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Grammar -- Notes

Collection Creator:
Klug, Linda M. (Linda Marie), 1940-  Search this
Container:
Box 8
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
The Linda Klug papers are open for research.

Access to the Linda Klug papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Linda Klug papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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Linda Klug Papers
Linda Klug Papers / Series 4: Research
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw38a15d539-0e78-4563-a66e-7cfbdb69af72
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2002-31-ref117

Ateso grammar notes

Collection Creator:
Karp, Ivan  Search this
Container:
Box 30
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
undated
Collection Restrictions:
Recommendations that Karp wrote for his colleagues and students are restricted until 2061.

Access to the Ivan Karp papers requires an appointment.
Collection Citation:
Ivan Karp papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Ivan Karp papers
Ivan Karp papers / Series 1: Iteso Research / 1.6: Ateso Language
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3dc2792d8-f81b-4f5f-9ca3-17ab624d0811
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2013-30-ref635

Linguistic material: Grammar notes

Collection Creator:
Leeds, Anthony, 1925-  Search this
Container:
Box 20
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
undated
Collection Restrictions:
Graded materials of Anthony Leeds' students and grant applications that he reviewed are restricted. His photo album is also restricted due to preservation concerns.
Collection Rights:
Contact the respository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Anthony Leeds papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Anthony Leeds Papers
Anthony Leeds Papers / Series 3: Field Work / Yaruro
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3595ceb15-d4d6-493d-80bd-dd5029f006a5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1994-35-ref273

Kaw grammar notes

Collection Creator:
Rankin, Robert Louis, 1939-  Search this
Container:
Box 4
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Collection Restrictions:
The Robert Rankin papers are open for research.

Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.

Computer disks are currently restricted due to preservation concerns.

Access to the Robert Rankin papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Robert Rankin papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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Robert Rankin papers
Robert Rankin papers / Series 2: Kaw (Kansa, Kanza) / 2.2: Files
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw338a3b6ca-6507-4f93-81b6-4828ad028119
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2014-16-ref134

Unchecked Safwa Vocabulary & Grammar Notes

Collection Correspondent:
Conklin, Harold C., 1926-2016  Search this
Greenberg, Joseph H. (Joseph Harold), 1915-2001  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harwood, Alan  Search this
Container:
Box 2
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
Undated
Collection Restrictions:
Materials that identify the participants in Harwood's Bronx and Boston studies are restricted until 2056.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Alan Harwood Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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Alan Harwood Papers
Alan Harwood Papers / Series 1: Safwa Research / #3: Language Data
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw377e0bca9-ce6c-4fe2-a6c6-3c4849212124
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2006-25-ref59

Ralph Pepper, Tulsa, OK, grammar notes

Collection Creator:
Rankin, Robert Louis, 1939-  Search this
Container:
Box 3
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1975-1979
Collection Restrictions:
The Robert Rankin papers are open for research.

Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.

Computer disks are currently restricted due to preservation concerns.

Access to the Robert Rankin papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Robert Rankin papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Robert Rankin papers
Robert Rankin papers / Series 2: Kaw (Kansa, Kanza) / 2.2: Files
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw326084202-a679-40ce-b150-c002343bbb1c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2014-16-ref509

[Miscellaneous notes on Safwa research]

Collection Correspondent:
Conklin, Harold C., 1926-2016  Search this
Greenberg, Joseph H. (Joseph Harold), 1915-2001  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harwood, Alan  Search this
Container:
Box 2
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
Undated
Scope and Contents:
Contains "aborted Kinga research plan, miscellaneous data on Safwa, unanswered questions, vocabulary & other grammar notes, kin terms, Isyesye compounds, data for paper on beer drinking"
Collection Restrictions:
Materials that identify the participants in Harwood's Bronx and Boston studies are restricted until 2056.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Alan Harwood Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Alan Harwood Papers
Alan Harwood Papers / Series 1: Safwa Research / #1: Research Files
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3cf8a1297-cf77-4519-a7db-468f4e23ad83
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2006-25-ref47

Chemehuevi

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
27 Boxes
Culture:
Chemehuevi  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1910-1946
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Chemehuevi.

