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MS 2028 Notebook containing North American Indian and other vocabularies collected by A.S. Gatschet and others, and miscellaneous notes and bibliographic references

Creator:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Loew, O. (Oscar), 1844-  Search this
Brinton, Daniel G. (Daniel Garrison), 1837-1899  Search this
Lyell, Charles, Sir, 1797-1875  Search this
Informant:
Antonia, Marie  Search this
Extent:
216 Items (ca. 216 pages)
Culture:
American Indian  Search this
Santa Ana Pueblo  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Yohuns  Search this
Yojuane  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Dakota (Eastern Sioux)  Search this
Kasua  Search this
Tongva (Gabrielino Mission)  Search this
Poospatuck  Search this
Apache  Search this
Minitari (Hidatsa)  Search this
Carib  Search this
Arawak  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Jemez Pueblo  Search this
Guatuso  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
Chibcha  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Unkechaug  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
ca. 1890's
Scope and Contents:
The material is in the handwriting of A.S. Gatschet, in a composition book. In the same volume are numerous miscellaneous notes, many in German script; brief bibliographic notes, and notes of an apparently personal nature. There are also extracts from the Codex Wangianus, from Charles Lyell, and from others. In addition, there is a Chinese vocabulary in Chinese characters, on pages 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, and one sheet pasted in book.
Partial contents: Carib terms (obtained from Maria Antonia, a native of Rio Frio, Costa Rica (or Chulpan, native name), 6 pages. Guatuso words, 3 pages. (same source.) Apache words and sentences, page 112. Santa Ana vocabulary (additional page.) Hopi vocabulary, page 113. Jemez vocabulary, page 113. Tehua (Tewa) page 114. Isleta vocabulary, page 114. Yohuns (Yojuane) vocabulary, page 115. Notes to vocabularies, page 115. Dakota language (words, etc.) page 122-129. Apache language (words, etc.) page 130. Dakota (Santee), page 131. Hidatsa, page 132. List of American languages, pages 133-138. Nevome grammatical notes, page 148. (Kasua) vocabulary, pages 151-152. Tobikhars (Gabrieleno) vocabulary, page 153. Island of LaCruz page 154 (from California Farmer- 1836). Few Poosepatuck words, page 154. Received by A.S. Gatschet, September 6, 1875. Chibcha vocabulary pages 155-170. Arawak language of Guiana in its linguistic and ethnological relations. By D.G. Brinton (1871) - Extracts from, pages 188-190. Chabas, les Papyrus---de Berlin, 1863- vocabulary in hieroglyphic symbols, pages 194-5. Hidatsa vocabulary, pages 206-208.
Page 114- Brief discussion of location of "Tehua" (Tanoan) pueblos. Gatschet, A.S. Pages 151-52 in notebook- "Kasua" vocabulary. June, 1875. Loew, Oscar. Page 153- Brief vocabulary of the "Tobokhars, extinct tribe at the San Gabriel Mission, collected from an old sick chief, [by] Oscar Lowe, June, 1875...(Fernando Quinto, who recollects Fremont's Exped..." This is not the same as the main "Tobikhar" vocabulary from Lowe in Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscript 774. Page 113- Note on "Moqui" (Hopi) language, with brief vocabulary. Gatschet, A.S. 1 slip bound between pages 112-113 in notebook- Eleven words and phrases of the Santa Ana or Silla language. Gatschet, A.S. Pages 122-129-Dakota vocabularies. 1890's? Autograph document. Gatschet, A.S.
Contents: Carib terms (obtained from Maria Antonia (or Chulpan, native name), 6 pages. Guatuso words, 3 pages (same source) Apache words and sentences, page 112. Santa Ana vocabulary (additional page) Hopi vocabulary page 113. Jemez vocabulary page 113. Tehua (Tewa) page 114. Isleta vocabulary page 114. Yohuns (Yojuane) vocabulary page 115. Notes to vocabularies, page 115. Dakota language (words, etc.) pages 122-129. Apache language (words, etc.) page 130. Dakota (Santee) page 131. Hidatsa page 132. List of American Languages, pages 133-138. Nevome grammatical notes page 148. Kasua vocabulary pages 151-152. Tobikhars (Gabrieleno) vocabulary page 153. Island of LaCruz page 154 8from California Farmer - 1836). Few Poosepatuck words, page 154. Received from A. S. Gatschet September 6, 1875. Chibcha vocabulary pages 155-170. Arawak language of Guiana in its linguistic and ethnological relations By D. G. Brinton (1871) - Extracts from pages 188-190 Chabas, les Papyrus --- de Berlin, 1863- vocabulary in hieroglyphic symbols, page 194-5. Hidatsa vocabulary pages 206-208.
Contents: Tanoan. Gatschet, A. S. Brief discussion of location of "Tehua" (Tanoan) pueblos. 1/3 page, page 114. Barbareno Chumash. Loew, Oscar. "Kasua" vocabulary. June, 1875. Pages 151-52 in notebook. Gabrielino. Loew, Oscar. Brief vocabulary of "Tobikhars, extinct tribe at the San Gabriel Mission, collected from an old sick chief, [by] Oscar Loew, June, 1875...(Fernando Quinto. who recollects Fremont's Exped..." Page 153 in notebook. This is not the same as the main "Tobikhar" vocabulary from Loew in Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscript 774. Hopi. Gatschet, A. S. Note on "Moqui" (Hopi) language, with brief vocabulary. Page 113 (1/4 page) in notebook. Page 113 on Microfilm Negative Reel 11 (Hopi manuscript reel). Sia. Gatschet, A. S. Eleven words and phrases of the Santa Ana or Silla language. 1 slip, bound between pages 112-113 in notebook. Dakota Gatschet, A. S. Dakota vocabularies. [1890s ?] Autograph document. 7 pages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2028
Topic:
Vocabularies -- American Indian  Search this
Writing systems -- hieroglyphics  Search this
Writing systems -- Chinese  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2028, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2028
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw33315191f-7e36-4e6f-8434-7f0794d2fc56
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2028

