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Middleburg -- The Hill School Arboretum

Former owner:
Clark, Stephen C. Jr.  Search this
Clark, Jane Forbes  Search this
Arboretum designer:
Rowley, Polly P.  Search this
Committee head:
Rowley, Polly P.  Search this
Landscape architect:
Starke, Barry W.  Search this
Tindall, Ian  Search this
Foster, Susie  Search this
Committee member:
Augenblick, Barbara  Search this
Morency, Mike  Search this
Hoovler, Karen  Search this
Gardener:
Vella, Matthew  Search this
Dornin, Bob  Search this
Looney, Greg  Search this
Faculty:
Dornin, Bob  Search this
Looney, Greg  Search this
Provenance:
Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
The Hill School Arboretum (Middleburg, Virginia)
United States of America -- Virginia -- Loudoun -- Middleburg
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and photocopies of articles and images.
General:
The arboretum was created on the 132-acre farm that was donated to the private pre-K through 8th grade Hill School in 1992. A landscaping committee decided that the mission of the arboretum would be to grow examples of both native and alien trees that have adapted to the region to be used as an environmental teaching facility for children and as a community resource. The initial plan was broken into stages, planting was done over several years, and the vision for the arboretum was that it would look like a country estate in 100 years. Eight distinct areas were identified that would be planted over time with more than 200 species of trees and shrubs in combinations that emphasize differing leaf shapes and bark textures for the children to study. Planning included respect for the instinctive pathways of children pursing daily activities while also promoting appreciation and respect for the natural environment. The arboretum provides habitat for birds and wildlife, another aspect that would be incorporated into the curriculum of the school.
When there was dissatisfaction with the contractors hired for the work members of the committee took charge themselves. There were drainage problems in some areas and the location of differing stands of trees had to be determined in part by soil conditions. Young trees were purchased that were easier to transplant successfully and less costly, although some of the specialty trees had to be kept in the chairwoman's nursery for three years until they were ready to be planted out. Community support included donations of tons of manure and humus from nearby farms.
Persons associated with the garden include Stephen C. Clark, Jr. and Jane Forbes Clark (former owners, 1945-1992); Polly P. Rowley (arboretum designer and committee head, 1992- ); Barry W. Starke (ASLA), Earth Design Associates (landscape architect, 1992-1993); Ian Tindall and Susie Foster, HOH Associates (landscape architects, 1992-1993); Barbara Augenblick, Mike Morency and Karen Hoovler (Hill School committee, 1992-1995); Matthew Vella (gardener, 1992-1998); Bob Dornin and Greg Looney (Hill School grounds supervisor and gardener, 1992-1998).
Related Materials:
The Hill School Arboretum related holdings consist of 1 folder (22 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Virginia -- Middleburg  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VA490
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Virginia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb64e473e31-526b-47b6-8ca7-13b8b8f63f38
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref18854

Yue, Seaouke (You Xiaoxi; 游筱溪)

Creator:
Freer, Charles Lang, 1856-1919  Search this
Yue, Seaouke  Search this
Names:
Pang Yuanji, 1864-1949  Search this
Collection Creator:
Freer, Charles Lang, 1856-1919  Search this
Extent:
6 Items (folders of correspondence)
Container:
Box 36, Folder 17-22
Type:
Archival materials
Letters (correspondence)
Date:
1917-1919
Scope and Contents:
Letters dated between 1917 and 1919, mostly discussing the offer of Chinese art objects by the Shanghai based dealer Seaouke Yue (You Xiaoxi)
游篠溪
Freer collection numbers: F1904.61
Letters between Charles Lang Freer and Seaouke Yue (You Xiaoxi)
Arrangement:
Organized chronologically under correspondent.
Biographical / Historical:
Charels Lang Freer first met Yue in 1917. Yue had travelled to New York with items from the collection of Pang Yuanji, an important Shanghai collector who met Freer in 1911. Over the next two years, Freer purchased a number of important works of Chinese painting, jades, pottery and bronzes from Yue.
Local Numbers:
FSA A.01 02.1Yue
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art, Chinese  Search this
Genre/Form:
Letters (correspondence)
Collection Citation:
Charles Lang Freer Papers. FSA.A.01. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Gift of the estate of Charles Lang Freer.
See more items in:
Charles Lang Freer Papers
Charles Lang Freer Papers / Series 2: Correspondence / 2.1: Charles Lang Freer Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/dc370218b0f-6618-486a-8bcc-70ab3b06b3c0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-01-ref634
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Bambusa bambos (L.) Voss

