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Octavio Medellin papers

Creator:
Medellin, Octavio, 1907 or 1908-1999  Search this
Names:
Gonzalez, Xavier, 1898-1993  Search this
Mérida, Carlos, 1891-1984  Search this
Extent:
3.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Photographs
Videorecordings
Date:
circa 1935-circa 1979
Summary:
The papers of painter, sculptor, and educator Octavio Medellin measure 3.6 linear feet and date from circa 1935 to circa 1979. The collection is comprised of correspondence with Carlos Mérida, Stanley Marcus, Lucy Maverick, Bess Hubbard, Xavier Gonzalez, and others; commission files for projects in Texas; professional files that include notes, biographical essays, and material for the Medellin School of Sculpture, Mendocino Art Center, International Institute of Arts and Letters, and the San Antonio Religious Show; printed and documentary materials consisting of an art reproduction, booklets, exhibition catalogs, magazines and yearbooks, and video recordings of Swank in the Arts; and photographic materials of Medellin, his studio, family and friends, travel in Mexico, his students, and works of art.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter, sculptor, and educator Octavio Medellin measure 3.6 linear feet and date from circa 1935 to circa 1979. The collection is comprised of correspondence with Carlos Mérida, Stanley Marcus, Lucy Maverick, Bess Hubbard, Xavier Gonzalez, and others; commission files for projects in Texas; professional files that include notes, biographical essays, and material for the Medellin School of Sculpture, Mendocino Art Center, International Institute of Arts and Letters, and the San Antonio Religious Show; printed and documentary materials consisting of an art reproduction, booklets, exhibition catalogs, magazines and yearbooks, and video recordings of Swank in the Arts; and photographic materials of Medellin, his studio, family and friends, travel in Mexico, his students, and works of art.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as five series.

Series 1: Correspondence, 1939-1978 (Box 1; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 2: Commission Files, 1950-1973 (Box 1, OV 6; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 3: Professional Files, circa 1950-circa 1979 (Box 1, OV 5; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 4: Printed and Documentary Materials, 1936-1979 (Boxes 1-2; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 5: Photographic Materials, circa 1935-circa 1979 (Boxes 2-4, OV 5; 1.8 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Octavio Medellin (1907-1999) was a painter, sculptor, and educator in Dallas, Texas. Medellin was born in Matehuala, Mexico to parents of Otomi heritage. His family moved to San Antonio, Texas when he was eight years old and he became a citizen of the U.S. in 1939. Medellin attended the San Antonio Art School with classmate Xavier Gonzalez and studied with José Arpa. He also studied at the Chicago Art Institute for a short time. Medellin returned to Mexico in order to study the arts, culture, and history of the country and was greatly influenced by the Mayan and Toltec ruins and artifacts he saw there. He returned to San Antonio in 1931 where he taught at the Witte Museum. Under the sponsorship of Lucy Maverick, an artist he met at La Villita Art Gallery who was involved in the historic preservation of San Antonio, Medellin returned to Mexico a few years later to visit the Yucatan region of the country. In 1966, Medellin opened the Medellin School of Sculpture that is now the Creative Arts Center of Dallas. He also taught at North Texas State University and the Dallas Museum of Art. He completed numerous commissions in the state of Texas including a monument at Calvary Hill Cemetery, a sculpture for the Houston Police Administration, mosaics and carvings for St. Andrew's Catholic Church and St. Bernard Catholic Church, and decorations for the sanctuary in Temple Emanu-el.

Medellin retired from teaching in 1979 and moved with his wife Consuelo to Bandera, Texas. He and his wife had two children, Patsy and Sergio. Medellin died in Dallas in 1999. He was buried in Calvary Hill Cemetery near his commissioned monument, The Garden of the Glorious Mysteries.
Related Materials:
Additional Octavio Medellin papers are at Syracuse University, Special Collections Research Center, Syracuse, New York, and the Southern Methodist University Bywaters Special Collections at the Hamon Arts Library, Dallas, Texas.
Provenance:
The collection was donated from 1981 to 1983 by Octavio Medellin.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual records with no duplicate copies requires advance notice.
Occupation:
Painters -- Texas -- Dallas  Search this
Sculptors -- Texas -- Dallas  Search this
Topic:
Painting, American  Search this
Public sculpture -- Texas -- Dallas  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Photographs
Videorecordings
Citation:
Octavio Medellin papers, circa 1935-circa 1979. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.medeocta
See more items in:
Octavio Medellin papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-medeocta

Stanton L. Catlin papers

Creator:
Catlin, Stanton L. , 1915-1997  Search this
Names:
Columbia Records, Inc.  Search this
Hunter College -- Faculty  Search this
Syracuse University -- Faculty  Search this
Universidad de Chile -- Faculty  Search this
Ades, Dawn  Search this
Ashton, Dore  Search this
Boulton, Alfredo  Search this
Motherwell, Robert  Search this
Obregón, Alejandro, 1920-  Search this
Paternosto, César, 1931-  Search this
Paz, Octavio, 1914-  Search this
Rasmussen, Waldo  Search this
Rockefeller, David, 1915-  Search this
Rockefeller, Nelson A. (Nelson Aldrich), 1908-1979  Search this
Sandoval, Judith Hancock de  Search this
Sebastián, Santiago  Search this
Torruella Leval, Susana  Search this
Williams, Amancio  Search this
Extent:
56.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Interviews
Transcripts
Diaries
Place:
Czech Republic -- Description and Travel
Date:
1911-1998
bulk 1930-1994
Summary:
The papers of curator, gallery director, educator, and Latin American art historian Stanton L. Catlin (1915-1997) measure 56.4 linear feet and date from 1911 to 1998 with the bulk of the material dating from 1930 to 1994. The papers are comprised of biographical material, correspondence, writings and notes, teaching and project files, professional files, research files, exhibition and subject files, printed material, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of curator, gallery director, educator, and Latin American art historian Stanton L. Catlin (1915-1997) measure 56.4 linear feet and date from 1911 to 1998 with the bulk of the material dating from 1930 to 1994. The papers are comprised of biographical material, correspondence, writings and notes, teaching and project files, professional files, research files, exhibition and subject files, printed material, and photographs.

Biographical material includes six address books, two annotated calendars, four day books, curriculum vitae, interview transcripts, records of Catlin's personal book collection, and his work as a student. Correspondence is with Catlin's family and prominent artists and colleagues, such as Dawn Ades, Dore Ashton, Alfredo Boulton, Robert Motherwell, Alejandro Obregon, César Paternosto, Octavio Paz, Waldo Rasmussen, David and Nelson Rockefeller, Susana Torruella Leval, Judith Sandoval, Santiago Sebastian, and Amancio Williams. Correspondence with Columbia Records concerns Catlin's Grammy Award for best album.

There are writings and notes by Catlin and others on Latin American art, and three journals kept by Catlin during his time in the Czech Republic and Minnesota.

Teaching files document some of Catlin's work as an art history professor at Hunter College, Syracuse University, and the University of Chile. The project files document his work as a consultant or contributor on various projects abd the professional files include records of Catlin's positions as art gallery curator and director, professional memberships, conference participation, and other professional activities. Research and subject files consist of annotated material related to Latin American art, European art, and various artforms and artists.