Headdress (Image withheld)

Culture/People:
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Previous owner:
Helen M. Greene (Helen Margaret Schweitzer-Stiefel), Non-Indian, 1901-1986  Search this
Seller:
Helen M. Greene (Helen Margaret Schweitzer-Stiefel), Non-Indian, 1901-1986  Search this
Object Name:
Headdress (Image withheld)
Media/Materials:
Cardboard
Techniques:
Painted
Object Type:
Ceremonial/Ritual items
Place:
Third Mesa, Hopi Reservation; Navajo County; Arizona; USA
Date created:
1958
Catalog Number:
22/6435
Barcode:
226435.000
See related items:
Hopi Pueblo
Ceremonial/Ritual items
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws67c1fce09-c16c-4c8e-9738-1e5f6cd29be4
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_241404

Jewelry mold

Culture/People:
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Artist/Maker:
Mary Day, Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Collector:
Helen M. Greene (Helen Margaret Schweitzer-Stiefel), Non-Indian, 1901-1986  Search this
Previous owner:
Helen M. Greene (Helen Margaret Schweitzer-Stiefel), Non-Indian, 1901-1986  Search this
Donor:
Helen M. Greene (Helen Margaret Schweitzer-Stiefel), Non-Indian, 1901-1986  Search this
Object Name:
Jewelry mold
Media/Materials:
Stone
Techniques:
Carved
Dimensions:
15.20 x 9.50 x 2.10 cm
Object Type:
Metal and Jewelry Tools and Equipment
Place:
Pine Springs, Navajo Reservation; Apache County; Arizona; USA
Date created:
1958
Catalog Number:
22/7719
Barcode:
227719.000
See related items:
Diné (Navajo)
Metal and Jewelry Tools and Equipment
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6bfe910ce-6a33-4aef-993d-6a74690bb7cd
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_242384
Online Media:

Basket jar

Culture/People:
Seri  Search this
Previous owner:
Helen M. Greene (Helen Margaret Schweitzer-Stiefel), Non-Indian, 1901-1986  Search this
Seller:
Helen M. Greene (Helen Margaret Schweitzer-Stiefel), Non-Indian, 1901-1986  Search this
Object Name:
Basket jar
Media/Materials:
Torote/Jatropha fiber
Techniques:
Coiled
Object Type:
Containers and Vessels
Place:
Baja California; Baja California State, Baja California Sur State; Mexico
Date created:
1957
Catalog Number:
22/7515
Barcode:
227515.000
See related items:
Seri
Containers and Vessels
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6952cd40f-429f-4f6d-870f-4553277a9685
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_242472
Online Media:

Cahuilla

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Anza, Juan Bautista de, 1735-1788  Search this
Font, Pedro, -1781  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
16 Boxes
Culture:
Cahuilla  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Diaries
Manuscripts
Narratives
Songs
Place:
California -- History
California -- Discovery and exploration
Date:
1922-1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Cahuilla. Materials include comparative vocabulary, grammar, texts, writings, and miscellaneous linguistic notes.