Biogeographical Region:
36 - China Southeast  Search this
Collector:
Ah To  Search this
Carl O. Levine  Search this
Place:
Hoh Shui Village, White Cloud Mt., Canton, Guangdong, China, Asia-Temperate
Collection Date:
19 Apr 1918
Taxonomy:
Plantae Monocotyledonae Poales Poaceae Bambusoideae
Published Name:
Bambusa bambos (L.) Voss
Bambusa spinosa Roxb.
Barcode:
01088762
USNM Number:
3414802
See more items in:
Botany
Flowering plants and ferns
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/30720dd12-3a74-4fe8-b11f-89dad6cac517
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_10076105
Online Media:

Lespedeza juncea subsp. sericea (Thunb.) Steenis

Biogeographical Region:
36 - China Southeast  Search this
Collector:
Elmer Drew Merrill  Search this
Place:
Kwong Tung Province, Lin District, Hoh Tsuen Hill, Guangdong, China, Asia-Temperate
Collection Date:
27 Sep 1918
Taxonomy:
Plantae Dicotyledonae Fabales Fabaceae Papilionoideae
Published Name:
Lespedeza juncea subsp. sericea (Thunb.) Steenis
Barcode:
02058001
USNM Number:
3507276
See more items in:
Botany
Flowering plants and ferns
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3ebb3b1d9-554e-46e9-9b47-85dea7d90a43
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_13472866

Plagiomnium venustum (Mitt.) T.J. Kop.

Biogeographical Region:
73 - Northwestern U.S.A.  Search this
Collector:
B. I. Brown  Search this
W. C. Muenscher  Search this
Place:
The Olympic Peninsula. Jefferson County. Near mouth of Hoh River., Washington, United States, North America
Collection Date:
9 Jul 1950
Taxonomy:
Plantae Bryophyta Bryopsida Bryales Mniaceae
Published Name:
Plagiomnium venustum (Mitt.) T.J. Kop.
Barcode:
04444306
See more items in:
Botany
Bryophytes and Lichens
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3eed8ade1-e0b0-481f-a3d9-111183e09b1e
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_16452751

Alma Thomas papers

Creator:
Thomas, Alma  Search this
Names:
Art in Embassies Program (U.S.)  Search this
Martha Jackson Gallery  Search this
Bader, Franz, 1903-1994  Search this
Breeskin, Adelyn Dohme, 1896-1986  Search this
Johnson, Nathalie J. Cole  Search this
Sarg, Tony, 1882-1942  Search this
Tarbary, Celine  Search this
Taylor, Joshua Charles, 1917-  Search this
Thomas, J. Maurice (John Maurice), 1900 or 1901-  Search this
Extent:
5.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Audiocassettes
Video recordings
Photographs
Date:
circa 1894-2001
Summary:
The papers of Washington, D.C. painter and art educator Alma Thomas, date from circa 1894-2001 and measure 5.5 linear feet. The papers document Thomas's work as a teacher, and her development and success as a painter of the Washington Color School, through biographical material, letters, notes and writings, personal business records, exhibition files, printed materials, scrapbooks, photographs, an audio recording, and two video recordings.
Scope and Contents note:
The papers of Washington, D.C. painter and art educator Alma Thomas, date from circa 1894-2001 and measure 5.5 linear feet. The papers document Thomas's work as a teacher, and her development and success as a painter of the Washington Color School, through biographical material, letters, notes and writings, personal business records, exhibition files, printed materials, scrapbooks, photographs, an audio recording, and two video recordings.