Exhibition files are found for Art of Latin America Since Independence (1966) and other exhibitions of Latin American art. Printed materials include books with an inscription, clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs, magazines, and publications. There are photographs of Catlin, family and friends, colleagues, and artwork.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 10 series.

Series 1: Biographical material , 1933-1989 (1 linear foot; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1914-1994 (4.5 linear feet; Box 2-6)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1930-1993 (4.5 linear feet; Box 6-10, OV 57)

Series 4: Teaching Files, 1941-1991 (1.5 linear feet; Box 10-12)

Series 5: Project Files, 1940-1993 (3.5 linear feet; Box 12-16)

Series 6: Professional Files, 1939-1994 (13.1 linear feet; Box 16-28, OV 58, 60)

Series 7: Research and Subject Files, 1938-1998 (8.0 linear feet; Box 28-36)

Series 8: Exhibition Files, 1941-1993 (15.6 linear feet; Box 37-51, OV 58-60)

Series 9: Printed Material, 1944-1993 (4.2 linear feet; Box 52-56)

Series 10: Photographs, 1911-1991 (0.5 linear feet; Box 56)
Biographical / Historical:
Stanton L. Catlin (1915-1997) was a curator, gallery director, educator, art historian, and expert on Latin American Art.

Catlin studied art history at Oberlin College and graduated in 1937. After graduation, he studied painting and art history at the Academy of Arts in Prague, Czech Republic for two years. Catlin received a Fogg Museum Fellowship in Modern Art at Harvard University to survey collections of art in Europe. However, the project was canceled because of World War II.

During the war, Catlin served as a Cultural Relations Representative for the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs where he assisted with exhibition arrangements throughout Latin America. In 1942, he also began teaching the history of art in the United States at the University of Chile. After the war, Catlin served in the Field Operations Division of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, working in the Displaced Persons Operation from 1945-1946.

From 1947 to 1950, Catlin served as the executive director of the American Institute of Graphic Arts. He received his graduate degree in art history from New York University in 1952, and shortly thereafter became editor and curator of American art at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. From 1958 to 1967, Catlin was the assistant director of the Yale University Art Gallery. While there, he curated the landmark exhibition Art of Latin America Since Independence in 1966, the first exhibition to include only Latin American art and the accompanying catalog remains a standard reference source. That same year, Catlin won a Grammy Award for best album notes for an essay on Mexican mural painting.

In 1967, Catlin left Yale to take a position as director of the Art Gallery at the Center for Inter-American Relations before joining the faculty of Syracuse University in 1971 and becoming director of the university's Art Gallery. He remained at Syracuse for the rest of his career.

Catlin was a consultant on the major retrospective exhibition of the work of Diego Rivera at the Detroit Institute of Arts in 1986. He also worked on a project to document Mexican murals in the United States. Catlin died in Fayetteville, New York in 1997.
Related Materials:
Also found at the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview conducted by Francis V. O'Connor with Stanton L. Catlin from July 1 to September 14, 1989.

The University of Texas at Austin holds a significant collection of Stanton Loomis Catlin's papers, some of which are duplicates of the papers held by the Archives of American Art.
Provenance:
The collection was donated from 1992 to 1995 to by Stanton L. Catlin.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Stanton L. Catlin papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Art historians -- New York  Search this
Minnesota -- Description and travel  Search this
Gallery directors -- New York (State)  Search this
Curators -- New York (State)  Search this
Topic:
Art, European  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Educators -- New York (State)  Search this
Art, Latin American  Search this
Art -- History -- Study and teaching  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Interviews
Transcripts
Diaries
Citation:
Stanton L. Catlin papers, 1911-1998, bulk 1930-1994. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.catlstan
See more items in:
Stanton L. Catlin papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-catlstan
Online Media:

Mel Casas papers

Creator:
Casas, Mel, 1929-2014  Search this
Names:
Con Safo (Group)  Search this
Extent:
1 Linear foot
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1963-1998
Summary:
The papers of San Antonio painter and educator Mel Casas measure 1 linear foot and date from 1963 to 1998. The collection is comprised of biographical material including files on the art collective Con Safo, correspondence regarding business and exhibitions, writings by Casas on Chicano art, printed materials documenting Casas's career and Con Safo events, and photographic materials, including photos and slides of Casas and others, his artwork, and an exhibition.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of San Antonio painter and educator Mel Casas measure 1 linear foot and date from 1963 to 1998. The collection is comprised of biographical material including files on the art collective Con Safo, correspondence regarding business and exhibitions, writings by Casas on Chicano art, printed materials documenting Casas's career and Con Safo events, and photographic materials, including photos and slides of Casas and others, his artwork, and an exhibition.

Of particular note are the files on Con Safo, including meeting minutes for two 1975 meetings, and copies of La Movida Con Safo numbers 1 and 2, which include records of the founding of the group and copies of defining documents of the Chicano art movement. Casas's writings, which express his ideas on Chicano art in diagrammatic form, are also of particular note.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as five series.

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1975-1996 (Box 1; 4 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1975-1993 (Box 1; 4 folders)

Series 3: Writings, 1973-1993 (Box 1; 0.9 folders)

Series 4: Printed Materials, 1963-1998 (Box 1-2, OVs 3-4; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 5: Photographic Materials, circa 1977 (Box 2; 2 folders)
Biographical / Historical:
Mel Casas (1929-2014) was a painter and educator in San Antonio, Texas.

Casas was born in El Paso in the historic El Segundo Barrio. After graduating from El Paso High School, he worked odd jobs before serving in the United States Army during the Korean War. Casas was wounded by a landmine in Korea and ultimately awarded the Purple Heart. After returning home he attended the University of Texas at El Paso and graduated in 1956. He subsequently earned a Master of Fine Art in 1958 from the University of the Americas in Mexico City.

Casas began his teaching career at Jefferson High School in El Paso where one of his students was artist Gaspar Enriquez. He went on to teach at San Antonio College and was chair of the art department there until his retirement in 1990.

Casas was a founder of the Chicano art movement and a key member of the art collective Con Safo with other founding members Felipe Reyes, Jose Esquivel, Rudy Treviño, and Roberto Ríos. Originally named El Grupo, the group's mission was to empower Chicano artists who were largely overlooked in the mainstream art world. In 1968 Casas penned the "Brown Paper Report," a manifesto explaining the meaning of Con Safo, Chicano, the "Brown Vision of America," and the group's use of the symbol "C/S." The report helped to define Con Safo as an organization and remains a fundamental document in the history of the Chicano art movement.

Casas is well-known for his series Humanscapes that includes 150 large-scale paintings produced between 1965 and 1989. This series, along with smaller works, has been exhibited throughout the United States and Mexico. Casas's work can be found in the permanent collections of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the San Antonio Museum of Art, and other collections worldwide.

