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History of Smithsonian Folklife Oral History Interviews

Extent:
0.5 cu. ft. (2 half document boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Date:
2005-2009
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives (SIA) began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also reminiscences and interviews recorded by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Smithsonian Institution predoctoral fellow, William S. Walker, of Brandeis University, conducted a series of oral history interviews on the history of folklife presentation at the Smithsonian, as part of his dissertation research.
Descriptive Entry:
The History of Folklife at the Smithsonian Oral History Interviews consist of 13.2 hours of analog and digital audio interviews and 369 pages of transcript.
Historical Note:
Folklife studies are carried on in several organizational units of the Smithsonian Institution: the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), the Festival of American Folklife (FAF), and the National Museum of American History (NMAH), and the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI). Dr. Walker began his project on the study and exhibition of folklife at the Smithsonian, focusing on the Folklife Festival and then expanded his interview scope to include other Smithsonian cultural scholars and solicit their views on the FAF and cultural studies, exhibition and public programming at the Smithsonian.

JoAllyn Archambault (1942- ), Director of the American Indian Program at the National Museum of Natural History, is an enrolled member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe. She earned her doctorate at the University of California in Berkeley in 1984. She was a faculty member of the Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukie, Wisconsin (1983-86), and the Director of Ethnic Studies, California College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland, California (1978-83). As curator of Anthropology at the NMNH since 1986, she organized various exhibitions, including Plains Indian Arts: Change and Continuity, 100 Years of Plains Indian Painting, Indian Baskets and Their Makers, and Seminole Interpretations.

Spencer Crew (1949- ) received the A.B. in history from Brown University in 1972 and holds a master's degree (1973) and a doctorate from Rutgers University (1979). He was assistant professor of African-American and American History at the University of Maryland-Baltimore County, 1978-1981; historian, 1981-1987, curator 1987-1989, Department of Social and Cultural History, chair, 1989-1991, deputy director, 1991-1992, acting director, 1992-1994, director, 1994-2001 of NMAH. He then served as historical consultant to the National Civil Rights Museum, in Memphis, Tennessee, from 1987-1991; consultant to the Civil Rights Institute, in Birmingham, Alabama, 1991-1994; and executive director and chief executive officer for the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center from 2001-2008; and was appointed Clarence Robinson Professor at George Mason University in 2008. At the Smithsonian, Crew curated several exhibitions, most notably Field to Factory: Afro-American Migration, 1915-1940

William W. Fitzhugh (1943- ), an anthropologist, specialized in circumpolar archaeology, ethnology and environmental studies. He received his B.A. from Dartmouth College in 1964. After two years in the U.S. Navy, he attended Harvard University where he received his PhD in anthropology in 1970. He joined the Anthropology Department at NMNH in 1970. As director of the Arctic Studies Center and Curator in the Department of Anthropology, NMNH, he has spent more than thirty years studying and publishing on arctic peoples and cultures in northern Canada, Alaska, Siberia and Scandinavia. His archaeological and environmental research has focused upon the prehistory and paleoecology of northeastern North America, and broader aspects of his research feature the evolution of northern maritime adaptations, circumpolar culture contacts, cross-cultural studies and acculturation processes in the North, especially concerning Native-European contacts. He curated four international exhibitions, Inua: Spirit World of the Bering Sea Eskimos; Crossroads of Continents: Native Cultures of Siberia and Alaska; Ainu: Spirit of a Northern People; and Vikings: The North Atlantic Saga.

Rayna D. Green (1942- ) curator and Director of the American Indian Program at the NMAH, received the B.A. in 1963 and M.A. in 1966 from Southern Methodist University, served in the Peace Corps as a history instructor and library director for the Teacher Training School in Harar, Ethiopia, and the Ph. D. in Folklore and American Studies from Indiana University in 1973. A member of the Cherokee tribe, she administered National Native American Science Resource Center, Dartmouth College, before joining the staff of the Smithsonian in 1984. She has written extensively of Native American culture and foodways. Her research and exhibit projects include a documentary narrative with Julia Child, In the Kitchen with Julia, following on her co-curation of the long-running popular exhibition Bon App tit: Julia Child's Kitchen at the Smithsonian.

