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MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers

Creator:
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
Bushotter, George, 1864-1892  Search this
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Powell, John Wesley, 1834-1902  Search this
Riggs, Stephen Return, 1812-1883  Search this
Extent:
30 Linear feet (70 boxes, 1 oversized box, 20 manuscript envelopes, 4 rolled maps, and 23 map folders)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Minitari (Hidatsa)  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Biloxi Indians  Search this
Tutelo  Search this
Iowa  Search this
Chiwere  Search this
Ho-Chunk (Winnebago)  Search this
Oto  Search this
Quapaw Indians  Search this
Osage  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Lakota (Teton/Western Sioux)  Search this
Dhegiha Indians  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Omaha  Search this
Tututni (Tutuni)  Search this
Kaw (Kansa)  Search this
Siletz  Search this
Coos (Kusan)  Search this
Yaquina (Yakwina)  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southeast  Search this
Takelma (Rogue River Indians)  Search this
Klikitat  Search this
Chasta Costa (Chastacosta)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Field notes
Drawings
Vocabulary
Folklore
Sermons
Manuscripts
Obituaries
Correspondence
Newspaper clippings
Place:
Siletz Indian Reservation (Or.)
Date:
circa 1870-1956
bulk 1870-1895
Summary:
Reverend James Owen Dorsey (1848-1895) was a missionary and Bureau of American Ethnology ethnologist who conducted extensive research on Siouan tribes and languages.The papers of James Owen Dorsey comprise mostly ethnographic and linguistic materials on various tribes of the Siouan language family as well as tribes from Siletz Reservation in Oregon. These materials include texts and letters with interlineal translations; grammar notes; dictionaries; drawings; and his manuscripts. In addition, the collection contains Dorsey's correspondence, newspaper clippings, his obituaries, and reprints.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains James O. Dorsey's research and writings as a BAE ethnologist, as well as his earlier work as a missionary among the Ponca. The vast majority of the collection pertains to his research on Siouan-Catawban languages, including the Dakota and Dhegiha languages, Chiwere, Winnebago, Mandan, Hidatsa, Tutelo, Biloxi, and Catawba. His research on Athapascan, Kusan, Takilman, and Yakonan languages from his field work at Siletz Reservation are also present, as well as some notes on the Caddoan languages. Dorsey's research files include linguistic and ethnological field notes, reading notes, stories and myths, vocabularies, drawings, and unpublished and published manuscripts. The collection also contains Omaha, Ponca, Quapaw, and Biloxi dictionaries that he compiled and materials relating to his work editing Steven Riggs' Dakota-English Dictionary. Additional noteworthy materials in the collection are Teton texts and drawings from George Bushotter and drawings by Stephen Stubbs (Kansa), Pahaule-gagli (Kansa), and George Miller (Omaha). The collection also contains Dorsey's correspondence, newspaper clippings, obituaries, and his collection of reprints.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into 6 series: 1) Siouan; 2) Siletz Reservation; 3) Caddoan; 4) General Correspondence; 5) Personal Papers; 6) Miscellaneous & Reprints.
Biographical Note:
Reverend James Owen Dorsey (1848-1895) was a missionary and Bureau of American Ethnology ethnologist who conducted extensive research on Siouan tribes and languages.

Dorsey was born on October 31, 1848 in Baltimore, Maryland. He exhibited a talent for languages at an early age. At age 6 he learned the Hebrew alphabet and was able to read the language at age 10. In 1867 Dorsey attended the Theological Seminary of Virginia and was ordained a deacon of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 1871. In May of that year, Dorsey traveled to the Dakota Territory to serve as a missionary among the Ponca. Plagued by ill health, Dorsey was forced to end his missionary work in August 1873. By that time, however, he had learned the Ponca language well enough to converse with members of the tribe without an interpreter.

Dorsey returned to Maryland and engaged in parish work while continuing his studies of Siouan languages. His linguistic talents and knowledge of these languages attracted the attention of Major John Wesley Powell. Powell arranged for Dorsey to work among the Omaha in Nebraska from 1878 to 1880 to collect linguistic and ethnological notes. When the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) was established in 1879, Powell recruited Dorsey to join the staff.

As an ethnologist for the BAE, Dorsey continued his research on Siouan tribes. His studies focused on languages but also included Siouan personal names, folklore, social organization, religion, beliefs, and customs. He conducted fieldwork among the Tutelo at Six Nations on Grand River in Upper Canada (1882); the Kansa, Osage, and Quapaw in Indian Territory (1883-1884); the Biloxi at Lecompte, Rapides Parish, Louisiana (1892); and again with the Quapaw at the Quapaw Mission (1894). He also worked with Native Americans that visited DC, including George Bushotter (Teton), Philip Longtail (Winnebago), Samuel Fremont (Omaha), and Little Standing Buffalo (Ponca). He also spent time at Siletz Reservation in 1884 to collect linguistic notes on the Athapascan, Kusan, Takilman, and Yakonan stocks.