Casas died in San Antonio, Texas, in 2014.
Related Materials:
Also at the Archives of American Art is an interview of Mel Casas conducted August 14-16, 1996 by Paul Karlstrom for the Archives of American Art.
Provenance:
The Mel Casas papers were donated by Mel Casas in 1981 and microfilmed as part of the Archives of American Art's Texas project. Additional papers were donated by Casas in 1999.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art teachers--Texas--San Antonio  Search this
Painters--Texas--San Antonio  Search this
Topic:
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Mexican American art  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Chicano art movement  Search this
Citation:
Mel Casas papers, 1963-1998. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.casamel
See more items in:
Mel Casas papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-casamel
Online Media:

Jesse Amado papers

Creator:
Amado, Jesse, 1951-  Search this
Extent:
1.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Drawings
Date:
circa 1970-2016
Summary:
The papers of artist Jesse Amado measure 1.3 linear feet and date from circa 1970 to 2016. The collection is comprised of biographical material, writings and notes, professional files, printed material, photographic material, and artwork.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of artist Jesse Amado measure 1.3 linear feet and date from circa 1970 to 2016. The collection is comprised of biographical material, writings and notes, professional files, printed material, photographic material, and artwork.

Awards, greeting cards, license, and a resume are found in biographical materials. The papers also include early writings, notes, and fifteen notebooks. Professional files consist of agreements, exhibition and project files, a teaching file, and source material.

Printed materials consist of clippings, ephemera, exhibition catalogs and announcements, and an exhibition wall description. Photographs and negatives are of Amado, works of art, and personal subjects. Artwork includes a few drawings, a sketchbook, and portraits of Amado drawn by his students.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as six series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1983-2011 (Box 1; 4 folders)

Series 2: Writings and Notes, circa 1970-2016 (Box 1; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 3: Professional Files, 1990-2016 (Boxes 1-2; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 4: Printed Material, circa 1983-2016, undated (Boxes 1-2; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 5: Photographic Material, circa 1970-circa 2000 (Box 1; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 6: Artwork, circa 2010-2015 (Boxes 1-2; 3 folders)
Biographical / Historical:
Jesse Amado (1951- ) is an artist active in San Antonio, Texas.

In his youth Amado had aspirations to become an architect but lost interest later in high school. Amado joined the Navy at 17 becoming an east coast communications operator. He left the Navy after five years and moved to New York City. There, he visited art museums and became interested in art though he did not consider a career as an artist at this time. Instead, he studied English in college and graduated in 1977 from the University of Texas in Austin. He returned to San Antonio and became an English teacher in the public school system, but left this position a short time later. Following the suggestion of a friend, Amado joined the San Antonio fire department where he worked until retiring in 2002. Upon gaining a steady income, Amado began taking art classes at San Antonio College studying under Chicano artist Mel Casas. Amado continued to study fine art at the University of Texas in San Antonio in the 1980s. He earned another bachelor's degree as well as a master's degree in fine art in 1990. During this time he began exhibiting his artwork. He has since held numerous solo and group exhibitions of his work.

Amado completed residencies at San Antonio's Artspace, South Korea's City Gallery of Kwangju, the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts in Omaha, N.E., and for the National Endowment for the Arts' Visual Arts Organization Grant at the Fabric Workshop and Museum of Philadelphia. His major projects include memorials for the San Antonio fire department and Days, an art installation in honor of Linda Pace at the San Antonio Central Library.
Related Materials:
Also at the Archives of American Art is an interview of Jesse Amado conducted May 31 and June 7, 2004 by Cary Cordova at the artist's studio, in San Antonio, Texas.
Provenance:
The papers were donated by Jesse Amado in 2017.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Topic:
Computer artists--Texas--San Antonio  Search this
Video artists--Texas--San Antonio  Search this
Hispanic American artists--Texas--San Antonio  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Drawings
Citation:
Jesse Amado papers, circa 1970-2016. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.amadjess
See more items in:
Jesse Amado papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-amadjess

Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material

Creator:
Ybarra-Frausto, Tomás, 1938-  Search this
Names:
Mexican Museum  Search this
Royal Chicano Air Force  Search this
Studio 24 (San Francisco, Calif.)  Search this
Goldman, Shifra M., 1926-2011  Search this
Lomas Garza, Carmen  Search this
Mesa-Bains, Amalia  Search this
Extent:
33.1 Linear feet
1.27 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Photographs
Slides (photographs)
Interviews
Place:
Mexico -- Religious life and customs
Date:
1965-2004
Summary:
The research material of Tomás Ybarra-Frausto, measures 33.1 linear feet and 1.27 GB and dates from 1965-2004. The collection, amassed throughout Ybarra-Frausto's long and distinguished career as a scholar of the arts and humanities, documents the development of Chicano art in the United States and chronicles Ybarra-Frausto's role as a community leader and scholar in the political and artistic Chicano movement from its inception in the 1960s to the present day.
Scope and Content Note:
The research material of Tomás Ybarra-Frausto, amassed throughout his long and distinguished career as a scholar of the arts and humanities, documents the development of Chicano art in the United States. As community leader and scholar, Ybarra-Frausto played dual roles of active participant and historian in the Chicano movement, chronicling this unique political and artistic movement from its inception in the 1960s to the present day.

Deeply rooted in American history, "El Movimiento," the Chicano movement, evolved from Mexican-Americans' struggle for self-determination during the civil rights era of the 1960s. It began as a grassroots community effort that enlisted the arts in the creation of a united political and cultural constituency. Chicano artists, intellectuals, and political activists were instrumental in mobilizing the Mexican-American community for the cause of social justice, and the movement was shaped by the affirmation of a cultural identity that embraced a shared heritage with Mexico and the United States.

Just as "El Movimiento" aimed to instruct and inspire through the recollection and conservation of culture, Ybarra-Frausto's own career as scholar and historian helped to shape the intellectual discourse of the Chicano art. As a leading historian and theoretician in the field of Chicano Studies, he has written extensively on the subject, and has been instrumental in defining the canons of Chicano art. His papers are accordingly rich and varied, and they will be of great use to future scholars.

His research material, dating from 1965 to 1996, are arranged in subject files containing original writings, notes, bibliographies compiled by Ybarra-Frausto and others, exhibition catalogues, announcements, newspaper clippings and other printed material, as well as slides and photographs. Many of these files also include interview transcripts and correspondence with prominent figures in the movement. While this research collection contextualizes Chicano art within the larger framework of Latino and Latin-American culture, the bulk of the files relates specifically to Chicano visual culture. The collection also contains pertinent documentation of the Chicano civil rights movement, material on Chicano poets and writers, and research files on the wider Hispanic community, but these also appear within the context of Chicano culture in general.

Prominent among the bibliographies are the many notes and drafts related to the publication of A Comprehensive Annotated Bibliography of Chicano Art, 1965-1981 (University of California, Berkeley, 1985), which Ybarra-Frausto co-authored with Shifra Goldman. Ybarra-Frausto's files on Goldman, like other files in the collection, document his close associations and collaborations with scholars.

Art historians have traditionally found the categorization of Chicano art a difficult task. Unsure whether to classify the work as "American" or "Latin American," critics often ignored the work altogether. An outgrowth of this dilemma was the proliferation of artists, curators, and critics within the Chicano community, and the papers contain many original writings by Chicano artists about Chicano art, found in extensive files on artists that will be of particular significance to researchers. These often contain exhibition essays, dissertation proposals, and course outlines authored by the artists, along with the standard biographies, exhibition records, and reviews. Some of the files contain rare interviews conducted and transcribed by Ybarra-Frausto. Highlights include conversations with Carmen Lomas Garza, Amalia Mesa-Bains, and members of the Royal Chicano Air Force artist cooperative.