Biographical material includes identity cards, chronologies, an audio recording including a biographical account, and scattered documentation of Thomas's education and teaching careers with D.C. Public Schools, Howard University, and Thomas Garrett Settlement in Wilmington, Delaware. Also found are records relating to Thomas's participation in a summer marionette class taught by Tony Sarg in 1934, and a tour of European art centers which Thomas took in 1958.

Letters relate primarily to the exhibition of Thomas's work and related events and are from galleries, museums, other art institutions, colleagues, and friends including Franz Bader, Adelyn Breeskin, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Howard University Gallery of Art, Martha Jackson Gallery, Nathalie J. Cole Johnson, Vincent Melzac, Celine Tabary, and Joshua Taylor.

Notes and writings include four notebooks and autobiographical writings by Thomas, a "Birthday Book," and an annotated engagement calendar. J. Maurice Thomas's writings about Alma Thomas, her research for a bibliography on James Weldon Johnson, and writings by others, including Jacob Kainen, about Alma Thomas, are also found here.

Exhibition files contain a wide variety of documentation for many group and solo exhibitions of Thomas's work from the early 1950s through a 1998-2000 traveling retrospective exhibition, including solo exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Corcoran Gallery of Art in 1972. The records include letters from Franz Bader Gallery, David Driskell at Fisk University, and Vincent Melzac. Photographs include Thomas with individuals including William Buckner, Jeff Donaldson, David Driskell, James W. Herring, and Vincent Melzac. Also found is a photograph of the 1951 Little Paris Studio Group picturing Lois Mailou Jones, Celine Tabary, Alma Thomas, and others. Two video recordings are of events related to the 1998-2000 retrospective at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art and the Columbus Museum of Art. Records documenting a 1981-1982 exhibition at the Smithsonian National Museum of American Art, A Life in Art: Alma Thomas, includes the script of a video written by Adolphus Ealey.

Personal business records include price lists, gift and loan receipts, and files concerning the Art in Embassies Program, the Martha Jackson Gallery, a benefit auction for the Corcoran School of Art, and the designation of the Thomas family home in Washington, D.C. as a historic property.

Eleven scrapbooks document Thomas's teaching career through the activities of the art classes she taught at Shaw Junior High School.

Printed materials include announcements and catalogs for exhibitions and other events; clippings which document Thomas's career and subjects of interest to her; Christmas cards featuring block prints designed by Thomas; and other programs and publications featuring Thomas.

Photographs are of Alma Thomas, family, and friends and colleagues including Sam Gilliam, James V. Herring, and Nathalie V. Cole Johnson; art classes taught by Thomas; Thomas's homes in Columbus, Georgia and Washington, D.C.; and exhibitions not documented in Series 4: Exhibition Files, including photographs of Alma Thomas at an opening at Barnett Aden Gallery with Alonzo Aden and others.
Arrangement note:
The papers have been arranged into 8 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1911-2001 (Box 1; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 2: Letters, circa 1930-2001 (Boxes 1-2; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 3: Notes and Writings, circa 1920s-circa 1998 (Box 2; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 4: Exhibition Files, 1951-2000 (Boxes 2-3, OV 7; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 5: Personal Business Records, circa 1950s-1994 (Box 3; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 6: Printed Material, circa 1908-2000 (Boxes 3-5, OV 7; 1.8 linear feet)

Series 7: Scrapbooks, 1930-1946 (Box 5; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1894-2001 (Boxes 5-6; 0.6 linear feet)
Biographical/Historical note:
Washington, D.C. painter and art educator Alma Thomas (1891-1978) was known for her abstract paintings filled with dense patterns of color, and was considered a major artist of the Washington Color School.

Thomas was born in Columbus, Georgia, in 1894, and was the eldest of the four daughters of John Harris Thomas and Amelia Cantey Thomas. The family moved to Washington, D.C. in 1906 and Thomas was first introduced to art classes at Armstrong Technical High School. Following her graduation in 1911 she took a course in kindergarten teaching at the Miner Normal School, and subsequently worked as a substitute teacher in the Washington, D.C. public school system until 1914, when she took a teaching position on the Eastern shore of Maryland. From 1916 to 1923 she taught kindergarten at Thomas Garrett Settlement House in Wilmington, Delaware.