The comparative vocabulary section contains terms excerpted from "Hopi Journal of Alexander M. Stephen," edited by Elsie Clews Parsons. Benjamin L. Whorf had reviewed the glossary compiled by Parsons while it was still in manuscript form and had appended to it Hopi terms from his own fieldwork. Harrington elicited equivalent terms in Cahuilla and Luiseno from Adan Castillo and made notes relative to a November 1926 interview with Whorf. There are minimal notes on phonetics and morphology. A later semantic vocabulary, variously dated between February 1944 and 1947, also contains Cahuilla and Luiseno equivalences. There are occasional Cupeno and Gabrielino terms and, rarely, a word or expression in Paiute, Yuma, Hopi, Pima, and Papago. Some grammatical elaborations are interspersed, with Castillo again the principal source.

The grammatical section is the most substantial part of the Cahuilla material. A 1948 draft of a proposed grammar was sent to C. F. Voegelin for his comments. On hand are preliminary draft pages with notes interspersed, some in English and some in Spanish. The introductory material touches on history, ethnology, other dialects, and foreign influences on the Cahuilla language. Luiseno notes form a large part of a group of notes marked "Rejects" or "Rejects and Pending." There is also a great of data from rehearings with Castillo. Random terms are expressed in Luiseno, Cupeno, and Tubatulabal. There are also terms in Pima, Papago, and Tewa, probably excerpted from Harrington's own field notes.

The texts portion of the subseries contains Adan Castillo's biography, the Lord's Prayer, and native myths and stories, some of which were used in Harrington's version of Chinigchinich. One small section contains several song texts. These contain Luiseno equivalences and an occasional Gabrielino term. Cahuilla, English, and Spanish are intermixed in a general interlinear format.

The writings section contains Harrington's efforts to publish a translation in Cahuilla of the diaries of the Juan Bautista de Anza expeditions of 1774-1776. The diaries of de Anza, Juan Diaz, and Pedro Font are arranged in chronological order from March 10, 1774, to May 7,1776. There are sketch maps of the de Anza routes, miscellaneous reading notes, and some linguistic and ethnographic comments from Castillo. Also filed in the category of writings are the notes for Harrington's article "Chuckwalla, a Cahuilla Indian Word," published in 1947 in El Palacio. Undated material for another proposed paper titled "The Non-denotive Framework of the Cahuilla Language" consists mainly of headings with sparsely scattered linguistic notes. Late in the 1950s during his retirement years in California, Harrington began to extract information from his earlier notes for possible use in a paper tentatively titled "Solutions of the Origin of the Tribal Name Cahuilla." These notes comprise the final group in the series on writings.

The subseries also contains miscellaneous linguistic notes. There are five pages of vocabulary provided by Luisa Barelas on March 21, 1922. Carbon copies of the June 1922 census of the Mission Indians include some information on farm production, stock counts, and car ownership, but lack linguistic annotations. There are also placenames extracted from eighteen unratified treaties of 1851. Placenames include northern, central, and southern California. Linguistic and ethnographic notes of the above are from Castillo, Clem Segundo, and Lee Arenas. There is also a 1952 document on Indian rights signed by Castillo and Purl Willis.

Since large portions of Harrington's Cahuilla field notes underwent frequent rehearings and reorganizations in Washington, new data often alternate with material collected several years earlier. Scattered gaps in pagination can probably be attributed to this method of collection.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Cahuilla language  Search this
Cupeño language  Search this
Gabrielino language  Search this
Luiseño language  Search this
Hopi language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Diaries
Manuscripts
Narratives
Songs
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 3.7
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3ab51847c-d36b-42f7-a459-b18e15ab873d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14294
Online Media:

Hopi

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Boxe
Culture:
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Place:
Arizona
Date:
1913-1946
Scope and Contents:
This set of files contains Harrington's Hopi research. The materials consist of Oraibi linguistic notes, Walpi linguistic notes, notes on phonetics, writings, and miscellaneous notes.