As a member of several Chicano art organizations and institutions, Ybarra-Frausto kept active records of their operation. The extensive files on the Mexican Museum and Galerie de la Raza/Studio 24, both in San Francisco, not only chronicle the history of Chicano art through the records of exhibitions and programming, but also offer case studies on the development of non-profit art institutions. The files on artist cooperatives, organizations, and exhibition spaces cover several regions of the United States, but focus on California, Texas and New York.

Two notable events in the development of Chicano art were the 1982 Califas: Chicano Art and Culture in California seminar at the University of California at Santa Cruz, and the 1990 traveling exhibition Chicano Art: Resistance and Affirmation, 1965-1985 (CARA), of which Ybarra-Frausto served as organizer and catalogue essayist. His records document the planning and development of these seminal events. Ybarra-Frausto's files on folk art, altars, posters, murals, performance art, border art, Chicana feminist art, and Southwestern and Mexican imagery (both urban and rural expressions) mirror the diverse forms and subject matter of Chicano art.

Spanning almost four decades of American culture from a Chicano perspective, these files have a unique historical value. The legacy of Chicano art and its contribution to the cultural landscape of this country, kept alive in Ybarra-Frausto's files, attests to the richness and diversity of American art.

Henry C. Estrada

Research Fellow, 1997.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as a single series of subject files. The general contents of each folder have been listed. The subject files are arranged in alphabetical order. While no two files are alike, they may contain résumés, printed and digital material, letters, draft writings, and photographs. Unless otherwise noted, each listing represents one file folder. The abbreviation TYF was used to refer to the name Tomá Ybarra-Frausto throughtout the Series Description.
Autobiographical Note:
Papelitos (little bits of paper), whether rent receipts, paid bills, or piles of personal letters, can become layered bundles of personal history. I have always been a pepenador (a scavenger) and saver of paper scraps. Diary notes, scribbled annotations, and first drafts are often useful indicators of ideas and gestation. Papelitos are the fragments of every-day life that gain expanded meaning integrated into the larger historical events of a period.

In the decade of the 1960s, I started saving ephemeral material--exhibition announcements, clippings of individual artists and of organizations fomenting a Chicano art movement. The social scenarios of the period such as marches, strikes, sit-ins, and mobilizations for social justice all spawned manifestos, posters, leaflets, and other forms of printed material. I somehow managed to assemble and protect the evanescent printed information that recorded the birth and development of Chicano art.

As I started to research and write about Chicano art and artists of the period, I continued to clip, photocopy, and preserve material given me by Mexican-American artists from throughout the nation. My idea was to form an archive that would be comprehensive rather than selective. I knew that it was the offbeat, singular piece of paper with a missing link of information that would attract the scholar.

Today, several decades after the flowering of Chicano art, there is still a lamentable paucity of research and information about this significant component of American art.

It is my fervent hope that this compendium of information will function as a resonant print and image bank for investigators of Chicano culture. Perhaps contained within the archive are the facts that will inspire new visions or revisions of Chicano art and culture--this is my fondest dream.

Dr. Tomás Ybarra-Frausto

New York City, 1998
Related Materials:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto Papers are located at University of Texas Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin.
Provenance:
The collection was donated to the Archives of American Art by Tomás Ybarra-Frausto in 1997, and in 2004.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Rights:
The Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material is owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Santos (Art)  Search this
Hispanic American art -- Sources  Search this
Mexican American artists -- Sources  Search this
Hispanic American artists -- Sources  Search this
Household shrines -- Mexico  Search this
Mexican American arts -- Sources  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Slides (photographs)
Interviews
Citation:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material, 1965-2004. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.ybartoma
See more items in:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-ybartoma
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Angel Rodriguez-Diaz

Interviewee:
Rodriguez-Diaz, Angel, 1955-  Search this
Interviewer:
Cordova, Cary  Search this
Creator:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Names:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Alvarez, Candida, 1955-  Search this
Anthes, John  Search this
Briseño, Rolando, 1952-  Search this
Cisneros, Sandra  Search this
Min, Yong Soon, 1953-  Search this
Molina, Antonio J. (Antonio José), 1928-  Search this
Morris, Robert, 1931-2018  Search this
Pace, Linda  Search this
Ramos Otero, Manuel  Search this
Roche-Rabell, Arnaldo, 1955-  Search this
Sward, Robert, 1933-  Search this
Tofino, Nitsa  Search this
Extent:
7 Sound discs (Sound recording, master (7 hr., 45 min.), digital, 2 5/8 in.)
6 Cassettes (Sound recording, duplicate)
94 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound discs
Cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2004 April 23-May 7
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Angel Rodriguez-Diaz conducted 2004 Apr. 23-May 7, by Cary Cordova, for the Archives of American Art, in San Antonio, Tex.
Rodriguez-Diaz speaks of his mother's upbringing and her untimely death from cancer; his childhood and schooling in Santurce, Puerto Rico, particularly his art experiences; his parents' conversion to Pentecostalism; the importance of travel in Puerto Rican culture; attending the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras; discovering his sexuality during adolescence; living in New York City; the city's gay scene on Christopher Street; exploring his identity as a Puerto Rican American; his jobs at mannequin factories; and his gradual ingratiation into the New York art world, mostly through Robert Morris. Rodriguez-Diaz also mentions his relationship with Rolando Briseño; the motifs in his paintings, such as mirrors and masks; witnessing the Tompkins Square Park riots of 1988; organizing a strike at his mannequin factory; contracting the HIV virus from a partner; Mexican art cinema; the cultural and historical similarities of Mexico and Puerto Rico; moving to San Antonio; choosing the models for his "Goddess" series; Anglo/Latino conflict within the San Antonio art scene; the commodification of Mexican culture in San Antonio; the spiritual importance of portraiture; the history of Puerto Rican artwork and culture, particularly native cultures; and the Smithsonian's acquisition of his painting, "The Protagonist of an Endless Story." Rodriguez-Diaz also recalls Antonio Molina, Sandra Cisneros, Arnoldo Roche-Rabell, John Anthes, Manuel Ramos Otero, Nitsa Tofino, Candida Alvarez, Soon Yong Ming, Robert Sward, Linda Pace, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Angel Rodriguez-Diaz (1955- ) is an artist from San Antonio, Tex. Cary Cordova (1970- ) is an art historian from Austin, Tex.
General:
Originally recorded on 7 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 12 digital wav files. Duration is 7 hr., 46 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Painters -- Texas -- San Antonio -- Interviews  Search this
Artists -- Puerto Rico -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- Puerto Rico  Search this
Hispanic American artists -- Texas -- Interviews  Search this
Gay artists -- Texas -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.rodriga04
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rodriga04