Thomas originally enrolled at Howard University in Washington, D.C. as a home economics major in 1921, but after studying under Lois Mailou Jones amd James V. Herring in Herring's newly established art department, she earned a Bachelor's degree in Fine Art in 1924, and became the first person to graduate from the program. Thomas then began her teaching career at Shaw Junior High School in Washington, D.C. that lasted from 1924, until her retirement in 1960. During this time she established community arts programs that would encourage her students to develop an appreciation of fine arts. Activities included marionette programs, distribution of student-designed holiday menu cards for dinners given for soldiers at the Tuskegee Veterans' Hospital, art clubs, lectures, and student exhibitions. In 1943 she became the founding vice president of Barnett Aden Gallery, which was established by James V. Herring and Alonzo Aden and was the first integrated gallery in Washington, D.C.

In 1934 Thomas earned an M.A. degree in Art Education from Columbia University. At American University in Washington, D.C., she studied creative painting under Joe Summerford, Robert Gates, and Jacob Kainen from 1950 to 1960, and began to break away from representational painting and experiment more seriously with Abstract Expressionism. In 1958 she participated in a tour of the art centers of Western Europe under the auspices of the Tyler School of Fine Arts at Temple University in Philadelphia.

Following her retirement from teaching in 1960, Thomas devoted herself full-time to painting, and continued to develop her signature style. She was inspired by nature and the desire to express beauty through composition and color, and refused to be constrained by societal expectations related to her race, gender, and age, achieving her greatest success in the last decade of her life. Her work was exhibited at the Dupont Theatre Art Gallery, Franz Bader Gallery, and the Howard University Gallery of Art, before she was honored in 1972 with exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

Thomas's work has been exhibited at the White House and can be found in the permanent collections of major museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.
Separated Materials note:
In 1979, J. Maurice Thomas loaned papers for microfilming. Most, but not all, of the loaned material was later donated and is described in this finding aid. Loaned materials not donated at a later date are available on reels 1541-1543 and are not described in the container listing of this finding aid.
Provenance:
J. Maurice Thomas, the artist's sister, loaned portions of the collection for microfilming in 1979. Most, but not all of this material was then later donated in several accretions by J. Maurice Thomas, between 1979 and 2004. Charles Thomas Lewis, Thomas' nephew, gave additional papers in 2010.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate copies requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Educators -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Topic:
Painting, American  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Washington Color School (Group of artists)  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Women painters  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Audiocassettes
Video recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Alma Thomas papers, circa 1894-2001. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.thomalma
See more items in:
Alma Thomas papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw98cd54656-ee02-4a0d-81ad-6db24f1be010
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-thomalma
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Online Media:

Audio Log Sheets

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 2: Circus Arts / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5fb09f8a5-50dd-4258-9dce-a788032b1865
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref1017
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Circus Arts

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Description:
The modern circus has been a form of public entertainment since the late 18th century; President George Washington attended John Bill Ricketts' circus in Philadelphia in 1793. In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the circus introduced towns and cities across the country to a wider world through the dazzling sights, sounds, and stunts of the circus artists.

With a history of more than 2 centuries, Circus Arts are considered a heritage and traditional art form; its varied skills have been passed down in families through generations. More recently, troupes and circus schools have been established to train new generations in the specific skills of circus arts. This traditional art form has finally received national recognition; the NEA awarded the aerialist Dolly Jacobs the National Heritage Fellowship in 2015. She is the first circus performer to receive this prestigious NHF award.

Circus members belong to a highly distinctive occupational group, including experts in any one of several clusters of both performance and material arts. Working and performing together, they create a spectacle which induces surprise and amazement in the spectators. It is not just the single acts, it is the entire production and business of the circus that was represented in the Circus Arts program of the 2017 Folklife Festival.

Circus performance arts have focused primarily on various aspects of physical movement, strength, and endurance. The artists work on the outer boundaries of the potential for the human body and physique. These performance arts encompass five main disciplines of circus arts: acrobatics, aerials, clowning, equilibristic, and object manipulation. For each of these performance categories, teams and individuals from around the country and around the world were invited to demonstrate and perform at the festival.