In addition to his research, Dorsey helped found the American Folklore Society and served as the first vice-president of the association. He also served as vice-president of Section H of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

At the age of 47, Dorsey died of typhoid fever on February 4, 1895.

Sources Consulted

1st-16th Annual Reports of the Bureau of American Ethnology. 1881-1897.

Hewitt, J.N.B. 1895. "James Owen Dorsey" American Anthropologist A8, 180-183.

McGee, W.J. 1895. "In Memoriam." Journal of American Folklore 8(28): 79-80.

1848 -- Born on October 31 in Baltimore, Maryland.

1871 -- Ordained a deacon of the Protestant Episcopal Church.

1871-1873 -- Served as a missionary among the Ponca in Dakota Territory.

1878-1880 -- Conducted fieldwork among the Omaha in Nebraska.

1879 -- Joined the staff of the Bureau of American Ethnology.

1882 -- Conducted fieldwork among the Tutelo at Six Nations on Grand River in Upper Canada.

1883-1884 -- Conducted fieldwork among the Kansa, Osage, and Quapaw in Indian Territory.

1887 -- Worked with George Bushotter to record information regarding the language and culture of the Dakota.

1884 -- Conducted fieldwork at Siletz Reservation.

1892 -- Conducted fieldwork among the Biloxi at Lecompte, Rapides Parish, Louisiana.

1894 -- Conducted fieldwork among the Quapaw at the Quapaw Mission in Indian Territory.

1895 -- Died of typhoid fever on February 4th at the age of 47.
Restrictions:
The James O. Dorsey Papers are open for research. Access to the James O. Dorsey Papers requires an appointment
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Catawba Indians  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Social structure  Search this
Kinship  Search this
Manners and customs  Search this
Shahaptian languages  Search this
Yakonan languages  Search this
Athapascan languages  Search this
Kusan languages  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Siouan languages  Search this
Dhegiha language  Search this
Siuslaw Indians  Search this
Hidatsa language  Search this
Omaha language  Search this
Dakota language  Search this
Catawba language  Search this
Biloxi language  Search this
Caddoan languages  Search this
Osage language  Search this
Alsea language  Search this
Kansa language  Search this
Mandan language  Search this
Chastacosta language  Search this
Coquille language  Search this
Tutelo language  Search this
Winnebago language  Search this
Siuslaw language  Search this
Takelma language  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Drawings
Vocabulary
Folklore
Sermons
Manuscripts
Obituaries
Correspondence
Newspaper clippings
Citation:
Manuscript 4800 James O. Dorsey papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4800
See more items in:
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3261ab492-5f9d-4be7-b1f4-c24d3f5da29b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4800
Online Media:

Yokuts

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Roberts, Helen H. (Helen Heffron), 1888-1985  Search this
Names:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
20 Boxes
Culture:
Yokuts  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Songs
Maps
Place:
California -- History
Date:
1914-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northern and Central California series contains Harrington's research on the Yokuts.

Notes from his fieldwork in 1914 include references to residents who he thought might be able to assist him in his research, detailed descriptions of house construction and the fabrication of sleeping mats, and small sketches of pictographs which Harrington had seen in the region. Amidst the miscellaneous notes are lists of baskets which he purchased, notes on photographs he took and bibliographic references from C. Hart Merriam. Harrington also copied extracts of his field notes onto slipfiles, which he filed under a variety of subject headings. The Tachi file contains ethnographic notes from Roberto Bautista and Agnes Light as well as a few Tachi lexical items. The file labeled "Tule" consists of mixed linguistic and ethnographic data from Jim Alto and Mr. Edmundson at the Tule River Reservation and notes on the Tachi dialect recorded from Pacifico Archuleta.

The section of linguistic, ethnographic, historical, and biographical notes consists of raw field data collected by Harrington and Carobeth from twenty residents of Yokuts territory during the period 1916-1917. Topics include vocabulary, placenames, tribenames, myths, ceremonial regalia and dances, songs, and religion. The notes from Josefa Damian, marked "Jos. Mar.," feature extensive data on relationship terms, age and sex terms, and moieties in Chunut, Tachi, Tejonefio, and Wowol. The most extensive notes were recorded from Francisca Lola. The notes contain voluminous amounts of linguistic data (vocabulary and paradigms) in Koyeti, Yawdanchi, Choynok, and Tachi as well as equivalent forms in "R. C." (Rio Chiquito). The material is also rich in ethnographic detail, providing information on uses of plants (Tejon ranch specimens), ceremonies, fiestas, dances, and material culture accompanied by diagrams and sketches. In addition, there are biographical notes on informants, myths, and texts of songs.