Oral history interview with Franco Mondini-Ruiz

Interviewee:
Mondini-Ruiz, Franco, 1961-  Search this
Interviewer:
Cordova, Cary  Search this
Creator:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Names:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Amado, Jesse, 1951-  Search this
Briseño, Rolando, 1952-  Search this
Casey, Mike  Search this
Cisneros, Sandra  Search this
Diaz, Alejandro  Search this
Herzberg, Julia P.  Search this
Jaukkuri, Maaretta  Search this
Judd, Donald, 1928-1994  Search this
Lozano, Danny  Search this
Moffatt, Tracey  Search this
Romo, Ito, 1961-  Search this
Taylor, Frederieke  Search this
Tracy, Michael, 1943-  Search this
Extent:
93 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2004 July 7-8
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Franco Mondini-Ruiz conducted 2004 July 7-8, by Cary Cordova, for the Archives of American Art, in Alameda and San Antonio, Tex.
Mondini speaks of his parents' disparate backgrounds; his repressed childhood in Boerne, Tex.; his family's electronics store; discovering that his brother was actually his half-brother; attending undergrad and law school at St. Mary's in San Antonio, Tex.; his Catholic rearing; raising his Latino consciousness during and after law school; his life as a successful lawyer; his ingratiation into both rich white and Latino cultures; his partying and coming-out as a gay man; his making of art as a counterpoint to his office work; advice for young Latino artists; the importance of cheap art; exoticizing of Mexican culture by Anglos; quitting law and his experience living in Mexico City; and being diagnosed with HIV. Mondini-Ruiz also speaks of opening his Infinito Botanica and how he operated it; American drug culture; San Antonio's cityscape and his "utopic" hope for it; his "Blue Star on Houston" exhibition; drug use; his show at Bard College as his big break; living with Alejandro Diaz; homosexual and Mexican rococo aesthetics; his exhibit at the 2000 Whitney Biennial and moving to New York City; the importance of found art; the universality of class and race struggles; the problems with over-materialization of artwork; his "Ballroom" show in Marfa, Tex. and the issues confronting that city's arts patronage; his making of the "Spurs Installation"; his new anti-materialistic mindset; and the patterns within his career. Mondini-Ruiz also recalls Michael Tracy, Ito Romo, Rolando Briseno, Sandra Cisneros, Jesse Amado, Donald Judd, Frederieke Taylor, Julia Herzberg, Danny Lozano, Maaretta Jaukkuri, Tracey Moffat, Mike Casey, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Franco Mondini-Ruiz (1961- ) is an artist in New York. Legal name is Gino Francisco Mondini. Interviewer Cary Cordova (1970-) is an art historian from Austin, Tex.
General:
Originally recorded on 5 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 9 digital wav files. Duration is 5 hrs., 12 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Gay artists -- Texas -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- Technique  Search this
Lawyers -- Texas -- Interviews  Search this
Hispanic American artists -- Texas -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.mondin04
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mondin04

Oral history interview with Alberto Mijangos

Interviewee:
Mijangos, Alberto, 1925-  Search this
Interviewer:
Cordova, Cary  Search this
Creator:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Names:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Casas, Mel, 1929-2014  Search this
Gamboa, Raul  Search this
Goitia, Francisco, 1882-1960  Search this
Orozco, José Clemente, 1883-1949  Search this
Rivera, Diego, 1886-1957  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Sanchez, Gabriel  Search this
Siqueiros, David Alfaro  Search this
Tamayo, Olga  Search this
Tamayo, Rufino, 1899-  Search this
Extent:
65 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2003 Dec. 5-12
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Alberto Mijangos conducted 2003 Dec. 5- 12, by Cary Cordova, for the Archives of American Art, in San Antonio, Tex.
Mijangos speaks of his family background, early childhood memories and early art education at San Carlos Academy of Art; the Air Force in Mexico; Los Tres Grandes, Diego Rivera, Jose Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siqueiros; coming to the United States; painting bull fighters; leaving Texas for Chicago; favorite paintings at the Art Institute of Chicago; moving to San Antonio; suspicion of being a communist; becoming a Mexican diplomat; working with Mel Casas who led Mijangos to abstraction; Con Safo; difficulty in achieving respect from Americans; moving to Oaxaca, working there and trying to fit in; returning to San Antonio, changing his lifestyle; changing inspiration, Mark Rothko and Mijangos new use for color; tee-shirt paintings; his relationship with galleries; the artistic community of San Antonio; his use of numbers and fabric in his paintings; interest and use of photography in his artwork. Mijangos also recalls Raul Gamboa, Rufino and Olga Tamayo, Gabriel Sanchez, Francisco Goitia and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Alberto Mijangos (1925-2007) was an artist from San Antonio, Tex. Cary Cordova (1970- ) is an art historian from Austin, Tex.
General:
Originally recorded on 5 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 8 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hrs., 48 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Painters -- Texas -- San Antonio -- Interviews  Search this
Mexican American artists -- Texas -- Interviews  Search this
Mexican American art -- Texas  Search this
Painting -- Technique  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.mijang03
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mijang03

Oral history interview with César Martínez

Interviewee:
Martínez, César Augusto, 1944-  Search this
Interviewer:
Quirarte, Jacinto, 1931-2012  Search this
Extent:
107 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1997 Aug. 21-28
Scope and Contents:
An interview of César Martínez conducted 1997 Aug. 21-28, by Jacinto Quirarte, in Martínez's studios, San Antonio, Tex., for the Archives of American Art. Martinez discusses his family; schooling; experience in Korea and returning to San Antonio; meeting other artists; joining artists' groups; artists who have influenced him; the themes, forms, meaning, development, processes of his work; and specific works.
Biographical / Historical:
César Martínez (1944- ) is a painter and printmaker from San Antonio, Tex.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 6 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hrs., 31 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1959 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for this interview provided by the Smithsonian Institution's Latino Pool Fund.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Hispanic American artists -- Texas -- San Antonio -- Interviews  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- Texas -- San Antonio  Search this
Hispanic American art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.martin97
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-martin97

Oral history interview with Jesús Moroles

Interviewee:
Moroles, Jesús Bautista, 1950-2015  Search this
Interviewer:
Cordova, Cary  Search this
Creator:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Names:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Baca, Judith Francisca  Search this
Jimenez, Luis, 1940-2006  Search this
Legorreta Vilchis, Ricardo  Search this
Noguchi, Isamu, 1904-1988  Search this
Pfeiffer, Eckhardt.  Search this
Ribelin, Frank  Search this
Rückriem, Ulrich.  Search this
Saarinen, Eero, 1910-1961  Search this
Shrader, David  Search this
Extent:
102 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2004 July 19-20
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Jesús Moroles conducted 2004 July 19-20, by Cary Cordova, for the Archives of American Art, in Rockport, Tex.
Moroles speaks of his parents' poor background and young courtship; his parents' strong work ethic, and his inheritance of this work ethic; earning money through art commissions at a young age; being a young entrepreneur; joining the Air Force and avoiding combat in Southeast Asia by working with electronics; doing photography while stationed in Thailand; choosing stone as medium; numerous injuries he has received during stonecutting; working in Pietra Santa, Italy; meeting and working under Luis Jimenez; working in segregated Waxahachie, Tex.; differences between his figurative and abstract works; why he curates all his shows; and the reasons behind his unconventional stone-sawing methods. Moroles also discusses how he names his works and series; moving his studio to Rockport; his fears of being typecast as a specific type of artist (i.e., "fountain" or "Chicano"); incredulity and disdain towards art journalism and scholarship; his commission for the CBS building; his good relationships with his dealers; his new book of artwork; his desire to slow down his production; his unconventional Baptist/Latino upbringing and his present lack of religion; the Houston Police Memorial; the pyramid motif in his work; his visits to China; moving to Rockport; the tactile nature of his works; his belief in the musicality of granite; his megalomaniacal disposition towards his works; the drowning victims in the Forth Worth Water Gardens; his desire to create sacred places, and the meaning of that phrase; the process of "granite weaving"; his new metal pieces; the lack of political meanings in his art; his "Moonscapes"; and his affections for his daughter. Moroles also recalls Eckhard Pfeiffer, Isamu Noguchi, Ulrich Ruckriem, Eero Saarinen, David Shrader, Frank Ribelin, Ricardo Legoretta, Judy Baca, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Jesús Moroles (1950- ) is a sculptor in Rockport, Tex. Cary Cordova (1970- ) is an art historian in Austin, Tex.
General:
Originally recorded on 6 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 10 digital wav files. Duration is 6 hrs., 13 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Sculptors -- Texas -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Art commissions  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.morole04
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-morole04

