied voice with Enrico Caruso. In vaudeville for 12 years. Accompanist and arranger for prominent singers. Successes include "There's Egypt in Your Dreamy Eyes."

4.196 SPINA, HAROLD -- (6/21/1906-7/18/1997). Composer, lyricist. Pianist, arranger for publishing house; wrote special material. Founder-President of Telefilm. Director and producer for record companies. Hits include "Annie Doesnt Live Here Anymore."

4.197 STEPT, SAM -- (9/18/1897-12/1/1964). Composer, lyricist, bandleader. Pianist for publishing house. Vaudevile accompanist for Mae West and Jack Norworth among others. Led dance band in early 20's. Songwriting mainly in 30's and 40's. Hits include "Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree" and "That's My Weakness Now."

4.30 STERLING, ANDREW B. -- (1874-1955). Composer and lyricist. Collaborated extensively with the popular Tin Pan Alley songwriter, Harry Von Tilzer, providing the lyrics to some of the most popular songs, including so-called coon songs of the early 1900's as "One Sunday Afternoon" and "Down Where The Cotton Blossoms Grow."

4.153 STERN, JOSEPH W. -- (1/11/1870-3/31/1934)

4.146 STOLLER, MIKE -- (3/13/1933-). Composer. Early piano lessons in New York. Moved to Los Angeles and met Jerry Lieber. First hits were "Kansas City" and "Hound Dog."

4.198 STRAIGHT, CHARLEY -- (1/16/1891-9/21/ or 10/17/1940). Composer, lyricist, pianist, bandleader. Early career in vaudeville. Leader of band in 30's. Musical director of company producing player-piano rolls. Hits include "Funny, Dear, What Love Can Do."

4.31 STYNE, JULE K. -- (12/31/1905- ). Composer. Collaborated with Sammy Cahn on several Broadway musicals. Became one of the most prolific theatrical composers of the post-WWII era, creating scores for over 20 musicals performed by such artists as Carol Channing, Mary Martin, Ethel Merman, and Barbra Streisand.

4.32 SULLIVAN, SIR ARTHUR S. -- (5/13/1842-11/22/1900). English composer and conductor. Composed comic operas whose music, written to librettos by W.S. Gilbert, represents a peculiarly English style of operetta that achieved exceptional renown in both England and the United States. One of the most widely popular of all British composers.

4.199 TAYLOR, TELL -- ...

4.200 THORNTON, JAMES -- (12/5/1861-7/27/1938). Composer, performer. Worked as a singing waiter, then toured in vaudeville, often performing with wife, Bonnie. Successes include "When You Were Sweet Sixteen."

4.201 TIERNEY, HARRY -- (5/21/1890-3/22/1965). Composer, pianist. Toured US and abroad as concert pianist. Worked for Remick publishing house. Wrote scores for several Broadway shows. Hits include "Alice Blue Gown."

4.202 TOBIAS, CHARLES -- (8/15/1898-7/7/1970). Lyricist, composer, vocalist. Prolific songwriter mid-20's into 50's. Collaborated with brothers Harry and Henry. Early career sang in vaudeville, for publishing houses, and on radio. Formed publishing company in 1923. Hits include "Those Lazy Hazy Crazy Days of Summer."

4.202 TOBIAS, FRED -- (3/25/1928-). Lyricist. Son of Charles Tobias. Wrote special material for Carol Burnett and Julius Monk, among others. Made Broadway debut as co-lyricist of Ellington's POUSSE CAFE. Wrote lyrics for TV specials THE GIFT OF THE MAGI and QUINCY. Songs recorded by Patti Page, Tony Bennett, Steve Lawrence, Elvis Presley and others.

4.202 TOBIAS, HARRY -- (9/11/1895-12/15/1994). Lyricist. Brother Charles among several collaborators; most songwriting in 30's and 40's. Wrote special material for movies. Hits include "It's a Lonesome Old Town."

2.202 TOBIAS, HENRY -- (4/23/1905 - 12/5/1997). Lyricist, composer pianist, vocalist. Wrote for vaudeville and night club performers and for radio. Pianist, singer and disc jockey; TV producer for CBS. Collaborated with brothers Charles and Harry. Directed and produced shows for summer stock and resort hotels. Hits include "What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life?"

4.33 VAN ALSTYNE, EGBERT -- (3/5/1878-7/9/1951). Composer and lyricist. Best known for his collaboration with lyricist Harry H. Williams, with whom he wrote songs exploiting Indian themes and the popular "In The Shade of the Old Apple Tree." Later joined forces with lyricist Gus Kahn.

4.203 VINCENT, NAT -- (11/6/1889-6/6/1979). Pianist on vaudeville circuit. One of radio's "Happy Chappies." Remained active in later years despite total blindness. Wrote "I'm Forever Blowing Bubbles."

4.34 VON TILZER, ALBERT -- (3/29/1878-10/1/1956). Composer, lyricist, and publisher. Wrote some of the most popular songs of the early 20th century, and contributed songs to a number of films and Broadway productions. Like brother Harry, Albert's songs incorporate dance rhythms and slang idioms typical of Tin Pan Alley that have since become standards.

4.35 VON TILZER, HARRY -- (7/8/1872-1/10/1946). Composer, lyricist, performer, and publisher. Wrote and published over 2,000 of his own songs and other sentimental and moralistic ballads. Also wrote so-called coon songs for blackfaced minstrels and vaudeville acts of the period. Plugged and published many of the Gershwin and Berlin songs that later became famous.

4.204 WALLACE, WILLIAM VINCENT -- (3/11/1812-10/12/1865). Irish composer, pianist, violinist. Debuted as composer at age 22. Moved to Australia, then various North and South American cities; finally settled in London where he had his great success with MARITANA.

4.36 WARREN, HARRY -- (12/24/1893-9/22/1951). Composer, lyricist. Wrote songs for Broadway reviews, including several co-authored and produced with Billy Rose. Considered one of the most successful composers of American films. The wide dissemination of his music through the film medium made him one of the most influential of all 20th-century songwriters.

4.205 WASHINGTON, NED -- (8/15/1901- 12/20/1996). Lyricist. Early career in vaudeville as M.C. and agent, and writing special material. Popular lyricist from late 20's into 60's; wrote for Broadway shows and movies, including title songs. Hits include "High Noo n" and "When You Wish Upon a Star."

4.206 WAYNE, BERNIE -- ( ? ). Composed "There She Is," the Miss America Pageant Theme Song.

4.207 WAYNE, SID -- (1/26/1923-). Composer, author. Wrote songs and comedy material for TV. Popular songs include "Nintey- nine Years" and "Two Different Worlds."

4.208 WEBSTER, JOSEPH PHILBRICK -- (2/18/1819-1/18/1875). Composer and performer. Toured in concerts of popular music. Managed a Connecticut troupe, The Euphonians, and composed many of their successful songs. Public opposition to slavery forced several moves. Published over 400 songs, ballads, patriotic songs and hymns.

4.209 WEBSTER, PAUL FRANCIS -- (12/20/1907- 3/22/1984). Lyricist. After college became seaman, dancing instructor. To Hollywood mid-30's for movie work. In 50's and 60's wrote many movie and title songs; had several Academy Award nominations and awards. Hits include "Giant" and "Love Is a Many Splendored Thing."

4.210 WEIL, KURT -- (3/2/1900-4/3/1950). German. Composer, arranger, pianist. Very successful career in Germany; left in 1933 with wife Lotte Lenya, first to Paris then to US in 1935. Composed many Broadway musicals in the 40's including KNICKERBOCKER HOLIDAY ("September Song") and THE THREEPENNY OPERA, first produced in Germany.

4.37 WENDLING, PETER -- (6/6/1888-4/8/1974). Composer, lyricist, and pianist. Wrote several hit songs of the post-WWII era in partnership with Bert Kalman and Edgar Leslie. Most popular song: "Oh, What a Pal Was Mary."

4.38 WENRICK, PERCY -- (1/23/1887-3/17/1952). Composer, lyricist, pianist, and singer. Best known for his pre-WWII popular songs such as "Put On Your Old Grey Bonnet," "Moonlight Bay," and others, that became favorites of barbershop quartets and sing-alongs. Known in Tin Pan Alley as "The Joplin Kid".

4.39 WHITING, RICHARD A. -- (11/12/1892-2/10/1938). Composer and lyricist. Among the most successful Tin Pan Alley songwriters of the 1920s and 1930s. He was one of the first important Hollywood composers to began writing music for silent film and later for sound productions such as the very successful movie, HOLLYWOOD HOTEL.

4.138 WHITNEY, JOAN -- (6/26/1914-7/12/1990). Composer, lyricist, vocalist. Own radio show; sang in clubs and hotels. Formed publishing firm with husband Alex Kramer. Hits include "Candy" and "High on a Windy Hill."

4.211 WILLIAMS, GUS -- (7/19/1847-1/16/1915). Composer, actor, singer. Performed at Tony Pastor's before playing legitimate leading roles. Toured in vaudeville.

4.212 WOOODBURY, ISAAC BAKER -- (10/23/1819-10/26/1858). Composer. Studied in London, Paris. Taught music; was conductor, editor, writer. Compiled music collections. Popular songs include "Be Kind to the Loved Ones at Home."

4.213 WOODS, HARRY -- (11/4/1896-1/14/1970). Composer, lyricist. Pianist and singer while student at Harvard. Wrote for English movies mid-30's. Hits include "When the Red, Red Red Robin Comes Bob-Bob-Bobbin' Along" and "Side by Side."

4.214 WRUBEL, ALLIE -- (1/15/1905-12/13/1973). Coposer, lyricist, bandleader. Saxman in bands; led own band; theater manager. Wrote for Warner Brothers, then Disney. Hits include "Gone with the Wind" and "Zip-a Dee-Doo-Dah."

4.40 YELLEN, JACK -- (7/6/1892-4/17/1991 ). Lyricist. Permanent lyricist for Tin Pan Alley songwriter, Milton Ager. Also wrote special material for entertainer Sophie Tucker for over 20 years. A famous song by the Yellen/Ager combination was "I Wonder What's Become of Sally." "Happy Days Are Here Again" was another great hit.

4.41 YOUMANS, VINCENT M. -- (9/27/1898-4/5/1946). Composer. Wrote and produced three successful Broadway musicals. Published fewer than 100 songs, but 18 of these were considered standards by ASCAP, including "Tea For Two," "Take A Chance," and "I Want To Be Happy."

4.145 YOUNG, JOE -- ...

4.215 YOUNG, VICTOR -- (b. Chicago, 8/8/1900-11/11/1956). Composer, violinist, conductor. Worked in radio and theater as violinist, arranger, conductor. Wrote over 200 scores for movies, including SHANE. Song hits include "Stella by Starlight" and "Sweet Sue."

4.216 YOUNG, VICTOR -- (b. Bristol, Tennessee, 4/9/1889-9/2/1968). Pianist and composer. Studied and toured in Europe. Accompanist to prominent singers. Music director in Thomas A. Edison's Experimental Laboratory. Composed for about 300 movies including some of the earliest sound productions.

4.217 ZAMECNIK, JOHN S. -- (5/14/1872-6/13/1953). Composer. Classical training included time under Antonin Dvorak. Violinist in Pittsburgh Orchestra under Victor Herbert. Wrote operettas.
Materials in Other Organizations:
Sam DeVincent Collection of American Sheet Music, Lilly Library, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana

This collection contains duplicates of materials in the Smithsonian collection, as well as materials acquired by Mr. DeVincent after the donation to the Smithsonian. The phonograph records described above were transferred to the University of Missouri at Kansas City.
Materials in the Archives Center, National Museum of American History:
Donald J. Stubblebine Collection of Musical Theater and Motion Picture Sheet Music and Reference Material, 1843-2010 (AC1211)
Forms Part Of:
Series 4: Songwriters forms part of the Sam DeVincent Collection of Illustrated American Sheet Music .

An ongoing, updated list of DeVincent topical series is available via the Smithsonian finding aid portal.
Provenance:
This collection was purchased by the Smithsonian Institution in 1988 from Sam and Nancy Lee DeVincent.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Citation:
The Sam DeVincent Collection of Illustrated American Sheet Music, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0300.S04
See more items in:
Sam DeVincent Collection of Illustrated American Sheet Music, Series 4: Songwriters Volumes I and II
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep870561ae6-a75d-451e-94f2-f77a29336206
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0300-s04
Online Media:

Duke Ellington Collection

Creator:
Ellington, Duke, 1899-1974  Search this
Names:
Duke Ellington Orchestra  Search this
Washingtonians, The.  Search this
Ellington, Mercer Kennedy, 1919-1996 (musician)  Search this
Strayhorn, Billy (William Thomas), 1915-1967  Search this
Collector:
National Museum of American History (U.S.). Division of Musical History  Search this
Extent:
400 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Phonograph records
Papers
Photographic prints
Posters
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks
Music
Clippings
Awards
Audiotapes
Place:
New York (N.Y.) -- 20th century
Harlem (New York, N.Y.) -- 20th century
Washington (D.C.) -- 20th century
Date:
1903 - 1989
Summary:
The collection documents Duke Ellington's career primarily through orchestrations (scores and parts), music manuscripts, lead sheets, transcriptions, and sheet music. It also includes concert posters, concert programs, television, radio, motion picture and musical theater scripts, business records, correspondence, awards, as well as audiotapes, audiodiscs, photographs, tour itineraries, newspaper clippings, magazines, caricatures, paintings, and scrapbooks.
Scope and Contents:
Dating approximately from the time Duke Ellington permanently moved to New York City in 1923 to the time the material was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution in 1988, the bulk of the material in the Duke Ellington Collection is dated from 1934-1974 and comprises sound recordings, original music manuscripts and published sheet music, hand-written notes, correspondence, business records, photographs, scrapbooks, news clippings, concert programs, posters, pamphlets, books and other ephemera. These materials document Ellington's contributions as composer, musician, orchestra leader, and an ambassador of American music and culture abroad. In addition, the materials paint a picture of the life of a big band maintained for fifty years and open a unique window through which to view an evolving American society.

The approximate four hundred cubic feet of archival materials have been processed and organized into sixteen series arranged by type of material. Several of the series have been divided into subseries allowing additional organization to describe the content of the material. For example, Series 6, Sound Recordings, is divided into four subseries: Radio and Television Interviews, Concert Performances, Studio Dates and Non-Ellington Recordings. Each series has its own scope and content note describing the material and arrangement (for example; Series 10, Magazines and Newspaper Articles, is organized into two groups, foreign and domestic, and arranged chronologically within each group). A container list provides folder titles and box numbers.

The bulk of the material is located in Series 1, Music Manuscripts, and consists of compositions and arrangements by Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn and other composers. Series 6, Sound Recordings also provides a record of the performance of many of these compositions. The materials in Series 2, Performances and Programs, Series 3, Business Records, Series 8, Scrapbooks, Series 9, Newspaper Clippings, Series 11, Publicity and Series 12, Posters provide documentation of specific performances by Duke Ellington and His Orchestra. Ellington was a spontaneous and prolific composer as evidenced by music, lyrical thoughts, and themes for extended works and plays captured on letterhead stationery in Series 3, Business Records, in the margin notes of individual books and pamphlets in Series 14, Religious Materials and Series 15, Books, and in the hand-written notes in Series 5, Personal Correspondence and Notes.

During its fifty-year lifespan, Duke Ellington and His Orchestra were billed under various names including The Washingtonians, The Harlem Footwarmers and The Jungle Band. The soloists were informally called "the band", and Series 3 includes salary statements, IOU's, receipts and ephemera relating to individual band members. Series 1, Music Manuscripts contains the soloists' parts and includes "band books" of several soloists (for example; Harry Carney and Johnny Hodges) and numerous music manuscripts of Billy Strayhorn. The changing role of Strayhorn from arranger hired in 1938 to Ellington's main collaborator and composer of many well-known titles for Duke Ellington and His Orchestra including "Take The A' Train" and "Satin Doll" can be traced in these music manuscripts. Series 7, Photographs and Series 2, Performances and Programs contain many images of the band members and Strayhorn. This Collection also documents the business history of Duke Ellington and His Orchestra. Series 3, Business Records contains correspondence on letterhead stationery and Series 11, Publicity contains promotional material from the various booking agencies, professional companies, and public relations firms that managed the Orchestra.

The materials in the Duke Ellington Collection provide insight into public and institutional attitudes towards African Americans in mid-twentieth-century America. The business records in Series 3 beginning in 1938 and published sheet music in Series 1 depict Duke Ellington's progression from an African-American musician who needed "legitimization" by a white publisher, Irving Mills, to a businessmen who established his own companies including Tempo Music and Duke Ellington, Incorporated to control his copyright and financial affairs. Programs from the segregated Cotton Club in Series 2, Performances And Programs and contracts with no-segregation clauses in Series 3: Business Records further illustrate racial policies and practices in this time period. The public shift in perception of Duke Ellington from a leader of an exotic "Jungle Band" in the 1930s to a recipient of the Congressional Medal Of Freedom in 1970 is evidenced in Series 2, Performances And Programs, Series 12, Posters, Series 7, Photographs and Series 13, Awards. Reviews and articles reflecting Ellington's evolving status are also documented in Series 8, Newspaper Clippings, Series 9, Scrapbooks, Series 10, Newspaper and Magazine Articles.

The materials in the Duke Ellington Collection reflect rapid technological changes in American society from 1923-1982. Sound recordings in Series 6 range from 78 phonograph records of three minutes duration manufactured for play on Victrolas in monaural sound to long-playing (LP) phonograph records produced for stereo record players. Television scripts in Series 4, programs in Series 2 and music manuscripts (for example, Drum Is A Woman) in Series 1 demonstrate how the development of television as a means of mass communication spread the Orchestra's sound to a wider audience. The availability of commercial air travel enabled the Ellington Orchestra to extend their international performances from Europe to other continents including tours to Asia, Africa, South America and Australia and archival material from these tours is included in every series.

Series 4, Scripts and Transcripts and Series 6, Audio Recordings contain scripts and radio performances promoting the sale of United States War bonds during World War II, and Series 7, Photographs includes many images of Duke Ellington and His Orchestra's performances for military personnel revealing the impact of historic events on Duke Ellington and His Orchestra. Series 2: Programs and Performances, Series 9, Newspaper clippings and Series 8, Scrapbooks document the 1963 Far East tour aborted as a result of President John F. Kennedy's assassination.

The Duke Ellington Collection contains works by numerous twentieth-century music, literature, and art luminaries. Series 1, Music Manuscripts contains original music manuscripts of William Grant Still, Eubie Blake, Mary Lou Williams, and others. Series 4, Scripts and Transcripts contains a play by Langston Hughes, and Series 12, Posters contains many original artworks.
Arrangement:
Series 1: Music Manuscripts, circa 1930-1981, undated

Series 2: Performances and Programs, 1933-1973, undated

Series 3: Business Records, 1938-1988

Series 4: Scripts and Transcripts, 1937-1970

Series 5: Personal Correspondence and Notes, 1941-1974, undated

Series 6: Sound Recordings, 1927-1974

Series 7: Photographs, 1924-1972, undated

Series 8: Scrapbooks, 1931-1973

Series 9: Newspaper Clippings, 1939-1973, undated

Series 10: Magazine Articles and Newspaper Clippings, 1940-1974

Series 11: Publicity, 1935-1988

Series 12: Posters and Oversize Graphics, 1933-1989, undated

Series 13: Awards, 1939-1982

Series 14: Religious Material, 1928-1974

Series 15: Books, 1903-1980

Series 16: Miscellaneous, 1940-1974
Biographical / Historical:
A native of Washington, DC, Edward Kennedy Ellington was born on April 29, 1899. Edward was raised in a middle-class home in the Northwest section of Washington described by his sister Ruth--younger by sixteen years--as a "house full of love." Ellington himself wrote that his father J.E. (James Edward) raised his family "as though he were a millionaire" but Edward was especially devoted to his mother, Daisy Kennedy Ellington. In 1969, thirty-four years after his mother's death, Ellington accepted the Presidential Medal of Freedom with these words, "There is nowhere else I would rather be tonight but in my mother's arms." Both his parents played the piano and Ellington began piano lessons at the age of seven, but like many boys he was easily distracted by baseball.