A year after collecting his field data on Yokuts, Harrington made copies of his notes and arranged them into several sizable slipfiles. One major file was created for the Chunut and Tachi languages, and another for the Yawelmani, Koyeti, Yawdanchi, and Wikchamni languages. There are also small slipfiles for Choynok and Palewyami. The slipfiles are organized semantically; headings included are cosmography, plants, animals, "artifacts" (material culture), sociology, religion, tribenames, and placenames. They include information regarding plant speciments collected by Harrington at the Tejon Ranch.

An additional step that Harrington took in the analysis of his Yokuts field data was the development of an outline grammar of the Yawelmani dialect. He extracted vocabulary and linguistic notes from the semantically arranged slipfiles, marking the slips which he copied with a check mark or the notation "gr." The data which he extracted are largely Yawelmani, although vocabulary and sentences from Koyeti, Yawdanchi, Chunut, and Tachi are included for comparative purposes. Harrington also submitted multiple manuscripts of his Yawelmani grammar to the Bureau of American Ethnology (former B.A.E. Mss. 2973, 3041, 3047, 3048, and 3054).

Harrington's files relating to the Tejon Ranch Case contain correspondence dating from 1921 to 1924, legal documents, a copy of a census taken at the ranch, and documentary evidence from a variety of secondary sources including military records, newspaper accounts, and Senate documents. The major portion of the records consists of notes from interviews with about twenty Tejon residents. The content is primarily biographical, with placename references. In many cases the notes were taken down in the form of depositions. Harrington simultaneously recorded lengthy Yokuts myth texts as well as stories in English and Spanish. Information from a number of the informants was formerly cataloged as B. A. E. ms. 3046. There is also a carbon copy of a "Report on Tejon Indians, Kern County, California" submitted by Herbert V. Clotts, Acting Superintendent of Irrigation, to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs on January 15, 1918.

Records relating to sound recordings pertain to songs performed by five Yokuts speakers and two Kitanemuks. The songs were recorded on wax by Harrington in Yokuts territory during the periods 1916-1917. The cylinders were sent to ethnomusicologist Helen H. Roberts in 1921 to review. The bulk of this section contains her lengthy notes on the texts of songs, accompanied by musical transcriptions.

The final section of this subseries consists of miscellaneous notes. There are notes from interviews and correspondence with information on boat construction, a sketch map received in a 1925 letter, notes relative to a conversation with J.N.B. Hewitt in 1926, notes from an interview with Angel Sanchez and Bill Skinner, and information from Roberts on song text. There are also copies of Harrington's own field notes and notes on secondary sources.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington worked on the Yokuts language a number of times during his forty years of fieldwork in California. This study certainly matches the breadth of the data for Karok and Salinan and is surpassed in volume only by his output for Costanoan and Chumash.

Harrington's first contact with the so-called "Tulareno" people occurred in late September to early October 1914 on a two-week trip to the San Joaquin Valley. At that time he made short visits to the Santa Rosa rancheria near Lemoore, to the Tule Indian Reservation near Porterville, and to Bakersfield as part of a dialect survey. A limited amount of additional data was obtained in 1914 and 1915 during the course of his work on Salinan and Chumash. Migueleno speaker Pacifico Archuleta, whose wife, Suncion, was Yokuts, gave a limited Tachi vocabulary, and Rosario Cooper, an Obispeno speaker, also provided several words.

In November 1916 Harrington traveled to the Tejon region, ostensibly to work with Jose Juan Olivas, an inland Chumash speaker. It appears, in addition, that for a virtually uninterrupted period from that time until September 1917, Harrington (assisted by his wife, Carobeth) made an in-depth study of a number of Southern Valley and Foothills Yokuts dialects, obtaining extensive vocabularies and texts, as well as a considerable amount of ethnographic and historical data. This work took them to the valley near the Santa Rosa rancheria and to the Tule River Reservation. Harrington also made trips with informants to obtain placename data and to collect, identify, and describe botanical specimens. The observance of ceremonial rituals during that winter afforded him the opportunity of recording on wax cylinders and in writing a significant number of songs.

The flare-up of the Tejon Ranch case, which threatened to disinherit many Indians of their tribal lands, brought Harrington back to the area in February 1922. As a special temporary appointee to the Department of the Interior, he was responsible for obtaining depositions from the elderly residents of the Tejon. He simultaneously elicited additional biographical, historical, and linguistic data for his own work. The case was argued before the Supreme Court on February 28, 1924. In June of that year the court held that the Indians had abandoned the land. The decision was based on the Indians' failure to present their claim to the commission appointed under the act of March 1851 to ascertain and adjust private land claims in territory ceded by Mexico to the United States.