Thomas W. Kavanagh (1949- ), an anthropologist, received the B.A. from the University of New Mexico in 1971, the M.A. from The George Washington University in 1980, and the Ph.D. from University of New Mexico in 1986. He began his career at Indiana University and then joined the staff of the Smithsonian Institution. A scholar of Comanche Indians of Oklahoma, he has published extensively on the Comanches and was appointed Consulting Anthropologist for the Comanche Nation. In the 2000s, he served as director of the Seton Hall University Museum. His publications include Comanche Ethnography (2008), Comanche Political History (1996), North American Indian Portraits: Photographs from the Wanamaker Expeditions (1996), and "Comanche" in the Handbook of North American Indians, Volume 13 (Plains), Smithsonian Institution (2001).

Roger G. Kennedy (1926-2011) graduated from Yale University in 1949 and the University of Minnesota Law School in 1952, and pursued a diverse career in banking, television production, historical writing, foundation management, and museum administration. He was appointed Director of the National Museum of History and Technology (NMHT) in 1979, renamed it the National Museum of American History, and left in 1992 to become Director of the National Park Service. He focused on social and cultural history, and oversaw controversial exhibits including A More Perfect Union: Japanese Americans & the American Constitution and Field to Factory: Afro-American Migration, 1915-1940.

Keith E. Melder (1932- ) studied American history at Williams College (B.A. 1954) and Yale University (M.A. 1957; PhD, 1964). He was an intern at the NMHT in 1958 and returned in 1961 as Curator of Political History until his retirement in 1996. His research focused on America political movements, especially the Women's Movement and the Civil Rights era. Melder was also interviewed for two other Smithsonian Institution Archives projects, Record Unit 9603, African American Exhibits at the Smithsonian, and Record Unit 9620, the American Association of Museums Centennial Honorees Oral History Project, as well as for the Ruth Ann Overbeck Capitol Hill History Project of the Capitol Hill Historical Society.

Clydia Dotson Nahwooksy (1933-2009), a Cherokee, and her husband Reaves, a Comanche Nation member, worked most of their lives to preserve American Indian tribal culture. Originally from Oklahoma, they spent 20 years in Washington, D.C., as cultural activists. In the 1970s, Clydia was director of the Indian Awareness Program for the Smithsonian Institution's Festival of American Folklife. In 1986 both Nahwooskys entered the seminary, and the Rev. Clydia Nahwooksy was an active pastor and a member of the Board of National Ministries and the American Baptist Churches USA General Board.

Ethel Raim (1936- ), Artistic Director of New York's Center for Traditional Music and Dance (CTMD), researched ethnic music and worked closely with community-based traditional for almost five decades. Raim also had a distinguished career as a performer, recording artist, music editor, and singing teacher. In 1963 she co-founded and was musical director of the Pennywhistlers, who were among the first to bring traditional Balkan and Russian Jewish singing traditions to the folk music world. Raim served as music editor of Sing Out! magazine from 1965 to 1975. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, she developed ethnic programs for the Newport Folklife Festival and the Smithsonian's Festival of American Folklife. In 1975 Raim joined Martin Koenig as Co-Director of the Balkan Folk Arts Center, which developed into the CTMD in New York City.

Joanna Cohan Scherer (1942- ) received the B.A. from Syracuse University in 1963 and the M.A. from Hunter College, City University of New York in 1968. A specialist in visual anthropology especially of Native Americans, historical photography, women and photography, North American Indian photography, and cultural anthropology. She joined the staff of the Anthropology Archives of the National Museum of Natural History in 1966 and in 1975 advanced to served as anthropologist and illustrations editor for the Smithsonian's multivolume series Handbook of North American Indians.

Robert D. Sullivan (1949- ) was educated at St. John Fisher College with a B.S. in anthropology in 1970, the M.A. in education management from the University of Rochester in 1979, and pursued the Ph.D. in human studies (ABD) at The George Washington University until 2006. He served as Chief of Museum Education at Rochester Museum and Science Center from 1970 to 1980, Director at the New York State Museum from 1980 to 1990, and Associate Director for exhibitions at National Museum of Natural History from 1990 to 2007.

