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John McDonald Moore papers

Creator:
Moore, John McDonald, 1919-1999  Search this
Names:
New School for Social Research (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Werblud, Elaine R. (Bobbie)  Search this
Extent:
21.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
1948-2015
bulk 1968-1999
Summary:
The papers of art historian and educator John McDonald Moore measure 21.5 linear feet and date from 1948-2015, with the bulk dating from 1968-1999. Included are biographical material regarding Moore; his writings, including book proposals and lectures; correspondence regarding teaching and letters from students; voluminous notecards for lectures; and sound recordings of lectures.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of art historian and educator John McDonald Moore measure 21.5 linear feet and date from 1948-2015, with the bulk dating from 1968-1999. Included are biographical material regarding Moore; his writings, including book proposals and lectures; correspondence regarding teaching and letters from students; voluminous notecards for lectures; and sound recordings of lectures.

This collection documents Moore's career as an art historian and educator at the New School for Social research and his contribution to understanding the New York Art Scene from the late 1960s through the 1990s. It also provides insight on Elaine R. (Bobbie) Werblud's long career as Moore's teaching assistant. Materials include Moore's academic transcripts and diplomas; resumes; a 1989 teaching award; certificates; correspondence related to his education and courses he taught at NYU's Liberal Arts Extension and the New School for Social Research; draft manuscripts; academic papers; book proposals; handwritten and typed lectures; lecture notebooks including lecture and research notes; lecture notebooks maintained by Werblud; lecture notecards documenting research for Moore's course lectures and hand written lectures; course descriptions; flyers; clippings; photographs; exams; enrollment lists; a sound recording of Moore's Memorial service; and sound recordings of a sample of Moore's lectures from circa 1969-1998.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 4 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1948-2015 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1959-1999 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1960s-1986 (0.8 linear feet, Box 1-2)

Series 4: Teaching Material, circa 1967-2000 (20.3 linear feet, Box 2-25)
Biographical / Historical:
John McDonald Moore (1919-1999) was a lecturer in art history at the New School for Social Research in New York City from 1968 until his death in 1999. Moore was born in the state of Georgia, where he attended the High Museum School of Art. He served as an illustrator for the U.S. Army Air Force during World War II. After the war he worked as an advertising illustrator in New York. In 1961, Moore realized his true vocation was teaching. He began teaching part time at New York University, and in 1968 became a lecturer in art history at the New School, where he continued to teach until his death. There he met his wife, Elaine R. (Bobbie) Werblud, who became Moore's teaching assistant in 1970. Werblud was instrumental in supporting Moore's work through her extensive logging of course lectures in notebooks, transcribing lectures on notecards, recording weekly lectures, and organizing trips to exhibitions and artist studios, as well as studies abroad. From 1968-1971 Moore earned a B.A. and M.A. in art history at Goddard College. Moore was an inspirational lecturer acclaimed by many New York artists who were his students, including Mary Frank and Ursula von Rydingsvard. The John McDonald Moore Memorial Lecture series at the Vera List Center for Art and Politics was established in his honor.
Separated Materials:
193 audio cassettes documenting 10 lecture courses taught by John McDonald Moore from 1971 through 1998 were transferred to the New School Libraries and Archives in 2019.
Provenance:
Donated in 2018 by Debra Werblud, Moore's step-daughter.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
John McDonald Moore papers, 1948-2015. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.moorjohn
See more items in:
John McDonald Moore papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-moorjohn