Materials from his early field work in 1910 and 1911 consist of vocabulary organized into catagories including tribenames, geographic terms, placenames, plants (mainly cacti), and shells as adornment. Among the tribenames are a number of Mohave and Diegueno equivalences, as well as a good bit of Mohave ethnohistory, based on Alfred L. Kroeber's "Shoshonean Dialects of California" and T. T. Waterman's "Religious Practices of the Diegueno Indians." Certain notes indicate the availability and use of the records of Barbara Freire-Marreco. Harrington also accumulated notes for a proposed review of Waterman's "The Phonetic Elements of the Northern Paiute Language," into which he put some of his recently acquired Chemehuevi phonetics.

Carobeth's field notes are also present in this subseries. The bulk of the lingustic and ethnographic data was amassed from her work with George Laird. Harrington copied her notes onto slips, some of which he arranged semantically. The topical vocabulary includes terms for cosmography, geography, age/sex, kinship, material culture, plants, animals, animal parts, and tribenames. There are smaller sections for minerals, names of places and persons, colors, religion, and history.

A section of grammar notes includes excerpts from Carobeth's notes, Edward Sapir's manuscript titled "Southern Paiute, an Illustrative Sketch" (B.A.E. ms. 1751), and from other secondary sources. There are also excerpts from Ben Paddock, Ruby Eddy, and Kitanemuk and Serrano speakers. The organizational pattern is loosely based on Sapir's manuscript.

The subseries also contains a set of thirty-size texts (of which number thirty is missing), each with related notes. In most cases there are typed versions, interlinear translations, handwritten notes, and free English translations. This material was intended for publication, possibly in the form of a primer. This section also contains the Lord's Prayer, notes on song, textlets, and folklore.

Some miscellaneous notes include Chemehuevi names extracted from a June 30, 1918 census of the Mohave Indians of the Colorado River Agency; quotations for the proposed Chemehuevi publication from little-used secondary sources and interviews with colleagues; texts related to sketches; notes and questions to be reheard or clarified; and general linguistic and ethnographic miscellany. There is also an article from fieldwork undertaken in 1934, probably by Harrington's daughter Awona and Carobeth. Notes in an unidentified handwriting list as informants Satania Lopez (Susie), Jerome Booth, George Snyder, and Mukewine.

The last section of this subseries consists of field notes from his research in 1946. There is a comparative vocabulary based on Harrington's Serrano information from Juan Lozada and on Edward Sapir's Paiute terms in "Southern Paiute, a Shoshonean Language." Lucy Mike (referred to as Mrs. Lucy and who also knew Walapai) and Luisa gave Chemehuevi equivalences. There are also notes on placename trips, rehearings of tribenames, and some ethnographic and anecdotal notes
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington first conducted research on Chemehuevi in 1910-1911, collecting information from Jack Jones, George Johnson, and Ohue. In 1919 and 1920, Carobeth, his wife at the time, accumulated extensive data from George Laird, Annie Laird, and Ben Paddock. These notes formed the backbone of Harrington's Chemehuevi material, which was copied, organized, and often reheard in Washington in 1920. Harrington renewed his research in 1946, initiating a search for surviving Chemehuevi speakers. He connected with a number of speakers and embarked with them on placename trips from Barstow to Needles, Searchlight, Nelson, and Las Vegas.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Chemehuevi language  Search this
Mohave language  Search this
Diegueño language  Search this
Serrano language  Search this
Southern Paiute language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 3.10
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3039f7824-8d73-4a8b-a243-6ba360229312
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14367

Mohave

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Henderson, Junius, 1865-1937  Search this
Robbins, Wilfred William, 1884-1952  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
33 Boxes
Culture:
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Chemehuevi  Search this
Cocopa  Search this
Havasupai (Coconino)  Search this
Hualapai (Walapai)  Search this
Piipaash (Maricopa)  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Date:
1907-circa 1914, 1946-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Mohave.