Peter Corbett Welsh (1926-2010) was a curator and historian at the Museum of History and Technology, now known as the National Museum of American History. He was born on August 28, 1926, in Washington, D.C. He received his B.A. from Mount Union College in Alliance, Ohio, in 1950 and completed a post-graduate year of study at the University of Virginia. He received his M.A. from the University of Delaware where he was the first recipient of the Hagley Fellowship in 1956. Welsh served in the United States Army, 1951-1954. Prior to coming to the Smithsonian Institution, he was Research Assistant and Fellowship Coordinator at the Eleutherian-Mills Hagley Foundation, 1956-1959. Welsh was Associate Curator in the Smithsonian's Department of Civil History, 1959-1969, and served as editor of the Smithsonian's Journal of History in 1968. As Curator he played a major role in the development of the Growth of the United States hall for the opening of the Museum of History and Technology which depicted American civilization from the time of discovery through the mid-twentieth century. Welsh was Assistant Director General of Museums, 1969-1970, and assisted with the implementation of the National Museum Act through seminars on improving exhibit effectiveness. He also served as Director of the Office of Museum Programs, 1970-1971. After Welsh's tenure at the Smithsonian, he became the Director of both the New York State Historical Association and the Cooperstown Graduate Program, 1971-1974. He then served as Director of Special Projects at the New York State Museum in Albany, 1975-1976; Director of the Bureau of Museums for the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission; President of The Welsh Group, 1984-1986; and Curator (1986-1988) and Senior Historian (1988-1989) of the Adirondack Museum in Blue Mountain Lake, New York. In 1989, he became a full-time, independent museum consultant and lecturer, and was a visiting professor of the State University of New York (SUNY) in 1992. Welsh was a contributor to numerous scholarly journals. He authored Tanning in the United States to 1850 (1964), American Folk Art: The Art of the People (1967), Track and Road: The American Trotting Horse, 1820-1900 (1968), The Art of the Enterprise: A Pennsylvania Tradition (1983), and Jacks, Jobbers and Kings: Logging the Adirondacks (1994).
Rights:
Restricted. Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission.
Topic:
Interviews  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Folklife studies  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9619, History of Smithsonian Folklife Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9619
See more items in:
History of Smithsonian Folklife Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9619

Interview of Joanna C. Scherer covers her career at the Smithsonian as a technician in the Anthropology Archives and Research Anthropologist for the Handbook of North American Indians at the NMNH; her role advancing women's careers at the Smithsonian; ...

Container:
Interviews
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Rights:
Restricted. Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9619, History of Smithsonian Folklife Oral History Interviews
See more items in:
History of Smithsonian Folklife Oral History Interviews
History of Smithsonian Folklife Oral History Interviews / Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru9619-refidd1e614

Taíno Symposium – Session 3 – José Barreiro and Christina González Co-Moderators Introduction

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2019-06-04T19:46:41.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_tpVVRprFBwM

"The Married Couple: the Man Whose Wife Was Wooed By a Bear

Creator:
National Museum of Natural History  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2008-08-13T01:06:06.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Natural History  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianNMNH
Data Source:
National Museum of Natural History
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianNMNH
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_XUXIGSdwPcI

Adrianna Link RV Seminar Presentation

Creator:
National Museum of Natural History  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2016-05-12T17:06:48.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Natural History  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianNMNH
Data Source:
National Museum of Natural History
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianNMNH
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_YiBlKIdPBVs

Handbook of North American Indians

Collection Creator:
Stewart, T. D. (Thomas Dale), 1901-1997  Search this
Extent:
3 Folders
Container:
Box 45
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1970-1981
Collection Restrictions:
The Thomas Dale Stewart papers are open for research.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Thomas Dale Stewart Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Thomas Dale Stewart Papers
Thomas Dale Stewart Papers / Series 3: Writings and Research
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1988-33-ref1257