His Oraibi notes include geographical terms provided by Bert Fredericks in slipfile format, a short etymology of the village name Awatobi, and a small rudimentary file of phonetic sounds. While at Elden Pueblo, Harrington also elicited several Oraibi terms from Otto Lomavitu, described as an educated Indian associated with the Moravian missionaries. Kuyawaima, an elderly Oraibi, provided information on basket-making during another interview in August 1926. The majority of the early records in the Oraibi dialect consist of numbered pages of Harrington's handwritten notes which emerge as a combination of vocabulary, phrases, and grammar in the early stages of development, followed by a brief text on Coyote with interlinear translation. Pages 38, 39, and 40 contain a selected number of terms in Zuni.There is one brief mention of an individual named Ignacio but it is not clear whether the vocabularies originated with him. The elicitation was based partly on a rehearing of a typed "Oraivi Vocabulary" found accompanying the handwritten notes. Harrington was in California in 1912 and early 1913 and was engaged in various projects, one of which was copying manuscripts at the Bancroft Library, a possible source of this material.

Harrington's Walpi data from the work in 1926 and 1939 are of a much less systematic nature. A pocket-sized notebook which he used while at the Grand Canyon contains notes from a brief survey of Walpi speakers, random vocabulary items from Percy Hilling, and an outline of the sequence of songs performed by kutKa, the chief of Walpi, and others. Also recorded during this period are additional lexical items, possibly obtained from a man named Sam, and five pages describing a placename trip which Harrington made from Polacca to Holbrook.

The material from 1939 consists of notes from several brief interviews with Walpi speakers encountered in the Fort Defiance area. On September 27, 1939, Harrington recorded one page of placenames from the son of Tom Polacca, an interpreter at First Mesa in the 1880s and 1890s. Additional placename data were obtained from an unidentified Hopi speaker at the home of Jack Snow. Following each of the vocabularies are copies which Harrington made of the names in 1944 in order to locate them on a map by Van Valkenburgh (1941). Three pages of miscellaneous vocabulary from an unidentified source also date from the 1939 period.

His notes on phonetics were likely made during his comparative study of Hopi and other Uto-Aztecan languages. Harrington made a number of observations on the phonetics of the language. These were recorded in the form of a "Hopi Mouthmap." Secondary sources referred to were Parsons (1936), Trubetskoi (1939), Whiting (1939), and Whorf (unspecified works). The mouthmap appeared in Hewett, Dutton, and Harrington's The Pueblo Indian World (1945).

His Hopi writings consist of preparatory notes and drafts in various stages of completion. From 1945-1946 are notes, handwritten drafts, and finished typescripts of his review of The Hopi Way by Laura Thompson and Alice Joseph, as well as the article "Note on the Names Moqui and Hopi." Both of these were published in the American Anthropologist. There is also a typed draft of an unpublished note, intended for release in Indians at Work, titled "Hopi Discovered To Be Most Nearly Akin to Northern Paiute."

Dating from both the periods around 1922 and 1939 are a number of pages of miscellaneous notations. These contain observations of an ethnographic nature, bibliographies, and brief extracts from secondary sources. One set, consisting of comments on seven "landnames," was obtained from an informant referred to as "Hopi at Jack Snow's." Also included is correspondence dated 1914 requesting information on Hopi rocks and a related photograph (originals in files of correspondence and photographs).

There are few field notes relative to the Hopi recordings Harrington made with Fewkes and Prescott and the related sound recordings have not been located.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington's field notes indicate that he worked on the Hopi language as early as 1913 and reviewed his material as late as 1944. Although he published a short article on Hopi in 1945 and a review of The Hopi Way (1944) in 1946, his notes on this language are not extensIve.

His first contact with speakers of Hopi evidently occurred in 1913, as suggested by his heading "Hopi Language. 1913." A more precise date and location are not given, but it is possible that Harrington made a side trip to the Third Mesa during February when he was working at a number of other pueblos or that he located a speaker of the Oraibi dialect at one of those locations.