Harrington organized his early linguistic and ethnographic notes into more than eighty categories, covering a broad spectrum of Mohave culture from daily practices to mythological and religious beliefs. The variety of content and order of arrangement are encyclopedic. Most of the material is original data from numerous native speakers. Animal and plant notes are also filed in this section. Notes on these topics stem from the Mohave Valley Expedition made with Henderson and Robbins. A typescript of Henderson's report precedes the botanical notes and one by Robbins precedes the zoological notes.

The semantic slipfile consists of data from the original field notes rewritten on slips and arranged in thirteen semantic divisions. Some new information provided by Irving and Wagner was inserted. Material relative to other Yuman tribes is included and almost all categories contain some inextricably interwoven Chemehuevi data which were originally provided by Chemehuevi speakers Jack Jones, John Pete, William Johnson, and Patty Smith. In most instances, the Chemehuevi equivalences are clearly marked. Information on kinship is relatively substantial.

Two Mohave notebooks are also present. One contains vocabulary and texts credited to "Mr. Edgar, Needles, Cal." The other is a packet of loose pages evidently removed from a notebook covering random linguistic and ethnographic data.

Another section consists of a small set of grammar notes arranged under such headings as language, phonology, and morphology. Some notes apparently were taken as early as 1907 and were transferred to slips in 1910 and 1911.

The section of miscellaneous notes on Yuman languages contains Yuma, Cocopa, and Walapai field notebooks. They are principally ethnographic and are difficult to read. Unrelated small groups of notes include Mohave, Yuma, Maricopa, Havasupai, and Walapai ethnographic data, probably provided by Joe Homer. There are lecture notes and students' papers probably from one of the courses which Harrington gave at the University of Colorado. Three small groups of slips include a list of Yuman clan names and a series of excerpts from a Yuman notebook which has not been located. The third is a copy of some Yavapai terms supplied by Barbara Freire-Marreco.

Late linguistic and ethnographic notes contain what appears to be the first draft of a manuscript on Mohave culture. Such subjects as sociology, religion and mythology, physical and mental characteristics, the Mohave universe, warfare, and design are covered. A variety of notes on historical events and on the geographic, political, and economic life of the Needles area was compiled from published sources and correspondence with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and with Indian Agency superintendents. The focus is on Mohave with some general Yuman references. The material has evidently undergone several reorganizations and notes from informants of the earlier period are interfiled. New linguistic and ethnographic information was supplied principally by Hal Davidson, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lewis, and Russell. Comparative terms appear in Yuma, Maricopa, Chemehuevi, and Paiute. Kroeber apparently lent Harrington some of his personal manuscripts, and information from this source is introduced as "Kr. notes." Correspondence with Charles Battye and excerpts from his scrapbooks in the possession of the Needles Public Library are also contained among these notes.

Another section consists of notes and drafts on material culture. They are arranged alphabetically and predominantly ethnographic. Notes came from the earlier period and such 1946 informants as Davidson and the Lewises. George Turner contributed numerous placenames.

The subseries also contains notes and drafts of tribenames. They represent an attempt to identify ethnic names applied to Yuman and some neighboring non-Yuman tribes. Some of the Mohave names may have been given by bilingual Chemehuevi speakers in July 1946, when Harrington and Murl Emery traveled the Colorado River-Mohave Valley area. A brief typescript follows the notes.

The section of semantically arranged notes consists of small amounts of data on minerals, pigments, fire, plants, animals, hunting, food, and medicine.

The section of late grammatical notes is also small. The notes originated mainly from Russell, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis, and Warren McCord. He based some hearings on Kroeber's (1911) "Phonetic Elements of the Mohave Language" and Sapir's (1930) "Southern Paiute Language." He also drew on A. M. Halpern's (1946 and 1947) six monographs on Yuma grammar published in the International Journal of American Linguistics. In the mid-1950s he again turned to Halpern and produced a small section of comparative Yuman terms.

The final section of the subseries consists of miscellaneus notes, including drafts of a paper on Mohave history and culture and another on the Kuchan vocabulary of George H. Thomas.
Biographical / Historical:
As a teacher of modern languages at Santa Ana High School in California (1906-1909), John P. Harrington spent his vacations studying Mohave and Yuma in Needles and Yuma, California. Working with a young Mohave woman in Needles in 1907, Mohave was the first Indian language that he ever recorded.