In his early teens, Ellington sneaked into Washington clubs and performance halls where he was exposed to ragtime musicians, including James P. Johnson, and where he met people from all walks of life. He returned in earnest to his piano studies, and at age fourteen wrote his first composition, "Soda Fountain Rag" also known as "Poodle Dog Rag." Ellington was earning income from playing music at seventeen years of age, and around this time he earned the sobriquet "Duke" for his sartorial splendor and regal air. On July 2, 1918, he married a high school sweetheart, Edna Thompson; their only child, Mercer Kennedy Ellington, was born on March 11, 1919. Duke Ellington spent the first twenty-four years of his life in Washington's culturally thriving Negro community. In this vibrant atmosphere he was inspired to be a composer and learned to take pride in his African-American heritage.

Ellington moved to New York City in 1923 to join and eventually lead a small group of transplanted Washington musicians called "The Washingtonians," which included future Ellington band members, Sonny Greer, Otto Hardwicke and "Bubber" Miley. Between 1923 and 1927, the group played at the Club Kentucky on Broadway and the ensemble increased from a quintet to a ten-piece orchestra. With stride pianist Willie "The Lion" Smith as his unofficial guide, Ellington soon became part of New York's music scene; Smith proved to be a long-lasting influence on Duke's composing and arranging direction. At the Club Kentucky, Ellington came under the tutelage of another legendary stride pianist, "Fats" Waller. Waller, a protege of Johnson and Smith, played solos during the band's breaks and also tutored Ellington who began to show progress in his compositions. In November 1924, Duke made his publishing and recording debut with "Choo Choo (I Got To Hurry Home)" released on the Blu-Disc label. In 1925, he contributed two songs to Chocolate Kiddies, an all-black revue which introduced European audiences to black American styles and performers. By this time Ellington's family, Edna and Mercer, had joined him in New York City. The couple separated in the late 1920's, but they never divorced or reconciled.

Ellington's achievements as a composer and bandleader began to attract national attention while he worked at the Cotton Club in Harlem, New York City, from 1927 to 1932. The orchestra developed a distinctive sound that displayed the non-traditional voicings of Ellington's arrangements and featured the unique talents of the individual soloists. Ellington integrated his soloists' exotic-sounding trombone growls and wah-wahs, their high-squealed trumpets, their sultry saxophone blues licks and Harlem's street rhythms into his arrangements. In the promotional material of the Cotton Club, the band was often billed as "Duke Ellington and His Jungle Band." With the success of compositions like "Mood Indigo," and an increasing number of recordings and national radio broadcasts from the Cotton Club, the band's reputation soared.

The ten years from 1932 to 1942 are considered by some major critics to represent the "golden age" for the Ellington Orchestra, but it represents just one of their creative peaks. These years did bring an influx of extraordinary new talent to the band including Jimmy Blanton on double bass, Ben Webster on tenor saxophone, and Ray Nance on trumpet, violin and vocals. During this ten year span Ellington composed several of his best known short works, including "Concerto For Cootie," "Ko-Ko," "Cotton Tail," "In A Sentimental Mood," and Jump For Joy, his first full-length musical stage revue.

Most notably, 1938 marked the arrival of Billy Strayhorn. While a teenager in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Strayhorn had already written "Lush Life," "Something To Live For" and a musical, Fantastic Rhythm. Ellington was initially impressed with Strayhorn's lyrics but realized long before Billy's composition "Take the A' Train" became the band's theme song in 1942 that Strayhorn's talents were not limited to penning clever lyrics. By 1942, "Swee' Pea" had become arranger, composer, second pianist, collaborator, and as Duke described him, "my right arm, my left arm, all the eyes in the back of my head, my brain waves in his head, and his in mine." Many Ellington/Strayhorn songs have entered the jazz canon, and their extended works are still being discovered and studied today. Strayhorn remained with the Ellington Organization until his death on May 30, 1967.

Ellington had often hinted of a work in progress depicting the struggle of blacks in America. The original script, Boola, debuted in Carnegie Hall in November of 1943, retitled Black, Brown and Beige. The performance met with mixed reviews, and although Ellington often returned to Carnegie Hall the piece was never recorded in a studio, and after 1944 was never performed in entirety again by the Ellington Orchestra. Nonetheless, it is now considered a milestone in jazz composition.

After World War II the mood and musical tastes of the country shifted and hard times befell big bands, but Ellington kept his band together. The band was not always financially self-sufficient and during the lean times Ellington used his songwriting royalties to meet the soloists' salaries. One could assign to Ellington the altruistic motive of loyalty to his sidemen, but another motivation may have been his compositional style which was rooted in hearing his music in the formative stage come alive in rehearsal. "The band was his instrument," Billy Strayhorn said, and no Ellington composition was complete until he heard the orchestra play it. Then he could fine tune his compositions, omit and augment passages, or weave a soloist's contribution into the structure of the tune.

In 1956, the American public rediscovered Duke and the band at the Newport Jazz Festival in Rhode Island. The searing performances of tenor saxophonist Paul Gonsalves on "Diminuendo and Crescendo In Blue," his premiere soloist, alto saxophonist Johnny Hodges on "Jeep's Blues", and the crowd's ecstatic reaction have become jazz legend. Later that year Duke landed on the cover of Time magazine. Although Ellington had previously written music for film and television (including the short film, Black and Tan Fantasy in 1929) it wasn't until 1959 that Otto Preminger asked him to score music for his mainstream film, Anatomy of a Murder, starring Jimmy Stewart. Paris Blues in 1961, featuring box-office stars Paul Newman and Sidney Poitier in roles as American jazz musicians in Paris, followed.

Ellington's first performance overseas was in England in 1933, but the 1960s brought extensive overseas tours including diplomatic tours sponsored by the State Department. Ellington and Strayhorn composed exquisite extended works reflecting the sights and sounds of their travels, including the Far East Suite, 1966. They wrote homages to their classical influences; in 1963, they adapted Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker Suite and celebrated Shakespeare's works with the suite Such Sweet Thunder in 1957. With Ella Fitzgerald, they continued the Norman Granz Songbook Series. Ellington also began to flex his considerable pianist skills and recorded albums with John Coltrane (1963), Coleman Hawkins (1963), Frank Sinatra, and Money Jungle (1963) with Charles Mingus and Max Roach. The First Sacred Concert debuted in San Francisco's Grace Cathedral in 1965. In his final years, Ellington's thoughts turned to spiritual themes and he added a Second (1968) and Third (1973) Concert of Sacred Music to his compositions.

In his lifetime, Duke received numerous awards and honors including the highest honor bestowed on an American civilian, the Congressional Medal Of Freedom. In 1965, Ellington was recommended for a Pulitzer Prize to honor his forty years of contribution to music but the recommendation was rejected by the board. Most likely he was disappointed, but his response at the age of sixty-six was, "Fate is being kind to me. Fate doesn't want me to be famous too young."

Ellington never rested on his laurels or stopped composing. Whenever he was asked to name his favorite compositions his characteristic reply was "the next five coming up," but to please his loyal fans Ellington always featured some of his standards in every performance. Even on his deathbed, he was composing the opera buffo called Queenie Pie.

Duke Ellington died on May 24, 1974 at seventy-five years of age. His funeral was held in New York's Cathedral of St. John The Divine; he was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery. His long-time companion Beatrice "Evie" Ellis was buried beside him after her death in 1976. He was survived by his only child, Mercer Kennedy Ellington, who not only took up the baton to lead the Duke Ellington Orchestra but assumed the task of caring for his father's papers and his legacy to the nation. Mercer Ellington died in Copenhagan, Denmark on February 8, 1996, at the age of seventy-six. Ruth Ellington Boatwright died in New York on March 6, 2004, at the age of eighty-eight. Both Mercer and Ruth were responsible for shepherding the documents and artifacts that celebrate Duke Ellington's genius and creative life to their current home in the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

William H. Quealy Collection of Duke Ellington Recordings (AC0296)

Rutgers University Collection of Radio Interviews about Duke Ellington (AC0328)

Duke Ellington Oral History Project (AC0368)

Duke Ellington Collection of Ephemera and realated Audiovisual Materials (AC0386)

Annual International Conference of the Duke Ellington Study Group Proceedings (AC0385)

Robert Udkoff Collection of Duke Ellington Ephemera (AC0388)

Frank Driggs Collection of Duke Ellington Photographic Prints (AC0389)

New York Chapter of the Duke Ellington Society Collection (AC390)

Earl Okin Collection of Duke Ellington Ephemera (AC0391)

William Russo Transcription and Arrangement of Duke Ellington's First Concert of Sacred Music (AC0406)

Ruth Ellington Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC0415)

Music manuscripts in the Ruth Ellington Collection complement the music manuscripts found in the Duke Ellington Collection.

Carter Harman Collection of Interviews with Duke Ellington (AC0422)

Betty McGettigan Collection of Duke Ellington Memorabilia (AC0494)

Dr. Theodore Shell Collection of Duke Ellington Ephemera (AC0502)

Edward and Gaye Ellington Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC0704)

Andrew Homzy Collection of Duke Ellington Stock Music Arrangements (AC0740)

John Gensel Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC0763)

Al Celley Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC1240)

Materials at Other Organizations

Institute of Jazz Studies
Separated Materials:
Artifacts related to this collection are in the Division of Culture and the Arts (now Division of Cultural and Community Life) and include trophies, plaques, and medals. See accessions: 1989.0369; 1991.0808; 1993.0032; and 1999.0148.

"
Provenance:
The collection was purchased through an appropriation of Congress in 1988.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but the original and master audiovisual materials are stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.

Copyright restrictions. Consult the Archives Center at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.

Paul Ellington, executor, is represented by:

Richard J.J. Scarola, Scarola Ellis LLP, 888 Seventh Avenue, 45th Floor, New York, New York 10106. Telephone (212) 757-0007 x 235; Fax (212) 757-0469; email: rjjs@selaw.com; www.selaw.com; www.ourlawfirm.com.
Occupation:
Composers -- 20th century  Search this
Topic:
Big bands  Search this
Pianists  Search this
Bandsmen -- 20th century  Search this
Jazz -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Musicians -- 20th century  Search this
Music -- Performance  Search this
African American entertainers -- 20th century  Search this
African Americans -- History  Search this
Popular music -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Music -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Phonograph records
Papers
Photographic prints
Posters
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Music -- Manuscripts
Clippings
Awards
Audiotapes
Citation:
Duke Ellington Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0301
See more items in:
Duke Ellington Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep850a376a1-6b6d-48bc-9076-cffef76fea2c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0301
Online Media:

The poetics of processing memory formation, identity, and the handling of the dead edited by Anna J. Osterholtz

Editor:
Osterholtz, Anna J.,  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (xi, 264 pages) illustrations (chiefly color), maps (some color)
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
Date:
2020
Jusqu'à 500
Topic:
Human remains (Archaeology)  Search this
Dead--Social aspects  Search this
Funeral rites and ceremonies, Ancient  Search this
Death--Social aspects  Search this
Violence  Search this
Restes humains (Archéologie)  Search this
Morts--Aspect social  Search this
Funérailles--Rites et cérémonies--Histoire  Search this
Mort--Aspect social  Search this
violence  Search this
SOCIAL SCIENCE / General  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1156795

BLK Vol. 2 No. 9

Published by:
Alan Bell, American  Search this
Edited by:
Alan Bell, American  Search this
Interview of:
Audre Lorde, American, 1934 - 1992  Search this
Subject of:
Nelson Mandela, South African, 1918 - 2013  Search this
Winnie Mandela, South African, 1936 - 2018  Search this
The New York Times, American, founded 1851  Search this
Associated Press, American, founded 1846  Search this
Supreme Court of the United States, American, founded 1789  Search this
Thurgood Marshall, American, 1908 - 1993  Search this
National Endowment for the Arts, American, founded 1965  Search this
Spike Lee, American, born 1957  Search this
Mayor Marion Shepilov Barry Jr., American, 1936 - 2014  Search this
2 Live Crew, American, 1985 - 2014  Search this
Black Entertainment Television, American, founded 1980  Search this
WLIB, American, founded 1941  Search this
AIDS Project Los Angeles, American, founded 1983  Search this
Minority AIDS Project, American, founded 1985  Search this
AIDS Healthcare Foundation, founded 1987  Search this
Black Gay and Lesbian Leadership Forum, American, 1988 - 2003  Search this
Gilberto Gerald, Panamanian American, born 1950  Search this
Jewel Thais-Williams, American  Search this
Rev. Carl Bean, American, 1944 - 2021  Search this
National LGBTQ Task Force, American, founded 1974  Search this
African-American Lesbian and Gay Alliance, American, founded 1986  Search this
Phill Wilson, American, born 1956  Search this
Sabrina Sojourner, American, born 1952  Search this
Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund, American, founded 1973  Search this
Tom Bradley, American, 1917 - 1998  Search this
National Association of Black and White Men Together, American, founded 1980  Search this
National Task Force on AIDS Prevention, American, 1985 - 1998  Search this
Nia Collective, American, founded 1987  Search this
Grupo Gay da Bahía, Brazilian, founded 1980  Search this
Chicago Tribune, American, founded 1847  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper (fiber product)
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 10 13/16 × 8 1/4 × 1/8 in. (27.4 × 20.9 × 0.3 cm)
Type:
magazines (periodicals)
Place made:
Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, United States, North and Central America
Place depicted:
Berkley, Alameda County, California, United States, North and Central America
West Hollywood, Los Angeles County, California, United States, North and Central America
Colorado Springs, El Paso County, Colorado, United States, North and Central America
State College, Centre County, Pennsylvania, United States, North and Central America
New York City, New York, United States, North and Central America
Bethesda, Montgomery County, Maryland, United States, North and Central America
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, United States, North and Central America
Saugatuck, Allegan County, Michigan, United States, North and Central America
Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, United States, North and Central America
Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, Florida, United States, North and Central America
Atlanta, Fulton County, Georgia, United States, North and Central America
Lagos, Nigeria, West Africa, Africa
London, England, Europe
Harare, Zimbabwe, Africa
Brazil, Latin America, South America
Date:
September 1990
Topic:
African American  Search this
Activism  Search this
Associations and institutions  Search this
Black Press  Search this
Communities  Search this
HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities)  Search this
Health  Search this
Identity  Search this
International affairs  Search this
LGBTQ  Search this
Mass media  Search this
Race relations  Search this
Sexuality  Search this
U.S. History, 1969-2001  Search this
Violence  Search this
White supremacy movements  Search this
Women's organizations  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Alan Bell
Object number:
2018.108.22
Restrictions & Rights:
© BLK Publishing Company, Inc.
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Documents and Published Materials-Published Works
Movement:
African American - Latinx Solidarity
HIV/AIDS Activist Movement
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd515bbc5a4-92ee-48c7-942a-5d2ab531a826
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2018.108.22

Peace Corps: Fifty Years of Promoting World Peace and Friendship

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
More than 200,000 Peace Corps volunteers have served in 139 countries since 1961, when the agency was established by Executive Order 10924. Signed by President Kennedy on March 1, 1961, the two-page Executive Order simply established "an agency in the Department of State which shall be known as the Peace Corps. The Peace Corps shall be headed by a Director." That person, appointed by Kennedy three days later, was Sargent Shriver, his brother-in-law. The U.S. Congress made it official on September 22, 1961, by authorizing the Peace Corps Act and appropriating $30 million for the new agency's first annual budget. The very first paragraph of the Act declares that the Peace Corps should "promote world peace and friendship" through three interrelated goals:

to help the people of interested countries meet their needs for trained workers;

to help the people in those countries better understand Americans; and

to help Americans better understand the people in those countries where Peace Corps volunteers are serving.

Half a century later, the annual federal appropriation had reached a high of $400 million in Fiscal Year 2010, but the three goals of the Peace Corps, its Congressional mandate, and its commitment to building world peace and friendship have never changed.

The 2011 Festival was pleased to host - and recognize - the Peace Corps volunteers who have served the organization since its founding fifty years ago. The Festival program built upon previous Folklife Festival programs that have examined occupational and organizational traditions. At the Festival, these occupational and organizational groups have each demonstrated their own sets of skills, specialized knowledge, and codes of behavior that not only distinguish them from other occupational groups but also meet their needs as a community. The fiftieth anniversary of the Peace Corps in 2011 provided a wonderful opportunity for understanding and appreciating its organizational and occupational cultures.

The Peace Corps program at the 2011 Festival brought together Peace Corps volunteers - both past and present - with roughly one hundred of the people with whom they have served from more than a dozen countries around the world in order to promote a greater understanding of world cultures. Together, volunteers and collaborating communities demonstrated to Festival visitors the experience and accomplishments of Peace Corps volunteers around the world. But they also looked forward: as the Peace Corps moves into its next fifty years, the inequities that existed half a century ago - poverty, disease, illiteracy, and hunger - still loom large in much of our world, often exacerbated by such contemporary challenges as climate change and HIV and AIDS. And as Festival visitors were reminded, the need for world peace and friendship is certainly as important today as it was fifty years ago.

James Deutsch was Curator; Jason Bowers was Program Coordinator; and Kim Stryker was Family Activities Coordinator. The Peace Corps Curatorial Advisory Committee included: Randy Adams, Shilpa Alimchandani, Marjorie Anctil, Anne Baker, Daniel Baker, Lenny Bankester, Lynette Bouchie, Karen Chaput, Kristen Fernekes, Angela Glenn, Carrie Hessler-Radelet, Lynn Kneedler, Nicole Lewis, Bob Michon, Jody Olsen, Kirsten Radewagen, Amber Smigiel, Frank Smith, Shelley Swendiman, and Lori Wallace. Kristen Fernekes was Program Manager for the Peace Corps and Chris Lisi was Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Director.

The program was produced in partnership with the Peace Corps. Major Donor support came from The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. UPS Foundation was a Contributor to the program.
Presenters:
Betty Belanus, Harold Closter, Nancy Groce, Diana N'Diaye, Marjorie Hunt, Cynthia Vidaurri
Participants:
BELIZE AND GUATEMALA - Garifuna Collective featuring Umalali

Joshua Arana, 1979-, vocals, drums, Stann Creek, Belize

Marcela Aranda, 1967-, vocals, percussion, Belize City, Belize

Sofia Blanco, 1953-, vocals, Livingston, Guatemala

Desiree Diego, 1974-, vocals, percussion, Stann Creek, Belize

Dayaan Ellis, 1975-, vocals, guitar, Dangriga, Belize

Denmark Flores, 1977-, vocals, drums, Belize City, Belize

Sam Harris, 1952-, vocals, guitar, San Ignacio, Belize

Al Ovando, 1975-, vocals, bass, Stann Creek, Belize

Tim O'Malley, 1978-, returned Peace Corps Volunteer (Belize), Portland, Oregon

BOTSWANA - Naro Giraffe Dance Group

Stella Xoo Bob, 1974-, dancer, Ghanzi, Botswana

Kuela Kiema, 1968-, dancer, Ghanzi, Botswana

Xhare Qoma, 1952-, dancer, Ghanzi, Botswana

Xonxae Qubi, 1968-, dancer, Ghanzi, Botswana

Bau Xhega, 1956-, dancer, Ghanzi, Botswana

Ed Pettitt, 1983-, returned Peace Corps Volunteer (Botswana), Houston, Texas

GEORGIA - wine-making

Lili Useinashvili, 1988-, wine maker, Tbilisi, Georgia

Johnny McRae, 1985-, Peace Corps Volunteer (Georgia), Tallahassee, Florida

GHANA - shea butter production

Rukaya Amidu, 1969-, shea butter producer, Damongo, Ghana

Shietu Braimah, 1958-, shea butter producer, Damongo, Ghana

Gladys Sala Petey, 1973-, shea butter producer, Damongo, Ghana

Rahama Wright, 1979-, returned Peace Corps Volunteer (Mali), Washington, D.C.