From May through September of 1926, Harrington was called away from fieldwork in northern California to assist J. Walter Fewkes, head of the Bureau of American Ethnology, in archeological excavations at Elden Pueblo near Flagstaff, Arizona. According to The B.A.E. Annual Report for 1925 -1926 (p. 5), prior to the excavations, Harrington and J. O. Prescott assisted Fewkes in the recording of Hopi songs. Four of the older Hopi were brought from Walpi to the Grand Canyon, where they performed 11 katcina songs.

Harrington had a second opportunity to record several short vocabularies in the dialect of First Mesa in 1939 when he and Robert W. Young were beginning joint work on Athapascan in the Fort Defiance area of Arizona. His interest in Hopi was renewed again in March of 1944 when he made a comparative study with other Uto-Aztecan languages of the Takic subfamily.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Hopi language  Search this
Zuni language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Toponymy  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Basket making  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 4.3
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw393ae4ea4-0c10-483e-8b23-9634516d98f2
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14601

Acoma/Laguna/Santo Domingo (Keresan)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Boxe
Culture:
Keresan Pueblos  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Laguna Indians  Search this
Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1909-1949
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southwest series contains Harrington's research on Keresan, focusing on Acoma, Laguna, and Santo Domingo dialects. The materials consist of vocabulary, notes, and drafts.

Harrington's field notes include data from an individual identified only as "L. A. Alb," copies of Acoma slips lent to Harrington by Father Jerome in 1913, and a Keresan vocabulary copied by Carobeth Harrington Laird. He also assembled a small group of miscellaneous lexical items relative to the Keresan migration story from Edward Hunt, probably recorded at Chaco Canyon in June 1929. The most substantive body of material from a linguistic point of view is a comparative vocabulary, for which the principal source was James Johnson.

Harrington extracted tribenames and placenames from a number of sources to provide bases for the various rehearings. Because of the comparative nature of the material, a number of the works dealt with languages other than the Keresan dialects. Among the principal sources consulted were Keresan Texts (1925, 1928) by Franz Boas, and Part I of Frederick W. Hodge's "Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico" (1907). For Navajo he relied on his own notes and those accumulated with the collaboration of Robert W. Young. He compared some Southern Paiute terms collected by Edward Sapir and turned again to Benjamin Whorf's additions to Elsie Clews Parsons' Hopi Journal (1936).

This material is arranged semantically and each page represents two or more rehearings recorded at different intervals. The basic Laguna and Acoma terms are compared with Santo Domingo and Zia, and with such non-Keresan languages as Hopi, Navaho, and Kiowa. There are a few words from the Hano, Queres, Luisenio, Teton, Tewa, and Zuni languages.

Among his notes and drafts is a questionnaire, based on information provided by Hunt, that he used in his work with Johnson. There are also notes without linguistic annotations which relate to Boas' Keresan publications. Included among the papers is an early draft of Harrington's published work on the origin of the name "Acoma." The sixteenth-century sources mentioned in the draft notes are taken directly from Hodge's "Handbook." Johnson, Solimon, and the Navajo speaker Sam Acquilla provided further linguistic information. A typed draft on Acoma phonetics and the meaning of the name "Queres" was evidently prepared in 1947. Another manuscript with accompanying notes and bibliography was titled ''Quirix Equals Kastica." It is undated. Neither paper was published.

Also in this subseries are some of the correspondence, phonetic notes, and word lists that Bertha P. Dutton sent Harrington. There are also handwritten condensations by Harrington (not annotated) of George H. Pradt (1902) and excerpts of miscellaneous ethnographic information from Matilda Coxe Stevenson (1894).
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington's interest in Keresan is documented as early as 1909, when he worked with Mrs. L. S. Gallup on a Cochiti census (see Cochiti subseries). In 1919, and again in 1929, he sought to establish a relationship among Keresan, Kiowa, and Zuni. He was among those who lectured on Acoma at the Chaco Canyon Field School of the School of American Research in July 1929. From July to October of 1939, Harrington was detailed to assist the Office of Indian Affairs at Fort Wingate, where he may have met James Johnson, an Acoma Indian who provided a great deal of material. Between February 1944 and August 1945, Harrington and Bertha P. Dutton exchanged Laguna information in the course of their collaboration with Edgar L. Hewett on the 1945 publication entitled The Pueblo Indian World, for which Harrington wrote the two appendices. Dutton supplied Harrington with the names of several Keresan speakers who were in military service in the Washington, D.C. area. Among these speakers were Calvin Solimon, a Laguna Indian who spoke both Laguna and Acoma dialects; Joe A. Mina and Santiago Pacheco, Santo Domingo men; and Perry A. Keahtigh, who worked at The United Nations Service Center in Washington and was frequently consulted for Kiowa comparisons. Harrington's last Keresan monograph, "Haa'k'o, Original Form of the Name of Acoma," was published in 1949.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Keres language  Search this
Acoma dialect  Search this
Laguna dialect  Search this
Navajo language  Search this
Southern Paiute language  Search this
Hopi language  Search this
Kiowa language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Santo Domingo (Kewa)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 4.5
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw37a6c48d3-1c29-4393-bff4-21619e9dd415
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14637

