Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
102 documents - page 1 of 6

Jambo Porini

Collection Creator:
Explorers Club  Search this
Extent:
Film reels (60 minutes, color sound; 2100 feet)
Type:
Archival materials
Film reels
Date:
circa 1955
Scope and Contents:
Edited film by Frederick C. Crawford documents the Cleveland Zoo East Africa Expedition to the British Colony of Kenya (Kenya) and Tanganyika (Tanzania) to secure animals for the zoo. Footage includes: Masai village and flamingos on Lake Munyora; secretary birds, wild dogs, antelopes, maribou storks, zebra, gnu, and baboons on the Serengetti Plain; Masai chief with herd of cattle and musical instruments at Ekoma; street scenes and shoe making near Lake Victoria; and black rhino, crocodile, cranes, ostriches, eland, hyenas, and other east African wildlife.
Local Number:
HSFA 1991.21.6
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Explorers Club film collection, Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Explorers Club films
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc9ad86dfff-2f3e-4121-a5f5-92fc75b695da
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-hsfa-1991-21-ref4

Sharpstone Film Footage of Africa

Collection Creator:
Sharpstone, David Collier  Search this
Smith, Lance Bales  Search this
Extent:
1 Film reel (silent color reversal; 350 feet, 16mm)
Container:
Item 2000.6.1-2
Type:
Archival materials
Moving Images
Film reels
Date:
circa 1946-1955
Scope and Contents:
This film footage was shot in Uganda near or on one of the 10 game preserves which has more wooded areas than savannah. It includes African wildlife (birds, antelope or gazelles or gnus, zebras, wildebeest, giraffe, elephants, and wild boars).
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
The David Collier Sharpstone films, Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
David Collier Sharpstone films
David Collier Sharpstone films / Sharpstone Film Footage of Africa
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc959c4dfbb-649f-424a-a01f-70ac5eb6bac0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-hsfa-2000-06-ref4

Eastern white-bearded wildebeests, Lake Manyara National Park, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Several races of wildebeest (also called gnu) exist. The species that forms the large herds of the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem of Tanzania and Kenya is known as the western white-bearded wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi). The brindled or blue race occurs south of the Zambezi River; the eastern white-bearded race inhabits Kenya and Tanzania east of Gregory Rift. The head of the wildebeest is large and box-like and both males and females have curving horns. The front end of the body is heavily built, the hindquarters slender and the legs spindly. The coat is gray and has a black mane and a beard which may be black or white. Wildebeest occupy the plains and acacia savannas of eastern Africa. When there is enough food for wildebeests to remain relatively sedentary, herds form in the typical fashion of social ungulates: bachelor herds and territorial males with a group of females and offspring. The wildebeest's blunt muzzle and wide row of incisors are adapted for large bites of short grasses. Wildebeests are water dependant and grazing, trampling and manuring the grasses on which they feed stimulates new growth as long as the ground has sufficient moisture. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 MAM 23.0 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
15
Frame value is 35.
Slide No. V 4 MAM 23.0 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Mammals  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24424
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo70cbcecba-4d4b-44f0-905b-188e1e7f674e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16601

Eastern white-bearded wildebeests, Lake Manyara National Park, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Several races of wildebeest (also called gnu) exist. The species that forms the large herds of the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem of Tanzania and Kenya is known as the western white-bearded wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi). The brindled or blue race occurs south of the Zambezi River; the eastern white-bearded race inhabits Kenya and Tanzania east of Gregory Rift. The head of the wildebeest is large and box-like and both males and females have curving horns. The front end of the body is heavily built, the hindquarters slender and the legs spindly. The coat is gray and has a black mane and a beard which may be black or white. Wildebeest occupy the plains and acacia savannas of eastern Africa. When there is enough food for wildebeests to remain relatively sedentary, herds form in the typical fashion of social ungulates: bachelor herds and territorial males with a group of females and offspring. The wildebeest's blunt muzzle and wide row of incisors are adapted for large bites of short grasses. Wildebeests are water dependant and grazing, trampling and manuring the grasses on which they feed stimulates new growth as long as the ground has sufficient moisture. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 MAM 23.3 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
16
Frame value is 1.
Slide No. V 4 MAM 23.3 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Mammals  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24427
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo725dfa8a3-7f3e-4f66-b673-6a571f76d424
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16604