GUATEMALA - bottle wall

Reyna Floridalma Alvarado Ortiz de Ramírez, 1965-, wall builder, Granados, Baja Verapaz, Guatemala

Zonia Judith García de García, 1959-, wall builder, Granados, Baja Verapaz, Guatemala

Laura Kutner, 1984-, returned Peace Corps Volunteer (Guatemala), Portland, Oregon

JAMAICA - organic farming

Raymond Martin, 1968-, urban gardener, Kingston, Jamaica

Brian Wedderburn, 1965-, urban gardener, Bluefields, Jamaica

Patrick Marti, 1983-, Peace Corps Volunteer (Jamaica)

KENYA - basket weaving

Ngaharin Lebitileg, 1957-, basket weaver, Ngurunit, Kenya

Munten Lebitilig, 1963-, basket weaver, Ngurunit, Kenya

Lilian Nalilian Lekadaa, 1977-, basket weaver, Ngurunit, Kenya

Nkerisapa Lewano, 1967-, basket weaver, Ngurunit, Kenya

Ntomulan Loibor, 1978-, basket weaver, Ngurunit, Kenya

Laura Lemunyete, 1965-, returned Peace Corps Volunteer (Nepal), Maralal, Kenya

KYRGYZ REPUBLIC – felt, silk, wool artisans

Gulmira Chonbagyshova, 1963-, craftsperson, Kochkor, Kyrgyzstan

Mahabat Sultanbekova, 1980-, craftsperson, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

Elena Urakayeva, 1982-, craftsperson, Karakol, Kyrgyzstan

Burul Zhakypova, 1977-, craftsperson, Kochkor, Kyrgyzstan

Andrew Kuschner, 1987-, Peace Corps Volunteer (Kyrgyz Republic), Montclair, New Jersey

MALI - bogolan "mud cloth" bags

Moussa Fofana, 1976-, bag maker, Sévaré, Mali

Simbè Sankaré, 1961-, bag maker, Sévaré, Mali

Issa Téssougué, 1976-, bag maker, Sévaré, Mali

Vina Verman, 1981-, returned Peace Corps Volunteer (Mali), Washington, D.C.

MOROCCO - carpet weaving

Fatima Akachmar, 1968-, weaver, Ribat El Kheir, Sofour, Morocco

Khadija Ighilnassaf, 1970-, Taznakht, Ouarzazale, Morocco

Anna Hermann, 1983-, Peace Corps Volunteer (Morocco), St. Louis, Missouri

PERU - weaving and pottery

Emilio Antón Flores, 1967-, craftsperson, Chulucanas, Piura, Peru

Danitza Lourdes Ramos de Gonzalez, 1963-, weaver, Callalli, Arequipa, Peru

Hilda Maribel Sifuentes Altamirano, 1981-, weaver, Huamachuco, La Libertad, Peru

Maria Cecilia Yarlequé Flores, 1976-, weaver, Catacaos, Piura

Camille Smith, 1980-, returned Peace Corps Volunteer (Peru), Crofton, Maryland

PHILIPPINES - tinikling dance

Ermalyn Bayeng, 1989-, dancer, musician, Camiling, Tarlac, Philippines

Alvin Blanco, 1991-, dancer, musician, Camiling, Tarlac, Philippines

Elvie O. Carbonell, 1972-, chaperone, Camiling, Tarlac, Philippines

Jenny Rose Castro, 1992-, dancer, musician, Camiling, Tarlac, Philippines

Crystalyn De la Cruz, 1992-, dancer, musician, Camiling, Tarlac, Philippines

Shiena Diza, 1991-, dancer, musician, Camiling, Tarlac, Philippines

Jeffrey Juliano, 1991-, dancer, musician, Camiling, Tarlac, Philippines

Roberto Lebuangen, 1992-, dancer, musician, Camiling, Tarlac, Philippines

John Carlo Plimaco, 1992-, dancer, musician, Camiling, Tarlac, Philippines

Amelia L. Tuquero, 1961-, chaperone, Camiling, Tarlac, Philippines

Leah Ferrebee, 1978-, Peace Corps Volunteer (Philippines)

Tom Ferrebee, 1979-, Peace Corps Volunteer (Philippines)

TONGA - grass weaving

Mele Vaikeli, 1962-, weaver, Nuku'alofa, Kolomotua, Tonga

Elena Borquist Noyes, Peace Corps Volunteer (Tonga)

UKRAINE — Opika Performance Group

Rudolf Dzurynets, 1990-, musician, Perechyn, Zakarpattia, Ukraine

Oleh Hodovanyy, 1991-, musician, Perechyn, Zakarpattia, Ukraine

Oksana Kydora, 1988-, musician, Perechyn, Zakarpattia, Ukraine

Maksym Olah, 1981-, musician, Perechyn, Zakarpattia, Ukraine

Nastia Sudakova, 1992-, musician, Perechyn, Zakarpattia, Ukraine

Shoni Turianytsia, 1990-, musician, Perechyn, Zakarpattia, Ukraine

Denys Varodi, 1980-, musician, Zarichevo, Zakarpattia, Ukraine

Anzhela Vartsaba, 1992-, Perechyn, Zakarpattia, Ukraine

Ihor Vyshnyak, 1992-, musician, Perechyn, Zakarpattia, Ukraine

Shelia Slemp, 1972-, Peace Corps Volunteer (Ukraine)

UNITED STATES - Peace Corps World Map Project

Barbara Jo White, Returned Peace Corps Volunteer (Dominican Republic), Cullowhee, North Carolina

UNITED STATES - Trees, Water & People

Sebastian Africano, 1977-, Fort Collins, Colorado

Stuart Conway, 1953-, Returned Peace Corps Volunteer (Guatemala), Fort Collins, Colorado

Claudia Menendez, 1977-, Fort Collins, Colorado

ZAMBIA - appropriate technology

Henry Chilufya, 1967-, Lusaka, Zambia

Kofi Taha, 1970-, Watertown, Massachusetts

Alexandra Chen, 1986-, Peace Corps Volunteer (Zambia)

Elizabeth Spellman, 1985-, returned Peace Corps Volunteer (Zambia), Woburn, Massachusetts
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2011 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2011, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2011 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk52fbe40b9-c6b8-40c6-94ea-6d05cc175304
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2011-ref26

One World, Many Voices: Endangered Languages and Cultural Heritage

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
From the rugged Oregon coast, to the Himalayan foothills, to the Bolivian Andes, languages are struggling to survive. Of the more than 7,000 languages spoken in the world today - many of them unrecorded, and with small numbers of speakers - up to half may disappear in this century.

Languages are humankind's principal way of interacting and of communicating ideas, knowledge, values, memories, and history. As primary vehicles of cultural expressions such as poetry, songs, textile weaving, basket making, and foodways, they are essential to the identity of individuals and communities. Languages also embody the accumulation of thousands of years of a people's science and art - from observations of wind and weather patterns to creation stories. Much of what humans know about the natural world is encoded in oral languages. Safeguarding endangered languages is crucial to preserving cultural and intellectual diversity worldwide.

When a language disappears, unique ways of knowing, understanding, and experiencing the world are lost forever. When a language survives, along with the stories and knowledge it contains, we all gain a deeper connection to our common cultural heritage. The 2013 Festival celebrated the survival of languages, and the wondrous art and knowledge they contain.

The world's endangered languages are speaking up, finding their global voice. No culture has a monopoly on genius, and we never know where the next great idea will come from. Languages provide different pathways of thought, leading us to different places. They are the seedbeds for new ideas. They support identity, creativity, and self-worth - all abundantly on display at the 2013 Festival.

K. David Harrison and Marjorie Hunt were Program Curators and Arlene Reiniger was Program Coordinator. Advisors included: Gregory D.S. Anderson, Betty Belanus, Joshua Bell, Jean Bergey, Olivia Cadaval, Aron Crowell, Kevin Healy, Emil Her Many Horses, Gwyneira Isaac, Henry Ke'a, Richard Kennedy, Robert Leopold, Theodore Levin, Mary Linn, Michael Mason, Fernándo Nava, Gabriela Pérez Báez, Ruth Rouvier, Theresa Secord, Daniel Sheehy, Kalena Silva, Beth Thomas, Jennifer Weston, Colin Williams, and Steve Zeitlin.

The program was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage in collaboration with UNESCO, the National Geographic Society's Enduring Voices Project, and the Smithsonian's Recovering Voices Initiative. Major support was provided by the Dr. Frederik Paulsen Foundation; Microsoft Local Language Program; the Embassy of Colombia in Washington, D.C.; the Ministry of Culture of Colombia, and the Caro y Cuervo Institute; the U.S. State Department Fund for Innovation in Public Diplomacy and the United States Embassy in Bolivia; the Inter-American Foundation; and the Hawai'i Tourism Authority, the University of Hawai'i System, and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Additional support was provided by the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian; the Smithsonian's Recovering Voices Initiative; the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center; the Christensen Fund and the International Institute of Education; the Dirección de Salvaguarda del Patrimonio Cultural del Gobierno de Oaxaca and the Mexican Cultural Institute of Washington, D.C.; the Welsh Government/Llywodraeth Cymru; the Smithsonian Institution Consortium for World Cultures and the Consortium for Understanding the American Experience; Certified Languages International; Diplomatic Language Services; CETRA Language Solutions; Mango Languages; the Nina & Ivan Selin Family Foundation; the Linguistic Society of America; the Center for Traditional Music and Dance; the Smithsonian Latino Center; and the Comisión Nacional para el Desarrollo de los Pueblos Indígenas.
Researchers:
Gregory D.S. Anderson, Joshua Bell, Dawn Biddison, Walter Brooks, Olga Lucía Calderón, Emalani Case, Víctor Cata, Jeremy Fahringer, Michele Goldwasser, K. David Harrison, Josefa María Hernández, Carmen Beatriz Loza, Daniel Manjarrés, Linda Moriarty, Gabriela Pérez Báez, Sean Quirk, Aaron Sala, Theresa Secord, Jeff Todd Titon, Norman Valencia, Jessie Vallejo
Presenters:
Gregory D. S. Anderson, Betty Belanus, Olivia Cadaval, Víctor Cata, Adriana Cruz, James Early, Blenda Femenias, María Firmino-Castillo, Kevin Healy, Alexandro D. Hernández, Chinchi Kungaa, Carmen Beatriz Loza, Michael Mason, Gabriela Pérez Báez, Sean Quirk, Aaron Sala, Silvia Salgado, Theresa Secord, Daniel Sheehy, Jessie Vallejo, Cynthia Vidaurri, Ranald Woodaman
Participants:
Colombia

Arhuaco -- ArhuacoAti Janey Mestre Izquierdo, 1979-, Pueblo Bell, Cesar, Colombia

Kamentzá -- KamentzáHugo Jesús Jamioy Juagibioy, 1971-, Cesar, Colombia

Ri Palenge -- Ri PalengeÉlida Cañate Díaz, 1990-, Palenque, Bolivár, ColombiaMaría del Transito Hernández Cabarcas, 1990-, San Basilio de Palenque, Bolivár, ColombiaAndris Padilla Julio, 1992-, San Basilio de Palenque, Bolivár, Colombia

Uitoto -- UitotoCalixto Kuiru, 1941-, Bogotá, D.C., ColombiaFany Kuiru Castro, 1962-, Bogotá, D.C., Colombia

Wayuunaiki -- WayuunaikiMónica López Pushaina, 1992-, Albania, La Guajira, ColombiaJoaquín Ramón Prince Bruges, 1972-, Uribia, La Guajira, ColombiaBenito Pushaina Apshana, 1982-, Uribia, La Guajira, ColombiaLuis Misael Socarrás Ipuana, 1970-, Albania, La Guajira, ColombiaMarciano Urrariyú Gouriyu, 1990-, Albania, La Guajira, Colombia

Garifuna – Los Angeles and New York City Diaspora

Libaya Baba (drumming and dance group) -- Libaya Baba (drumming and dance group)Dayton Bernardez, 1969-, Los Angeles, CaliforniaJeff Bernardez, 1965-, Inglewood, CaliforniaKelsie Bernardez, 1966-, Inglewood, CaliforniaConrad Nolberto, 1957-, Los Angeles, California

Greg Palacio, 1962-, cultural artist, Los Angeles, California

Carlos "Mingo" Alvarez, 1951-, Wanaragua dancer, drummer, drum maker, cultural historian, Los Angeles, California

Flavio "Paps" Alvarez, 1950-, Wanaragua chief, Los Angeles, California

Philip Gabriel, Wanaragua dancer, Chicago, Illinois

Carlos Gonzalez, Wanaragua dancer, Miami Garden, Florida

Georgette Lambey, 1968-, singer, dancer, Los Angeles, California

James Lovell, 1964-, musician, singer, songwriter, storyteller, educator, Brooklyn, New York

Martha Martinez, 1941-, singer, dancer, foodways, cultural leader, Los Angeles, California

Chester Nunez, drummer, singer, Bronx, New York

Delmo Nunez, drummer, singer, Bronx, New York

Julio Nunez, drummer, singer, Bronx, New York

Ruben Reyes, 1962-, language teacher, cultural historian, filmmaker, Los Angeles, California

Miriam Suazo-Moore, dancer, educator, poet

Hawaiian

Kalani Akana, 1957-, -- kumu hula -- , Honolulu, Hawaii

Kaimana Barcarse, teacher, radio DJ, voyager, Hilo, Hawaii

Chad Kālepa Baybayan, wayfinder, non-instrument navigator, Kailua, Kona, Hawaii

Kanani Beniamina, -- ni'ihau -- shell lei maker, Makaweli, Hawaii

Snowbird Puananiopaoakalani Bento, -- kumu hula -- , Honolulu, Hawaii

Pele Ka'io, hula learner

Nāoho Kanahele, hula learner

Tuhi Kanahele, hula learner

Kekuhikuhi K. Keali'ikanaka'oleohaililani, kumu hula, Hilo, Hawaii

Kalehua Krug, immersion teacher, musician

Kihapaiokalani Krug, language homeschool teacher

Kamaleikuhalia Krug, language learner

Ka'ulakauikeaokea Krug, language learner

Leleapao'o Krug, language learner

Earl Kawa'a, cultural educator, Kailua, Oahu, Hawaii

Kihei Nahale-a, -- makuakane -- , Kahuku, Hawaii

Nāhiku Nahale-a, -- kikikane -- , Kahuku, Hawaii

Wahinepō'aimoku Nahale-a, -- kikamahine -- , Kahuku, Hawaii

Lolena Nicholas, Hawaiian language and culture expert

Puakea Nogelmeier, Hawaiian language expert

Aaron Salā, musician, singer, Kane-oha, Hawaii

Makanani Salā, dancer

Noheahiwahiwa Stibbard, -- makuahine -- , Kahuku, Hawaii

Taupōuri Tangarō, -- kumu hula -- , Hilo, Hawaii

Annette Ku'uipolani Wong, Hawaiian language and culture expert, Honolulu, Hawaii

Keola Wong, Hawaiian language expert

Isthmus Zapotec – Mexico

Rosaura López Cartas, artisan tortilla maker, knowledge bearer, Juchitán de Zaragoza, Oaxaca, Mexico

Víctor Cata, writer, language activist

Reyna López López, field researcher, Juchitán de Zaragoza, Oaxaca, Mexico

Natalia López de Paz, writer, language activist, Juchitán de Zaragoza, Oaxaca, Mexico

Velma Orozco Trujillo, expert cook, knowledge bearer, Juchitán de Zaragoza, Oaxaca, Mexico

Martín Fabian Peña Santos, musician

Vicente Guerra López, musician

Gerardo Valdivieso Parada, musician

Kallawaya – Bolivia

Walter Alvarez Quispe, 1940-, medicinal practitioner, La Paz, Bolivia

Max Chura Mamani, 1953-, medicinal practitioner, La Paz, Bolivia

Lucio Cuba Quispe, 1946-, medicinal practitioner

Fernando Huanca Mamani, 1944-, medicinal practitioner

Lola Palluca Nina de Quispe, 1965-, weaver, ritualist, El Alto, Bolivia

Yola Martina Quispe de López, 1961-, weaver, ritualist, El Alto, Bolivia

Kalmyk – Russian Federation

Olga Semenovna Andratova, musician, singer

Baator Bukhaev, musician

Namin Songadzheyavich Mandzhiev, singer, dancer

Nina Kochayevna Mandzhieva, musician, singer

Ervena Semenovna Matsakova, musician, singer

Shard Nigryan Nasanka, instrument maker, woodcarver

Viktor Batyrovich Okchayev, musician

Dmitriy Sergejevich Sharaev, musician, singer

Kichwa – Ecuador

Hatun Kotama -- Hatun KotamaAlfonso Cabascango, flutistEnrique Cachiguango, founder, flutistMariano Maldonado, flutist, weaver, Otavalo, EcuadorPatricio Maldonado, flutist, weaver, language teacher, Otavalo, EcuadorMariano Quinchuquí, flutist, flute makerSegundo Quinchuquí, flutist, Otavalo, EcuadorJulio Tabango, flutist, shoe maker, Otavalo, Ecuador

Koro – India

Khandu Degio, 1987-, basket maker, spirit house maker, West Kameng, Arunachal Pradesh, India

Ramda Degio, 1956-, basket maker, spirit house maker, West Kameng, Arunachal Pradesh, India

Sorsomi Degio, 1972-, weaver, East Kameng, Arunachal Pradesh, India

Sange Mijew, 1986-, basket maker, spirit house maker, East Kameng, Arunachal Pradesh, India

Bhokta Newar, 1974-, basket maker, spirit house maker, Itanagar, Arunachal Pradesh, India

Quechua – Bolivia

Los Masis – Indigenous Andean Music -- Los Masis – Indigenous Andean MusicGonzalo Del Carpio Soria, 1976-, Sucre, Chuquisaca, BoliviaRene Figueroa Cano, 1996-, Sucre, Chuquisaca, BoliviaWalter Montero Valda, 1978, Sucre, Chuquisaca, BoliviaYamil Adrián Patzi Zubieta, 1981, Sucre, Chuquisaca, BoliviaEdgar Sahonero Gutiérrez, 1957-, Sucre, Chuquisaca, BoliviaRoberto Sahonero Gutiérrez, 1949-, Sucre, Chuquisaca, BoliviaRobert Sahonero Cuéllar, Sucre, Chuquisaca, BoliviaGillmar Sandy Gildres, 1982-, Sucre, Chuquisaca, Bolivia

Siletz Dee-ni – Oregon

Rosalee Jurado, 1983-, dancer, regalia maker, Salem, Oregon

Kathy Kentta-Robinson, 1960-, dancer, regalia maker, basket maker, Logsden, Oregon

Robert Kentta, 1963-, dancer, regalia maker, basket maker, Logsden, Oregon

Alfred "Bud" Lane III, 1957-, dancer, regalia maker, basket maker, Siletz, Oregon

Alissa Lane, 1980-, dancer, regalia maker, Siletz, Oregon

Cheryl Lane, 1957-, dancer, regalia maker, Siletz, Oregon

Sonya F. Moody-Jurado, 1967-, dancer, regalia maker, Salem, Oregon

Joseph C. Scott, 1966-, dancer, regalia maker, Shedd, Oregon

Andrew Viles, 1959-, basket maker, Eugene, Oregon

Carson Viles, 1990-, dancer, Eugene, Oregon

Tuvan – Russian Federation

Said Mikhailovich Chüldük, 1977-, saddle maker, leatherworker, throat singer, musician, Kyzyl, Tuva, Russia

Marat Boragaevich Damdyn, instrument maker, Kyzyl, Tuva, Russia

Ayana Samiyaevna Mongush, 1976-, musician, composer, Kyzyl, Tuva, Russia

Artysh Kherlievich Salchak, 1981-, nomad traditions, Kyzyl, Tuva, Russia

Cheynesh Ivanovna Salchak, nomad traditions

Artur Dorzhuevich Shozhunchap, stone carver

Aldar Konstantinovich Tamdyn, 1975-, instrument maker, throat singer, yurt and furniture maker, Kyzyl, Tuva, Russia

Raisa Kopeekovna Tas-ool, seamstress, Kyzyl-Dag, Tuva, Russia

Wabanaki – Maine

Cassandra Dana, Passamaquoddy student, dancer, Princeton, Maine

Stacey Dana, Passamaquoddy student, dancer, Princeton, Maine

Brenda Lozada, Passamaquoddy language teacher, dancer, Princeton, Maine

George Neptune, 1988-, Passamaquoddy basket maker, museum educator, Sullivan, Maine

Jennifer Sapiel Neptune, 1969-, Penobscot basket maker, Old Town, Maine

Wayne Newell, Passamaquoddy storyteller, singer, educator, Princeton, Maine

Molly Neptune Parker, 1939-, Passamaquoddy basket maker, language educator, Princeton, Maine

Gabriel Paul, 1985-, Penobscot-Passamaquoddy-Maliseet basket maker, language instructor, Indian Island, Maine

Theresa Secord, 1958-, Penobscot basket maker, Waterville, Maine

Blanche Sockabasin, Passamaquoddy elder, singer, teacher, Princeton, Maine

Donald Soctomah, Passamaquoddy historic preservation officer

Welsh – Wales

Gwyneth Glyn, singer-songwriter, poet, Caerdydd, De Morgannwg, Wales

Ifor ap Glyn, poet, broadcaster, Caermarfon, Gwynedd, Wales

Twm Morys, poet, musician, singer, Llanystumdwy, Gwynedd, Wales

Owen Saer, language teacher, choir director, Caerdydd, De Morgannwg, Wales

Yiddish – New York City

An-sky Yiddish Heritage Ensemble -- An-sky Yiddish Heritage EnsembleMichael Alpert, singer, violin and accordion player, poyk/drummer, dancerEthel Raim, singer, New York, New YorkPete Rushefsky, tsimbl/hammered dulcimer playerJake Shulman-Ment, violin player, Brooklyn, New York
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2013 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2013, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2013 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk55770f59f-f8af-44e4-b40e-159ca86f409f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2013-ref25

Washington, D.C.: It's Our Home

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Washington, D.C.: It's Our Home was a program rich with the memories and flourishing traditional practices of the city's fishermen, taxi and bus drivers, lawyers, dancers, activists, retirees, seamstresses, craftspeople, musicians, choirs, quartets, gardeners, poets, cooks, quilters, and rappers, from east of the Anacostia River to west of Rock Creek Park. Washington, D.C., is a city of refuge and advocacy for the marginalized peoples of our nation and the world, and participants helped visitors see the social, cultural, and political context for their folklife practices. More than 45 researchers from community institutions and universities in the District worked for over a year and compiled cultural documentation on hundreds of potential Festival participants. Then they tackled the ticklish task of making a coherent statement about their multi-faceted city. A few examples illustrate what they found and chose to present on the National Mall.