General and Miscellaneous Materials

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Freire-Marreco, Barbara W. (Barbara Whitchurch), 1879-1967  Search this
Henderson, Junius, 1865-1937  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
3 Boxes
Culture:
Hualapai -- language  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Tiwa Pueblos  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Hualapai (Walapai)  Search this
Yavapai  Search this
Pueblo  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Sketches
Place:
Elden Pueblo (Ariz.)
Date:
circa 1907-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southwest series within the John P. Harrington papers contains general and miscellaneous materials. Certain notes in this subseries encompass the Southwest as an entity; others constitute small files of miscellany which do not relate directly to the preceding sets of field notes. Few precise dates are assigned to this section of material as it is based on information accumulated over an indefinite period of time.

One section contains archaeological field notes relating to Elden Pueblo. In 1926 Harrington was called to assist J. W. Fewkes at the excavation of ruins at Elden Pueblo near Flagstaff, Arizona. This set of files comprises the journal entries which Harrington made on an almost daily basis between May 27 and August 27, 1926. There are two sets of notes--the original handwritten ones and a typed copy which was submitted to Fewkes on November 10, 1926 (former B.A.E. MS 6010). The journal contains brief notes, sketches of pits and artifacts, references to photographs, and names of associates; there are no significant linguistic or ethnographic data.

The subseries also contains a comparative list of Taos, Picuris, Isleta, Tewa (San Juan), and Tanoan numerals, based mainly on Harry S. Budd's B.A.E. MS 1028. There are also notes on pueblo basket-making from his interviews with Dr. and Mrs. Colton and Mr. Gladwin (B.A.E. MS 2291) , as well as an account of an Indian scout (Yavapai) working for the U.S. Cavalry. In addition, there is an assortment of notes on photographs, bibliography, and a large chart of pronouns.

Harrington's writings are also present. These include preliminary drafts and notes for "The Southwest Indian Languages" and "The Sounds and Structure of the Aztecan Languages." Most of the information was evidently extracted from notes on hand at the time. Harrington mentioned James Johnson and Edward Hunt, both of whom spoke Acoma-Laguna and worked with him in July and August of 1944. Tom Polacca's son gave Hopi data. There are also a partial draft, notes, and bibliography for an article titled "Indians of the Southwest" (1942). Material relating to unpublished writings includes notes for a review of Mary Roberts Coolidge's The Rain-Makers (1929). An undated draft and notes on "The Southern Athapascan" are also included.

A group of original field notes from Harrington's collaborators were left in his possession; in particular, a group of handwritten slips taken between December 10, 1912, and April 6, 1913, were found in an envelope addressed to Harrington. Barbara Freire-Marreco evidently sent them from Polacca, Arizona, to Harrington in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The content is mainly grammatical, with vocabulary items and ethnographic material interspersed. The language has not been identified. A second set of notes consists of cards and a typed list, evidently compiled by Junius Henderson. The data include animal terms in Hopi (Moki), Pima, and Walapai.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Tanoan languages  Search this
Tiwa language  Search this
Isleta language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Laguna dialect  Search this
Acoma dialect  Search this
Hopi language  Search this
Pima language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Basket making  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Numeration  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Sketches
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 4.12
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw39c14572f-6a9e-42ff-ba40-1f88a00acd31
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14711

Supplemental Material on the Southwest

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Geronimo, 1829-1909  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Boxe
Culture:
Apache  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Maps
Date:
circa 1907-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Notes and writings on special linguistic studies series contains material that supplement Harrington's Southwest field notes. The materials cover the Apache, Hopi, Zuni, and Tewa. There are also some general and miscellaneous materials.