Department of Anthropology records

Creator:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. United States National Museum. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Extent:
330.25 Linear feet (519 boxes)
330.25 Linear feet (519 boxes)
Note:
Some materials are held off-site; this will be indicated at the series or sub-series level. Advanced notice must be given to view these portions of the collection.
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1840s-circa 2015
1840s-circa 2015
Summary:
The Department of Anthropology records contain administrative and research materials produced by the department and its members from the time of the Smithsonian Institution's foundation until today.
Scope and Contents:
The Department of Anthropology records contain correspondence, manuscripts, photographs, memoranda, invoices, meeting minutes, fiscal records, annual reports, grant applications, personnel records, receipts, and forms. The topics covered in the materials include collections, exhibits, staff, conservation, acquisitions, loans, storage and office space, administration, operations, research, budgets, security, office procedures, and funding. The materials were created by members of the Section of Ethnology of the Smithsonian Institution, the Division of Anthropology of the United States National Museum, the Office of Anthropology of the National Museum of Natural History, and the Department of Anthropology of the National Museum of Natural History and range in date from before the founding of the Smithsonian Institution to today. The Department of Anthropology records also contain some materials related to the Bureau of American Ethnology, such as documents from the River Basin Surveys.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 28 series: (1) Correspondence, 1902-1908, 1961-1992; (2) Alpha-Subject File, 1828-1963; (3) Alpha-Subject File, 1961-1975; (4) Smithsonian Office of Anthropology Subject Files, 1967-1968; (5) River Basin Survey Files, 1965-1969; (6) Research Statements, Proposals, and Awards, 1961-1977 (bulk 1966-1973); (7) Publication File, 1960-1975; (8) Memoranda and Lists Concerning Condemnations, 1910-1965; (9) Notebook on Special Exhibits, 1951-1952 (10) Section on Animal Industry; (11) Administrative Records, 1891-1974; (12) Administrative Records, 1965-1994 (bulk 1975-1988); (13) Fiscal Records, 1904-1986; (14) Annual Reports, 1920-1983; (15) Chairman's Office Files, 1987-1993; (16) Division of Archaeology, 1828-1965; (17) Division of Ethnology, 1840s, 1860-1972, 1997; (18) Division of Physical Anthropology; (19) Division of Cultural Anthropology, 1920-1968; (20) Records of the Anthropological Laboratory/Anthropology Conservation and Restoration Laboratory, 1939-1973; (21) Collections Management, 1965-1985; (22) Photographs of Specimens and Other Subjects (Processing Laboratory Photographs), 1880s-1950s; (23) Exhibit Labels, Specimen Labels, Catalog Cards, and Miscellaneous Documents, circa 1870-1950; (24) Antiquities Act Permits, 1904-1986; (25) Ancient Technology Program, circa 1966-1981; (26) Urgent Anthropology; (27) Records of the Handbook of North American Indians; (28) Personnel; (29) Repatriation Office, 1991-1994
Administrative History.:
The Smithsonian Institution was founded in 1846. Although there was no department of anthropology until the creation of the Section of Ethnology in 1879, anthropological materials were part of the Smithsonian's collection from its foundation. The Section of Ethnology was created to care for the rapidly growing collection. In 1881, the United States National Museum was established. Soon thereafter, in 1883, it was broken up into divisions, including the Division of Anthropology. In 1904, Physical Anthropology was added to the Division.

The Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) was created in 1879 as a research unit of the Smithsonian, separating research from collections care. However, during the 1950s, research became a higher priority for the Department of Anthropology and, in 1965, the BAE was merged with the Department of Anthropology to create the Office of Anthropology, and the BAE's archives became the National Anthropological Archives (NAA).

In 1967, the United States National Museum was broken up into three separate museums: the Musuem of History and Technology (now the National Museum of American History), the National Museum of American Art, and the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). The Office of Anthropology was included in NMNH and was renamed the Department of Anthropology in 1968.

New divisions were added to the Department, including the Human Studies Film Archives (HSFA) in 1981, the Research Institute on Immigration and Ethnic Studies (RIIES) in 1982, and the Repatriation Office in 1993. In 1983, the Smithsonian opened the Museum Support Center (MSC) in Suitland, Maryland, as offsite housing for collections with specialized storage facilities and conservation labs.

The Department of Anthropology is currently the largest department within NMNH. It has three curatorial divisions (Ethnology, Archaeology, and Biological Anthropology) and its staff includes curators, research assistants, program staff, collections specialists, archivists, repatriation tribal liaisons, and administrative specialists. It has a number of outreach and research arms, including the Repatriation Office, Recovering Voices, Human Origins, and the Arctic Studies Center.

The Museum is home to one of the world's largest anthropology collections, with over three million specimens in archaeology, ethnology, and human skeletal biology. The NAA is the Smithsonian's oldest archival repository, with materials that reflect over 150 years of anthropological collecting and fieldwork. The HSFA is the only North American archive devoted exclusively to the collection and preservation of anthropological film and video.

Sources Consulted

National Museum of Natural History. "Department of Anthropology: About" Accessed April 13, 2020. https://naturalhistory.si.edu/research/anthropology/about

National Museum of Natural History. "History of Anthropology at the Smithsonian." Accessed April 13, 2020. https://naturalhistory.si.edu/sites/default/files/media/file/history-anthropology-si.pdf

National Museum of Natural History. "History of the Smithsonian Catalog." Accessed April 13, 2020 https://siris-sihistory.si.edu/ipac20/ipac.jsp?profile=sicall

Chronology

1846 -- The Smithsonian Institution is founded

1879 -- George Catlin bequeaths his collection to the Smithsonian The Section of Ethnology is established to oversee ethnological and archaeological collections The Bureau of Ethnology is established by Congress as a research unit of the Smithsonian

1881 -- The U.S. National Museum (USNM) is established as a separate entity within the Smithsonian Institution