In the fall of 1923, he took a number of Yokuts to the Ventura County Fair to perform dances, to demonstrate house and boat building techniques, and to exhibit their crafts. He also made trips to Yokuts territory in the early 1930s and again in January 1942. These were possibly side trips made during the course of other work to follow upon the Tejon Ranch case.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Yokuts language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ethnomusicology  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Songs
Maps
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 2.16
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 2: Papers Relating to the Native American history, language and culture of northern and central California
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw34367f9fc-3a4a-44fa-8d76-e8ad250f8dfe
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref13960

Algonquian

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Speck, Frank G. (Frank Gouldsmith), 1881-1950  Search this
Voegelin, C. F. (Charles Frederick), 1906-1986  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
2 Boxes
Culture:
Cheyenne language  Search this
Fox Indians  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Miami  Search this
Mohegan  Search this
Pequot  Search this
Montauk  Search this
Montagnais Innu  Search this
Nanticoke  Search this
Piscataway (Conoy)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Vocabulary
Date:
circa 1907-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northeast/Southeast series contains John P. Harrington's Algonquian research. It consists primarily of material he collected; there is very little original data, most of which are undated. The topics covered are Cheyenne grammar, Fox linguistic notes, Menominee grammar, Miami-Peoria grammar, Mohegan-Pequot-Montauk vocabulary, Montagnais miscellaneous notes, Nanticoke-Conoy-Unalachtigo linguistic notes, Ojibwa linguistic notes, Potawatomi linguistic notes, and comparative and miscellaneous notes.

The Cheyenne material consist of two pages of grammatical excerpts from Rodolphe Petter's English-Cheyenne Dictionary (1915).

The Fox notes stem from conversations which Harrington had with Truman Michelson on the Fox syllabary and grammar. One note is dated September 24, 1924; others are undated. One page gives the etymology of the word Chicago and a Potawatomi equivalent. Phonetic material (former B.A.E. MS 6021 pt. and 6025pt.) is based on William Jones's "Algonquian (Fox)" (1911). A bibliography is included, mainly on Michelson's publications and manuscripts which he submitted to the B.A.E.

The Menominee files contain a phonetic key from Leonard Bloomfield's Menomini Texts (1928), a short report on a conversation with Michelson (former B.A.E. MS 6025pt. and 6030), and a brief description of Menominee tentshaking was excerpted from W. J. Hoffman's The Menomini Indians (1896).

Miami-Peoria vocabulary were copied from Albert Gatschet's B.A.E. manuscripts 3025 and 3026b. (Those entries marked 3026b are no longer listed as part of that B.A.E. manuscript.)

An 1890 copy of a 1798 Montauk vocabulary taken by John Lyon Gardiner was loaned to Harrington by Foster H. Saville. There are also a three-page typescript of this manuscript and several pages of a Mohegan-Pequot bibliography.

For Montagnais, there are three bibliographical notes. Two placenames came from J.N.B. Hewitt in November 1926.

Reading notes on Nanticoke, Conoy, and Unalachtigo were taken principally from Speck's The Nanticoke and Conoy Indians . .. (1927) and from Hodge's "Handbook" (1907). Some linguistic and ethnohistoric material is included and there is a brief bibliography.

Ojibwa forms the largest portion of this subseries. It includes notes from a joint interview conducted most likely in 1940 with C. F. Voegelin and his informant, Gregor McGregor, who was technically considered a speaker of Ottawa. There are also notes Harrington took of Voegelin's lecture at the University of Michigan on June 25, 1940 (former B.A.E. MS 6020pt.). There is a slight emphasis on placenames in an otherwise random vocabulary. From James Hammond Trumbull's Notes on Forty Algonkin Versions of the Lord's Prayer (1873), Harrington copied the Southern Chippeway version (pp. 74 -75) and penciled in a slightly different English translation. A final potpourri of undated notes includes a miscellaneous vocabulary from secondary sources and a few pages of grammatical material. The etymologies of several Ojibwa words are briefly developed. Frederic Baraga's A Dictionary of the Otchipwe Language is the most frequently cited source (former B.A.E. MS 6020pt. and 6025pt.).

The Potawatomi files contain material from Harrington's interview with Chief Simon Kahquados in Blackwell, Wisconsin (n.d.) with whom he recorded general ethnographic information, particularly regarding the loss of Potawatomi lands due to Indian Office policies and illegal acts of the Menominee. A brief vocabulary is included. Unrelated to this interview is a Potawatomi phoneme chart.