The material arts of the circus include aspects of painting and drawing, design, costuming, and tent making, as well as derivative arts inspired by the circus, such as toy making and miniatures. Workshops for modeling these skills were set up around the festival grounds to enable visitors to view the intricacies of their production. Panels also discussed the interplay between the material and performance arts.

In the Circus Science tent, demonstrations and discussions presented the synergies of science and skill in different circus art forms. The circus Cookhouse was set up to display the culinary skills of circus chefs. Multiple forums were scheduled where circus stories could be shared, including topics such as the social circus, circus families, the history of the circus in American culture, and the changing circus landscape. These forums provided opportunities for experiential exploration of the life and work of circus people, encompassing both the family and community structures in which they thrive.

The emerging concept of the social circus was everywhere on display during the Circus Arts program. The training opportunities focused on the future roles of these young actors beyond their personal growth. By removing themselves from the professional/commercial entertainment arena, they have become participants in social change. This new concept brings needed revitalization to the traditional circus arts in the same year that, coincidentally, the largest American circus, Ringling Brothers, Barnum and Bailey Circus announced its closure due to business concerns.

This presentation on the National Mall spotlighted the occupational culture of Circus Arts at a critical moment in 2017. The Circus Arts program not only helped expand and elevate visitors' understanding and appreciation of a distinctive occupational group. It also championed the vitality of Circus Arts around the world, paving the way for future collaborations. It is in this exploration that myths can be displayed, tough questions can be raised, and the sharing of deep knowledge can take place between Festival participants and visitors.
Production Staff & Participants:
Production

Director: Sabrina Lynn Motley

Curator: Preston Scott

Co-curators: James Deutsch, Cristina Díaz-Carrera

Program Coordinator: Nichole Procopenko

Foodways Coordinator: Arnie Malin

D.C. Circus Day Coordinator: Marissa Walker

Interns: Isabella Barrengos, Maia Daniel, Miranda DiMase-Nordling, Taylor Heagler, Maris Jones, Michaela Podolny, Laura Yee

Lead Volunteer: Zakiya Williams

Advisors and Presenters: Hovey Burgess, David Carlyon, Janet M. Davis, LaVahn Hoh, Rodney Huey, Dominique Jando, Jennifer Lemmer Posey, Linda Simon, Deborah Walk, Matthew Wittmann Big Top Artistic Director: Pedro Reis

Big Top Production Team: Henry Barragan, Jesse Cogswell, Joe D'Emilio, Luis S. Garcia, Leigh Ketchum, Devin Nee, Amanda Scarpa, Mark Wilson, Atos Zamperla

Participants

Stars of the CircusDolly Jacobs

Rafael Palacios

Ambra Zerbini Bauer

Joseph Dominic Bauer

Marina Luna

Ella Storme

Olesya Fedotova

Rony Gomez

Diosmani Aguero

Leosvel Almeida Gutierrez

Kenneth Kenny Raskin

Circus Arts ConservatoryBarry Lubin

Diosmani Aguero

Leosvel Almeida Gutierrez

Luna Storme

Olesya Fedotova

Karen Bell

Robin Eurich

Jaime Hernandez Carranza, student

Keith Phillips, student

Big Apple CircusRay Slizewski, circus cook

Bindlestiff Family Circus

Circus BellaCarlo Gentile

Gianluca "Gianni Magi" Gentile

Gioia Mei "Tatlo" Gentile

Giulia "Trixie Love" Gentile

Giuseppina "Guisi", Gentile

Orlene Gentile

Circus CenterSteve Smith

Circus CultureAmy Cohen

Circus Harmony

Circus JuventasDan Butler

Makenna Cook

Piper Gibbs

Sophie Bauer

Circus SmirkusJacqueline Davis

Jennifer Agans

Amity Stoddard

Cirque des VoixElla Storme

Marina Luna

Pedro Reis

Dolly Jacobs

Rafael Palacios

Matuni Vaiaoga

Barry Lubin

Clowns without Borders

Happenstance Theater

Hebei Golden Eagle Acrobatic Troupe

Listo Trapeze VolantMiguel Cáceres

Medical Clown Project

New England Center for Circus Arts (NECCA)