1883 -- The staff and collections of the USNM are reorganized into divisions, including a Division of Anthropology

1897 -- The United States National Museum is reorganized into three departments: Anthropology headed by W. H. Holmes; Biology with F. W. True as head; and Geology with G. P. Merrill in charge The Bureau of Ethnology is renamed the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) to emphasize the geographic limit of its interests

1903 -- The Division of Physical Anthropology established

1904 -- The Division of Physical Anthropology is incorporated into the Division of Anthropology

1910 -- The USNM moves into the new Natural History Building

1965 -- The Smithsonian Office of Anthropology is created on February 1 The BAE is eliminated and merged with the Office of Anthropology

1968 -- The Smithsonian Office of Anthropology (SOA) of the National Museum of Natural History is retitled the Department of Anthropology on October 29

1973 -- The Research Institute on Immigration and Ethnic Studies (RIIES) is established at the National Museum of Natural History's (NMNH) Center for the Study of Man (CSM) to study the waves of immigration to the United States and its overseas outposts that began in the 1960's

1975 -- The National Anthropological Film Center is established

1981 -- The National Anthropological Film Center is incorporated into the Department of Anthropology

1982 -- The RIIES, part of the CSM at the NMNH, is transferred to the Department of Anthropology

1991 -- NMNH establishes a Repatriation Office

1993 -- The Repatriation Office is incorporated into the Department of Anthropology

Head Curators and Department Chairs

1897-1902 -- William Henry Holmes

1902-1903 -- Otis T. Mason (acting)

1904-1908 -- Otis T. Mason

1908-1909 -- Walter Hough (acting)

1910-1920 -- William Henry Holmes

1920-1923 -- Walter Hough (acting)

1923-1935 -- Walter Hough

1935-1960 -- Frank M. Setzler

1960-1962 -- T. Dale Stewart

1963-1965 -- Waldo R. Wedel

1965-1967 -- Richard Woodbury

1967-1970 -- Saul H. Riesenberg

1970-1975 -- Clifford Evans

1975-1980 -- William W. Fitzhugh

1980-1985 -- Douglas H. Ubelaker

1985-1988 -- Adrienne L. Kaeppler

1988-1992 -- Donald J. Ortner

1992-1999 -- Dennis Stanford

1999-2002 -- Carolyn L. Rose

2002-2005 -- William W. Fitzhugh

2005-2010 -- J. Daniel Rogers

2010-2014 -- Mary Jo Arnoldi

2014-2018 -- Torbin Rick

2018- -- Igor Krupnik
Related Materials:
The NAA holds collections of former head curators and department chairs, including the papers of Otis Tufton Mason, Walter Hough, T. Dale Stewart, Waldo Rudolph and Mildred Mott Wedel, Saul H. Riesenberg, Clifford Evans, and Donald J. Ortner; the photographs of Frank Maryl Setzler; and the Richard B. Woodbury collection of drawings of human and animal figures.

Other related collections at the NAA include the papers of Gordon D. Gibson, Eugene I. Knez, and Betty J. Meggers and Clifford Evans; and the records of the Bureau of American Ethnology, the Center for the Study of Man, and the River Basin Surveys.
Provenance:
This collection was transferred to the National Anthropological Archives (NAA) by the National Museum of Natural History's Department of Anthropology in multiple accessions.
Restrictions:
Some materials are restricted.

Access to the Department of Anthropology records requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Anthropology  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Citation:
Department of Anthropology Records, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.XXXX.0311
See more items in:
Department of Anthropology records
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-xxxx-0311

Records of the Handbook of North American Indians

Collection Creator:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. United States National Museum. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Extent:
15.42 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents:
Please contact NAA staff for more information.
Collection Restrictions:
Some materials are restricted.

Access to the Department of Anthropology records requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Department of Anthropology Records, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.XXXX.0311, Series 27
See more items in:
Department of Anthropology records
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-xxxx-0311-ref73