Comparative material includes reading notes regarding the earliest appearances of certain Algonquian phonetic sounds. Harrington consulted primarily the works of Sir Isaac Pitman, Jean Claude Mathevet (Nipissing, Abnaki), and Silas Tertius Rand (Micmac). Additional peripheral bibliographical information is identified in the notes. The only date recorded is March 26, 1951. There are other scattered reading notes with Menominee, Cree, Fox, and Ojibwa phonetic comparisons, based mainly on Leonard Bloomfield's Menomini Texts (1938) and Plains Cree Texts (1934). One page of Arapaho terms was copied from Kroeber.

In the category of general linguistic and ethnographic notes (former B.A.E. ms. 6025pt.), information results from various conversations with fellow linguists: Truman Michelson and J.N.B. Hewitt on September 24, 1924; Hewitt in November 1924 and November 1926; Michelson in October 1930; and Michelson and Frank G. Speck in May 1934. Under the heading "The Southern Delawares," Harrington arranged random information on the Virginia Indians, touching briefly on history and ethnography. He included some Abnaki, Cree, and Cherokee linguistic terms, as well as a general bibliography. Vocabulary material in this series (former B.A.E. MS 6025pt.) consists of terms from various Algonquian languages, most probably taken from unidentified printed sources. One note gives "The Chief from Mass[achusetts]" as an informant. One group of terms is compared with Natick words and with a vocabulary recorded by Roger Williams.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Algonquian languages  Search this
Abenaki language  Search this
Cree language  Search this
Cherokee language  Search this
Cheyenne language  Search this
Fox language  Search this
Menominee language  Search this
Miami language (Ind. and Okla.)  Search this
Mohegan language  Search this
Montagnais language  Search this
Nanticoke language  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Potawatomi language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 6.1
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 6: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Northeast & Southeast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw320d52ed8-2a4a-49a7-b5a3-67bbc9806544
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14792

Northern Iroquoian

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Fenton, William N. (William Nelson), 1908-2005  Search this
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (box)
Culture:
Iroquoian Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Songs
Date:
1940
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northeast/Southeast series contains Harrington's Northern Iroquoian research. Most of this brief section results from his time in Ontario in 1940. The materials consist of Mohawk and Six Nations linguistic notes, Iroquoian songs, and mixed Iroquoian miscellaneous notes. The Mohawk linguistic notes is comprised of eight pages of random notes given by Mr. and Mrs. Davis on May 4, 1940. The Six Nations linguistic notes contains an interview with Sam Liquors, which provided a variety of linguistic information in Mohawk, Tuscarora, and Seneca, with a slight emphasis on placenames and tribenames. The Mohawk material is usually preceded by the labels "Hag." or "Hagersv.," presumably referring to the Ontario town of Hagersville which Harrington visited in May 1940. A few notes on conversations with Fenton are included, probably taken in 1940 at the University of Michigan. Fenton provided further information on Iroquoian songs in a rough, undeveloped stage. (Fenton later published articles on this subject.) An April 1943 note indicates another conversation with Fenton on Seneca. There are a few pages of highly miscellaneous bits of Seneca, Oneida, and Tuscarora material, some of it from J.N.B. Hewitt. Notes on Iroquoian food preparation were excerpted from a number of secondary sources.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington spent a few days in Ontario in May 1940, where his primary purpose was to interview Delaware speakers. He apparently came into contact, however, with Iroquoian residents Sam Liquors (Lickerish) and Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Davis. According to Delaware field notes, Davis was a storekeeper just west of the Smoothtown home of Josiah Montour, a Delaware informant. Davis was described as a Cayuga Indian, but he provided Mohawk information. Other notes were apparently taken in 1940 at the University of Michigan Linguistics Institute in Ann Arbor, most of them in conjunction with Bureau of American Ethnology ethnologist William N. Fenton. Two of Fenton's informants were Dozy and Shanks. Harrington mentioned John Jimmieson as a third speaker; his name could possibly be Jimmerson.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Iroquoian languages  Search this
Mohawk language  Search this
Seneca language  Search this
Oneida language  Search this
Tuscarora language  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Songs
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 6.6
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 6: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Northeast & Southeast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw32ba824f2-cccf-4aff-a5ef-d677ad916c30
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15012

Records Relating to Phonetics

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Bloomfield, Leonard, 1887-1949  Search this
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Kroeber, A. L. (Alfred Louis), 1876-1960  Search this
Lowie, Robert Harry, 1883-1957  Search this
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Sapir, Edward, 1884-1939  Search this
Swadesh, Morris, 1909-1967  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Underhill, Ruth, 1883-1984  Search this
Voegelin, C. F. (Charles Frederick), 1906-1986  Search this
Waterman, T. T. (Thomas Talbot), b. 1885  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (box)
Type:
Archival materials
Notes
Manuscripts
Date:
1910-1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Notes and writings on special linguistic studies series contains materials resulting from Harrington's efforts to develop a phonetic alphabet for writing all languages.