Oral history interview with Luis Jimenez

Interviewee:
Jimenez, Luis, 1940-2006  Search this
Interviewer:
Bermingham, Peter  Search this
Names:
University of Texas -- Students  Search this
Lipton, Seymour, 1903-1986  Search this
Ossorio, Alfonso, 1916-1990  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound cassettes (Sound recording)
124 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1985 Dec. 15-17
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Luis Jimenez conducted 1985 Dec. 15-17, by Peter Bermingham, in Tuscon, Ariz., for the Archives of American Art.
Jimenez speaks of his family and ancestral background; his father's artistic ability and work as a neon sign maker; starting out in the architecture program at the University of Texas, and later changing to the art program; moving to New York City, and getting his sculpture career started there; meeting and working with Seymour Lipton; selling his work and getting established in galleries; the inspirations for and the development of some of his pieces; the influence of pop art; returning to the Southwest; the importance and influence of his Mexican ancestry; personal images and reflections in his work. He recalls Alfonso Ossorio.
Biographical / Historical:
Luis Jimenez (1940-2006) was a sculptor from Hondo, N.M. Born in El Paso, Tex.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Pop art  Search this
Hispanic American artists -- Interviews  Search this
Sculptors -- New Mexico -- Hondo -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.jimene85
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-jimene85

Oral history interview with Benito Huerta

Interviewee:
Huerta, Benito, 1952-  Search this
Interviewer:
Cordova, Cary  Search this
Creator:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Names:
Galería de la Raza (San Francisco, Calif.)  Search this
Lynn Goode Gallery  Search this
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Beardsley, John  Search this
Caton, David  Search this
Chin, Mel, 1951-  Search this
Hernandez, John, 1952-  Search this
Livingston, Jane  Search this
Lomas Garza, Carmen  Search this
Pitman, Bonnie  Search this
Vargas, Kathy  Search this
Yanez, Rene  Search this
Zamudio-Taylor, Victor  Search this
Extent:
5 Sound discs (Sound recording, master (5 hrs., 52 min.), digitial, 2 5/8 in.)
84 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound discs
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2004 Feb. 29-Mar. 2
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Benito Huerta conducted 2004 Feb. 29-Mar. 2, by Cary Cordova, for the Archives of American Art, in Arlington, Tex.
Huerta speaks of his early childhood; interest in art; attending graduate school at New Mexico State University; the exhibition "Hispanic Art in the United States: Thirty Contemporary Painters and Sculptors," 1987; interest in music and planning programs while attending undergraduate school at the University of Houston; his relationship with artist Mel Chin; his exhibition at the Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston; the Lynn Goode Gallery and an exhibition entitled "Aneurism"; criticism of his artwork; living in San Francisco for two years; Galería de la Raza; painting on black velvet; the exhibition "Chulas Fronteras (Beautiful Borders)" 1986; his chalupas series; the value of curating versus making his own art; "Seen and Unseen" at Diverse Works 1983; "Cowboys, Cadillacs, and Computers" Lawndale Art and Performance Center, University of Houston, 1985; his installation pieces; maps and global images in his work; his co-founding of the art Magazine "Artlies"; public commissions; connections to North Carolina; the Serie project; and the artists he has worked with since arriving at University of Texas, Arlington. Huerta also recalls David Caton, Jane Livingston, John Beardsley, René Yañez, Carmen Lomas Garza, John Hernandez, Kathy Vargas, Victor Zamudio Taylor, Bonnie Pitman, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Beniton Huerta (1952-) is an artist from Arlington, Tex. Interviewer Cary Cordova (1970-) is an art historian.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Hispanic American artists -- Texas -- Interviews  Search this
Curators -- Texas -- Interviews  Search this
Art criticism  Search this
Art commissions  Search this
Painting -- Technique  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.huerta04
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-huerta04

Oral history interview with Juana Alicia

Interviewee:
Juana Alicia  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J.  Search this
Extent:
99 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2000 May 8 and July 17
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Juana Alicia conducted 2000 May 8-July 17, by Paul Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art, in Alicia's studio, Berkeley, California.
Juana Alicia discusses her childhood in Detroit and Texas; her identification as part of the black community; admiration of Paul Robeson and Martin Luther King, Jr., whose death "devastated" her; moving in 1972 to Salinas, California at the invitation of Cesar Chavez; working in the lettuce fields and inspiration for her mural Lechugueras (1985) in the Mission District of San Francisco; Chicana identity; art as central to her story; her work during the 1970s and 80s becoming more international in scope and connecting to the struggles of others; her interest in ancient techniques and in the work of Los Tres Grandes and the frescos of Diego Rivera; her current project, Santuarios, with her partner, at SFO, and the iconography of the work in terms of three forces at work: artist's experience, mandate of commission, spiritual/universal force; El Cordon Rota (1998), a banner prepared for and withdrawn from a Tijuana show in response to John Valadez's poster image of a nude Chicana; interest in aesthetics and the idea of beauty in art as vital to survival; her views on gender equality, empowerment through art, differences between men and women; the "Positive Visability" mural (1995) in San Francisco's lower Haight district, with a description of the iconography and recent restoration project supported by Neighborhood Beautification Program fighting hate crimes throughout the city.
Biographical / Historical:
Juana Alicia Araiza (1953-), commonly known as Juana Alicia, is a painter, printmaker, and educator in Berkeley, California. Juana Alicia is among the leading Chicana muralists in California and a major figure in Bay Area Chicana and women's movements. Among her commissions is a mural done with her partner Emmanuel C. Montoya at the San Francisco International Airport. Uses only her forenames; does not use her last name.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 8 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hrs., 6 minutes.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Funding for this interview provided by SI Latino Initiative II, 1999.
Topic:
African American artists -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Hispanic American artists -- Interviews  Search this
Muralists -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.alicia00
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-alicia00