Soccer, for example, offers windows to connections and community. New immigrants to Washington often search for soccer teams from home. Each week Washington's parks host a small contest between nations, from Trinidad to Korea and Ethiopia. Spectators cook and share traditional foods, play music, and dance, transforming these games into celebrations. Long-time Washingtonians have grown to love soccer as well, and the city has nurtured its own legendary players and coaches, clinics and camps, styles, language, and new generations of players.

Washington, D.C., residents are also enthusiastic participants in and spectators of numerous parades and processions throughout the year. Caribbean Carnival, Gay Pride, Chinese New Year, Unifest, Halloween, the Cherry Blossom, and inaugural parades and Good Friday processions are examples of lively celebratory events that take place on city streets. Participants in those celebrations spend countless hours in detailed planning and preparation to create the delicate balance between artistic style and performance. Spectators interact with performers as this unpredictable form of dynamic street theater pulsates through city neighborhoods. Folklife Festival visitors could enjoy both the celebrations themselves and the behind-the-scenes preparations.

The program also honored community life and civic action, including the memories of the neighborhoods that people built as safe spaces from discrimination, and others that people lost through urban renewal and relocation. Participants described the city's long tradition of human rights activism, and they shared the songs, arts, stories, icons, rituals, and memorabilia that have enlivened this tradition.

Go-go, Washington's indigenous music, may be the quintessential urban music, all percussion and beat, pulsing from garbage can lids, plastic buckets, homemade drums, cowbells, bass guitar, and saxophone, drawing audiences into passionate call-and-response as they identify the neighborhoods where they live. As musicians, deejays, dancers, stylists, instrument builders, and fans make this music, they also communicate its deep and complex roots in African American musical styles, the history of live musical gatherings in the city, and the pride of place expressed in a musical tradition that begins with meager material resources.

Marianna Blagburn, Michael McBride, Brett Williams, and John Franklin were Curators, and Ivy Young was Program Coordinator. Program Area Organizers were: Gabriel Benn (spoken word), Tom Blagburn (basketball), Sally Gifford (social justice dialogues), Lisa Pegram (spoken word), and Lauren Rogers (reunions). Marianna Blagburn and Brett Williams were Research Coordinators.

The program was produced in collaboration with the D. C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities. Major support was provided by the Government of the District of Columbia, The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, The D.C. Sports and Entertainment Commission, Hilton Hotels Corporation, The Dunn and Bradstreet Corporation, The Meyer Foundation, The Washington Post, Chevy Chase Bank, Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, IBM, and the Recording Industries Music Performance Trust Funds. Additional support was provided by the D.C. Humanities Council; the Blum Kovler Foundation; Program in African American Culture, Division of Cultural History, National Museum of American History; and SPOT Image Corporation.
Researchers:
Lois E. Adams, Diane A. Bacote, Candace Barnes, Sue Barnes, Gabriel C. Benn, Toni Blackman, Tom Blagburn, Iley Brown II, James Brown, Jr., P J. Brownlee, Camilla Bryce-Laporte, Anika Collins, Evelyn Curenton, Sandy Dang, Anna De Fina, Jane Flegel, Christopher Flores, Paul Gardullo, Lilo Gonzales, Alan Hersker, Sherri Lawson-Clark, William Mabry, Atiba Madyun, Angie Manzano, Susie McFadden-Resper, Melinda Michels, Lisa Pegram, Jemima Pierre, Kishanna Poteat, Rose Powhatan, Mingo Roberts, Elizabeth Sheehan, Danette Sokocich, Pallavi Thakur, Michael Twitty, Nilda Villalta, Sheila Wise, Yohannes Zeleke
Presenters:
Gabriel Benn, Kai Blagburn, Rahman Branch, Camilla Bryce-Laporte, Kenny Carroll, Anna DeFina, Robert Fry, Howard Gassaway, Jordan Graye, Marjorie Hunt, Philippa Jackson, Linda Lee, Beverly Lindsay, Diana N'Diaye, Lisa Pegram, Mingo Roberts, Sheila Roberts, Ryan Rodríguez, Stephen Syphax, Michael Twitty, Nilda Villalta, David Wang, Brian Williams
Participants:
CRAFT TRADITIONS

James Brown, fiber artist

Daughters of Dorcas -- Daughters of DorcasViola Canady, quilterRaymond Dobard, quilter

Veronica DeNegri, -- arpilleras -- maker

Videlbina Flores-Fitch, piñata maker

Carlos Gomez, -- berimbau -- maker

Iola Hall, basket weaver

Brian Hamilton, stained glass maker

Alfredo Herrera, woodcarver

Lafayette Elementary School Quilters -- Lafayette Elementary School QuiltersJory BaroneKathy ByrdEdith JicklingJane McIntyre

Patrick Plunkett, stone carver

Vilma Quintanilla, quinceañera dress maker

Francisco Rigores, drum maker

Andy Seferlis, stone carver

Constantine Seferlis, stone carver

Mamo Tessema, potter

Rome Yetbarek, basket weaver

DANCE TRADITIONS

African Heritage Drummers and Dancers

Andrew Cacho African Drummers and Dancers

International Capoeira Angola Foundation -- International Capoeira Angola FoundationSheryll AldredChandra BrownSkher BrownHahnhuynh Armando DrakeCarlos GomezKojo JohnsonGabriela MandolesiCobra MansaSaadika MooreFrancisco Bermudez MoralesGege PoggiSylvia RobinsonAmina Malik SantemuKevin WilsonAyende Youmans

Poetry in Motion -- Poetry in MotionLarry BarronCharles BrownLevet Brown, Jr.Antonio F. BrutonSarah L. CrawleyRenee FinkleyGloria GoodeClinton J. GreenGary HolmesMary D. HopkinsGrace Little, vocalsJames OnqueCrystal P. ThompsonMell L. WalkerWarren E. WashingtonAnthony Yancey

KanKouran West African Dance Company

Smooth & E-Z Hand Dancing -- Smooth & E-Z Hand DancingMichael AshtonKermit BanksLawrence BradfordLarry BrownNovella CampbellKathi DavisVictor HowardJoy HunterVirginia IrbyMary JohnsonB.J. JonesLawrence LindseyDelores MavritteRonald MooreJoseph NelsonGregory OwensCarlyle PrinceCynthia SpignerGerald Woodfork

Step Afrika! -- Step Afrika!Darrius GourdineGenia MorganDavid MyersKirsten SmithBrian WilliamsPaul Woodruff

SECULAR MUSIC TRADITONS

Archie Edwards Blues Heritage Foundation -- Archie Edwards Blues Heritage FoundationMichael E. Baytop, guitar, harmonica, vocalsNapoleon Brundage, harmonicaEleanor Ellis, guitar, vocalsResa Gibbs, vocalsJeff Glassey, harmonicaNeal Harpe, guitar, vocalsDavid Jackson, guitar, bass, vocalsNeal Johnson, guitar, vocalsSteve Levine, harmonicaThorin O'Neil, guitarJesse Palidofsky, keyboardMiles Spicer, guitar, drums, vocalsRichard "Mr. Bones" Thomas, bonesDion Thompson, guitarJoe Wabon, guitar, vocalsN.J. Warren, guitar, vocals

Michelle Banks, Quique Aviles, and Friends

the blueshounds -- the blueshoundsChris Dean, bassBarbara Jackson, lead vocalsNick Martin, keyboardsTony Rakusin, guitarBarry Turner, drums

Big Hillbilly Bluegrass -- Big Hillbilly BluegrassMike Marceau, bassTad Marks, fiddleBob Perilla, guitar, vocalsDick Smith, banjo, mandolin

Chuck Brown and the Soul Searchers -- Chuck Brown and the Soul SearchersChuck Brown, guitar, vocalsBrad Clement, trumpetGlen Ellis, bassRobert Green, congasJuJu House, drumsBrian Mills, saxophoneSherrie Mitchell, keyboard

D.C.'s Finest -- D.C.'s FinestAvon Barbour, vocalsRichard Collins, vocalsJoe Herndon, vocalsDeane Larkins, vocalsReamer Shedrick, vocals

Davey Yarborough Band

Fugazi -- FugaziBrendan Canty, drumsJoe Lally, bassIan MacKaye, guitar, vocalsGuy Picciotto, guitar, vocals

Nicki Gonzalez Band -- Nicki Gonzalez BandMarc Capponi, pianoIra Gonzalez, bassNicki Gonzalez, vocalsSrdjan Kolacevich, guitarJay Tobey, drums

Image Band -- Image BandPeter Aimable, tromboneJohn Georges, trumpetEric Hamm, lead vocalsDarryle Jones, saxophoneAdrian Laldee, bassMarge Lawrence, lead vocalsJoe Louis, guitarClaude Richards, trumpetLaughton Sargeant, keyboard, vocals

In Process... -- In Process...Tia Ade, vocalsNketia Agyeman, vocalsPaula Pree, vocalsPamela Rogers, vocals

LaJazz -- LaJazzBob Balthis, tromboneBhagwan, bassCliff Bigoney, trumpetPaul Hawkins, percussionDon Junker, trumpetTom Monroe, alto and tenor saxophone, fluteRudy Morales, bongosDarius Scott, pianoSam Turner, percussion

Lesbian and Gay Chorus of Washington, D.C. -- Lesbian and Gay Chorus of Washington, D.C.Ray Killian, music directorJill Strachan, general manager

Luci Murphy and Friends -- Luci Murphy and FriendsDarnell Bell, percussionSteve Jones, guitar, pianoLuci Murphy, vocalsRoger St. Vincent, electric bass, vocals

Memphis Gold -- Memphis GoldTony Fraizo, rhythm guitarMorris Freeman, drumsMemphis Gold, guitar, vocalsLorenzo Johnson, congasCharlie Sayles, harmonicaRobert Seymore, keyboardCharles Soleman, bass

Rare Essence -- Rare EssenceMichael Baker, bassEric Butcher, percussionDonnell G. Floyd, Sr., rap, saxophoneAdebayo A. Folarin, vocalsDarrin Frazier, keyboardMilton Freeman, percussionKimberly Graham, vocalsByron Jackson, keyboardAnthony Johnson, lead guitarDerek Paige, trumpetMichael Smith, drumsKent Wood, keyboard

Rumisonko -- RumisonkoCarlos Arrien, kena, zampoña, charango, vocalsMariano Arrien, kena, zampoñaRene Dehega, guitar, vocalsAlberto Lora, kena, zampoña

Sin Miedo -- Sin MiedoAnna Mercedes Castrello, lead vocalsBrad Clements, trumpetRalph Eskenazi, timbalesSamuel Mungia, bassPatrick Noel, bongosDidier Prossaird, pianoGary Sosias, congas

Sweet Honey in the Rock -- Sweet Honey in the RockYsaye Maria Barnwell, vocalsNitanju Bolade Casel, vocalsAisha Kahlil, vocalsCarol Maillard, vocalsBernice Johnson Reagan, vocalsShirley Childress Saxton, ASL interpreter

Nap Turner

Youth Steel Band

D.C. Divas

Julia Nixon -- Julia NixonJulia Nixon, vocalsDavid Ylvisaker, piano

Bernice and Toshi Reagon -- Bernice and Toshi ReagonMichelle Lanchester, vocalsBernice Reagan, vocalsToshi Reagan, vocals, guitarYasmeen, vocals

SACRED MUSIC TRADITIONS

Barbara Gaskins -- Barbara GaskinsRoyce Bouknight, bassDeborah Delgado, vocalsBarbara Roy Gaskins, vocals, lead and rhythm guitarCharles Marvary, drumsKim Watson, vocals

B'nai Shalom Adult and Youth Choir

Cambodian Network Council - Cambodian Arts Project -- Cambodian Network Council - Cambodian Arts ProjectNatalie Chhuan, cymbals, dancerPhavann ChhuanRithy Chhuan, dancerThyda Chhuan, dancerBonnary Lek, dancerAmarind Sam, dancerChanmoly Sam, dancerLaksmi Sam, dancerMalene Sam, dancer

Cardozo High School Concert Choir

Carlton Burgess & Friends

Complete Praise

Rev. James Flowers and the Flowers Family Singers -- Rev. James Flowers and the Flowers Family SingersTommy Crosby, guitarReverend James N. Flowers, Jr., vocalsLizzy Flowers, vocalsMargaret L. Flowers, vocalsYolanda Flowers, vocalsMarie Hickson, vocalsDorothy McDowell, vocalsJerry Parker, keyboardsMargie Pickett, vocalsErma Reed-Flowers, vocalsMildred Scruggs, vocalsGeorge White, drumsTommy White, bass

Foundation Khadimou Rossoul, North America -- Foundation Khadimou Rossoul, North AmericaPape DiengCheikh KèbèMassaer SambKhidim SeckPape SeckAbdoulaye TambaEl Hadj ThiamMourtala Thiam

The Four Echoes -- The Four EchoesGeorge G. Blake, tenorWilliam Evans, lead vocalsJames Stein, baritoneGlen Taylor, lead guitar, vocals

Holy Comforter - St. Cyprian Catholic Church Gospel Choir -- Holy Comforter - St. Cyprian Catholic Church Gospel ChoirKenneth Louis, music director

Kings of Harmony - United House of Prayer for All Peoples

Keshet Chorale of the D.C. Jewish Community Center

Cantor Aaron Marcus

Reverb -- ReverbMike Brisco, vocalsChristopher Hunter, vocalsRussell Jeter Ill, vocalsSteve Langley, vocalsR. Bruce O'Neal, vocalsVictor Pinkney, vocals

Seven Sons -- Seven SonsJenny Andrews, vocalsLee Haley, drumsRev. James Hardy, vocalsNathan Jones, vocalsThomas Peterson, vocalsWardell Rogers, lead guitarGregory Young, bass

Washington Toho Koto Society -- Washington Toho Koto SocietyClaudia Clark, kotoYuriko Gandol, kotoShuho Ishii, shakuhachiVera Land, kotoKyoko Okamoto, kotoRobert Preston, shakuhachiSachiko Smith, shamisen, kotoJohn Welsh, shakuhachi

The Wright Singers -- The Wright SingersPatricia Bryant, vocalsElizabeth Hunter-Williams, vocalsLaShawn Rembert, vocalsJaqueline Richardson, vocalsEureka Robinson, vocalsFannie White, vocalsLeavia Wright, vocals

FOODWAYS TRADITIONS

Roberta Baietti, Northern Italian cooking

Edith Ballou, African-American cooking

Diana Celarosi, Central, Southern Italian cooking

Liberata Ehimba, Senegalese cooking

Patricia Giles, African-American cooking

Rabbi Hayyim, Sephardic cooking

Columbus Jones, fish fry

Jodie Kassorla, Sephardic cooking

Lillia Knight, Panamanian cooking

Henry Lieu, Chinese cooking

Hala Maksoud, Arab-American cooking

Alpheus Mathis, African-American cooking

Ester Muhammad, African-American cooking

Rashida Muhammad, African-American cooking

Joan Nathan, Jewish cooking

Hai Nguyen, Vietnamese cooking

Mildred Palm, African-American cooking

Charles Reindorf, Ghanaian cooking

Dwane Ricketts, Jamaican cooking

Yvonne St. Hill, Panamanian cooking

Maria Luisa Sylos-Labini, Northern Italian cooking

Sing Tam, Chinese cooking

Ester Treviño, Salvadoran cooking

Taye Wogederes, Ethiopian cooking

Dorothy Young, African-American cooking

Bruno Zara, Central Italian cooking

Christina Zara, Central Italian cooking

GARDENING TRADITIONS

Diane Dale

Patricia Giles

Pride Heitt

Columbus Jones

Frieda Murray

Judy Tiger

SOCIAL JUSTICE TRADITIONS

Judith Bauer

Dorothy Brizill

Carl Cole

Sandy Dang

Lori Dodson

Alfred Dudley

Bernice Fonteneau

Pat Hawkins

George LaRoche

Julius Lofton

Ignatius Mason

Phil Ogilvie

Mark Richards

Maurice Shorter

Kathryn Sinzinger

Larry Smith

John C. Snipes

Ivan Walk

Karen Zachary

SPOKEN, WRITTEN, RHYTHMIC WORD TRADITIONS

D.C. National Teen Slam Team -- D.C. National Teen Slam TeamHenry ArangoKenneth CarrollIsaac ColonJabari ExumOkechukwu lwealaLarry RobertsonLauren Wyatt

Jane Alberdeston

Quique Avilés

Racquel Brown

Grace Cavalieri

Kyra Garrett

Infinite Loop -- Infinite LoopChi Garden

Heady -- HeadyBrandon JohnsonKamaylaErnesto MercerE. Ethelbert MillerTerrance Nicholson

Opus Akoben -- Opus AkobenBlack IndianKokayiSub-Z

Orphyx -- OrphyxLisa PegramTiffany Thompson

Po-Emcees -- Po-EmceesDarrell PerryPatrick Washington

DJ Renegade

Rhyme Deferred -- Rhyme DeferredPsalmayene 24

Silvana Straw

Henry Taylor

Eleanor Traylor

Laurie Tsang

Fong Sai U

Unspoken Heard -- Unspoken HeardMichael AbbottAsheruBlue BlackRahman Branch

SPORT AND GAME TRADITITONS

Joe Lewis Abney

Wil Atkins

Jim "Bad News" Barnes

Bobby Bennett

Theo Brooks

Phil Chenier

Mark Chisolm

Betty Cleeg

Andrew Dyer

Richard Evans

Steve Francis

Barbara Garcia

Sonny Hill

Saleem Hylton

Brenda Jackson

Roy Jefferson

Andrew Johnson

George Johnson

Sam Jones

Andre Jordan

Lamont Jordan

Carver Leech

Dr. George Logan-El

Butch McAdams

Bill McCaffrey

Jimmy McLain

Thurston McLain

Mike McLeese

Lenny Moore

George Nock

Wanda Oates

Soya Proctor

Michael Smith

Betsy Stockard

Marty Tapscott

Tony Watkins

Christie Winters

Willie Wood

Jimmy Wright

WATERWAYS TRADITIONS

Anacostia Watershed Society

Sheila Brennan

Roger Legerwood, boat builder

Bob Martin, boat builder
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2000 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2000, Series 5
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2000 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5266f0af9-f647-4619-90fb-c7565eb2c485
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2000-ref39

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives
Photographic prints
Video recordings
Videotapes
Digital images
Sound recordings
Audiotapes
Memorandums
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Slides (photographs)
Notes
Correspondence
Plans (drawings)
Business records
Place:
Caribbean Area
Central America
Latin America
Puerto Rico
Cuba
El Salvador
Colombia
Dominican Republic
Date:
June 23-July 4, 2005
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 6 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Food Culture USA

Series 3: Forest Service, Culture, and Community

Series 4: Nuestra Música: Music in Latino Culture

Series 5: Oman: Desert, Oasis, and Sea

Series 6: Special Events
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
In its 39th year, the Festival once again presented a sample of the diverse cultural heritage of America and the world to large public audiences in an educational, respectful, and profoundly democratic way on the National Mall of the United States. True to form, the Festival illustrated the living, vital aspect of cultural heritage and provided a forum for discussion on matters of contemporary concern.