The Apache section supplements the notes and drafts for a proposed paper on the life of Geronimo. There is an electrostatic copy of a letter from W. B. Hill to Harrington dated September 23, 1936, in which he enclosed a photograph of Robert Geronimo, the son of the Chiricahua chief. The photograph was used by Charles K. Shirley to make an ink sketch, which is present along with a caption. The Hopi file includes a pocket-sized notebook which Harrington used while conducting fieldwork during May 1926. The notebook contains a brief record of a trip from Somes Bar to Eureka with Mr. Ike, a Karok informant; an expense account for the month of May; miscellaneous personal notes and addresses; and instructions on the use of a camera and compass. Data specifically relating to Hopi include several tiny sketch maps, notes on possible informants and on dances, songs, and kachinas, and a few lexical items from Tom Povatiya (Walpi) and Otto Lomavitu (Oraibi). There are also bibliographic notes for a proposed paper on "The Sounds of the Hopi Language," probably prepared in 1946. The Zuni notes consist of four native names for plants. There are two entries each under the headings "Fungus" and "Pinacea-Pine Family." Most of the supplemental notes on Tewa consist of an alphabetical list of tribenames and placenames from "Abechiu" to "Rio Grande." This file represents a portion of the etymological material which Harrington compiled around 1910 for use in his publication "The Ethnography of the Tewa Indians." Found with this file was a set of about fifty small slips containing one vocabulary item per slip. Most of the words are anatomical terms.

General and miscellaneous materials consist of a typed slip listing residents of Acomita, Casa Blanca, Seama, and Laguna who were possible informants for early fieldwork; a two-page description of Catherine Swan, a young woman whom Harrington met at Elden Pueblo in August 1926; a message to Robert Young (ca. 1936 to 1939) regarding the format of a Navaho primer; and information on the placename "Chaco" (January to February 1946). A note on Tewa and Spanish "accentuology" and notes for a description of the Olivella River were written in the 1940s. There are also two pages of notes on Washington Matthews's paper "The Night Chant, a Navaho Ceremony" (1902) as well as numbered captions for photographs which were taken at a number of archeological excavations. These are divided into separate sections on Rito de los Frijoles, Mesa Verde, Puye, and ruins in southern Utah; one caption mentions Professor Kidder.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Hopi language  Search this
Zuni language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Spanish language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology)  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Maps
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 8.4
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d780d737-eeec-444c-bb78-5854384d0595
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15278

MS 746 Moqui and Táowa vocabulary

Creator:
Palmer, Edward, 1829-1911  Search this
Extent:
10 Pages
Culture:
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1869
Scope and Contents:
Contains a general Hopi vocabulary, with a little Tewa.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 746
Local Note:
Title changed from "Moqui and Ta'owi vocabulary" 8/26/2014.
autograph document
Topic:
Hopi language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 746, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS746
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d0ee793a-ecbb-4197-aedf-418e1e14eb4f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms746
Online Media:

MS 30 Tewa vocabulary and Moqui foods

Creator:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Extent:
50 Pages
Culture:
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Consists of a Tewa vocabulary of 20 pages in a notebook, and 54 pages of a vocabulary of Hopi foods, mostly untranslated.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 30
Local Note:
manuscript document
Topic:
Food preparation -- Hopi  Search this
Hopi language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 30, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS30
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw381132926-d6eb-4b52-b06f-4d938bfc51a7
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms30
Online Media:

MS 7317 Transcriptions and Extracts of Selected Letters Written to Frederick W. Hodge by Jesse Walter Fewkes Between Feb. 20, 1890 and June 7, 1928

Creator:
Fewkes, Jesse Walter, 1850-1930  Search this
Transcriber:
Pilles, Peter J.  Search this
Extent:
30 Pages
Culture:
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
February 20, 1890-June 7, 1928
Scope and Contents:
Mostly concerns Fewkes's archeological work in the Southwest and his ethnographic studies of the Pueblos and Hopi.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 7317
Topic:
Archeology -- Southwest  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 7317, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS7317
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3822e4eaf-122f-4c8d-a250-5c29f4ba4c9d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms7317