Oral history interview with Jesse Amado

Interviewee:
Amado, Jesse, 1951-  Search this
Interviewer:
Cordova, Cary  Search this
Creator:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Names:
ArtPace (Foundation : San Antonio, Tex.)  Search this
Contemporary Art for San Antonio (Organization)  Search this
Finesilver Gallery  Search this
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Casas, Mel, 1929-2014  Search this
Davis, Barbara  Search this
Ford, O'Neil, 1905-  Search this
Hickey, Dave, 1940-  Search this
Holland, Rebecca, 1962-  Search this
Mondini-Ruiz, Franco, 1961-  Search this
Ramirez, Chuck  Search this
Reynolds, Steve  Search this
Extent:
79 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2004 May 31-June 7
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Jesse Amado conducted 2004 May 31 and June 7, by Cary Cordova, for the Archives of American Art, at the artist's studio, in San Antonio, Texas.
Includes artist's family background, personalities, and relationship of artist's mother and father; parents' occupations and the effect on the family; brother Gilbert; early influences and experiences in drawing; role of religion during childhood; experiences in school including parochial school and losing interest in 12th grade; experiences working with architect O'Neil Ford in high school; decision to go into the Navy; experiences and travels in the Navy; first impressions of New York City; interest in literature and reading on works and life, including T.S. Eliot, "Tom Sawyer," "The Odyssey;" first experiences with foreign film, especially L'Avventura; bilingualism including learning to speak English and it's possible influences on art; work after the Navy on a tanker; travels in Europe; New York City and experiences working and living there; decision to return to San Antonio; starting at San Antonio College and experience of returning to school; first paintings; attempt at teaching; joining the fire department and influences of that job on his art; MFA study at University of Texas, San Antonio; influences of professors including Steve Reynolds, Mel Casas, and Dave Hickey; major influential discussion with Dave Hickey and art that resulted; BFA show exhibition; beginnings of ideas of fragility and mutability in early pieces; relationship to Minimalism or Conceptual Art in works; the growing art scene in San Antonio and it's galleries, including FineSilver, Blue Star and Art Pace; relationships with other San Antonio artists including Franco Mondini, Chuck Ramirez, Rebecca Holland; discussion of Bemis Foundation show; artist's feelings on being a Latino or Chicano artist; possible Latino influences on his art; discussion of Latino culture and iconography; change from stronger tendencies in painting towards sculpture and installation pieces; discussion of works in the "Taking Liberties" exhibition [1992]; the artist's creation process; discussion of Antonioni's L'Avventura and its use in artist's work; use of text as a visual form; importance of backstory and context to artist's work; use of music and lyrics in work, including James Brown and the Beatles; interest in taglines and its use in art; interest in fashion especially fashion magazines and its use in art; introduction and use of DYMO tape in art; relationship and interactions with galleries and museums, especially the Whitney, Blue Star, FineSilver; Barbara Davis; use of digital photography in work; discussion of the economics of the gallery; the future of artist's work and the importance of the process for the artist in the future; role of Catholicism in artist's work; the exhibition "Renascence" at the Contemporary Arts Museum in Houston; influence of marriage and divorce on works.
Biographical / Historical:
Jesse Amadao (1951-) is an artist in San Antonio, Texas. Cary Cordoza (1970-) is an art historian.
General:
Originally recorded on 7 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 9 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hrs., 45 minutes.
Interview recorded on mini discs and compact discs.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Sculptors -- Texas -- San Antonio  Search this
Topic:
Painters -- Texas -- San Antonio -- Interviews  Search this
Hispanic American artists -- Texas -- San Antonio -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- Technique  Search this
Religion in art  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- Texas -- San Antonio
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.amado04
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-amado04

Ruth Goddard material on Porfirio Salinas

Creator:
Goddard, Ruth, 1912-  Search this
Names:
Salinas, Porfirio, 1910-1973  Search this
Extent:
1 microfilm reel
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microfilm reels
Date:
1943-1981
Scope and Contents:
Papers, 1943-1981, gathered by Ruth Goddard, a biographer of Salinas. Included are: correspondence; price lists; portions of interview transcripts about Salinas; a few manuscript pages; the cover and title page of Goddard's 1975 book, PORFIRIO SALINAS; an unpublished article on Salinas by Goddard; two photos of Salinas; and miscellany.
Biographical / Historical:
Biographer of Salinas; Austin, Texas.
Provenance:
Microfilmed as part of the Archives of American Art's Texas project.
Lent for microfilming 1981 by Ruth Goddard.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Authors -- Texas -- Austin  Search this
Topic:
Women authors -- Texas -- Austin  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.goddruth
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-goddruth

Kathy Vargas papers

Creator:
Vargas, Kathy  Search this
Names:
Guerrilla Girls (Group of artists)  Search this
Goldberg, Jim, 1953-  Search this
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Perrone, Jeff  Search this
Extent:
10.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Interviews
Date:
circa 1965-2016
Summary:
The papers of San Antonio-based educator and photographer Kathy Vargas measure 10.8 linear feet and date from circa 1965-2016. Vargas's career is documented through biographical material, correspondence, writings and notes, project and exhibition files, professional files, and printed material.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of San Antonio-based educator and photographer Kathy Vargas measure 10.8 linear feet and date from circa 1965-2016. Vargas's career is documented through biographical material, correspondence, writings and notes, project and exhibition files, professional files, and printed material.

The collection contains biographical materials, including a video recording of an interview, photographs of family and friends, and records for Vargas's studies at the University of Texas. Correspondence is with Lucy Lippard, Jim Goldberg, Jeff Perrone, colleagues, and others. Topics of professional correspondence includes exhibitions, publications, and residencies. Writings and notes that include five notebooks, manuscripts by Vargas and others, notes, and lecture and panel talks. Project and exhibition files document her work on major exhibitions of Chicano art, and include twelve sound recordings of interviews for the exhibition Hospice: A Photographic Inquiry. Other projects include the Guerrilla Girls Fotonovela and research on San Antonio shrines. Professional files document Vargas's activities on various boards and committees, employment, and for her work on selection panels. Printed material includes clippings, exhibition material, magazines, posters, and other publications.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as six series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1965-2014 (Boxes 1, 12; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1979-2014 (Boxes 1-5, 12; 4.0 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, circa 1985-2014 (Boxes 5-6; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 4: Project and Exhibition Files, 1984-2004 (Boxes 6-8, 12; 2.0 linear feet)

Series 5: Professional Files, 1975-2016 (Boxes 8-9; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1974-circa 2010 (Boxes 9-12, OV 13; 2.4 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Kathy Vargas (1950- ) is an educator and photographer in San Antonio, Texas.

Vargas's early influences were the stories of her elder family members, Catholicism, and her uncle Antonio Valdez, a photographer. In the early 1970s, Vargas became acquainted with rock and roll photographers who introduced her to their world of professional photography. Her interest led to taking photography classes at the Southwest Craft Center where she studied under photographer Tom Wright. She quickly became captivated with the art form and started freelancing as a rock and roll photographer. Around this time, Vargas also became familiar with Chicano art and the artist group Con Safo, co-founded by Mel Casas. Vargas and Casas maintained their friendship until his death.