Oral history interview with Paulus Berensohn

Interviewee:
Berensohn, Paulus  Search this
Interviewer:
Shapiro, Mark, 1955-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Bennington College -- Students  Search this
Columbia University -- Students  Search this
Goddard College -- Students  Search this
Juilliard School -- Students  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
New York Philharmonic  Search this
Pendle Hill (School : Wallingford, Pa.) -- Faculty  Search this
Penland School of Crafts -- Faculty  Search this
Swarthmore College -- Faculty  Search this
Yale University -- Students  Search this
Anderson, Ian, 1947-  Search this
Bennion, Joseph W., 1952-  Search this
Brown, Carolyn  Search this
Brown, William J. (William Joseph), 1923-1992  Search this
Callahan, Harry M.  Search this
Charlip, Remy  Search this
Cowles, Fleur  Search this
Cunningham, Merce  Search this
Dunn, Robert G.  Search this
Ekman, June  Search this
Garfinkel, Ron  Search this
Graham, Martha  Search this
Karnes, Karen, 1925-2016  Search this
Kokis, George  Search this
Mendes, Jerry  Search this
Oliver, Mary, 1935-  Search this
Peterson, Mary  Search this
Pieser, Jane  Search this
Raine, Yvonne  Search this
Richards, Mary Caroline  Search this
Stanford, Verne  Search this
Stannard, Ann  Search this
Supree, Burton  Search this
Takaezu, Toshiko  Search this
Williams, Gerald, 1926-2014  Search this
Extent:
60 Pages (Transcript)
7 Items (Sound recording: 7 sound files (4 hr., 13 min.), digital, wav)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
Australia -- Description and Travel
Date:
2009 March 20-21
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Paulus Berensohn conducted 2009 March 20-21, by Mark Shapiro, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Berensohn's home and studio, in Penland, North Carolina.
Berensohn speaks of growing up in New York City and his family; his brother Lorin Bernsohn, cellist with the New York Philharmonic; his problems with dyslexia as a child and yet his interest in reading and learning; an early interest in dance and the lack of support he received from his family; his admittance into Yale University, from where he quickly removed himself to attend Goddard College in Vermont; after Goddard attending Columbia University, Juilliard, and Bennington College while studying dance; studying under both Martha Graham and Merce Cunningham; his relationship with M.C. Richards; his first teaching job at Pendle Hill in Pennsylvania that lead to teaching at Swarthmore College for four years; his want to become a production potter while living on a farm in rural Pennsylvania where he created an artist commune; working with pinched pots and moving to Penland, North Carolina to teach workshops at the Penland School of Crafts; his book, "Finding Your Way With Clay," which started as a journaling and teaching project while at Penland; his interest in book art via his interest in journaling; the importance of clay as a healing material that connects humanity and the earth and his role as an advocate for clay; his work in and travels to Australia; recent photography projects and his busy and active schedule. Berensohn also recalls Remy Charlip, June Ekman, Fleur Cowles, John Cage, Robert Dunn, Yvonne Rainer, Carolyn Brown, Mary Oliver, Karen Karnes, Burt Supree, Toshiko Takaezu, Ann Stannard, Gerry Williams, George Kokis, Joe Bennion, Bill Brown, Jane Pieser, Ron Garfinkel, Jenny Mendes, Ian Anderson, Verne Stanford, Meg Peterson, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Paulus Berensohn (1933-2017) was a poet, ceramic artist, dancer, and educator in Penland, North Carolina. Mark Shapiro (1955- ) is executive director of Lumina Art Gallery, in New York.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 SD memory cards. Reformatted in 2010 as 7 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hr., 13 min.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds the papers of Paulus Berensohn.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
Artists' books  Search this
Ceramicists -- North Carolina -- Interviews  Search this
Clay  Search this
Communal living  Search this
Dance -- Study and teaching  Search this
Diaries -- Authorship  Search this
Dyslexia  Search this
Photography  Search this
Poets -- North Carolina -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.berens09
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-berens09

John McDonald Moore papers, 1948-2015, bulk 1968-1999

Creator:
Moore, John McDonald, 1919-1999  Search this
Subject:
Werblud, Elaine R. (Bobbie)  Search this
New School for Social Research  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)17553
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)393540
AAA_collcode_moorjohn
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_393540