From 1909 until 1915, when he joined the Bureau of American Ethnology, Harrington held various positions with the Museum of the University of New Mexico and the School of American Archaeology, based mainly in Santa Fe. Along with work in other indigenous languages and cultures, he pursued his Mohave studies in Lincolnia, Cottonia, Needles, and Fort Mohave. The focus was on Mohave with ethnographic references to Yuma, Maricopa, Cocopa, Havasupai, and Walapai.

Under the auspices of the Bureau of American Ethnology, the School of American Archaeology, and the University of Colorado, he was ethnologist for a Mohave Valley expedition undertaken in March and April 1911, in conjunction with Junius Henderson and W. W. Robbins. Henderson identified the botanical life of the Mohave Valley and Robbins the zoological.

According to field notes and reports, the years 1910 and 1911 were the most productive ones for this first period of accumulation of Mohave data. Harrington worked with a number of people who spoke Mohave and Chemehuevi, resulting in numerous comparative references. Among the many Mohave speakers, Lee Irving (abbreviated L. I.), Mr. Edgar (Rev. Edgar), Ferd Wagner (Mr. Ferd), and Peter Dean (Peter) contributed substantially. Harrington primarily worked with Wagner in 1907. Edward H. Davis accompanied him on various placename trips and apparently advised him on the collection of artifacts. Financial records indicate that he spent about six weeks in Needles in late spring, 1914, collecting objects for the Panama-California Exposition.

A second period of endeavor commenced in 1946 with new recordings from Hal Davidson (Hal), Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lewis, George Turner, and Russell. Returning from the field to Washington, D.C., in 1947, Harrington compiled a variety of notes on historical events and interfiled some of his earlier material. The physical arrangement indicates an interest in drafting a paper on Mohave culture, more ethnographic than linguistic.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Mohave language  Search this
Yuma language  Search this
Chemehuevi language  Search this
Cocopa language  Search this
Hualapai language  Search this
Havasupai language  Search this
Maricopa language  Search this
Yuman languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Grammar, Comparative and general  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Zoology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 3.11
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw39e2556eb-1c2d-43d3-85a3-fdeca5f835b0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14386

Zuni

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
8 Boxes
Culture:
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1913-1953
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southwest series contains Harrington's Zuni research, which mainly focused on the linguistic relationship between Zuni and Tano-Kiowan-Keresan-Shoshonean stock.

The earliest field data which Harrington obtained on Zuni was recorded in the form of three brief vocabularies. One, dated February 20, 1913, was elicited from George Piro. Harrington indicated that another list of Zuni terms was copied for his B.A.E. colleague Neil Judd in 1919. A third gives the Indian names of several Zuni native speakers and ethnologists. Brief intermixed vocabulary and grammar notes were taken in the field from Nachapani in June and July 1929. A few Navajo comparisons were added.

The vocabulary sections contains Zuni terms arranged semantically, most numerous in the animal and animal parts categories. Other categories include age/sex, material culture, phenomena, placenames, plants, rank, relationship terms, religion, time, and tribenames. Most of the original material was obtained in 1929 in New Mexico where he consulted primarily with Charles or Dick Nachapani.

For his comparative vocabulary, Harrington followed the same semantic arrangement he used for the vocabulary notes, interfiling and comparing Tewa, Kiowa, Hano, Taos, Acoma, and Cahuilla terms. The material stems from his original notes in these languages and contains references to his publications in Tewa ethnozoology and ethnogeography. Perry A. Keahtigh was cited as the Kiowa souce and Adan Castillo for Cahuilla terms. Juan is the only Tewa speaker mentioned by name in the notes, although other Tewa speakers undoubtedly contributed to the original notes used in the many comparisons. Also interfiled are excerpts from papers by Ruth L. Bunzel on Zuni ethnology and grammar and compilations of Nahuatl from the works of Horatio Carochi and Alonso de Molina. Other terms labeled "Gatschet revd by Hodge" may refer to B.A.E. ms. 2870 in which many of Gatschet's approximately 200 Zuni/English vocabulary slips contain annotations by Frederick W. Hodge. Harrington also tapped Matilda Coxe Stevenson's "The Zuni Indians" (1904) for further comparisons. Kymograph tracings are mainly a comparison of Zuni and Navajo lexical terms.