Photographs of Gay Head Indians of Martha's Vineyard

Extent:
77 Copy prints
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Gay Head Wampanoag  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Copy prints
Photographs
Portraits
Place:
Massachusetts
Martha's Vineyard (Mass.)
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs depicting Gay Head Indians including portraits as well as images of people at Martha's Vineyard Beach, in boats, near their homes, and on or around trains. Many of the copies were made from case photographs. The collection also includes photocopies of the original photographs with identifications by Gale Huntington, a lifetime resident of Martha's Vineyard.
Biographical/Historical note:
The Gay Head Indians resided in the Martha's Vineyard region as early as 1642. The tribe continues to remain relatively isolated and maintains strong tribal identity, partly due to its reservation location on the extreme western peninsular point of the Vineyard and strict tribal membership laws.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot R81-51
Reproduction Note:
Copy prints made by Smithsonian Institution, 1981.
General note:
Historical background published in Laura E. Conkey, Ethel Boissevain, and Ives Goddard, "Indians of Southern New England and Long Island: Late Period," Handbook of North American Indians, vol. 15, Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1978.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
This copy collection has been obtained for reference purposes only. Contact the repository for terms of use and access.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Portraits
Citation:
Photo lot R81-51, Photographs of Gay Head Indians of Martha's Vineyard, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.R81-51
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-r81-51

Microfilm of Sheldon Jackson photograph collection

Creator:
Jackson, Sheldon, 1834-1909  Search this
Extent:
1 Roll (microfilm)
Culture:
Eskimos  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Alaskan Eskimo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Roll
Photographs
Place:
Alaska
Date:
circa 1877-1907
Scope and Contents note:
Circa 500 photographs documenting Sheldon Jackson's work in the Presbyterian Church and among Alaskan natives, including images of towns, buildings, scenery, and Alaskan natives. The collection includes commercial prints and photographs probably made by Jackson.
Biographical/Historical note:
Sheldon Jackson (1834-1909) was a Presbyterian minister and missionary and a United States government official. He graduated from Union College in New York (1855) and completed a program in theological studies at Princeton (1858). After graduation, he worked at a school for Choctaw boys in what is now Spencer, Oklahoma. He then moved to Minnesota to work as a pastor (1859-1869), stopping briefly to serve as a chaplain in the Civil War. In 1869, he became superintendent for the Board of Home Missions for Iowa, Nebraska, the Dakotas, Wyoming, Montana, and Utah. In 1870 his superintendency included almost all of the American West.

Jackson first visited Alaska in 1877, and in 1884 the federal government appointed him the territory's first superintendent of public instruction. In 1885 he joined the Bureau of Education as a general agent for education in Alaska. In this position, he worked to increase access to education and establish schools. He also introduced domesticated reindeer to Alaska in 1892 in order to alleviate undernourishment in the Alaska native population. In 1897, Jackson was elected moderator of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church, the highest honor of that denomination.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot R81-13
Location of Other Archival Materials:
The Presbyterian Historical Society holds the Sheldon Jackson papers.
Photographs relating to Jackson's project to import reindeer for Alaskans held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 130.
The Department of Anthropology collections holds artifacts collected by Sheldon Jackson in Alaska and elsewhere.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
The microfilm was obtained for reference purposes only. Copies of the images should be obtained from the Presbyterian Historical Society in Philadelphia.
Topic:
Presbyterian Church  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot R81-13, Microfilm of Sheldon Jackson photograph collection, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.R81-13
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-r81-13

Sally McLendon photograph collection of Pomo Indians

Creator:
McLendon, Sally (collector and photographer)  Search this
Extent:
43 Copy prints
Culture:
Pomo  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Copy prints
Photographs
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents note:
Copies of photographs depicting Pomo Indians, including formal and informal portraits and views of gatherings for a feast and other ceremonies.
Biographical/Historical note:
Dr. Sally McLendon is an anthropologist and professor at the City University of New York. Her research focuses on linguistics, material culture, and the Indians of California, especially the Eastern and Southeastern Pomo. She wrote "A Sketch of the Eastern Pomo Language" for the 15th volume of the Smithsonian's Handbook of North American Indians, published in 1996.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot R82-4
Reproduction Note:
Copy prints made by Smithsonian Institution, 1981.
Location of Other Archival Materials:
A Southwest Indian bowl, donated by McLendon, can be found in the Department of Anthropology in accession 387036.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
This copy collection has been obtained for reference purposes only. Contact the repository for terms of use and access.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot R82-4, Sally McLendon photograph collection of Pomo Indians, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.R82-4
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-r82-4

Photograph of Native Americans in Bismarck, North Dakota

Names:
Wilson, Woodrow, 1856-1924  Search this
Extent:
1 Copy print
1 Copy negative
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Copy prints
Copy negatives
Photographs
Place:
Bismarck (N.D.)
Date:
circa 1919
Scope and Contents note:
Photograph depicting Native American men in suits and hats, women in scarves and shawls, and girls and boys standing outside of a building. One small boy is wearing a military uniform and carrying an American flag. The photograph was probably made in Bismarck, North Dakota, on September 10, 1919, when Woodrow Wilson stopped there on his national speaking tour for the League of Nations.