Woman's Building records

Creator:
Woman's Building (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Names:
Feminist Studio Workshop  Search this
Women's Graphic Center (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Chicago, Judy, 1939-  Search this
Raven, Arlene  Search this
de Bretteville, Sheila Levant  Search this
Extent:
33.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides
Artists' books
Date:
1970-1992
Summary:
The records of the Woman's Building feminist arts organization in Los Angeles measure 33.5 linear feet and date from 1970-1992. Originally founded by artist Judy Chicago, graphic designer Sheila Levant de Bretteville, and art historian Arlene Raven in 1973, the Woman's Building served as an education center and public gallery space for women artists in southern California. The records document both the educational and exhibition activities and consist of administrative records, financial and legal records, publications, curriculum files, exhibition files, grant funding records and artist's works of arts and prints. A significant portion of the collection documents the Women's Graphic Center, a typesetting, design, and printing service operated by The Woman's Building.
Scope and Content Note:
The records of the Woman's Building measure 33.5 linear feet and date from 1970 to 1992. The organization played a key role as an alternative space for women artists energized by the feminist movement in the 1970s. The records document the ways in which feminist theory shaped the Building's founding core mission and goals. During its eighteen year history, the Building served as an education center and a public gallery space for women artists in Los Angeles and southern California; the records reflect both functions of the Building's activities.

The Administrative Files series documents the daily operations of the Building, with particular emphasis on management policies, budget planning, history, cooperative relationships with outside art organizations and galleries, special building-wide programs, and relocation planning. Included in this series are the complete minutes from most Building committees from 1974 through closing, including the Board of Directors and the Advisory Council. The General Publicity and Outreach series is particularly complete, containing publicity notices from most events, exhibits, and programs held at the Woman's Building, including brochures, announcements, programs, invitations, press releases, newspaper clippings, and magazine articles.

The Woman's Building's educational programs centered on courses offered by the Feminist Studio Workshop and the Extension Program. While the Workshop provided a two-year program for women interested in fully developing their artistic talent, the Extension Program offered a broad range of classes, specifically oriented to working women interested in art and art vocations. The records fully document both programs, focusing on the course development and descriptions, teacher contracts, class evaluations, budget planning, and scholarship programs. Although the Archives does not have the entire slide library, there are files concerning the establishment and administration of the library, as well as a few folders of slides.

The Gallery Programs series houses the records of the visual, performing, literary and video arts events held at the Woman's Building. Administrative files detail the daily operation of the gallery spaces. The files in the remaining subseries are primarily arranged by event and contain proposals, announcements, publicity, and artist biographies.

The Women's Graphic Center became a profit-making arm of the Woman's Building in 1981 but the typesetting and design equipment had been used by staff and students since 1975. The records in this series focus on the work produced at the Center, including general projects and artist designs and art prints. Many of the design and printing examples were produced for Woman's Building events and programs.

The Artist's Works of Art series includes artist books, resumes, correspondence, postcards, and samples of art in the form of sketches, drawings, and prints. There is also material related to Woman's Building projects. Especially noteworthy is the "What is Feminist Art?" project where artists gave their responses in various formats and mediums from text to pieces of artwork.

The Printed Materials series contains feminist and art publications not produced by or for the Woman's Building.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 7 series.

Series 1: Administrative Files, circa 1970-1991 (Box 1-9, 32; 9 linear feet)

Series 2: Educational Programs, 1971-1991 (Box 10-14; 4.9 linear feet)

Series 3: Gallery Programs, 1973-1991 (Box 14-20, OV 54; 5.7 linear feet)

Series 4: Women's Graphic Center, circa 1976-1989 (Box 20-23, 32, OV 33-50; 5.6 linear feet)

Series 5: Artists' Works of Art, circa 1972-1990 (Box 24-25, OV 51-53; 1.7 linear feet)

Series 6: Grants, 1974-1992 (Box 25-30; 5.3 linear feet)

Series 7: Printed Material (Not Woman's Building), 1970-1983 (Box 30-31; 1.3 linear feet)
Historical Note:
In 1973, artist Judy Chicago, graphic designer Sheila Levant de Bretteville, and art historian Arlene Raven founded the Feminist Studio Workshop (FSW), one of the first independent schools for women artists. The founders established the workshop as a non-profit alternative education center committed to developing art based on women's experiences. The FSW focused not only on the development of art skills, but also on the development of women's experiences and the incorporation of those experiences into their artwork. Central to this vision was the idea that art should not be separated from other activities related to the developing women's movement. In November of 1973 the founders rented workshop space in a vacated building in downtown Los Angeles and called it The Woman's Building, taking the name from the structure created for the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The FSW shared space with other organizations and enterprises including several performance groups, Womanspace Gallery, Sisterhood Bookstore, the National Organization of Women, and the Women's Liberation Union.