There are four main groupings of notes relating to phonetics. A large set of uncategorized notes has been arranged in chronological order from 1910 through the 1950s. Most of the material dates from the period 1910 to 1915 and from 1921 to 1928; there are smaller amounts of data for the following three decades. The notes present alternate phonetic systems--sometimes referred to as "sonoscript"--in chart form with accompanying explanations of the rationale behind each proposed alphabet. There are also sample words and sentences written out phonetically. The notes from 1910 include a draft of a letter from Harrington to his mother and those from 1912 contain three large poster-sized charts. A second set of notes is arranged alphabetically by topic and includes subsections on alphabetic order, length, letters practical in handwriting, and pitch accent. A relatively large file labeled "phon[etic] letter forms" consists of various handwritten and typed letters as well as cut-and-pasted examples of letters from printed sources. There is also a clipping dated 1922 regarding an advocate of Esperanto with Harrington's own proposals for word forms in that language. In addition, the files contain a copy of an I.P.A. questionnaire and Harrington's comments on it. A third section of material consists of the notes which Harrington made during or immediately following interviews with about twenty linguists and anthropologists, among them Leonard Bloomfield, Alfred L. Kroeber, Robert H. Lowie, Edward Sapir, Morris Swadesh (misspelled "Schwadesh"), Ruth Underhill, Carl F. Voegelin, T. T. Waterman, and B.A.E. colleagues Hewitt, Michelson, and Swanton. Not all of the notes are dated; those which are clearly labeled cover discussions from the 1920s to the 1940s. The last grouping, compiled around 1923 to 1926, contains brief notes on various alphabets. The alphabetically arranged files cover the proposed systems of Arden, Forchhammer, Jespersen, Murray, Olbrechts, Pierce, Powell, and Rouse.

This subseries also contains drafts for four papers by Harrington on phonetics as well as a brief one-page draft description of a "Seminar in General Phonetics" which Harrington was planning to offer at the University of Southern California in 1935 or 1936.
Biographical / Historical:
One aspect of the study of linguistics of special interest to John P. Harrington was the development of a practical phonetic alphabet for writing all languages. It was an effort to which he devoted a great amount of time from 1910 to 1915, from 1922 to 1928, and again intermittently in the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s.

In 1912 Harrington drafted comments on a proposal for an international conference to devise a universal phonetic system, and on a sample questionnaire which was mailed to many linguists by the International Phonetic Association (I.P.A.). It is unclear whether or not he actually submitted them to the I.P.A.

Also in that year he was chosen to serve on a committee ofthe American Anthropological Association to "prepare a scheme of phonetic representation which [would] have the official sanction" of the organization. Fellow committee members were Franz Boas (chair), Edward Sapir, Alfred L. Kroeber, and Earl Pliny Goddard.

Although later notes indicate that he consulted a number of language specialists, it appears that most of Harrington's efforts at devising a workable alphabet were undertaken alone or with only the cooperation of his friend Paul Vogenitz.

In the mid-1930s he was invited to teach a seminar on "General Phonetics" at the University of Southern California. While correspondence with Dr. Frank C. Touton, vice president of the university, suggests that Harrington contemplated offering the course at various times between the spring of 1935 and the summer of 1936, this plan was abandoned because of more pressing interests. He did touch on phonetics during his course on language at the University of Washington during the summer of 1910

At various points in his career Harrington wrote preliminary descriptions of the phonetic system he favored at that time. None of the early drafts appeared in print and as late as the 1940s, while writing the treatise "Linguistics," Harrington was undecided whether to publish his system or "die keeping it hidden."
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Phonetics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Notes
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 8.17
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw37683fd02-43cb-403a-bd16-24268d884c66
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15672

"Iroquois Lodges" from Moeurs des Sauvages Ameriquians, tome 2, pages 10-15

Creator:
Lafitau, Joseph Franc̜ois  Search this
Translator:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Collection Creator:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. United States National Museum. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Extent:
5 Pages
Container:
Box 17a, Folder 249
Type:
Archival materials
Pages
Collection Restrictions:
Some materials are restricted.