Handwritten on original image: "Some of Mrs. Melson's relations. Taken in Bismarck. Waiting to see W. Wilson."
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 86-44
Reproduction Note:
Copy negative and print made by Smithsonian Institution, circa 1979.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 86-44, Photograph of Native Americans in Bismarck, North Dakota, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.86-44
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-86-44

Ed Edson photographs of Oglala people and camp near Chadron, Nebraska

Creator:
Edson, Ed  Search this
Names:
Red Cloud, 1822-1909  Search this
Extent:
3 Glass negatives
3 Modern prints (silver gelatin)
Culture:
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Modern prints
Place:
Chadron (Neb.)
Date:
circa 1889
Scope and Contents note:
Portraits of Red Cloud and possibly Little Wound, as well as one image of probably an Oglala camp near the eastern edge of Chadron, Nebraska.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 2001-14, NAA MS 4701
Reproduction Note:
Contact prints made by Smithsonian Institution, circa 2001.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Camps  Search this
Citation:
Photo Lot 2001-14, Ed Edson photographs of Oglala people and camp near Chadron, Nebraska, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.2001-14
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-2001-14

Robert Rankin papers

Creator:
Rankin, Robert Louis, 1939-  Search this
Extent:
31.77 Linear feet (55 boxes, 1 map folder)
196 Sound recordings
Culture:
Quapaw Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Field notes
Date:
1886, 1914, 1956-2011
Summary:
The Robert Rankin papers, 1886, 1914, 1956-2011, document his field work, research, and professional activities, primarily in relation to his work studying American Indian languages. Rankin was professor of linguistics at the University of Kansas from 1969 until his retirement in 2005. The collection consists of sound recordings, field notebooks, vocabulary lists and bibliographies, dictionaries, research files, slip files, word lists, correspondence, ephemera, notes, readings and reprints, writings, drafts, and teaching materials. This includes materials from Rankin's work with the last native speakers of the Quapaw and Kaw (Kansa, Kanza) languages and subsequent research, writings, and collaborations with tribes and fellow linguists.
Scope and Contents:
The Robert Rankin papers, 1886, 1914, 1956-2011, document his field work, research, and professional activities, primarily in relation to his work studying American Indian languages. The collection includes sound recordings, field notebooks, vocabulary lists and bibliographies, dictionaries, research files, slip files, word lists, correspondence, ephemera, notes, readings and reprints, writings, drafts, and teaching materials.

The 196 sound recordings include material from Rankin's work with the last native speakers of both the Quapaw and Kaw (Kansa, Kanza) languages. The collection includes extensive research on these languages along with research on other facets of the Siouan language family. Rankin's close collaboration with colleagues and tribes is well documented, especially his work with linguists John E. Koontz and W.L. Ballard, as well as his contributions to language documentation efforts including the Handbook of North American Indians, the Annotated Dictionary of Kaw (Kanza), and the Comparative Siouan Dictionary. The collection also includes sound recordings and notes from Rankin's study of the Romanian language as part of his graduate study.
Arrangement:
The Robert Rankin papers are arranged in 9 series: Series 1. Quapaw, 1972-1991, undated; Series 2. Kaw (Kansa, Kanza), circa 1970-2011, undated; Series 3. Field notebooks, 1981-1983, 1995, undated; Series 4. Subject and correspondence files, 1886, 1956-2007, undated; Series 5. Conferences and professional associations, 1974-2010; Series 6. Writings, 1975-2010, undated; Series 7. Teaching and academic files, 1973-2006, undated; Series 8. Romanian study, 1914, 1962-1972, undated; Series 9. Sound recordings, 1963-1987, undated.
Biographical Note:
Chronology

1939 -- Born January 17

1960 -- Graduated from Emory University with a B.A. in Romance Languages

1966-1968 -- Fulbright Fellowship in Romania researching Romanian dialects

1968 -- M.A. in Linguistics, University of Chicago

1969 -- Started at the University of Kansas as an Acting Assistant Professor of Linguistics

1972 -- Ph.D. in Linguistics, University of Chicago

1972 -- Became an Assistant Professor of Linguistics at the University of Kansas

1973 -- Language work with the Quapaw

1973-1974 -- Began work with the Kaw (Kansa, Kanza) language that continued for the rest of his life