For the first time, a full-scale Festival program was devoted to an Arab nation, Oman. Oman is at the edge of the Arabian Peninsula, both geographically and historically situated between East Africa and the Indian Ocean. Trade routes, frankincense, silverwork, Islam, a strategic location, and oil have connected it to the cultures of the Middle East, Africa, Asia, the Mediterranean region, and beyond. Contemporary Omanis live poised between a long and rich past and a future they are in the midst of defining. New roads, hospitals, schools, businesses, high-tech occupations, and opportunities for women are developing alongside traditionally valued religion, family life, artistry, and architecture. Omanis are well aware of the challenges of safeguarding their cultural heritage in an era of globalization. The Festival program provided a vivid illustration of the approaches they have taken and enabled American visitors and Omanis to engage in open, two-way interchange.

During the Festival, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service celebrated its 100th anniversary. Programs in previous years have illustrated the traditions of White House workers and of Smithsonian workers. This Festival examined the occupational culture of Forest Service rangers, smokejumpers, scientists, tree doctors, and many others devoted to the health and preservation of our nation's forests. They were joined by artists and workers from communities that depend upon the forests for their livelihood or sustenance. The Festival offered the opportunity for an active discussion of the significance of our national forests and rangelands to the American people.

Food Culture USA examined the evolution of our nation's palate over the preceding generation. New produce, new foods, new cooking techniques, and even new culinary communities have developed as a result of immigrant groups taking their place in our society, the rise of organic agriculture, and the growing celebrity of ethnic and regional chefs on a national stage. A diversity of growers, food inspectors, gardeners, educators, home cooks and prominent chefs shared their knowledge and creativity as they demonstrated the continuity and innovation in America's culinary culture.

The program in Latino music continued with a series of evening concerts. The 2004 program drew many Latinos to the National Mall, helping the Smithsonian reach out to a major segment of the American population. Audiences in both 2004 and 2005 were thrilled by the performances, as were the musicians who presented their own cultural expressions and thus helped educate their fellow citizens of the nation and the world. Smithsonian Folkways released recordings of three of the groups that had performed the previous year, and one later went on to be nominated for a Grammy award.

The 2005 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 23-27 and June 30-July 4) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 9th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). It featured four programs and the Rinzler Concert.

The 2005 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; keynote essays provided background on the Festival and on each of the programs (with a Spanish version of the Latino music essay).

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

Richard Kurin, Director; Richard Kennedy, Deputy Director; Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Diana Parker, Festival Director; Arlene L. Reiniger, Program Specialist; Charlie Weber, Media Specialist; Smithsonian Folkways Recordings/Smithsonian Global Sound: Daniel Sheehy, Curator and Director; Anthony Seeger, Curator and Director, Emeritus; D.A. Sonneborn, Assistant Director; Ralph Rinzler Archives: Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Stephanie Smith, Assistant Archivist; Cultural Heritage Policy: James Early, Director; Cultural Research and Education: Olivia Cadaval, Chair; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist Emeritus; Betty J. Belanus, Olivia Cadaval, Nancy Groce, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Frank Proschan, Peter Seitel, Cynthia Vidaurri, Nilda Villalta, Curators, Folklorists, Education and Cultural Specialists; Carla Borden, Program/Publications Manager; John W. Franklin, Program Manager; Research Associates: Robert Albro, Geri Benoit, Patrick Delatour, Kip Lornell, Mara Mayor, Joan Nathan, Sam-Ang Sam, Preston Scott, Chucho Valdez, Patrick Vilaire, Nilda Villalta; Rockefeller Humanities Fellows (2004-05): Robert Albro, Jane Anderson, Lesley Fordred-Green, Christina Kreps, Tong Lam, Lillian Manzor, Marya McQuirter, Sita Reddy

Folklife Advisory Council

Kurt Dewhurst (chair), Judy Mitoma (vice-chair), Michael Doucet, Anthony Gittens, John Herzog (ex-officio), Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Debora Kodish, Enrique Lamadrid, Worth Long, Libby O'Connell, J. Scott Raecker, Robert Santelli, Ricardo Trimillos

Folkways Advisory Board

Michael Asch (chair), Phyllis Barney, Hal Cannon, Don De Vito, Ella Jenkins, Anthony Seeger (ex-officio), Fred Silber

National Park Service

Fran P. Mainella, Director; Donald W. Murphy, Deputy Director; Joseph M. Lawler, Regional Director, National Capital Region

The Festival was supported by federally appropriated funds; Smithsonian trust funds; contributions from governments, businesses, foundations, and individuals; in-kind assistance; and food, recording, and craft sales. Support for this year's Festival came from the Music Performance Fund, with in-kind support provided through Motorola, NEXTEL, WAMU 88.5 FM, WashingtonPost.com, Pegasus Radio Corp., and Icom America.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Food habits  Search this
Folk music  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
World music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Photographic prints
Video recordings
Videotapes
Digital images
Sound recordings
Audiotapes
Memorandums
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Slides (photographs)
Notes
Correspondence
Plans (drawings)
Business records
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2005
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5762f551c-a3bb-49a3-98fd-cd5d64e7199b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-2005

Food Culture USA

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The 2005 program celebrated what was characterized as a recent "food revolution". The program looked both backward and forward: backward to long-held community traditions in growing, marketing, cooking, and eating; forward to innovations for making these traditions sustainable and passing them on to future generations. The food revolution depends on nurturing a physical environment that supports diversity; sustaining the knowledge needed to cultivate that biodiversity; and passing on traditions of preparing and eating. Together, these traditions are the foundation of much of our shared human experience and they served as the organizing themes for theFestival program.

America's food by 2005 had become a constantly changing blend of native and foreign ingredients and techniques coupled with the ingredients of all-American ingenuity and energy. The Civil Rights Movement spurred Americans to explore their rich African American and Native American traditions. In 1965 a new Immigration Act lifted the quotas on immigration from many non-European countries, contributing to an increase in immigrants from Latin American, African, and Asian countries. As many others had done for centuries, people from India, Thailand, Afghanistan, and Lebanon brought their culture to the U.S. in the way of food. Presentations at the Festival included farmers and growers, noted chefs and cookbook authors, and suppliers of diverse, largely artisanal, food products - as well as a strong focus on educational programs aimed both at children and their parents.

As of 2005, an expanding group of innovative growers were supplying the creative cooks, urban markets, and rows of ethnic restaurants. Over the previous four decades, for cultural, culinary, environmental, health, and economic reasons many chefs, environmentalists, and growers became advocates for locally grown, seasonal, sustainable, and organic food. Those models of agriculture have entered the mainstream through grocery stores, farmers markets, and restaurants, altering the American food landscape.

Farmers markets and produce stands give consumers direct contact with farmers, allowing them to ask questions and learn about what is in season. Personal relationships help to create a community bond between growers and eaters. There are also opportunities for people to become more directly involved in the growing of their food. Local farms called CSAs (community supported agriculture) that are supported by subscribers who pay money for a portion of the farm's produce and who also work periodically planting, weeding, and harvesting help people learn about the source of their food. Growers and suppliers to restaurants, farmers' markets, and specialty shops shared their knowledge with Festival visitors.

The number of food programs designed for children has swelled in the past decade alone. Probably the best-known program is Alice Waters's The Edible Schoolyard in Berkeley, California. Begun in 1994, the program is designed to bring the community and experiential ethos of the locally grown-sustainable movement to middle school students. Seeing food as central to building individual health, fulfilling social relationships, and community life, The Edible Schoolyard teaches children to plan a garden, prepare soil, plant, grow and harvest crops, cook, serve, and eat - in its phrasing, food "from seed to table." Students collaborate in decision-making on all aspects of the garden. Working closely with the Center for Ecoliteracy, The Edible Schoolyard teachers have been on the forefront of designing a curriculum that can place food at the center of academic subjects such as math, reading, and history in order to "rethink school lunch." Festival visitors could interact with participants from The Edible Schoolyard and other educational programs, and take a guided tour of a schoolyard garden plot.

Joan Nathan was Guest Curator and Stephen Kidd was Co-Curator; Arlene Reiniger was Program Coordinator, Beverly Simons was Program Assistant, and Deborah L. Gaffin was Education Consultant. An Advisory Committee included: Michael Batterberry (Chair), Ariane Batterberry, Warren Belasco, Partice Dionot, John T. Edge, Rayna Green, Tom Head, Ethel Raim, Phyllis Richman, Gus Schumacher, Marsha Wiener, and Ann Yonkers.

The program was made possible through major contributions from Whole Foods Market, the Wallace Genetic Foundation, Silk Soy, and Horizon Organic Dairy. Additional funding came from the United States Department of Agriculture. Contributors included Vanns Spices, Honest Tea, Farm Aid, Guest Services, Inc. , Chipotle Mexican Grill, The Rodale Institute, and the Jean-Louis Palladin Foundation. Major in-kind support came from KitchenAid and Zola/Star Restaurant Group. Collaborative support came from Marriott International, the Washington, DC Convention and Tourism Corporation, and the Culinary Institute of America.
Presenters:
Polly Adema, Betty Belanus, Emily Botein, Charley Camp, John Franklin, Alexandra Greeley, Nancy Groce, Mark Haskell, Kevin Healy, Lucy Long, Steven Prieto, Michael Twitty, Cynthia Vidaurri, Chris Williams
Participants:
Cheese

Melanie Cochran, 1974-, Keswick Creamery, Newburg, Pennsylvania

Allison Hooper, 1959-, Websterville, Vermont

Rob Kaufelt, New York, New York

Mike Koch, FireFly Farms, Bittinger, Maryland

Cesare Marrocchi, Chevy Chase, Maryland

Maria Moreira, 1953-, Lancaster, Massachusetts

Wendy Wiebe, Orange, Virginia

Chocolate

El Ceibo, Río Beni, Bolivia -- El Ceibo, Río Beni, BoliviaBernardo Apaza LluscuEmilio Villca CopaClemente Puna PacoVincente Quelca MixtoMario Choque Quisbert

Coffee

Mshikamano Farmers Association, Mbeya Region, Tanzania -- Mshikamano Farmers Association, Mbeya Region, TanzaniaLinda H. MsangiDavid RobinsonThomas T. Sikapila

Cooking Demonstrations

Ann Amernick, Chevy Chase, Maryland

Douglas Anderson, 1960-, Washington, D.C.

José Andrés, 1969-, Washington, D.C.

Jimmy Andruzzi, 1971-, Staten Island, New York

Dan Barber, Pocantico Hills, New York

Lidia Bastianich, New York, New York

Najmieh Batmanglij, 1947-, Washington, D.C.

Susan Belsinger, Brookeville, Maryland

Tom Bivins, 1962-, Burlington, Vermont

Aulie Bunyarataphan, Washington, D.C.

Mariana Camara, Washington, D.C.

Gilroy Chow, 1940-, Clarksdale, Mississippi

Sally Chow, 1947-, Clarksdale, Mississippi

Nongkran Daks, Chantilly, Virginia

Roberto Donna, Washington, D.C.

Mark Federman, New York, New York

Mark Furstenberg, Washington, D.C.

Marla Gooriah, Alexandria, Virginia

Todd Gray, 1964-, Washington, D.C.

Carole Greenwood, Washington, D.C.

Hi Soo Shin Hepinstall, 1936-, Silver Spring, Maryland

Steve Herrell, 1944-, Northampton, Massachusetts

Melissa Kelly, Rockland, Maine

Ris Lacoste, Washington, D.C.

Ed LaDou, 1955-, Studio City, California

Emeril Lagasse, New Orleans, Louisiana

Cesare Lanfranconi, Washington, D.C.

Francis Layrle, Washington, D.C.

Sheila Lukins, New York, New York

Karen MacNeil, 1954-, St. Helena, California

Brenda Rhodes Miller, Silver Spring, Maryland

Nahid Mohamadi, Chevy Chase, Maryland

Frank Morales, Washington, D.C.

Diana My Tran, Washington, D.C.

Patrick O'Connell, 1945-, Washington, Virginia

Kaz Okochi, Washington, D.C.

Morou Ouattara, Washington, D.C.

Charlie Palmer, 1959-, Washington, D.C.

Charles Phan, San Francisco, California

Culinary Institute of America

Nora Pouillon, Washington, D.C.

Paul Prudhomme, New Orleans, Louisiana

Steven Raichlen, 1953-, Miami, Florida

Carol N. Reynolds, 1955-, Greensboro Bend, Vermont

Michel Richard, 1948-2016, Washington, D.C.

Akasha Richmond, Los Angeles, California

Suvir Saran, New York, New York

David Scribner, Washington, D.C.

Sudhir Seth, Bethesda, Maryland

Suad Shallal, Washington, D.C.

Marion Spear, 1944-, Fox, Arkansas

Fabio Trabocchi, McLean, Virginia

Anthony Uglesich, 1969-, New Orleans, Louisiana

John Uglesich, New Orleans, Louisiana

Herman Vargas, New York, New York

Robert Weland, Washington, D.C.

Janos Wilder, 1954-, Tucson, Arizona

Lisa Yockelson, Hoboken, New Jersey

Eric Ziebold, 1972-, Washington, D.C.

Culinary Institute of America -- Culinary Institute of AmericaCraig Carey, Patrick Decker, Jennifer Meyer, Matthew Raiford, Tara Zmuda

Dairy

Horizon Organic, Boulder, Colorado -- Horizon Organic, Boulder, ColoradoJarod Ballentine, Michael Boswell, Fred Ceconi, Bill Eckland, Jeff Grapko, Diane Kistler, Arden Landis, Cindy Masterman, Jason McGowin, David Morton, Peter Slaunwhite, Connie Weaver, Warren Weaver

The Edible Schoolyard

Jessica Benthien, Berkeley, California

Chelsea Chapman, 1975-, Oakland, California

Eliot Coleman, 1938-, Harborside, Maine

Ann Cooper, East Hampton, New York

Barbara Damrosch, Harborside, Maine

Benjamin Goff, Berkeley, California

Marsha Guerrero, Berkeley, California

Jenny Guillaume, Washington, D.C.

Davia Nelson, San Francisco, California

Kimberly Rush, Washington, D.C.

Kelsey Siegel, 1971-, Berkeley, California

Nikki Silva, San Francisco, California

Josh Viertel, 1977-, New Haven, Connecticut

Alice Waters, Berkeley, California

Food Safety and Quality

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) -- The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)Peggy Barrow, Leslie Davis, Lula Mae Gray, Amy Green, Graciela Iguina, Synthia Jenkins, Basil Lindsay, Howard Seltzer, Robin Smith, Shirley Turpin, Juanita Yates

USDA Food and Nutrition Service -- USDA Food and Nutrition ServiceAudrina Lange, Alison Pack

USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service -- USDA Food Safety and Inspection ServiceJanice Adams-King, Tara Balsley, Matt Baun, Kathy Bernard, Autumn Canaday, Susan Conley, Ben Dinsmore, Eileen Dykes, Amanda Eamich, Nathan Fretz, Brenda Halbrook, Melissa Halbrook, Mary Harris, Rita Hodges, Delphine Hyman, Delphine Hyman, Natalie Illum, Bridgette Keefe, Lydia Kleiner, Argyris Magoulas, Barbara Masters, Holly McPeak, Trish Moynihan, Barbara O'Brien, Keith Payne, Laura Reiser, Ashley Short, Crystal Straughn, Diane Van, Jason Waggoner, Anne Withers, Audrey Young

Guest Services, Inc.

National Restaurant Association

Restaurant Association of Metropolitan Washington -- Restaurant Association of Metropolitan WashingtonStephanie Burdette, Christine Gloninger, Daniel Traster, Glenn Walden

District of Columbia Department of Health

Honey

Beehive Beeproducts, New York, New York

Beekeepers -- BeekeepersShirley Ammon, Ken Brown, Toni Burnham, Pat Deely, Michael Fry, Daphne Fuentevilla, Andy Greig, Carl Greig, Len Greig, Patricia Greig, Claire Hoffman, Marc Hoffman, Kameha Kidd, Brenda Kiessling, Betsy Klinger, Marilyn Kray, Gertrud Mergner, Wolfgang Mergner, Bill Miller, Mary Miller, Ed Murtagh, Laszlo Pentek, Janis Ritchie, Michael Ritchie, Barbara Sina, David Sitomer, Nikki Thompson

Narrative Sessions

Bruce Aidell, San Francisco, California

Ariane Batterberry, New York, New York

Michael Batterberry, New York, New York

Ann Brody, Bethesda, Maryland

Steve Demos, Boulder, Colorado

Steve Jenkins, New York, New York

Judith Jones, New York, New York

Erika Lesser, New York, New York

Bill Niman, Marin County, California

Gus Schumacher, Washington, D.C.

Howard Shapiro, San Juan Pueblo, New Mexico

Slow Roast

Mike Mills, 1941-, Hingham, Massachusetts

Amy Mills Tunicliffe, Hingham, Massachusetts

Rosana Gilmore, El Patio, Rockville, Maryland

Jim Tabb, Tryon, North Carolina

Soy

White Wave, Boulder, Colorado -- White Wave, Boulder, ColoradoMike Bandstra, David Cai, Kortney Dockter, Steve Ehli, Ellen Feeney, Dale Hess, Dick Hou, Summer Lee, Stephanie Null, Eric Sherman

Spices

Vanns Spices, Baltimore, Maryland -- Vanns Spices, Baltimore, MarylandRita Calvert, Sarah Graham, Ellen Honey, Arehan Kuran, Ellen Trusty, Ann Wilder, Rob Wilder

Tea

Honest Tea, Bethesda, Maryland -- Honest Tea, Bethesda, MarylandJennifer Blazejewski, Jonathan Clark, Seth Goldman, Carrie Haverfield, Thammara Liyanage, Mike Patrone, John Rego, Alicia Schnell

Tools of the Trade

Culinary Historians of Washington, D.C. -- Culinary Historians of Washington, D.C.Jane Adams Finn, Chevy Chase, MarylandMarigail BarcomeKari Barrett, Rockville, MarylandFrancine Berkowitz, Silver Spring, MarylandClaire Cassidy, Bethesda, MarylandMeryle Evans, New York, New YorkLeslie ForrestLinda Franklin, Charlottesville, VirginiaBryna Freyer, Arlington, VirginiaBruce Gaber, Bethesda, MarylandCathy Gaber, Bethesda, MarylandLaura Gilliam, Washington, D.C.Larry HepinstallMarty Kaiser, Fairfax, VirginiaDiane King, Vienna, VirginiaZina Musgrove, Washington, D.C.Kay Shaw Nelson, Bethesda, MarylandElizabeth Nosek, Winterthur, DelawareDenise PetersonPat Reber, Ellicott City, MarylandBettye Robertson, Capitol Heights, MarylandKathi Trepper, Alexandria, VirginiaCarter Van Devanter, Poolesville, MarylandWillis Van Devanter, Poolesville, MarylandDebbie Warner, Cheverly, MarylandVera Oye Yaa-Anna, Washington, D.C.