Sailor Circus

School of Acrobatics and New Circus ArtsIan Jagel

Tyler Henry

UniverSoul CircusBone Breakers, Contorionists

Caribbean Dynasty Dancers

Chain Reaction, Acrobats

Daniel "Lucky" Malatsi, Ringmaster

Fresh the Clowns

Veronica Blair, Aerialist

Carlos Pinto Morales, Acrobatics

Sherrie Silver, Dancer

Wallenda Family TroupeAlessandro Wallenda

Tomas Wallenda

Wenatchee Youth CircusRebecca Geren

Jillian Davis

Lily-Ann Geren

Martin Talbot

Wise Fool New MexicoAmy Christian

Lisa Smith

Band of Jugglers

Unaffiliated PerformersPatrik Elmnert, Juggler

Craig Quat, Juggler

David Tetrault, Calliope

Jeffrey Raz, Clown

Kim Hawkins, Clown

Thom Wall, Juggler

Dominique Jando, Scholar

LaVahn Hoh

Sarah Chapman, Circus Cook

Tim Mack, Ringmaster
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Series 2
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5c321f85e-cbc0-4ed1-a412-eb2067906a09
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref17

Circus Origins and History

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 June 29
Scope and Contents:
Dominique Jando (presenter); Janet Davis; LaVahn Hoh; Dominique Jando The idea of running away with the circus, a place that praises human oddities and extreme talents, has drawn people looking to escape social conformity. To this day, the circus presents itself as a place of acceptance, building a strong community for social outsiders or anyone looking for a fresh start.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0629_Circus_Arts_Circus_Stories_0001
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 2: Circus Arts / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5a6dc03c4-20f6-46d4-8204-8fe78db52383
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref548

Circus Talk: Special Language of the Circus

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 June 29
Scope and Contents:
Deborah Walk (presenter); Deborah Walk; Rodney Huey; LaVanh Hoh What is it like running away with the circus? Discover these panelistss intriguing stories on how they discovered the circus, how they joined, and what life is like after the circus. Learn how they survived living on the road and having families all while being a part of their circus family.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0629_Circus_Arts_Circus_Stories_0006
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 2: Circus Arts / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk56a69f725-313c-4596-800b-bdbaa7a79967
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref553

Circus Rites: Beliefs, Charms, and Customs

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 June 30
Scope and Contents:
Dominique Jando (presenter); David Tetrault; LaVanh Hoh; Dominique Jando The Big Apple Circus opened in 1977 in New York City, bringing a focus on community engagement and programs like Clown Care to the circus world. In June 2016, they had to file for bankruptcy. But the Big Apple Circus was revived once more in 2017, just in time for its fortieth anniversary season.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0630_Circus_Arts_Circus_Stories_0002
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 2: Circus Arts / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5c24295c3-793c-4b99-a1c2-ea5f21b60093
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref579

Circus Dreams: Running Away With the Circus

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 June 30
Scope and Contents:
Janet Davis (presenter); Janet Davis; Elena Panova; LaVanh Hoh; Linda Simon Father of the Modern Circus. Philip Astley opened a horse-trick-riding exhibit in 1768, adding other forms of entertainment like acrobats, animals, and clowns. Approximately two centuries later, America had over one hundred traveling circuses.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0630_Circus_Arts_Circus_Stories_0006
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 2: Circus Arts / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5e8bb909a-5561-4519-851d-3e6a1de42579
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref583

Circus Origins and History

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 June 30
Scope and Contents:
Rodney Huey (presenter); Rodney Huey; LaVanh Hoh; Dominique Jando Focused on personal growth and social change, social circus is a growing movement in the circus community, and also serves as the guiding principle for many of the circus schools in the United States. Social circus promotes the circuss ability to not only entertain but also enact change.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0630_Circus_Arts_Circus_Stories_0007
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 2: Circus Arts / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5e440c577-7956-4e38-862a-126555133a95
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref584