Harrington's Zuni grammatical material was probably assembled in Washington for correlation with his own notes on other languages and with notes from secondary sources to be compiled into a comparative grammar. Most of Harrington's original Zuni material was derived from his fieldwork with Nachapani in June and July of 1929.

Correspondence indicates that Harrington's first draft of a comparative grammar was written in 1944 and was to be titled "Zuni Discovered To Be Hokan." Many of the notes which precede it, however, were interfiled later (probably in the early 1950s) and stem from his original field notes in Zuni, Tewa, and Kiowa. Also included are a lesser number of Taos and Aztec expressions. Harrington utilized the same sources as those found in the grammatical notes, relying most heavily on Bunzel's "Zuni." Another version of the manuscript has the modified title "Zuni, Tanoan, Kiowa Comparisons: Zuni Discovered To Be Hokan."

His ethnobotany notes contains extracts from Wooton and Standley's Flora of New Mexico (1913) and Stevenson's "Ethnobotany of the Zuni Indians." The ethnographic notes are based on Stevenson's The Zuni Indians. This work is frequently referred to in the notes as "Zuni Book."

Harrington's writings consists of notes used in "Name of Zuni Salt Lake in Alarcon's 1540 Account" (1949) and in "Trail Holder" (1949) as well as drafts and notes for proposed publications. Harrington's article "The Name Zuni Comes from the Laguna Dialect of West Keresan" was apparently not accepted for publication. Most of the notes are based on the Zuni section of Hodge's "Handbook." Another unpublished article is on Zuni phrases and numbers. It is similar in approach to a draft on Aztec phrases and numbers, suggesting that he may have contemplated a series of such short articles.
Biographical / Historical:
As early as 1919, John P. Harrington claimed a linguistic relationship between Zuni and a putative Tano-Kiowan-Keresan-Shoshonean stock. In 1929, at the suggestion of Edgar L. Hewett, he was authorized by the Bureau of American Ethnology to work with University of New Mexico students at a summer session in Chaco Canyon. Correspondence and reports indicate that he accumulated the bulk of his original Zuni notes at that time, later reorganizing them at various intervals in Washington, D.C., with an eye toward producing a vocabulary and grammar that would clearly demonstrate affinity among these languages. Harrington also recorded several hundred kymograph tracings. Charles and Dick Nachapani (Natcapanih) and Charlie Cly served as the primary sources of information. Harrington called one of the Nachapani brothers "the prince of all Zuni informants;" which one is uncertain.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Zuni language  Search this
Cahuilla language  Search this
Kiowa language  Search this
Acoma dialect  Search this
Tiwa language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Navajo language  Search this
Nahuatl language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Grammar, Comparative and general  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Zoology -- nomenclature  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Numeration  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 4.4
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw385cf212b-afea-4900-97c1-e610682ed7cc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14612
Online Media:

MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers

Creator:
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
Bushotter, George, 1864-1892  Search this
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Powell, John Wesley, 1834-1902  Search this
Riggs, Stephen Return, 1812-1883  Search this
Extent:
30 Linear feet (70 boxes, 1 oversized box, 20 manuscript envelopes, 4 rolled maps, and 23 map folders)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Minitari (Hidatsa)  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Biloxi Indians  Search this
Tutelo  Search this
Iowa  Search this
Chiwere  Search this
Ho-Chunk (Winnebago)  Search this
Oto  Search this
Quapaw Indians  Search this
Osage  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Lakota (Teton/Western Sioux)  Search this
Dhegiha Indians  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Omaha  Search this
Tututni (Tutuni)  Search this
Kaw (Kansa)  Search this
Siletz  Search this
Coos (Kusan)  Search this
Yaquina (Yakwina)  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southeast  Search this
Takelma (Rogue River Indians)  Search this
Klikitat  Search this
Chasta Costa (Chastacosta)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Field notes
Drawings
Vocabulary
Folklore
Sermons
Manuscripts
Obituaries
Correspondence
Newspaper clippings
Place:
Siletz Indian Reservation (Or.)
Date:
circa 1870-1956
bulk 1870-1895
Summary:
Reverend James Owen Dorsey (1848-1895) was a missionary and Bureau of American Ethnology ethnologist who conducted extensive research on Siouan tribes and languages.The papers of James Owen Dorsey comprise mostly ethnographic and linguistic materials on various tribes of the Siouan language family as well as tribes from Siletz Reservation in Oregon. These materials include texts and letters with interlineal translations; grammar notes; dictionaries; drawings; and his manuscripts. In addition, the collection contains Dorsey's correspondence, newspaper clippings, his obituaries, and reprints.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains James O. Dorsey's research and writings as a BAE ethnologist, as well as his earlier work as a missionary among the Ponca. The vast majority of the collection pertains to his research on Siouan-Catawban languages, including the Dakota and Dhegiha languages, Chiwere, Winnebago, Mandan, Hidatsa, Tutelo, Biloxi, and Catawba. His research on Athapascan, Kusan, Takilman, and Yakonan languages from his field work at Siletz Reservation are also present, as well as some notes on the Caddoan languages. Dorsey's research files include linguistic and ethnological field notes, reading notes, stories and myths, vocabularies, drawings, and unpublished and published manuscripts. The collection also contains Omaha, Ponca, Quapaw, and Biloxi dictionaries that he compiled and materials relating to his work editing Steven Riggs' Dakota-English Dictionary. Additional noteworthy materials in the collection are Teton texts and drawings from George Bushotter and drawings by Stephen Stubbs (Kansa), Pahaule-gagli (Kansa), and George Miller (Omaha). The collection also contains Dorsey's correspondence, newspaper clippings, obituaries, and his collection of reprints.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into 6 series: 1) Siouan; 2) Siletz Reservation; 3) Caddoan; 4) General Correspondence; 5) Personal Papers; 6) Miscellaneous & Reprints.
Biographical Note:
Reverend James Owen Dorsey (1848-1895) was a missionary and Bureau of American Ethnology ethnologist who conducted extensive research on Siouan tribes and languages.

Dorsey was born on October 31, 1848 in Baltimore, Maryland. He exhibited a talent for languages at an early age. At age 6 he learned the Hebrew alphabet and was able to read the language at age 10. In 1867 Dorsey attended the Theological Seminary of Virginia and was ordained a deacon of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 1871. In May of that year, Dorsey traveled to the Dakota Territory to serve as a missionary among the Ponca. Plagued by ill health, Dorsey was forced to end his missionary work in August 1873. By that time, however, he had learned the Ponca language well enough to converse with members of the tribe without an interpreter.

Dorsey returned to Maryland and engaged in parish work while continuing his studies of Siouan languages. His linguistic talents and knowledge of these languages attracted the attention of Major John Wesley Powell. Powell arranged for Dorsey to work among the Omaha in Nebraska from 1878 to 1880 to collect linguistic and ethnological notes. When the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) was established in 1879, Powell recruited Dorsey to join the staff.

As an ethnologist for the BAE, Dorsey continued his research on Siouan tribes. His studies focused on languages but also included Siouan personal names, folklore, social organization, religion, beliefs, and customs. He conducted fieldwork among the Tutelo at Six Nations on Grand River in Upper Canada (1882); the Kansa, Osage, and Quapaw in Indian Territory (1883-1884); the Biloxi at Lecompte, Rapides Parish, Louisiana (1892); and again with the Quapaw at the Quapaw Mission (1894). He also worked with Native Americans that visited DC, including George Bushotter (Teton), Philip Longtail (Winnebago), Samuel Fremont (Omaha), and Little Standing Buffalo (Ponca). He also spent time at Siletz Reservation in 1884 to collect linguistic notes on the Athapascan, Kusan, Takilman, and Yakonan stocks.