Slow Food USA

Tradition and Adaptation

Erika Allen, Growing Power, Chicago, Illinois

Will Allen, Growing Power, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Elizabeth Beggins, 1962-, Pot Pie Farm, Whitman, Maryland

Ann Yonkers, Pot Pie Farm, Whitman, Maryland

Don Bustos, 1956-, Espanola, New Mexico

Jim Crawford, Hustontown, Pennsylvania

Moie Crawford, Hustontown, Pennsylvania

Leslie Harper, Cass Lake, Minnesota

John Jamison, 1947-, Latrobe, Pennsylvania

Sukey Jamison, Latrobe, Pennsylvania

Nova Kim, Albany, Vermont

Les Hook, Albany, Vermont

Tzaxe Lee, 1956-, Fresno, California

Ying Lee, Fresno, California

Mike Pappas, Lanham, Maryland

Harry Records, 1932-, Exeter, Rhode Island

Joel Salatin, Swoope, Virginia

Teresa M. Showa, 1957-, Window Rock, Arizona

Rodale Institute, Kutztown, Pennsylvania -- Rodale Institute, Kutztown, PennsylvaniaKerry Callahan, Amanda Kimble Evans, Kelly Grube, John Haberern, Paul Hepperly, Chris Hill, April Johnson, Jeff Moyer, Maria Pop, Matthew Ryan, Dan Sullivan, Eileen Weinsteiger

Wine

The wine section of the Food Culture USA program was coordinated by WineAmerica, Association of Maryland Wineries, Pennsylvania Wineries Association, New York Wine and Grape Foundation, Missouri Grape and Wine Program, North Carolina Grape Council, and Virginia Wineries Association.

Dana Alexander, Patty Held, Kim Kelsey, Margo Knight, Bob McRitchie, Ann Miller, David Sloane, Susan Spence, Cara Stauffer, Jim Trezise, Bill Wilson, Brian Wilson, Christine Wilson
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2005, Series 2
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5e618a15e-64a3-4706-9320-63f606d70e53
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2005-ref18

The Commonwealth of The Bahamas

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Festival visitors could discover how a rich and vibrant Bahamian culture has evolved in its islands over the past four centuries, shaped by the forces of migration. After the Spanish removed the last of the indigenous Lucayans to work elsewhere in the Caribbean, the archipelago was settled by English who had left Bermuda for greater religious freedom and brought enslaved Africans with them. After American independence, British Loyalists and their slaves arrived from Virginia, the Carolinas, and Georgia. In the 1820s, Black Seminoles escaped from the Florida coast and settled on the island of Andros. Throughout the 19th century, British ships freed Africans headed for slavery in the Americas and gave them land in The Bahamas. In the 1880s, tourists from the United States, en route to Havana, began to stop in Nassau, and hotels instituted racial segregation to accommodate them. Chinese, Syrian, and Greek immigrants, as well as people from throughout the Caribbean moved to The Bahamas, and Bahamians traveled to Europe, the United States, and Panama, primarily in search of work but for schooling as well. Although White Bahamians made up less than 15 percent of the population in 1994, they dominated politics until majority rule in 1967.

All of these people from Britain, Africa, U.S. African American and British American communities, Asia, and the Caribbean have had to develop strategies to survive in The Bahamas, and to adapt their cultures to local realities. It was these strategies that were presented at the Festival program. Bahamians expressed their creativity using local materials and themes. Communities throughout The Bahamas have developed their own specialties in crafts and foods, sacred and secular music, storytelling and narrative traditions, and their own particular accents. Over the year leading to the Festival, a team of Bahamian researchers knowledgeable in the history and culture of The Bahamas worked with the Smithsonian to assess and document contemporary traditional Bahamian culture, on display for Festival visitors to experience, learn, and enjoy.

John Franklin and Gail Saunders were Curators of the program; Angela Cleare was Project Coordinator in The Bahamas. Emily Botein served as Program Coordinator and Amy Andrus as Assistant Program Coordinator.

An Advisory Committee included Angela Cleare (Chairperson), Stan Burnside, Philip Burrows, Kayla Olubumni Lockhart Edwards, Everette Hart, Willamae johnson, Kim Outten, Maxwell Poitier, Gail Saunders, Rosemae Thompson, and Grace Turner.

The Bahamas was made possible with the collaboration of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas Ministry of Tourism and the Department of Archives, with support from Barclay's Bank, the Private Trust Corporation, and Syntex Pharmaceutical International Ltd.
Researchers:
Patricia Bazzard, Nicolette Bethel, Philip Burrows, Haldane Chase, Kayla Olubumni Lockhart Edwards, Percy "Vola" Francis, Patricia Glinton-Meicholas, Jolton Johnson, Pandora Johnson, Willamae Johnson, Jessica Minnis, Kim Outten, Gail Saunders, Tracey Thompson, Elaine Toote, Grace Turner, Patrice Williams, Keith Wisdom, David Wood

Additional research and photo documentation

Pete Reiniger, Lyle Rosbotham, Joan Wolbier
Presenters:
Patricia Bazzard, Nicolette Bethel, Philip A. Burrows, Eddison "Fast Eddie" Dames, Kayla Olubumni Lockhart Edwards, Everette Hart, Jolton Johnson, Kim Outten, Tracey Thompson, Elaine Toote, Grace Turner, Keith Wisdom
Participants:
CRAFTS

Peggy Colebrooke, straw worker, basket maker, Red Bays, Andros, Bahamas

William "Scrap Iron" Colebrooke, straw worker, basket maker, Red Bays, Andros, Bahamas

Viola Collie, straw & needle worker, Nassau, New Providence, ex-Masons Bay, Acklins, Bahamas

Allen Dixon, shell worker, Burnt Ground, Long Island, Bahamas

Cecile Annette Dunnam, quilter, Spanish Wells, Bahamas

Amos Ferguson, folk painter, Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Bloneva Ferguson, rag doll maker, Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Wendy Kelly, straw worker, Nassau, New Providence, ex-Acklins, Bahamas

Lorna Kemp, straw worker, Current Island, Eleuthera, Bahamas

Elsie Knowles, straw worker, O'Neals, Long Island, Bahamas

Olga Major, straw worker, Berry's, Long Island, Bahamas

Marie Murray, quilter, Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Eloise Smith, straw worker, Farmer's Cay, Exuma, Bahamas

Henry Wallace, woodcarver, Red Bays, Andros, Bahamas

BOATBUILDERS

Joseph Albury, boat builder, Man of War Cay, Abaco, Bahamas

Kingston Brown, boat builder, Cargill Creek, Andros, Bahamas

Bertis Knowles, boat builder, Mangrove Bush, Long Island, Bahamas

Ryan Knowles, boat builder, kite maker, Mangrove Bush, Long Island, Bahamas

Edward Lockhart, boat builder, Nassau, New Providence, ex-Ragged Island, Bahamas

STORYTELLERS

Derek Burrows, storyteller, Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Sheddie Cox, storyteller, Inagua, Bahamas

Cleveland Eneas, storyteller, Bain Town, New Providence, Bahamas

Mabel Williams, storyteller, United Estates, San Salvador, Bahamas

FOODWAYS, BUSH MEDICINE

Samuel Collie, bush medicine, boat builder, storyteller, Pirate's Well, Mayaguana, Bahamas

Agnes Britely Ferguson, contemporary Bahamian cuisine, Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Wealthy Gomez, contemporary Bahamian cuisine, Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Anthony "Tony Macaroni" Hanna, conch cuisine, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas

Rowena Hepburn, fire hearth cooking, Bluff, Cat Island, Bahamas

Daisy Nottage, bush medicine, Behring Point, Andros, Bahamas

James Sweeting, traditional Bahamian cuisine, Nicholl's Town, Andros, Bahamas

Daisy Thompson, traditional baking, Gregory Town, Eleuthera, Bahamas

MUSICIANS

Cebric "Seabreeze" Bethel, vocals, Gregory Town, Eleuthera, Bahamas

Jane "Baby Doll" Clarke, drums, Exuma, Bahamas

Clifton Deveaux, gospel rhyme, Dunmore, Long Island, Bahamas

Israel Forbes, guitar, vocals, Bluff, South Andros, Bahamas

Macfarlane "Tony" Mackey, "Exuma the Obeah Man", Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Donald Newbold, anthem singer, Orange Creek, Cat Island, Bahamas

Patrick Rahming, vocals, Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Nattie Saunders, banjo, Alice Town, Bimini, Bahamas

Dicey Doh, a cappella -- Dicey Doh, a cappellaEdward Bethel, Nassau, New Providence, BahamasDwayne Curtis, Nassau, New Providence, BahamasGarland Dean, Nassau, New Providence, BahamasKermit C. Strachan, Nassau, New Providence, BahamasTex Turnquest, Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Ed Maxey's Goombay Rake 'n Scrape -- Ed Maxey's Goombay Rake 'n ScrapeCyril Oliver Dean, drum, Nassau, New Providence, BahamasEdmund Moxey, accordion, Nassau, New Providence, BahamasHuelon Newbold, saw, Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Johnson Family and Friends, choral, wake music -- Johnson Family and Friends, choral, wake musicEric Darville, New Bight, Cat Island, BahamasRoslyn Johnson, New Bight, Cat Island, BahamasBettymae McKenzie, New Bight, Cat Island, BahamasGraida Knowles, Steventon, Exuma, BahamasIva Thompson, New Bight, Cat Island, Bahamas

Osborne King and the Cat Island Mites, dancers -- Osborne King and the Cat Island Mites, dancersOlivia Bowles, Orange Creek, Cat Island, BahamasBuina Cleare, Nassau, New Providence, BahamasSusiemae Dorsett, Nassau, New Providence, BahamasIshmel Gaitor, Dumfries, Cat Island, BahamasEugene Gilbert, Arthur's Town, Cat Island, BahamasPearl Hart, Nassau, New Providence, BahamasOsborne "Ossie" King, Nassau, New Providence, BahamasSam Webb, Arthur's Town, Cat Island, Bahamas

Thomas Cartwright and the Boys, goombay rake and scrape -- Thomas Cartwright and the Boys, goombay rake and scrapeThomas Cartwright, accordion, Clarence Town, Long Island, BahamasHerbert Turnquest, saw, Clarence Town, Long Island, BahamasOrlando Turnquest, drum, Clarence Town, Long Island, Bahamas

"Zippy" Frazier and Children, a cappella, dry bones -- "Zippy" Frazier and Children, a cappella, dry bonesDexter Frazier, Staniard Creek, Andros, BahamasHarrington Frazier, Jr., Staniard Creek, Andros, BahamasHarrington "Zippy" Frazier, Sr., Staniard Creek, Andros, BahamasQuintero Frazier, Staniard Creek, Andros, BahamasRicardo Frazier, Staniard Creek, Andros, Bahamas

MUSICAL DRAMATISTS

Avis Larrimore Armbrister, Arthur's Town, Cat Island, Bahamas

Almeda Campbell, Arthur's Town, Cat Island, Bahamas

JUNKANOO PARTICIPANTS

Anthony Bain (One Family), Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Calvin Balfour (Most Qualified), Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Stan Burnside (One Family), Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Doyle A. Burrows (Valley Boys), Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

John Chipman, goatskin drum maker, Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Eugene Collie (Z Bandits), Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Winston "Gus" Cooper (Valley Boys), Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Bernard Davis (One Family), Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Paul Henderson Deal (Fun Time), Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Andrew Edwards (Vikings), Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Percy "Vola" Francis (Saxon Superstars), Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Donzel Huyler, Jr. (Most Qualified), cowbell maker, Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Donzel "Donnie" Huyler, Sr. (Most Qualified), cowbell maker, Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Glen Erick Knowles (Magnificent Congas), Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Johnny Lee (Saxon Superstars), Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Barry Miller (Valley Boys), Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Peter Minnis (Saxon Superstars), Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Anthony Morley (Magnificent Congas), Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Wayde G. Robinson (Fancy Dancers), Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Ted Sealey (Pigs), Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Ronald Simms, Junkanoo Leaders Association, Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Quintin "Banabbes" Woodside (Roots), Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

JUNKANOO RUSH PARTICIPANTS

Classic Dancers -- Classic DancersGodfrey "Pickey" Beneby, Ken "Motorboat" Ferguson

Fancy Dancers -- Fancy DancersFelix Adderley, Henry Adderley, Keith Barr, Andrew Jared, Daren Johnson, Marco Mullings, Sharargo Oliver, Gary Rolle, Torn Thompson

Freeport -- FreeportGodfrey Beneby

Fun Time -- Fun TimeLeonard Bain, Stephen Davis, Franklyn Destama, Dudley Saunders

Harbour Boys -- Harbour BoysOswald Knowles, Charles Michael Wright

Magnificent Congas -- Magnificent CongasHarry Cooper, Reginald Demeritte, Aaron Deveaux, Gary Ferguson, Keith Johnson, Allan McClain, Jay Morley, Amos Rahming, Marvin Roker, Trevor Taylor, Alvin Thurston

Mighty Vikings -- Mighty VikingsDave Adderley, Doroton Darling, Will Delancey, Marciano McKay, Clay Martin, Richard Martin, Deral Roker, Leon Roker, Audley Thompson, Paul Thurston, Dalon Williams

Most Qualified -- Most QualifiedBenny Adderley, Anthony Bosfield, Trevor DaCosta, Roger Demeritte, Larry Forbes, Sean Neilly, Cecil Pinder, James Price, Andrew Wallace

One Family -- One FamilyJohn Beadle, Ronald Campbell, Dennis Charlow, Gary Cooper, Teran Davis, Freddie Mackey, Robert Milfort, Dennie Saunder, Marvin Stubbs, Paul Thompson, Byron Trotman, Timmie Turnquest

Pigs -- PigsEskit Dean, Tyrone Fitzgerald, William Newman

Roots -- RootsKevin Adderley, Maxwell Beneby, Kevin Ferguson, Stirling March, Albert Rahming, Chris Rahming, David Rolle, Gary Rolle, Jason Simms, Cedric Taylor, Kenneth Walcott

Saxon Superstars -- Saxon SuperstarsSean Adderley, Alexander Green, George Henderson, Jerome Johnson, Dion Miller, Theodore Parker, Clinton Paul, Gregory Pickering, Kingsley Pickering, Jeffrey Rahming

Superstar Rockers -- Superstar RockersErnest Demeritte, Barry Wilson

Swingers LTD -- Swingers LTDPhilip Hanna, Errol Seymour, Anthony "Huck" Williams

Valley Boys -- Valley BoysCunlta Herbert Bain, Howard Bethel, Ronnie Cash, Ryan Dorsett, Robert Ferguson, Sean Fernander, Michael Foster, Andrew Hunter, Kemuel Gardiner, Shayne Moncur, Tyrone Peterson, Dew Poitier, Dennis Sturrup, Kim Thompson, Tony Williams

Western Jammers -- Western JammersGordon Grant, Wesley "Tanker" Williams

Z Bandits -- Z BanditsAdmiral Collie, Tito Collie, Chris Elliot, Herbert Miller
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1994, Series 2
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk515151e11-fec0-4386-a9b8-bc12267db709
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1994-ref18

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Business records
Correspondence
Memorandums
Sound recordings
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Negatives
Video recordings
Slides (photographs)
Plans (drawings)
Videotapes
Audiotapes
Digital images
Notes
Photographic prints
Place:
Caribbean Area
Trinidad and Tobago
Puerto Rico
Date:
June 23-July 4, 1988
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1988 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 6 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: American Folklore Society Centennial

Series 3: Festival Music Stage

Series 4: Ingenuity and Tradition: The Common Wealth of Massachusetts

Series 5: Migration to Metropolitan Washington: Making a New Place Home

Series 6: Music from the Peoples of the Soviet Union
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1988 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Office of Folklife Programs and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The 1988 Festival celebrated the centennial of the American Folklore Society, founded one hundred years earlier because of the need to document and study cultures that were seen as disappearing. Much of the Society's attention today, however, is engaged in the documentation and interpretation of emerging traditions and cultural expressions. Folklorists work in inner cities, conduct research on occupational groups, analyze processes of traditionalization and cooperate with other professionals in devising natural conservation and historical preservation strategies, which also promote cultural continuity, equity and integrity. Visitors to the 1988 Festival could learn about what it is that folklorists do and what impacts they have on the communities with which they work.

The other living exhibitions that made up this year's Festival also provided ample illustrations of this same view of the traditional. The Massachusetts program told a paradigmatic American story. Gay Head Wampanoag, Yankee settlers, Afro American migrants, and immigrants from Italy, Greece, Poland, the Cape Verde Islands, Puerto Rico, and Southeast Asia have not only preserved their traditions; through ingenious acts of individual and community creativity they have adapted them and endowed them with new meanings, as circumstances have changed. The Metropolitan Washington program pointed to the heightened consciousness of cultural issues associated with the migration experience. The program asked how immigrants from El Salvador, Ethiopia, China, Trinidad and Tobago, as well as domestic Anglo and Afro American groups historically migrating from nearby states, discard, reinvent, and reconstitute their traditions as they actively make a new place home. A varied contingent of musicians and performers from several republics of the Soviet Union demonstrated how truly ancient traditions nurtured in various pastoral, tribal, and religious environments have not merely survived but actually flourished in contemporary Soviet life. Also at the Festival were American musicians who, as part of a groundbreaking cultural exchange with the Soviet Union, would later travel to Moscow to participate in the International Folklore Festival in August 1988 and be reunited with the Soviet musicians participating in the Smithsonian's Festival.

The 1988 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 23-27 and June 30-July 4) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan).

The 1988 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; the Program Book essays provided a larger context for the Festival presentations, extending beyond the traditions actually presented at the 1988 Festival.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Office of Folklife Programs.

Office of Folklife Programs

Richard Kurin, Acting Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Anthony Seeger, Curator, Folkways Records; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist; Peter Seitel, Senior Folklorist; Marjorie Hunt, Phyllis M. May-Machunda, Heliana Portes de Roux, Frank Proschan, Nicholas R. Spitzer, Folklorists; Jeffrey Place, Assistant Archivist

National Park Service

William Penn Mott, Jr., Director; Manus J. Fish, Jr., Regional Director, National Capital Region
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
World music  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk art  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Genre/Form:
Business records
Correspondence
Memorandums
Sound recordings
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Negatives
Video recordings
Slides (photographs)
Plans (drawings)
Videotapes
Audiotapes
Digital images
Notes
Photographic prints
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1988
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk59e9f3773-cd55-493f-94e0-c53650d914c4
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1988
Online Media:

Caribbean Carnival

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Trinidad is the home of Carnival in the Caribbean. While Carnival is found elsewhere - St. Lucia, Grenada, Antigua, Nevis, the Virgin Islands, and Haiti - Trinidad's fete is considered the Caribbean's greatest, its most spectacular, its trendsetter. Migrating West Indians have brought their traditions and culture to North America. Theirs is a rich culture compounded of elements from Africa, the Middle East, China and the Far East, North and South America, and Europe.

Carnival is the principal social activity through which West Indian immigrants from the widest range of generations, classes, countries, and hues are able to identify, interact with, and enjoy one another. Indeed Carnival has provided a new cultural focus and has created an economy of its own in the communities of many North American cities where people of West Indian descent are concentrated. Carnival has become a commonly shared and much-anticipated activity among West Indians who live in North America, practiced from Brooklyn and other eastern seaboard cities to the Canadian cities of Montreal and Toronto, and across the continent to Los Angeles. The largest and oldest Carnival in North America began in Harlem in the mid-1940s. The Festival was later moved to Brooklyn in 1967 and is run by the West Indian American Day Carnival Association, Inc. In North America, Caribbean communities organize their Carnivals to take advantage of summer weather and to avoid conflicting with any neighboring community's carnival.

At the Festival, Trinidadian American communities from Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, Maryland were joined by other West Indian immigrant communities from those and other East Coast cities to demonstrate the diverse musical and dance traditions and to discuss the importance of Carnival as a source and emblem of community identity.

D. Elliott Parris and Katherine Williams were the Caribbean Program Coordinators; Roy Bryce-LaPorte served as Special Consultant.
Participants:
Carol Aqui, costumed band leader, Adelphi, Maryland

Batucada Brasilera (William Brown, leader), Brazilian music band, Washington, D.C.