A concordance of Hopi Indian texts / Armin W. Geertz

Author:
Geertz, Armin W. 1948-  Search this
Physical description:
457 p. ; 21 x 30 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1989
Topic:
Hopi language  Search this
Call number:
E99.H7 G44 1987X Suppl
E99.H7G44 1987X Suppl
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_390736

Ornithological vocabulary of the Moki Indians / by Edgar A. Mearns

Author:
Mearns, Edgar Alexander 1856-1916  Search this
Physical description:
p. 391-403, [1] leaf of plates ; 25 cm
Type:
Nomenclature (Popular)
Date:
1896
Topic:
Birds--Hopi  Search this
Hopi language  Search this
Call number:
QL677 .M477 1896
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_724163

Hopitutuwutsi = Hopi tales : a bilingual collection of Hopi Indian stories / by Ekkehart Malotki ; illustrated by Anne-Marie Malotki

Author:
Malotki, Ekkehart  Search this
Physical description:
xix, 213 p. : ill. ; 21 x 26 cm
Type:
Texts
Date:
1978
C1978
Topic:
Folklore  Search this
Hopi language  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_913748

Field mouse goes to war = Tusan homichi tuwvöta / by Edward A. Kennard ; Hopi text by Albert Yava ; illustrated by Fred Kabotie ; edited by Willard W. Beatty

Title:
Tusan homichi tuwvöta
Author:
Kennard, Edward A (Edward Allan) 1907-  Search this
Yava, Albert 1888-1980  Search this
Kabotie, Fred  Search this
United States Bureau of Indian Affairs  Search this
Physical description:
[2], 71 p. : ill. ; 21 cm
Type:
Legends
Texts
Date:
1977
Topic:
Hopi language  Search this
Call number:
E77.H7 K46 1977
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_920284

Coyote & the winnowing birds = Iisaw niqw tsaayantotaqam tsiròot : a traditional Hopi tale / based on a story told by Eugene Sekaquaptewa ; translated & edited by Emory Sekaquaptewa & Barbara Pepper ; illustrated by Hopi children

Author:
Sekaquaptewa, Eugene  Search this
Sekaquaptewa, Emory  Search this
Pepper, Barbara 1949-  Search this
Physical description:
95 p. : col. ill. ; 21 cm
Type:
Folklore
Texts
Place:
Arizona
Date:
1994
C1994
Topic:
Tales  Search this
Hopi language  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_483951

Field mouse goes to war = Tusan homichi tuwvöta / by Edward A. Kennard ; Hopi text by Albert Yava ; illustrated by Fred Kabotie ; edited by Willard W. Beatty

Title:
Tusan homichi tuwvöta
Author:
Kennard, Edward A (Edward Allan) 1907-  Search this
Yava, Albert 1888-1980-  Search this
Kabotie, Fred  Search this
Beatty, Willard W (Willard Walcott) 1891-  Search this
Haskell Institute  Search this
Physical description:
75 p. : ill. ; 18 x 26 cm
Type:
Juvenile literature
Texts
Date:
1969
[1969]
Topic:
Mice  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Hopi language  Search this
Call number:
E99.H7 K44 1969
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_772772

Children of cottonwood : piety and ceremonialism in Hopi Indian puppetry / Armin W. Geertz, Michael Lomatuway'ma ; illustrations by Warren Namingha and Poul Nørbo

Author:
Geertz, Armin W. 1948-  Search this
Lomatuway'ma, Michael  Search this
Physical description:
ix, 412 p. : ill. ; 24 cm
Type:
Texts
Place:
Arizona
Date:
1987
C1987
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Hopi dolls--Religious aspects  Search this
Indian dolls--Religious aspects  Search this
Puppets--Religious aspects  Search this
Puppet theater--Religious aspects  Search this
Puppet plays--Religious aspects  Search this
Hopi language  Search this
Call number:
E99.H7G44 1987X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_336769

Little Hopi Hopihoya. Hopi text [by] Albert Yava. Illus. [by] Charles Loloma

Author:
Kennard, Edward A (Edward Allan) 1907-  Search this
Physical description:
201 p. illus. 26 cm
Type:
Readers
Date:
1948
[1948?]
Topic:
Readers  Search this
Hopi language  Search this
Call number:
E99.H7 K47 1948
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_792393

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