In addition to his research, Dorsey helped found the American Folklore Society and served as the first vice-president of the association. He also served as vice-president of Section H of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

At the age of 47, Dorsey died of typhoid fever on February 4, 1895.

Sources Consulted

1st-16th Annual Reports of the Bureau of American Ethnology. 1881-1897.

Hewitt, J.N.B. 1895. "James Owen Dorsey" American Anthropologist A8, 180-183.

McGee, W.J. 1895. "In Memoriam." Journal of American Folklore 8(28): 79-80.

1848 -- Born on October 31 in Baltimore, Maryland.

1871 -- Ordained a deacon of the Protestant Episcopal Church.

1871-1873 -- Served as a missionary among the Ponca in Dakota Territory.

1878-1880 -- Conducted fieldwork among the Omaha in Nebraska.

1879 -- Joined the staff of the Bureau of American Ethnology.

1882 -- Conducted fieldwork among the Tutelo at Six Nations on Grand River in Upper Canada.

1883-1884 -- Conducted fieldwork among the Kansa, Osage, and Quapaw in Indian Territory.

1887 -- Worked with George Bushotter to record information regarding the language and culture of the Dakota.

1884 -- Conducted fieldwork at Siletz Reservation.

1892 -- Conducted fieldwork among the Biloxi at Lecompte, Rapides Parish, Louisiana.

1894 -- Conducted fieldwork among the Quapaw at the Quapaw Mission in Indian Territory.

1895 -- Died of typhoid fever on February 4th at the age of 47.
Restrictions:
The James O. Dorsey Papers are open for research. Access to the James O. Dorsey Papers requires an appointment
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Catawba Indians  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Social structure  Search this
Kinship  Search this
Manners and customs  Search this
Shahaptian languages  Search this
Yakonan languages  Search this
Athapascan languages  Search this
Kusan languages  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Siouan languages  Search this
Dhegiha language  Search this
Siuslaw Indians  Search this
Hidatsa language  Search this
Omaha language  Search this
Dakota language  Search this
Catawba language  Search this
Biloxi language  Search this
Caddoan languages  Search this
Osage language  Search this
Alsea language  Search this
Kansa language  Search this
Mandan language  Search this
Chastacosta language  Search this
Coquille language  Search this
Tutelo language  Search this
Winnebago language  Search this
Siuslaw language  Search this
Takelma language  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Drawings
Vocabulary
Folklore
Sermons
Manuscripts
Obituaries
Correspondence
Newspaper clippings
Citation:
Manuscript 4800 James O. Dorsey papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4800
See more items in:
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3261ab492-5f9d-4be7-b1f4-c24d3f5da29b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4800
Online Media:

MS 3440 Terminations of the Algonquian Transitive and Indefinite Verbs and their Meanings

Creator:
Gerard, William R. (William Ruggles), 1841-  Search this
Addressee:
Hodge, Frederick Webb, 1864-1956  Search this
Commentator:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Extent:
49 Pages
Culture:
Algonquin (Algonkin)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Grammar notes
Letters
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Manuscript of 45 pages with letter of transmittal, and criticism of the paper by Dr. T. Michelson.
Also Phonetic shifts and dialects. Two-page letter to Mr. Hodge.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3440
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Algonquin  Search this
Genre/Form:
Grammar notes
Letters
Citation:
Manuscript 3440, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3440
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3e38603b8-fdb3-44d1-b436-8e54ef059d47
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3440

MS 3545 Algonkin roots with their derivatives

Creator:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Extent:
83 Items (cards , 4 x 6-1/2 in.)
Culture:
Algonquin (Algonkin)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Grammar notes
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3545
Genre/Form:
Grammar notes
Citation:
Manuscript 3545, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3545
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw319a5750e-435c-4f12-9c26-e315034a3f9e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3545

MS 3736 Algonquian grammar notes

Creator:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Extent:
37 Pages (8 x 10 in.)
Culture:
Algonquin (Algonkin)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Grammar notes
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3736
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Algonquin  Search this
Genre/Form:
Grammar notes
Citation:
Manuscript 3736, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3736
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw37462e939-507b-44d3-923a-4516186b8393
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3736