1986 -- Became a Professor of Linguistics at the University of Kansas

2005 -- Retired from the University of Kansas

2014 -- Died on February 24

Robert Rankin was a professor of linguistics at the University of Kansas who spent the majority of his career working with American Indian languages in the Siouan language family. He began his career studying romance languages as part of his undergraduate and graduate work and completed a Fulbright Fellowship in Romania (1966-1968) examining regional linguistic differences. He began teaching at the University of Kansas in 1969 and was introducted to the Choctaw language in Summer 1972 while teaching a field methods course. He became fascinated with American Indian languages and started working with the remaining native speakers of the Quapaw tribe in early 1973. When there were no more native speakers left, he started working with the Kaw (Kansa, Kanza) language. When he began this research in 1973-1974, there were only four fluent speakers of Kaw (Kansa, Kanza) left. He continued studying the language until well after his retirement from the University of Kansas in 2005. Rankin died on February 24, 2014 in Kansas City, MO.

Sources consulted: "Robert L. Rankin obituary," Lawrence Journal-World, March 1-5, 2014 http://obituaries.ljworld.com/obituaries/ljworld/obituary.aspx?pid=169905179
Provenance:
This collection was transferred to the National Anthropological Archives by Robert Rankin's wife, Carolyn Rankin, in 2014.
Restrictions:
The Robert Rankin papers are open for research.

Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.

Computer disks are currently restricted due to preservation concerns.

Access to the Robert Rankin papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Southern states  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Kansa Indians  Search this
Kansa language  Search this
Yuchi language  Search this
Yuchi Indians  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Field notes
Citation:
Robert Rankin papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2014-16
See more items in:
Robert Rankin papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2014-16

Foster, HNAI

Collection Creator:
Rankin, Robert Louis, 1939-  Search this
Container:
Box 10
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Collection Restrictions:
The Robert Rankin papers are open for research.

Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.

Computer disks are currently restricted due to preservation concerns.

Access to the Robert Rankin papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Robert Rankin papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Robert Rankin papers
Robert Rankin papers / Series 4: Subject and correspondence files / 4.4: HNAI (Handbook of North American Indians)
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2014-16-ref214

Jim Goodtracks, Chiwere dictionary

Collection Creator:
Rankin, Robert Louis, 1939-  Search this
Container:
Box 10
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1990
Collection Restrictions:
The Robert Rankin papers are open for research.

Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.

Computer disks are currently restricted due to preservation concerns.

Access to the Robert Rankin papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Robert Rankin papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Robert Rankin papers
Robert Rankin papers / Series 4: Subject and correspondence files / 4.4: HNAI (Handbook of North American Indians)
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2014-16-ref367

Handbook Osage orthography

Collection Creator:
Rankin, Robert Louis, 1939-  Search this
Container:
Box 10
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Collection Restrictions:
The Robert Rankin papers are open for research.

Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.

Computer disks are currently restricted due to preservation concerns.

Access to the Robert Rankin papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Robert Rankin papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Robert Rankin papers
Robert Rankin papers / Series 4: Subject and correspondence files / 4.4: HNAI (Handbook of North American Indians)
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2014-16-ref368

Handbook Chiwere

Collection Creator:
Rankin, Robert Louis, 1939-  Search this
Container:
Box 10
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1990
Collection Restrictions:
The Robert Rankin papers are open for research.

Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.

Computer disks are currently restricted due to preservation concerns.

Access to the Robert Rankin papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Robert Rankin papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Robert Rankin papers
Robert Rankin papers / Series 4: Subject and correspondence files / 4.4: HNAI (Handbook of North American Indians)
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2014-16-ref369

Handbook, HNAI

Collection Creator:
Rankin, Robert Louis, 1939-  Search this
Container:
Box 10
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1994-1995
Collection Restrictions:
The Robert Rankin papers are open for research.

Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.

Computer disks are currently restricted due to preservation concerns.

Access to the Robert Rankin papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Robert Rankin papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Robert Rankin papers
Robert Rankin papers / Series 4: Subject and correspondence files / 4.4: HNAI (Handbook of North American Indians)
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2014-16-ref370

Goddard's Siouan materials for the Handbook of North American Indians

Collection Creator:
Rankin, Robert Louis, 1939-  Search this
Container:
Box 10
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1974-1978
Collection Restrictions:
The Robert Rankin papers are open for research.

Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.

Computer disks are currently restricted due to preservation concerns.

Access to the Robert Rankin papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Robert Rankin papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Robert Rankin papers
Robert Rankin papers / Series 4: Subject and correspondence files / 4.4: HNAI (Handbook of North American Indians)
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2014-16-ref374

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