Access to the Department of Anthropology records requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Department of Anthropology Records, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Department of Anthropology records
Department of Anthropology records / Series 17: Division of Ethnology / 17.1: Manuscript and Pamphlet File / Habitations
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw369583dca-6402-4149-b88f-a9d9d9839fce
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-xxxx-0311-ref15658

MS 374 Onondaga words, phrases and sentences in Powell's Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages

Collector:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Smith, Erminnie A. (Erminnie Adele), 1836-1886  Search this
Extent:
110 Pages
Culture:
Onondaga  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1880
Scope and Contents:
In schedule of John Wesley Powell's Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages. Volume well filled. Also grammatical notes, the Parable of the Sower, and the Lord's Prayer.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 374
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 374, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS374
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d5955e96-8282-4f13-9ffa-0ce8da50d907
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms374
Online Media:

MS 422 Ten tales or legends, with translations

Collector:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Extent:
72 Pages
Culture:
Iroquois  Search this
Tuscarora  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Drawings
Date:
1888 ?
Scope and Contents:
Contents: 1. U-stru-ri or the Prophetic Bird-like Being (text and translation.) 2. Ru-ren f-a- A Monster (Miss Lucinda Thompson, 1888, text and translation). 3. Duel between a lame dog and a Fox (translation only). 4. Tradition of the elopment of a woman with an owl (text and translation.) 5. An uncle and his nephew, or The child adopted by the bear (Miss L. Thompson, text and translation.) 6. A man entertained by the thunderer (text and translation). 7. Superstition about dogs (translation only). 8. Making a stone giant (text and translation). 9. The Vampire Doll (translation only). 10. Ka-nen-hen'twa t or Mysterious Insect (text and translation, 2 copies of translation). Includes pencil and crayon drawing of the Mythic Bird.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 422
Other Title:
U-stru-ri or The Prophetic Bird-like Being
Ru-ren f-a- A Monster
Duel between a lame dog and a fox
Tradition of the elopement of a woman with an owl
An uncle and his nephew, or The child adopted by the bear
A man entertained by the thunderer
Superstition about dogs
Making a stone giant
The Vampire Doll
Ka-nen-hen'twa t or Mysterious Insect
Topic:
Folklore -- Iroquois  Search this
Folklore -- Iroquois -- Tuscarora  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Citation:
Manuscript 422, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS422
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d3541184-4363-4839-ac28-37c9b502c48c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms422
Online Media:

MS 447 "The Cheroki an Iroquoian Language. A Critical Study and Comparison of Etymologies, words, sentence words, phrase-forms and conjugations common to the Cherokian and Iroquoian tongues to establish their common origin."

Creator:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Extent:
88 Pages
Culture:
Cherokee  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
July and August 1887
Scope and Contents:
Includes A. annotations in red ink by James Mooney, concerning the Cherokee. Two series of pages numbered 1-10 account for the fact that the page Numbers run from 1-76 and yet there are 86 pages of text plus the title page.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 447
Local Note:
Autograph Document
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 447, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS447
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3eae77839-ce83-41f9-8d2b-4496ff33659d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms447
Online Media:

MS 403 Mohave and Waicuri linguistic notes

Creator:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Extent:
19 Pages
Culture:
Guaycura (Waicuri)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Contains vocabulary items and grammar notes on Mohave. The Mohave material may be derived from the text of Manuscript 2071.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 403
Local Note:
Waicuri (3 pages) copied from J.C.E. Buschmann, Die Spuren Der Aztekischen Sprache (Berlin, 1859).
manuscript document
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Mohave Indians  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 403, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS403
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3cac66789-0ca4-453c-b9d5-980f237a2f31
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms403
Online Media:

MS 421 Tuscarora grammatical notes

Collector:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Extent:
142 Pages
Culture:
Iroquois  Search this
Tuscarora  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
November 1890
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 421
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 421, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS421
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw34e6da954-bf3f-4ccc-92c2-ef5d080b0455
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms421
Online Media:

MS 436 Legends

Collector:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Extent:
37 Pages
Culture:
Iroquois  Search this
Seneca  Search this
Onondaga  Search this
Tuscarora  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1889-1892
Scope and Contents:
Contents: Beginning of Witchcraft, 4 pages; The Captive Girl, 12 pages; The So-Called Witch Medicine, 5 pages (Onondaga- John Buck); The Magical Finger, 3 pages (Tuscarora); The Stone Giants, 5 pages (Onondaga); Monster Clitoris, 3 pages (Seneca). All English translations.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 436
Topic:
Folklore -- Iroquois  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 436, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS436
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3584c8efa-3ba1-42e5-8bfc-4ce3fa6d8ce3
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms436
Online Media:

MS 435 List of 31 Remedies among the Tuskaroras

Collector:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Extent:
15 Pages
Culture:
Iroquois  Search this
Tuscarora  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1888
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 435
Topic:
Folklore -- Iroquois -- Tuscarora  Search this
Medicine -- Iroquois -- Tuscarora  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 435, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS435
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw36b807e3c-5927-4a20-acdb-18eeed783e75
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms435

MS 3521 Welcome Chant, with first three burdens

Collector:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Creator:
Hess  Search this
Extent:
11 Pages
Culture:
Iroquois  Search this
Onondaga  Search this
Cayuga  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1905-6-7 ?
Scope and Contents:
These also in Cayuga.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3521
Citation:
Manuscript 3521, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3521
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3e461e3a8-4971-492f-b855-c4820a576b5a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3521
Online Media:

MS 3561 Cayuga text and notes on Personal Chant (Adonwa)

Creator:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Extent:
1 Folder
Culture:
Iroquois  Search this
Cayuga  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
(a) Cayuga text; (b) Note on Chant (Adonwa).
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
MS 3561 Cayuga text and notes on Personal Chant (Adonwa), National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3561
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3f2ce759b-079b-4cf4-af26-3bac6c9d6041
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3561

MS 3821 Correspondence relating to Iroquois land claims

Topic:
Treaty of Fort Stanwix (1784 October 22)
Collector:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Addressee:
Collier, John, 1884-1968  Search this
Culture:
Iroquois  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1886-1936
Scope and Contents:
Miscellaneous collection of correspondence, portions of treaties, and other papers relating to the Treaty of Fort Stanwix, and to various claims of the Iroquoian (Six Nations) Tribes. Also letter (carbon copy) dated June 25, 1935, to Hon. John Collier, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior, relating to treaties dealing with the Six Nations of Iroquois, especially that of Fort Stanwix (10 pages.)
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3821
Local Note:
carbon copy
Topic:
Treaties -- Iroquois  Search this
Land tenure -- Iroquois  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 3821, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3821
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c90910dd-dbf8-45c4-a53a-e502fb81f703
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3821

J.N.B. Hewitt letters and other material

Creator:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Bushnell, David I., Jr. (David Ives), 1875-1941  Search this
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Collector:
Stirling, Matthew Williams, 1896-1975  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
December 1919
Scope and Contents:
Concerning the abolishment of Franz Boasʹs position of Honorary Philologist with the BAE.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4372(10)
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 4372, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 4372 Miscellaneous material relating to the history of the Bureau of American Ethnology, the history of anthropology, and anthropological controversies
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c1bd8148-6bcb-4b5d-ad27-7deb9f7f0341
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms4372-ref12

Letter from Reuben Gold Thwaites

Creator:
Thwaites, Reuben Gold, 1853-1913  Search this
Blair, E. Helen  Search this
Boas, Franz, 1858-1942  Search this
Brinton, Daniel G. (Daniel Garrison), 1837-1899  Search this
Addressee:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Collection Collector:
Stirling, Matthew Williams, 1896-1975  Search this
Culture:
Wendat (Huron)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Wyandot  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
October 1897
Scope and Contents:
Regarding the meaning of a passage in the Jesuit Relations about a Huron myth.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4372(18)
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 4372, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 4372 Miscellaneous material relating to the history of the Bureau of American Ethnology, the history of anthropology, and anthropological controversies
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3507fa0f5-3443-4460-b98a-efdad5ab0e20
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms4372-ref26

Letter to J. W. Fewkes

Creator:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Collection Collector:
Stirling, Matthew Williams, 1896-1975  Search this
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
April - May 1918
Scope and Contents:
Concerning Hewittʹs criticism of Michelsonʹs "The Ritualistic Origin Myth of the White Buffalo Dance of the Fox Indians."
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4372(6)
Topic:
Meskwaki; Sauk and Fox  Search this
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 4372, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 4372 Miscellaneous material relating to the history of the Bureau of American Ethnology, the history of anthropology, and anthropological controversies
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d344a7a1-a61d-4cff-ac52-7cd7b2e41181
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms4372-ref7

Correspondence among BAE staff

Creator:
Fewkes, Jesse Walter, 1850-1930  Search this
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Names:
Boas, Franz, 1858-1942  Search this
Collection Collector:
Stirling, Matthew Williams, 1896-1975  Search this
Culture:
Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
December 1920
Scope and Contents:
Concerning efforts to draft a letter to Franz Boas concerning errors in "Ethnology of the Kwakiutl."
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4372(9)
Topic:
Kwakiutl (Kwakwaka'wakw)  Search this
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 4372, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 4372 Miscellaneous material relating to the history of the Bureau of American Ethnology, the history of anthropology, and anthropological controversies
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c65fe7bd-0788-4208-9ff7-7959de9116e3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms4372-ref9

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