MS 2648 Verbal pronominal tables of various Algonquian tribes

Creator:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Extent:
18 Pages
Culture:
Algonquin (Algonkin)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Grammar notes
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2648
Topic:
Algonquin  Search this
Genre/Form:
Grammar notes
Citation:
Manuscript 2648, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2648
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b5a2de5d-7ace-479c-b6e2-ce9aceeb7611
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2648

MS 1569 Remarks for a general study of the Algonkin languages

Creator:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Extent:
1 Notebook (7 x 8 in.)
49 Pages
Culture:
Algonquin (Algonkin)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Notebooks
Pages
Grammar notes
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Includes grammatical notes, foreign words in Algonkin languages, morphology, phonetics, etc.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1569
General:
Previously titled "General memoranda on Algonquian languages."
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Algonquin  Search this
Genre/Form:
Grammar notes
Citation:
Manuscript 1569, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1569
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw385649ff5-8937-46f5-8797-5a5748e4c4a4
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1569

MS 7440 Copy of Horatio Hale's "Manuscript volume of memoranda and notes"

Creator:
Hale, Horatio, 1817-1896  Search this
Names:
Alexander Turnbull Library  Search this
Extent:
166 Pages
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1830s-40s
Scope and Contents:
Included are notes from the Sandwich Island Gazette and other periodicals, original notes and vocabularies, diary entries, and copies of materials collected by others. There is a description of the New Hebrides, Gambier, disturbances on the Duke of Clarence's Island of the Tokelaus, notice of the death of John Alexis Augustus Bachelot, and wordlist of the Kingsmill language, material on the Ellice Islands and Nukufetau, a Samoan vocabulary and notes on religion and on ceremonial language from Mr. Mills (missionry at Apia), grammar notes and a vocabulary from Fakaafo, language material on Drummond's Island, and some generalized notes on geography and culture as well as miscellaneous specific materials.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 7440
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
New Hebrides  Search this
Gambier Islands (French Polynesia)  Search this
Tokelau Islands -- Duke of Clarence Island  Search this
Kingmills Islands -- language  Search this
Ellice Islands -- language  Search this
Nukufetau -- language  Search this
Samoa -- language -- ceremonial language -- Religion  Search this
Fakaafo -- lanaguage  Search this
Drummond's Island -- language  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 7440, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS7440
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3470a2e34-656c-4193-841c-e845c96fc5c2
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms7440

MS 403 Mohave and Waicuri linguistic notes

Creator:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Extent:
19 Pages
Culture:
Guaycura (Waicuri)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Contains vocabulary items and grammar notes on Mohave. The Mohave material may be derived from the text of Manuscript 2071.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 403
Local Note:
Waicuri (3 pages) copied from J.C.E. Buschmann, Die Spuren Der Aztekischen Sprache (Berlin, 1859).
manuscript document
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Mohave Indians  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 403, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS403
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3cac66789-0ca4-453c-b9d5-980f237a2f31
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms403
Online Media:

MS 2047 Shoshoni grammar

Creator:
Boas, Franz, 1858-1942  Search this
St. Clair, Harry Hull  Search this
Extent:
187 Items (ca. 187 pages)
150 Items (ca. 150 slips)
Culture:
Shoshone  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Contains a reworking of St Clair's grammar, with additions and miscellaneous notes by Boas. Slips contain vocabulary and grammar notes and tables.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2047
Local Note:
Based on Harry Hull St Clair's "A Sketch of the Shoshoni Language," Manuscript 1804.
manuscript document
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2047, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2047
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3044f6d8d-3824-4330-b939-05b66283c358
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2047

MS 2685-a Miscellaneous collection of Julius Platzman material related to South American languages

Collector:
Platzmann, Julius  Search this
Extent:
1 Boxe
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Material contains vocabularies, Yuma grammar notes, nomenclature, etc.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2685-a
Local Note:
See also Number 2623, 2633-2638 incl.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
South America  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2685-a, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2685A
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw33f8d3af9-496f-4fc0-86d8-295e06231c5d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2685a

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