When the building they were renting was sold in 1975, the FSW and a few other tenants moved to a three-story brick structure, originally designed to be the administrative offices of the Standard Oil Company in the 1920s. In the 1940s, it had been converted into a warehouse and consisted of three floors of open space, conducive to publically available extension classes and exhibitions offered by the Woman's Building staff and students. By 1977, the majority of the outside tenants had left the Woman's Building, primarily because they were unable to sustain business in the new location. The new building was more expensive to maintain and the FSW staff decided to hire an administrator and to create a board structure to assume the financial, legal, and administrative responsibility for the Building. The funds to operate came from FSW tuition, memberships, fund-raising events, and grant monies.

In 1981, the Feminist Studio Workshop closed, as the demand for alternative education diminished. The education programs of the Building were restructured to better accommodate the needs of working women. The Woman's Building also began to generate its own artistic programming with outside artists, including visual arts exhibits, performance art, readings, and video productions. That same year, the Woman's Building founded the Women's Graphic Center Typesetting and Design, a profit-making enterprises designed to strengthen its financial base. Income generated from the phototypesetting, design, production, and printing services was used to support the educational and art making activities of the Building.

When the graphics business closed in 1988, the Woman's Building suffered a financial crisis from which it never fully recovered. The Building closed its gallery and performance space in 1991.
Related Material:
Among the other resources relating to the Woman's Building in the Archives of American Art is an oral history with Suzanne Lacy on March 16, 1990, March 24, 1990, and September 24, 1990. While not credited as a founding member, Lacy was among the first group of staff of the Woman's Building which she discusses in her interview.

The Getty Research Institute also holds a large collection on the Woman's Building which includes a wide range of material relating to its exhibitions, activities, and projects.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art donated 5 boxes of video tape from the collection to the Long Beach Museum of Art, Video Annex in 1994. According to documentation, this was the desire of Sandra Golvin and the Board of Directors of the Woman's Building.
Provenance:
The Woman's Building records were donated to the Archives of American Art in 1991 by Sandra Golvin, President of the Board of Directors. An small addition of a set of "Cross Pollination" posters was donated in 2019 by by ONE Archives at University of Southern California Libraries via Loni Shibuyama, Archives Librarian.
Topic:
Works of art  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Women artists -- California  Search this
Feminism and art  Search this
Arts organizations -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Function:
Nonprofit organizations -- California -- Los Angeles
Genre/Form:
Slides
Artists' books
Citation:
Woman's Building records, 1970-1992. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.womabuil
See more items in:
Woman's Building records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-womabuil
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Biographical Material

Collection Creator:
Moore, John McDonald, 1919-1999  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet (Box 1)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1948-2015
Scope and Contents:
Biographical material documents John McDonald Moore's education at Goddard College in Plainfield, Vermont and the Art Students League of New York; the John Moore Fund which supported his teaching endeavors; and the John McDonald Moore Memorial fund that was set up around the time of his death in 1999 that supports the Memorial Lecture Series at the New School. Materials include correspondence related to Moore's attendance at Goddard College, the John Moore Fund, a letter of recommendation for his wife, Elaine R. (Bobbie) Werblud, and the John McDonald Moore Memorial fund and Lectures; resumes; transcripts; a teaching award Moore received in 1989; certificates including Moore's 1948 honorable discharge from the United States Army and his New York State teaching certificate; two diplomas including Moore's Bachelor of Arts (1967) and Master of Arts (1972) degrees from Goddard College; and a sound recording of Moore's memorial service in 1999.
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
John McDonald Moore papers, 1948-2015. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.moorjohn, Series 1
See more items in:
John McDonald Moore papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-moorjohn-ref1

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