Circus Rigging: What Holds It Up and What Makes It Work

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 July 01
Scope and Contents:
Dominique Jando (presenter); Luis Garcia; LaVahn Hoh; Pedro Reis Many of the professional performers you see on stage actually grew up in the circus, discovering their craft at young ages. Learn how these circus experts navigated growing up on the road, surrounded by clowns, acrobats, and all of the other characters you might find in a circus.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0701_Circus_Arts_Circus_Stories_0001
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 2: Circus Arts / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5e21bb857-4e6c-47bb-be75-6c4c0bfda90a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref610

So, You Want to Start a Circus?

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 July 01
Scope and Contents:
Rodney Huey (presenter); Deborah Walk; Rodney Huey; Dominique Jando; LaVanh Hoh As a source of entertainment, circuses today have a lot more competition than they once did. The structure of the circus has shifted with the changing times. However, the art form itself is currently flourishing. New circus arts schools have popped up across America and Europe, along with social circus programs focused on personal growth and social change.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0701_Circus_Arts_Circus_Stories_0003
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 2: Circus Arts / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5f7e79e73-628c-4a24-ad2d-5b97c75b97cd
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref612

Circus Rites: Beliefs, Charms, and Customs

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 July 02
Scope and Contents:
Montana Miller (presenter); David Tetrault; LaVanh Hoh; Dominique Jando; Montana Miller Ever since the advent of modern transportation, circus troupes have historically traveled from city to city to showcase their talent. At this panel, circus artists will share their unique experiences of being on the road, sometimes for months on end.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0702_Circus_Arts_Circus_Stories_0002
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 2: Circus Arts / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk53eee2bcd-9e0f-4e23-ae76-00719c14d2ea
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref647

Circus in the Arts: Photography and Filmmaking

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 July 03
Scope and Contents:
Deborah Walk (presenter); Deborah Walk; LaVahn Hoh; Veronica Blair Williams; Dawn Rogala(x) Many of the professional performers you see on stage actually grew up in the circus, discovering their craft at young ages. Learn how these circus experts navigated growing up on the road, surrounded by clowns, acrobats, and all of the other characters you might find in a circus.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0703_Circus_Arts_Circus_Stories_0003
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 2: Circus Arts / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk59b9b94e0-c78c-4233-b315-41bcd81e7ff9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref688

Circus Dreams: Running Away With the Circus

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 July 03
Scope and Contents:
LaVahn Hoh (presenter); LaVahn Hoh; Janet Davis; Paul Binder; Elena Panova; Pedro Reis As a source of entertainment, circuses today have a lot more competition than they once did. The structure of the circus has shifted with the changing times. However, the art form itself is currently flourishing. New circus arts schools have popped up across America and Europe, along with social circus programs focused on personal growth and social change.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0703_Circus_Arts_Circus_Stories_0006
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 2: Circus Arts / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5e0221832-9d48-4045-9d2f-98f169e40735
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref691

Circus Origins and History

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 July 04
Scope and Contents:
Barry Lubin (presenter); Hovey Burgess; LaVanh Hoh; Dominique Jando; Janet Davis Many of the late stars of American circus began their stories abroad, as touring artists from all over the world who settled in America, even starting families. Current generations of circus artists still trace their heritage and influences back to their roots abroad.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0704_Circus_Arts_Circus_Stories_0001
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 2: Circus Arts / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5331094b9-7731-49d9-b670-e787c9f45f31
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref722

African American Circus Experience

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 July 04
Scope and Contents:
Veronica Blair Williams (presenter); Robert Fuller Houston; Kristin Finley; Susan Voyticky; Veronica Blair Williams; LaVanh Hoh Among circus troupes, it is not uncommon for circus traditions to be passed down from generation to generation. Circus artists who have grown up in the circus will share how it has defined their identity, often from the moment of their conception.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0704_Circus_Arts_Circus_Stories_0003
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 2: Circus Arts / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk53f9a3d50-6575-4bad-8bf5-9a1adb456cf4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref724

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