The Big Drum Nation Dance Company, Inc. (Winston T. Fleary, 1943-, director), New York, New York

William Brown, Brazilian costumed band, Washington, D.C.

Caribana Caribbean Cultural Committee (Raymond England, leader), carnival organizer, Ontario, Canada

Egbert Christian, B.W.I.A. ole mas band organizer, New York, New York

Hector Corporan, 1945-, master of ceremonies, Hyattsville, Maryland

Marvsyn David, Mod band, Washington, D.C.

Joan Dupigny, 1941-, costumed band, Washington, D.C.

Oscar Anstey Hunte, 1942-, fire eater, Quebec, Canada

Lucille Jacob, seamstress, band organizer, Hartford, Connecticut

Junior Errol Jones, 1940-, steel pan tuner, Brooklyn, New York

K. Alex King (Lord Baker), back-up calypso singer, Takoma Park, Maryland

Lilian Knight, Panamanian costumed band, Washington, D.C.

Michael Legerton (Protector): master of ceremonies, Seabrook, Maryland

Eli Mannette, 1929-, steel pan tuner, New York, New York

Dianne Marshall, comedian, Washington, D.C.

Von Martin, master of ceremonies, Seabrook, Maryland

The Maryland Pacesetters (Pasley Graham, 1943-, agent), steel band, Baltimore, Maryland

The Masterful Band (Serge Bellegarde, 1949-, leader), Haitian music band, Washington, D.C.

Stephenson Michael, 1952-, costumed band, Silver Spring, Maryland

Montreal Carnival Development Committee (Winston Roberts, leader), carnival organizer, Quebec, Canada

Wil Morris, 1948-, stick fighter, Washington, D.C.

Errol Payne, 1928-, wire bender, New York, New York

The Trinidad Steel Orchestra (Franklin Harding, 1941-, leader), music band and costumed band, Washington, D.C.

The Trinidad and Tobago Baltimore Steel Orchestra (Paul Gervais, 1941-, leader), music band, Baltimore, Maryland

Brian Walker, 1957-, costumed band, Washington, D.C.

The West Indian American Labor Day Association (Carlos Lezema, 1923-, leader), carnival organizer, New York, New York

Peter Whiteman, 1944-, wire bender, costumed band leader, Hyattsville, Maryland
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1979 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1979, Series 2
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1979 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk54e15c8b7-904b-4d3f-b160-6be18bfc7a50
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1979-ref19

Marcel Breuer papers

Creator:
Breuer, Marcel, 1902-  Search this
Names:
Bauhaus  Search this
Marcel Breuer Associates/Architects and Planners  Search this
Extent:
37.6 Linear feet
0.14 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Photographs
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1920-1986
Summary:
The Marcel Breuer papers, 1920-1986, contain biographical material, correspondence, business and financial records, interviews, notes, writings, sketches, project files, exhibition files, photographs, and printed material that document the career of architect and designer Marcel Breuer.
Scope and Contents note:
The Marcel Breuer papers span the years 1920 to 1986 and measure 37.6 linear feet and 0.14 gigabytes. They consist of biographical material, correspondence, business and financial records, interviews, notes, writings, sketches, project files, exhibition files, photographs, and printed material that document Breuer's career as an architect and designer. This material reflects the prolificacy and diversity of his creations, from tubular steel chairs to private residences, college campuses, factories, department stores, and international, municipal, and corporate headquarters and complexes.

The Biographical Material Series contains documents that list or certify significant events or associations attained by Breuer during his career, such as résumés, licenses, and certificates. The number of awards contained in this series attest to the esteem in which he was held by his colleagues.

Breuer's Correspondence Series illustrates the interaction of his various colleagues and the operation of his architectural offices in the execution of their projects, many of which were in progress simultaneously. This series includes letters from Joseph Albers, Jean Arp, Herbert Bayer, Alexander Calder, Serge Chermayeff, Naum Gabo, Sigfried Giedion, Walter and Ise Gropius, Louis I. Kahn, György Kepes, László Moholy-Nagy, Henry Moore, Eero Saarinen, and José Luis Sert.

The Business and Financial Records Series contains documents which reflect Breuer's commercial transactions that do not directly relate to one specific project. Two project books pertain to 36 architectural projects and record their basic physical and financial details, such as site measurements and cost projections. There are also miscellaneous invoices and receipts, and one of Breuer's personal income tax returns.

The Interviews Series contains typescripts of interviews. Of particular interest is the audiotape interview of Breuer, who discusses his early years as a student and his first impressions of the Bauhaus. There are also untranscribed audiotape interviews of his colleagues György Kepes and Harry Seidler, and his patrons Mr. A. Elzas, and the Koerfers, who discuss their business relationships with Breuer.

There are address lists of colleagues and patrons and résumés from architects contained within the series on Notes, while the Writings Series contains typescripts of lectures and articles written by Breuer concerning architecture and its history. Writings by others are about Breuer and his work, including typescripts, galleys, and photographs of architectural and design projects used in the publication of the book Marcel Breuer Buildings and Projects, 1921-1961 by Cranston Jones.

The Sketches Series consists of 3 small, hand-drawn depictions of unidentified floor plans.

The largest and most comprehensive series houses the Project Files, which consist of approximately 300 project files containing letters, legal documents, and photographs that record the planning and execution of many of Breuer's most important architectural projects. These include the UNESCO Headquarters Building (Paris, France), St. John's Abbey and University (Collegeville, Minnesota), the IBM Corporation Research Center (La Gaude, France), the HUD Headquarters Building (Washington, D.C.), the De Bijenkorf Department Store (Rotterdam, The Netherlands), and the third power plant and forebay dam for the Grand Coulee Dam (Washington state). The file for the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York contains an interesting set of photographs of Breuer showing Jacqueline Kennedy through the construction site.

Of equal importance are the additional Project Files for the 100 residences designed by Breuer, including prefabricated houses such as Kleinmetalhaus and Yankee Portables, and commissioned residences such as the two Gagarin Houses (Litchfield, Connecticut), the two Harnischmacher Houses (Wiesbaden, Germany), Koerfer House (Moscia, Switzerland), the Neumann House (Croton-on-Hudson, New York), the Saier House (Glanville-Calvados, France), the Staehelin House (Feldmeilen, Switzerland), the Starkey House (Duluth, Minnesota), and the three Rufus Stillman Houses (Litchfield, Connecticut). There are also files concerning the four houses Breuer designed for himself in Lincoln and Wellfleet, Massachusetts, and in New Canaan, Connecticut.

The Project Files for Breuer's furniture designs are not as comprehensive as those for his architectural creations but contain many photographs of his early conceptions for chairs, tables, desks, cabinets, rugs, and tapestries.

The Exhibition Files Series contains primarily photographs of exhibitions in which Breuer participated. The extent of his participation is sometimes difficult to determine, because it ranged from designing a single chair, designing rooms for an apartment or an entire house specifically to be shown in an exhibition, to designing an exhibition building. Breuer was also the subject of a retrospective exhibition sponsored by the Metropolitan Museum of Art. This traveling exhibition was seen in New York City, Chicago, Paris, and Berlin.

Images contained in the Photographs Series are of Breuer, including one of him in Philip Johnson's house, Breuer family members, and colleagues, including Herbert Bayer, Alexander Calder, Serge Chermayeff, Walter and Ise Gropius, and Matta. Three photograph albums in this series contain more than 1,000 photographs of 59 architectural projects.

The Printed Material Series houses general clippings that concern groups of projects, rather than one specific project. There is also a scrapbook of tearsheets concerning architectural projects, exhibition announcements, and catalogs for others, and miscellaneous press releases and brochures.
Arrangement:
The Marcel Breuer papers are arranged into 11 series, based on type of document. Each series, except Project Files, has been arranged chronologically. The Project Files Series has been divided into 19 subseries of related architectual and design project types. The overall arrangement reflects Breuer's original arrangement. Each subseries or file group within is arranged alphabetically according to the surname of an individual, or a location name of a university. The contents of each project file have been arranged according to material type and a chronology that best reflects the progression of the project toward completion.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1920-1981 (Boxes 1, 36; Reel 5708; 0.4 linear ft.)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1923-1986 (Boxes 1-6, OV 47; Reels 5708-5717; 5.3 linear ft.)

Series 3: Business and Financial Records, 1933-1980 (Box 6; Reels 5717-5718; 0.4 linear ft.)

Series 4: Interviews, 1963-1985 (Boxes 6-7; Reel 5718; 0.4 linear ft., ER01; 0.14 GB)

Series 5: Notes, 1934-1976 (Box 7; Reel 5718; 0.4 linear ft.)

Series 6: Writings, 1923-1981 (Boxes 7-8; Reels 5718-5720; 1.0 linear ft.)

Series 7: Sketches, circa 1920s-circa 1980 (Box 8; Reel 5720; 1 folder)

Series 8: Project Files, 1921-1986 (Boxes 8-23, 36-40, OVs 43-57; Reels 5720-5737; 27.6 linear ft.)

Series 9: Exhibition files, 1922-1974 (Box 34, OV 49; Reels 5737-5738; 0.8 linear ft.)

Series 10: Photographs, 1928-1979 (Boxes 34, 41-42; Reel 5738; 0.3 linear ft.)

Series 11: Printed Material, 1925-1984 (Boxes 35, 42; Reels 5738-5739; 1.0 linear ft.)
Biographical/Historical note:
Marcel Lajos Breuer was born on May 21, 1902, in the Danube valley town of Pécs, Hungary, to Jacques Breuer, a physician, and Franciska (Kan) Breuer. His siblings were Hermina and Alexander. Throughout his life, Breuer used his first name only on official documents and preferred that his friends use his middle name, the Hungarian form of "Louis." The diminutive form of this name was usually spelled "Lajkó" and pronounced "Lye-ko."

In 1920, Breuer graduated from the Magyar Királyi Föreáliskola in Pécs. He had received a scholarship to study art in Vienna but took an immediate dislike to the Art Academy there, so searched elsewhere for training. He started working in the studio of a Viennese architect and soon became interested in training in the cabinetmaking shop of the architect's brother. Breuer was not satisfied with this arrangement either, and, upon hearing about the year-old Bauhaus school in Germany, he departed for Weimar in 1921.

Founded and directed by Walter Gropius, the Bauhaus combined the teaching of the pure arts with training in functional technology. Breuer received a master's degree from the Bauhaus in 1924, then studied architecture in Paris, where he first met Le Corbusier.

In 1925, Gropius enticed Breuer to return to the Bauhaus, now relocated in Dessau, by offering him a post as master of the carpentry workshop and a commission to design the interiors of the new Bauhaus buildings. Inspired by his new bicycle's handlebars, Breuer designed his first tubular steel chair, the Wassily chair, named for his friend Wassily Kandinsky. This chair and dozens of other Breuer designs for furnishings were mass-produced by the Thonet Brothers in Germany.

Two years later, in 1928, Breuer left the Bauhaus to begin a private architecture practice in Berlin, emphasizing prefabricated housing and the use of concrete in building. During this time Breuer worked on a designs for the Potsdamer Platz, Spandau-Haselhorst Housing, and a hospital in Elberfeld, and he completed work on the Lewin House and the Harnischmacher Apartment. Due to the deteriorating economic and political conditions in Germany, Breuer closed his Berlin office in 1931 and traveled to Budapest, Zurich, Morocco, Greece, and Spain. Returning to Germany in the following year, he began designing furniture in aluminum. Breuer established his reputation as an architect upon completion of the Harnischmacher House in Wiesbaden, a house notable for the use of contrasting materials and distinctive interiors.

The Nazis closed the Bauhaus in 1933. The following year, Breuer designed the Dolderthal Apartments in Zurich for the Swiss architectural historian Sigfried Giedion. From 1935 to 1937, Breuer settled in London, and became partners with F. R. S. Yorke. During this time he designed for the Isokon ("isometric unit construction") Control Company laminated plywood furniture that became widely imitated.

In 1937, Breuer accepted an invitation from Walter Gropius to join the faculty of the School of Design at Harvard University to teach architecture, and he moved to the United States. Among his students were Edward Larrabee Barnes, Ulrich Franzen, Philip Johnson, I. M. Pei, and Paul Rudolph. Breuer formed a partnership with Gropius in Cambridge, Massachusetts, from 1937 to 1941. Their firm was engaged primarily in the design of private homes.

In 1946, Breuer moved to New York City, where he established an office in an East 88th Street townhouse. The number of his commissions began to grow slowly, and it was during this time he constructed his own notable residence in New Canaan, Connecticut. He developed the bi-nuclear, or "two-center" house, which was designed to meet the living requirements of modern families by creating functional areas for separate activities.

Breuer's architectural reputation was greatly enhanced when, in 1953, he was commissioned to design, in collaboration with Pier Luigi Nervi and Bernard Zehrfuss, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Headquarters in Paris. During this year, he also began work on a series of innovative buildings for St. John's Abbey and University in Collegeville, Minnesota.

Between 1963 and 1964, Breuer began work on what is perhaps his best-known project, the Whitney Museum of American Art, in New York City. He also established an office with the name Marcel Breuer Architecte, in Paris, to better orchestrate his European projects. Also during this time, Herbert Beckhard, Murray Emslie, Hamilton Smith, and Robert F. Gatje became partners in Marcel Breuer and Associates. When Murray Emslie left a year later, he was replaced by Tician Papachristou, who had been recommended by Breuer's former student, I. M. Pei.

After several moves to increasingly larger office space in New York, Breuer established his largest office at 635 Madison Avenue and 59th Street in 1965. After suffering the first of a series of heart attacks, Breuer reduced his travel to Europe, eventually leaving the management of the Paris office in the hands of Mario Jossa.

Between 1965 and 1973, Marcel Breuer and Associates continued to receive many diverse and important commissions, including the Department of Housing and Urban Development Headquarters Building (Washington, D.C.), showrooms for Scarves by Vera (New York City), the IBM Corporation (La Gaude, France), the Baldegg Convent (Lucerne, Switzerland), Bryn Mawr School for Girls (Baltimore, Maryland), a third power plant for the Grand Coulee Dam, the Australian Embassy (Paris, France), the Armstrong Rubber Company (New Haven, Connecticut), and the State University of New York Engineering Complex (Buffalo). Breuer also designed residences including a second Gagarin House (Litchfield, Connecticut), the Saier House (Glanville-Calvados, France), the Soriano House (Greenwich, Connecticut), and a third Rufus Stillman House (Litchfield, Connecticut).

Due to failing health in 1972, Breuer sold his New Canaan house and moved into Manhattan so he could more easily commute to the office. By 1976, Breuer's health had declined further, and he retired from practice. The name of his firm was subtly changed from Marcel Breuer and Associates to Marcel Breuer Associates, and later to MBA/Architects and Planners.

Marcel Breuer died on July 1, 1981, in New York City.

This chronology below is based on evidence found within the Marcel Breuer Papers. The dating of projects reflects the range of dates encompassed by the files for each project, not the project's actual construction time. Most architectural projects have several equally significant dates from which it is difficult to assign a single date. Significant dates for a building may include the date of groundbreaking, the laying of the cornerstone, or the first opening day. When a project's dates are unknown or uncertain, a question mark in brackets appears at the end of the entry.

Missing Title

1902 -- Marcel Lajos Breuer is born on May 21 in Pécs, Hungary.

1920 -- Breuer graduates from Magyar Királyi Föreáliskola (high school) in Pécs. Breuer travels to Vienna to study art.

1921 -- Breuer enrolls at the Bauhaus, Wiemar, Germany. Furniture designs: tea table; wooden cabinet.

1922 -- Furniture designs: poltrana chair; side chairs. Exhibition: Bauhaus Exhibition, Berlin, Germany Haus-am-Horn

1923 -- Architectural project: apartment house (multistory duplex with continuous terrace gardens). Furniture designs: miscellaneous bureaus.

1924 -- Breuer earns a master's degree from the Bauhaus. Breuer studies architecture in Paris, where he meets Le Corbusier. Furniture designs: desk and bookcase.

1925 -- Breuer returns to the Bauhaus, now located in Dessau, and takes post of master of the carpentry workshop. Architectural projects: Canteen, Bauhaus-Dessau, Germany; Kleinmetallhaus (prefabricated house in steel); Gropius House, Dessau, Germany; Wissinger Apartment, Berlin, Germany [1925?]. Furniture designs: Wassily chair; Rückenlehnstuhl ("back-leaning chair"); tubular steel stool; modular system for cabinets.

1926 -- Breuer marries Martha Erps. Architectural projects: Gröte Residence, Dessau, Germany; Moholy-Nagy Apartment and Studio, Berlin, Germany; Muche House, Dessau, Germany; Piscator Apartment, Berlin, Germany; Thost House, Hamburg, Germany. Furniture designs:(modular) system for unit furniture; dining room chair; tubular steel chair; office chair; storage wall unit. Exhibition: Bauhaus Exhibition, Dessau, Germany; table for Kandinsky's Master's Studio.

1927 -- Architectural project: Bambos Houses, Dessau, Germany. Furniture designs: folding chair; theater chairs; tubular steel and wood desks.

1928 -- Breuer leaves the Bauhaus and establishes business in Berlin. Architectural projects: Potsdamer Platz, Berlin, Germany; Spandau-Haselhorst Housing, Spandau, Germany; Elberfeld Hospital, Elberfeld, Germany; Breuer Apartment, Berlin, Germany; Heinersdorff House, Berlin, Germany; Melder House, Mährisch-Ostrau, Czechoslovakia. Furniture designs: folding chair; Cesca dining room chair; tubular steel coffee table; tea wagon

1929 -- Architectural projects: Fuld Factory Competition, Frankfurt, Germany; Kharkov Theater, Kharkov, Ukraine, U.S.S.R.; De Francesco Apartment, Berlin, Germany; Harnischmacher Apartment, Wiesbaden, Germany; Heydt Apartment, Berlin, Germany; Lewin House, Berlin, Germany; Schneider House, Wiesbaden, Germany. Furniture design: armchair.

1930 -- Breuer meets György Kepes in Berlin. Architectural project: Boroschek Apartment, Berlin, Germany. Exhibitions: Bauhaus Exhibition, Berlin-Germany, House for a Sportsman, Cork Industry Display; Paris Werkbund Exhibition, Paris, France, Wohn Hotel, Vitrine and Cabinets, and Klubraum Gropius.

1931 -- Breuer closes the Berlin office and travels in Europe and North Africa. Architectural project: Reidemeister Residence, Berlin, Germany. Furniture design: bookcase. Exhibition: Bauausstellung Exhibition, Berlin, Germany, Mitarbeiter Hassenpflug Apartment.

1932 -- Breuer returns to Germany.

1933 -- Nazis close the Bauhaus. Architectural project: Harnischmacher House I, Wiesbaden, Germany. Furniture designs: aluminum chairs; aluminum tables.

1934 -- Breuer divorces Martha Erps. Architectural project: Dolderthal Apartments, Zurich, Switzerland. Exhibition Building Competition, Budapest Spring Fair, Budapest, Hungary.

1935 -- Breuer moves to London and forms partnership with F. R. S. Yorke. Furniture designs: Isokon chairs; plywood nesting tables; plywood dining table. Exhibition: Heal's "Seven Architects" Exhibition, London, England; Designs for two chairs.

1936 -- Architectural projects: Motley Fashion Shop, London, England; London Theatre Studio, London, England; Clifton House (Crofton Gane House), Bristol, England; Sea Lane House, Angmering-on-Sea, Sussex, England; Ventris Apartment, London, England. Exhibitions: Royal Show, Bristol, England, Gane's Pavilion; British Cement and Concrete Association Exhibition, London, England, Garden City of the Future (civic center).

1937 -- Breuer and Yorke dissolve their partnership. Breuer moves to the United States to teach at Harvard. Breuer and Walter Gropius establish Walter Gropius and Marcel Breuer, Associated Architects. Architectural project: Obergurgl Ski Lodge, Obergurgl, Austria.