In addition to attending the Southwest Craft Center, Vargas also attended San Antonio College. She went on to earn a Bachelor of Fine Art in 1981 and a Master of Fine Art in 1984 from the University of Texas in San Antonio. Vargas has exhibited her work, as well as curated numerous exhibitions in the U.S. and abroad, collaborating with colleagues such as Jim Goldberg, close friend Lucy Lippard, and others. Vargas is a professor and art department chair at the University of the Incarnate Word where she developed a Bachelor of Fine Art program for photography. Previously she was the Visual Arts Director at the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center.
Related Materials:
Also found at the Archives of American Art is an oral history with Kathy Vargas conducted by Jacinto Quirarte, in San Antonio, Texas on November 7-25, 1997 for the Archives of American Art.
Provenance:
The Kathy Vargas papers were donated in 2016 by Vargas.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Use of archival records with audiovisual records with no duplicate copies requires advance notice.
Occupation:
Photographers -- Texas -- San Antonio  Search this
Educators -- Texas -- San Antonio  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Kathy Vargas papers, circa 1965-2016. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.vargkath
See more items in:
Kathy Vargas papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-vargkath

Oral history interview with Mel Casas

Interviewee:
Casas, Mel, 1929-2014  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J.  Search this
Names:
Incarnate Word College (San Antonio, Tex.) -- Faculty  Search this
Almaraz, Carlos  Search this
Lomas Garza, Carmen  Search this
Extent:
66 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1996 August 14 and 16
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Mel Casas conducted 1996 August 14-16, by Paul Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art.
Casas discusses his current work - dipped acrylic paintings in which technique and material become the subject; his involvement with Chicano art political issues and his own experience as a Mexican-American; a discussion of his family background; art education; early Abstract Expressionist painting; a shift to figuration; thirty years teaching at San Antonio College; the Chicano "movimiento"; and Chicano art and key figures, including Carlos Almaraz and Carmen Lomas Garza.
Biographical / Historical:
Mel Casas (1929-) is a painter from San Antonio, Texas.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 6 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 5 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Painters -- Texas -- San Antonio -- Interviews  Search this
Mexican American artists -- Interviews  Search this
Mexican American art  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.casas96
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-casas96

Oral history interview with Barbara Carrasco

Interviewee:
Carrasco, Barbara, 1955-  Search this
Interviewer:
Rangel, Jeffrey J.  Search this
Names:
Asco (Group of artists)  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles -- Faculty  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles -- Students  Search this
University of California, San Francisco. School of Fine Arts -- Students  Search this
Almaraz, Carlos  Search this
Chavez, Cesar, 1927-  Search this
Gamboa, Harry  Search this
Lomas Garza, Carmen  Search this
Valadez, John, 1951-  Search this
Extent:
87 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1999 April 13-26
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Barbara Carrasco conducted 1999 April 13 and 26, by Jeffrey Rangel, in two sessions, for the Archives of American Art.
Carrasco speaks of the roles played by her parents in her career as an artist, her experiences as a light-skinned Chicana, and the marginalization of women artists within the Chicano art movement; her relationship and marriage to fellow artist, Harry Gamboa, Jr., who has supported women artists; and her perception of Asco ("nausea" in Spanish), a group of artists and performers who joined together during the Chicano civil rights movement. She also discusses the influence of the art professors at UCLA and the quality of the training she received there; working with Carlos Almaraz and John Valadez on the "Zoot Suit" mural in Hollywood; meeting César Chávez and how he in part shaped her identity as a cultural worker; attending California School of Fine Arts, Valencia, California, and receiving her MFA there; other Chicana artists such as Carmen Lomas Garza; and the changes in her most recent work.
Biographical / Historical:
Barbara Carrasco (1955-) is a painter and muralist from Los Angeles, California. Carrasco was born in El Paso, Texas, and a resident of the Los Angeles area since 1956. She is best known for her work inspired by the United Farm Workers Union, by her experiences as a Chicana, by historical events, and by personal issues.
General:
Originally recorded on 5 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 10 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hr., 41 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for the interview and transcription provided by the Smithsonian Institution Latino Initiatives Fund.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Hispanic American artists -- Interviews  Search this
Mexican American artists -- Interviews  Search this
Hispanic American women artists -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.carras99
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-carras99

Oral history interview with Rolando Briseño

Interviewee:
Briseño, Rolando, 1952-  Search this
Interviewer:
Cordova, Cary  Search this
Creator:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Names:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Amado, Jesse, 1951-  Search this
Barraza, Santa  Search this
De Syzslo, Fernando  Search this
Del Viller, Melita  Search this
Kanjo, Kathryn  Search this
Mazuca, Roland  Search this
Mondini-Ruiz, Franco, 1961-  Search this
Orozco, Sylvia, 1954-  Search this
Pace, Linda  Search this
Ramirez, Chuck  Search this
Von Honts, Jackie  Search this
Extent:
73 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2004 March 16-26
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Rolando Briseño conducted 2004 March 16 and 26, by Cary Cordova, for the Archives of American Art, in San Antonio, Texas.
Briseño speaks of his family background; as a child going to Mexico during the summer; growing up in San Antonio; visiting the Witte Museum, taking art classes there; Jackie von Honts, a special tutor of Briseño; scholarship to Cooper Union in New York; Catholicism; Melita del Villar and realizing "Christian mythology"; exchange program with University of Texas, Austin and La Pontifica Universidad Católica del Peru, Lima, Peru; calling himself Chicano; passion for food; traveling around Europe; politics and its influence; coming to terms with his sexuality; graduate school at Columbia University; interest in boxing; involvement in Con Safo; working on a computer as opposed to painting; and the Historic and Design Review Commission of San Antonio. Briseño also recalls Roland Mazuca, Fernando de Syzslo, Santa Barraza, Sylvia Orozco, Kathryn Kanjo, Linda Pace, Jesse Amado, Chuck Ramirez, Franco Mondini-Ruiz, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Rolando Briseño (1952-) is an artist from San Antonio, Texas. Cary Cordova (1970-) is an art historian from Austin, Texas.
General:
Due to technical problems the interview was recorded on both compact disc and mini disc.
Originally recorded on 2 sound discs and 2 compact discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 6 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 26 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Painters -- Texas -- San Antonio -- Interviews  Search this
Mexican American artists -- Texas -- Interviews  Search this
Catholicism  Search this
Gay artists -- Texas -- San Antonio -- Interviews  Search this
Computer Art  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.brisen04
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-brisen04

Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material, 1965-2004

Creator:
Ybarra-Frausto, Tomás, 1938-  Search this
Subject:
Lomas Garza, Carmen  Search this
Goldman, Shifra M.  Search this
Mesa-Bains, Amalia  Search this
Mexican Museum  Search this
Studio 24 (San Francisco, Calif.)  Search this
Royal Chicano Air Force  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Slides (photographs)
Interviews
Place:
Mexico -- Religious life and customs
Topic:
Santos (Art)  Search this
Hispanic American art -- Sources  Search this
Mexican American artists -- Sources  Search this
Hispanic American artists -- Sources  Search this
Household shrines -- Mexico  Search this
Mexican American arts -- Sources  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)5563
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)216281
AAA_collcode_ybartoma
Theme:
Latino and Latin American
Art Theory and Historiography
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_216281
Online Media:

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