1938 -- Architectural projects: Wheaton College Competition, Art Center, Norton, Massachusetts; Fischer House and Studio, Newtown, Pennsylvania; Gropius House, Lincoln, Massachusetts; Haggerty House, Cohasset, Massachusetts; Margolius House, Palm Springs, California. Furniture design: cabinet with hinged drawers. Exhibition: "Marcel Breuer and the American Tradition in Architecture," Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

1939 -- Architectural projects: Black Mountain College, Black Mountain, North Carolina; Breuer House, Lincoln, Massachusetts; Ford House, Lincoln, Massachusetts; Frank House, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Exhibition: New York World's Fair, Flushing Meadows, New York; Pennsylvania Pavilion.

1940 -- Breuer marries Constance Crocker Leighton. Architectural projects: Chamberlain Cottage, Wayland, Massachusetts; Weizenblatt House, Asheville, North Carolina.

1941 -- Breuer and Gropius dissolve their partnership. Architectural project: New Kensington Defense Housing, New Kensington, Pennsylvania.

1942 -- Architectural projects: Plas-2-Point Demountable Houses; Yankee Portables.

1943 -- Architectural projects: South Boston Redevelopment Project, Boston, Massachusetts; Stuyvesant Six (housing development), New York, New York; Wellfleet Housing Development, Bi-Nuclear "H" House, Wellfleet, Massachusetts.

1944 -- Architectural projects: Van Leer Vatenfabrieken N.V., Office Building, Amstelveen, The Netherlands; 1200 Square Foot House, Florida; Geller House I, Lawrence, Long Island, New York; East River Apartments, New York, New York; Long Beach Nurses' Residence, Long Beach, Long Island, New York.

1945 -- Architectural projects: Eastern Airlines Ticket Office, Boston, Massachusetts; Smith College Competition, Dormitories, Northampton, Massachusetts; Unidentified Memorial, [location unknown]; Cambridge War Memorial, Cambridge, Massachusetts; Florida House, Miami Heights, Florida; Tompkins House, Hewlett Harbor Village, Long Island, New York.

1946 -- Breuer and family move to New York City. Breuer establishes an office on East 88th Street. Architectural projects: Small House Competition; Martine House, Stamford, Connecticut; Preston Robinson House, Williamstown, Massachusetts.

1947 -- Architectural projects: Breuer House I, New Canaan, Connecticut; Scott House, Dennis, Massachusetts; Thompson House, Ligonier, Pennsylvania.

1948 -- Architectural projects: Ariston Club, Mar del Plata, Argentina; Breuer Cottage, Wellfleet, Massachusetts; Kniffin House, New Canaan, Connecticut; Witalis House, Saddle Rock, Kings Point, New York; Wise Cottage, Wellfleet, Massachusetts. Exhibition: Low Cost Furniture Competition, Museum of Modern Art, New York, Cutout plywood chair.

1949 -- Publication of book, Marcel Breuer: Architect and Designer, by Peter Blake. Architectural projects: United States Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO); Headquarters, Paris, France; Clark House, Orange, Connecticut; Herrick House, Canajoharie, New York; Hooper Residence Additions, Baltimore, Maryland; Marshad House, Croton-on-Hudson, New York; Smith House, Aspen, Colorado; Tilley House, Middletown, New Jersey; Wolfson Trailer House, Pleasant Valley, New York. Exhibition: Museum of Modern Art Exhibition, New York, New York, House in museum garden.

1950 -- Breuer moves his office to East 37th Street, New York. Architectural projects: Alaska Air Terminal, Anchorage, Alaska [1950?]; Sarah Lawrence College, Arts Center, Bronxville, New York; Vassar College, Dwight Ferry House (a cooperative dormitory), Poughkeepsie, New York; Aspen House, Aspen, Colorado; Englund House, Pleasantville, New York; Hanson House, Lloyd Harbor, Huntington, Long Island, New York; Lauck House, Princeton, New Jersey; McComb House, Poughkeepsie, New York; Mills House, New Canaan, Connecticut; Pack House, Scarsdale, New York; Rufus Stillman House I, Litchfield, Connecticut.

1951 -- Architectural projects: Grosse Pointe Public Library, Grosse Pointe, Michigan; Aufricht House Addition, Mamaroneck, New York; Breuer House II, New Canaan, Connecticut; Caesar House, Lakeville, Connecticut. Furniture design: Canaan desk.

1952 -- Architectural projects: Scarves by Vera, Showroom, New York, New York; Levy House, Princeton, New Jersey; George Robinson House, Redding Ridge, Connecticut; Tibby House, Port Washington, New York.

1953 -- Architectural projects: Bantam Elementary School, Litchfield, Connecticut; Litchfield High School, Litchfield, Connecticut; Northfield Elementary School, Litchfield, Connecticut; St. John's Abbey and University, Monastery Wing, Abbey Church and Bell Banner, Collegeville, Minnesota; Torrington Manufacturing Company, Oakville, Ontario, Canada; De Bijenkorf Department Store and Garage, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Calabi House, Lagrangeville, New York; Crall House, Gates Mills, Ohio; Gagarin House I, Litchfield, Connecticut; Neumann House, Croton-on-Hudson, New York; Snower House, Kansas City, Missouri; Edgar Stillman House, Wellfleet, Massachusetts. Exhibition: Tile Council of America Exhibition, New York, New York, Patio-Bathroom.

1954 -- Architectural projects: New London Railroad Station, New London, Connecticut; Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey; Grieco House, Andover, Massachusetts; Harnischmacher House II, Wiesbaden, Germany; Karsten House, Owings Mills, Maryland; Starkey House (formerly Alworth House), Duluth, Minnesota.

1955 -- Publication of book, Sun and Shadow: The Philosophy of an Architect, edited by Peter Blake. Architectural projects: New York, New Haven, and Hartford Railroad, Train "X," Budd "Hot Rod," Budd "Flying Cloud," and ACF Talgo Locomotives and Passenger Cars, Rye Railroad Station, Rye, New York [1955?]; Connecticut Junior Republic Association Dormitory, Litchfield, Connecticut; Torrington High School, Torrington, Connecticut; Hunter College, Library, Classrooms, and Administration Building, Bronx, New York; Annunciation Priory, Bismarck, North Dakota; O. E. McIntyre, Inc. Plant, Westbury, Long Island, New York; Laaff House, Andover, Massachusetts; McGinnis Apartment, Biltmore, New York, New York; McGinnis House, Charlmont, Massachusetts. Exhibition: Good Design Exhibition, Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York, Hyperbolic Paraboloid.

1956 -- Breuer moves his office to Third Avenue and 57th Street, New York. Breuer is the first recipient of La Rinascente's Compasso d'Oro Prize. Architectural projects: U.S. Embassy, The Hague, The Netherlands; Boston and Maine Railroad, North Station Industrial Building; Boston and Maine Railroad, Fairbanks Morse Locomotive and Passenger Cars; New Haven Railroad Station, New Haven, Connecticut; New York University, University Heights Campus, Bronx, New York; Torrington Manufacturing Company, Van Nuys, California; Wohnbedarf Furniture Showroom, Zurich, Switzerland; Hooper House, Baltimore, Maryland; Krieger House, Bethesda, Maryland; Staehelin House, Feldmeilen, Switzerland.

1957 -- Breuer receives an honorary doctorate from the University of Budapest. Architectural project: Westchester Reform Temple, Scarsdale, New York. Exhibitions: International Autumn Fair, Vienna, Austria, U.S. Pavilion; "Amerika Baut" ("America Builds"), Marshall House, Berlin, Germany.

1958 -- Breuer becomes a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects. Architectural projects: El Recreo Urban Center, Caracas, Venezuela; St. John's Abbey and University, St. Thomas Aquinas Residence Hall, Collegeville, Minnesota; Halvorson House, Dryberry Lake Area, Kenora, Ontario, Canada; Recreational Apartments, Tanaguarena, Venezuela. Exhibitions: "Ars Sacra" Exhibition, Louvain, France; Concrete Industries Exposition, Cleveland, Ohio, The Pavilion.

1959 -- Architectural projects: Whitby Elementary School, Greenwich, Connecticut; Ustinov House, Vevey, Switzerland. Exhibitions: "U.S. Architecture in Moscow," Moscow, U.S.S.R.; "1960 National Gold Medal Exhibition of the Building Arts," Museum of Contemporary Crafts, New York, New York, Photographic Displays of Various Breuer Projects; "Form Givers at Mid-Century" (traveling exhibition), Photographic Displays of Various Breuer Projects.

1960 -- Architectural projects: Flaine Ski Resort Town, Haute-Savoie, France; St. John's Abbey and University, Library, Collegeville, Minnesota; Brookhaven National Laboratory (for Nuclear Research), Upton, Long Island, New York; Torrington Manufacturing Company, Rochester, Indiana; Abraham & Straus Department Store, Facade, Hempstead, Long Island, New York; McMullen Beach House, Mantoloking, New Jersey.

1961 -- Architectural projects: St. Francis de Sales Church, Church and Rectory, Muskegon, Michigan; Temple B'Nai Jeshurun, Short Hills, Millburn Township, New Jersey; One Charles Center, Baltimore, Maryland; International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), Research Center, La Gaude, France; Fairview Heights Apartments, Ithaca, New York. Exhibitions: "Bauhaus" [location unknown]; "New Forms in Concrete," American Federation of Arts (traveling exhibition).

1962 -- Publication of book, Marcel Breuer Buildings and Projects, 1921-1961, by Cranston Jones. Architectural projects: Torrington Manufacturing Company, Machine Division, Torrington, Connecticut; Scarves by Vera, Showroom, Los Angeles, California; Kacmarcik House, St. Paul, Minnesota. Exhibition: "Fourth Biennale of Present-Day Christian Art," Salzburg Dome, Salzburg, Austria.

1963 -- Herbert Beckhard, Murray Emslie, and Hamilton Smith become partners in Marcel Breuer and Associates. Architectural projects: Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Headquarters Building, Washington, D.C.; Hoboken Terminal Building, Hoboken, New Jersey; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, New York; Grand Central Air Rights Building, 175 Park Avenue, New York, New York; Torrington Manufacturing Company, Nivelles, Belgium; Koerfer House, Moscia, Tessin, Switzerland; Van der Wal House, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Exhibitions: "Recent American Synagogue Architecture," The Jewish Museum, New York, New York; "Churches and Temples: Postwar Architecture," American Institute of Architects, Pepsi Cola Gallery, New York, New York; "On Campus: Recent Buildings," American Federation of Arts (traveling exhibition).

1964 -- Breuer establishes an office near the Parc des Expositions, Paris, France. Robert F. Gatje becomes a partner in Marcel Breuer and Associates. Murray Emslie leaves, and Tician Papachristou joins Marcel Breuer and Associates. Architectural projects: Boston Redevelopment Parcel 8 Competition, Boston, Massachusetts; ZUP (Zone à Urbaniser par Priorité/"Zone Designated for Priority Urbanization") Community, Bayonne, France; New York University, University Heights Campus, Technology Building II, Bronx, New York; St. John's Abbey and University, Science Hall, and Auditorium, Collegeville, Minnesota; Yale University, Becton Center for Engineering and Applied Science, New Haven, Connecticut; St. Luke's Church, Fairport, New York; Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial, Washington, D.C.; Scarves by Vera, Showroom and Offices, 417 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York; De Gunzburg Houses, Megève, Haute-Savoie, France; Rufus Stillman House II, Litchfield, Connecticut. Exhibition: "Art in the United States" Part III, ("Architecture in the U.S.A."), Brearley School, New York, New York.

1965 -- Breuer's Paris office (Marcel Breuer Architecte) moves to 48 rue Chapon in the third arrondissement. Breuer's New York office moves to 635 Madison Avenue and 59th Street. Breuer suffers the first of a series of heart attacks while in New York in August. Architectural projects: Interama (Community for Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay), Miami, Fla.; Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) Headquarters, Washington, D.C.; State School for the Mentally Retarded, Nassau County, New York; Cardinal Stritch College (Tri-Arts Center), Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Mary College, Bismarck, North Dakota; University of Massachusetts, Murray Lincoln Campus Center and Parking Structure, Amherst, Massachusetts; Laboratoires Sarget, Corporate Headquarters and Pharmaceutical Plant, Bordeaux, France; Purdue Frederick Company, Corporate Headquarters, Bordeaux, France; Torrington Manufacturing Company, Swindon, England; Torrington Manufacturing Company, Administration Building, Torrington, Connecticut. Exhibition: "Architecture of Industry," Architectural League of New York, (traveling exhibition).

1966 -- Breuer and Robert F. Gatje move back to the New York office. Eric Cercler and Mario Jossa are left in charge of the Paris office. Architectural projects: Sports Park, Corona-Flushing Meadow Park, Queens, New York; Charlotte Hungersford Hospital, Torrington, Connecticut; Stables Competition, Central Park, New York, New York; St. John's Abbey and University, Student Residence Hall II and Student Center and Swimming Pavilion, Collegeville, Minnesota. Furniture design: Tapestries. Exhibitions: Svoboda & Company Furniture Exhibition," Selection 66," Vienna, Austria; School of Architecture Exhibition, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma; "Rugs," Stephen Radich Gallery, New York, New York; "Bauhaus: A Teaching Idea," Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

1967 -- Architectural projects: Campus High School, Secondary Education Complex, Madison Park Urban Renewal Area, Boston, Massachusetts; Kent School, Girls' Chapel, Kent, Connecticut; St. John's Abbey and University, Ecumenical and Cultural Research Center, Collegeville, Minnesota; Cleveland Museum of Art, Education Wing, Cleveland, Ohio; Baldegg Convent, Mother House Institute, near Lucerne, Switzerland; Cleveland Trust Company, Bank and Office Building, Cleveland, Ohio; Grand Coulee Dam, Columbia Basin Project Third Power Plant and Forebay Dam, Douglas County, Washington; Geller House II, Lawrence, Long Island, New York; Kreizel House Addition, [location unknown]; Soriano House, Greenwich, Connecticut.

1968 -- Breuer is awarded the Gold Medal of the American Institute of Architects. Breuer is awarded the Jefferson Foundation Medal in Architecture from the University of Virginia. Architectural projects: Olgiata Parish Church, Rome, Italy; Harrison-State Development Corporation, Office Building, Bristol Center, Syracuse, New York; Armstrong Rubber Company, New Haven, Connecticut; International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), Expansion of Headquarters Facility, Armonk, New York; International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), Offices, Laboratories, and Manufacturing Facility, Boca Raton, Florida; Scarves by Vera, Showroom, 1411 Broadway, New York, New York; Rosenberg House, [location unknown].

1969 -- Mario Jossa is made sole director of the Paris office. Architectural projects: West Queens High School, Long Island City, Queens, New York; Harvard University, Bio-Chemistry Building, Cambridge, Massachusetts; Boston Office Building, 60 State Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Exhibition: "Le Bauhaus: 1919-1969," Musée National d'Art Moderne et Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Paris, France.

1970 -- Breuer receives an honorary doctorate from Harvard University. Publication of book, Marcel Breuer New Buildings and Projects, by Tician Papachristou. Architectural projects: Australian Embassy, Paris, France; Bryn Mawr School for Girls, Baltimore, Maryland; State University of New York at Buffalo, Engineering and Applied Science Complex, Buffalo, New York; University of Virginia, Physics Building, Charlottesville, Virginia. Exhibition: ["Marcel Breuer"?], Szépmuvészeti Múzeum (Museum of Fine Arts), Budapest, Hungary.

1971 -- Architectural projects: Acquitaine Coast Resort, Port Contis, France; Atlanta Central Library, Atlanta, Georgia; Pine Ridge High School, Pine Ridge, South Dakota; Marlborough-Gerson Gallery, New York, New York; European Investment Bank, Kirchberg Plateau, Luxembourg; Torin Corporation, Tech Center, Building 1, Torrington, Connecticut.

1972 -- Breuer suffers another heart attack in Kabul, Afghanistan. Breuer sells his house in New Canaan and moves to 63rd Street, New York. Architectural projects: Clarksburg Public Library, Clarksburg, West Virginia; Southern New England Telephone Company (SNET), Traffic Service Position; Systems Building, Torrington, Connecticut; American Press Institute, Conference Center, Reston, Virginia; Afghanistan Hotels, Kabul and Bamyan, Afghanistan; Picker House, Lake Carmel, New York; Saier House, Glanville-Calvados, France. Exhibitions: "Breuer en France," Knoll International, Paris, France; "Marcel Breuer at the Metropolitan Museum of Art" (traveling exhibition), Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York.

1973 -- Architectural projects: Heckscher Museum, Expansion Project, Huntington, New York; Defendon Pharma, Limburg an der Lahn, Germany; Torin Corporation, Sculpture, Torrington, Connecticut; Torin Corporation, Assembly Plant, Lawton, Oklahoma; Gagarin House II, Litchfield, Connecticut; Rufus Stillman House III, Litchfield, Connecticut. Exhibition: "Marcel Breuer at the Metropolitan Museum of Art" (traveling exhibition), Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago, Illinois.

1974 -- Architectural projects: Strom Thurmond Courthouse and Federal Office Building, Columbia, South Carolina; Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority, Red Line Subway Expansion, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Exhibitions: "The Flowering of American Folk Art," Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, New York, Installation designed by Breuer and Hamilton Smith; "Marcel Breuer at the Metropolitan Museum of Art" (traveling exhibition), Centre de Création Industrielle, Pavillon de Marsan, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, France.

1975 -- Architectural projects: Lawton Community, Lawton, Oklahoma; Mundipharma, Limburg, Germany; Andrew Geller Shoes, Inc., Showroom, New York, New York; Mt. Tochal Hotel, Tehran, Iran. Exhibition: "Marcel Breuer at the Metropolitan Museum of Art" (traveling exhibition), Bauhaus-Archiv, Berlin-Charlottenburg, Germany.

1976 -- Breuer retires from practice. Marcel Breuer and Associates becomes Marcel Breuer Associates and later MBA/Architects and Planners. Architectural projects: Sadat City Ministries Complex, Cairo, Egypt; National Museum of American Amusement, [location unknown]; Torin Corporation, Penrith, Australia; Mideast Market (fish, meat, and vegetable market), Kuwait; Cairo Airport Hotel, Cairo, Egypt; Bratti House, New Canaan, Connecticut.

1977 -- Mario Jossa becomes a partner in MBA/Architects and Planners. Architectural projects: BAFO Warehouse, Springfield, Virginia; ITT Palm Coast Condominiums, Flagler Beach, Florida. Exhibition: "Art and Contemporary Architecture," David Findlay Galleries, New York, New York.

1978 -- Breuer receives the Grand Médaille d'Or from the Academy of Architecture, France. Architectural projects: Litchfield County Courthouse, Litchfield, Connecticut; Grand Coulee Dam, Columbia River Basin Project, Visitors Arrival Center, Douglas County, Washington.

1979 -- Architectural project: Boyarsky House, Lawrence, New York.

1980 -- Breuer receives an honorary doctorate from the Parsons School of Design. MBA/Architects and Planners moves to 26th Street, New York. MBA/Architects and Planners sells the Paris practice to Mario Jossa. Architectural projects: Pall Corporation, Headquarters and Parking Structure, Glen Cove, New York; Philip Morris, Inc., Manufacturing Facility, Cabarrus County, North Carolina; Pittsburgh Convention Center Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

1981 -- Marcel Breuer dies on July 1 in New York City. Architectural projects: N F & M Corporation, Jericho, New York; Garces House, Cali, Colombia.

1982 -- Herbert Beckhard leaves the partnership in November. Architectural projects: Xerox Corporation, [location unknown]; General Electric Company, Waldorf Towers Apartment, New York, New York; General Electric Company, Chairman's Office Competition, New York, New York; General Electric Company, Corporate Guest Facility and Helipad, Lewisboro, New York.

1983 -- Partnership now called Gatje Papachristou Smith, and is located in offices on lower Fifth Avenue, New York. Architectural project: 44th Street Precinct House, Bronx, New York.

1986 -- Partnership of Gatje Papachristou Smith dissolved.
Related Archival Materials note:
Additional blueprints and drawings by Breuer are located at Syracuse University.

A presentation book for the IBM Research Center in La Gaude, France, is located in the Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris.
Provenance:
The collection was donated to the Archives of American Art in five installments, 1985-1999, by Constance Breuer, widow of Marcel Breuer.
Restrictions:
The microfilm for this collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
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Citation:
Marcel Breuer papers, 1920-1986. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.breumarc
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Marcel Breuer papers
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