Eastern white-bearded wildebeests, Lake Manyara National Park, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Several races of wildebeest (also called gnu) exist. The species that forms the large herds of the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem of Tanzania and Kenya is known as the western white-bearded wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi). The brindled or blue race occurs south of the Zambezi River; the eastern white-bearded race inhabits Kenya and Tanzania east of Gregory Rift. The head of the wildebeest is large and box-like and both males and females have curving horns. The front end of the body is heavily built, the hindquarters slender and the legs spindly. The coat is gray and has a black mane and a beard which may be black or white. Wildebeest occupy the plains and acacia savannas of eastern Africa. When there is enough food for wildebeests to remain relatively sedentary, herds form in the typical fashion of social ungulates: bachelor herds and territorial males with a group of females and offspring. The wildebeest's blunt muzzle and wide row of incisors are adapted for large bites of short grasses. Wildebeests are water dependant and grazing, trampling and manuring the grasses on which they feed stimulates new growth as long as the ground has sufficient moisture. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 MAM 23.5 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
16
Frame value is 3.
Slide No. V 4 MAM 23.5 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Mammals  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24429
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo768efdd12-3d27-490b-a621-ef43154eb753
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16606

Western white-bearded wildebeests, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Several races of wildebeest (also called gnu) exist. The species that forms the large herds of the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem of Tanzania and Kenya is known as the western white-bearded wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi). The brindled or blue race occurs south of the Zambezi River; the eastern white-bearded race inhabits Kenya and Tanzania east of Gregory Rift. The head of the wildebeest is large and box-like and both males and females have curving horns. The front end of the body is heavily built, the hindquarters slender and the legs spindly. The coat is gray and has a black mane and a beard which may be black or white. Wildebeest occupy the plains and acacia savannas of eastern Africa. When there is enough food for wildebeests to remain relatively sedentary, herds form in the typical fashion of social ungulates: bachelor herds and territorial males with a group of females and offspring. The wildebeest's blunt muzzle and wide row of incisors are adapted for large bites of short grasses. Wildebeests are water dependant and grazing, trampling and manuring the grasses on which they feed stimulates new growth as long as the ground has sufficient moisture. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 MAM 23.7 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
62
Frame value is 6.
Slide No. V 4 MAM 23.7 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Mammals  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24431
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo72831608d-8ea9-4856-84a4-b3247a23eb4b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16608

Western white-bearded wildebeests, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Several races of wildebeest (also called gnu) exist. The species that forms the large herds of the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem of Tanzania and Kenya is known as the western white-bearded wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi). The brindled or blue race occurs south of the Zambezi River; the eastern white-bearded race inhabits Kenya and Tanzania east of Gregory Rift. The head of the wildebeest is large and box-like and both males and females have curving horns. The front end of the body is heavily built, the hindquarters slender and the legs spindly. The coat is gray and has a black mane and a beard which may be black or white. Wildebeest occupy the plains and acacia savannas of eastern Africa. When there is enough food for wildebeests to remain relatively sedentary, herds form in the typical fashion of social ungulates: bachelor herds and territorial males with a group of females and offspring. The wildebeest's blunt muzzle and wide row of incisors are adapted for large bites of short grasses. Wildebeests are water dependant and grazing, trampling and manuring the grasses on which they feed stimulates new growth as long as the ground has sufficient moisture. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 MAM 23.9 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
62
Frame value is 8.
Slide No. V 4 MAM 23.9 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Mammals  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24433
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo71adf1e12-342e-42c8-966d-d787f2b17b7d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16611

Western white-bearded wildebeests, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Several races of wildebeest (also called gnu) exist. The species that forms the large herds of the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem of Tanzania and Kenya is known as the western white-bearded wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi). The brindled or blue race occurs south of the Zambezi River; the eastern white-bearded race inhabits Kenya and Tanzania east of Gregory Rift. The head of the wildebeest is large and box-like and both males and females have curving horns. The front end of the body is heavily built, the hindquarters slender and the legs spindly. The coat is gray and has a black mane and a beard which may be black or white. Wildebeest occupy the plains and acacia savannas of eastern Africa. When there is enough food for wildebeests to remain relatively sedentary, herds form in the typical fashion of social ungulates: bachelor herds and territorial males with a group of females and offspring. The wildebeest's blunt muzzle and wide row of incisors are adapted for large bites of short grasses. Wildebeests are water dependant and grazing, trampling and manuring the grasses on which they feed stimulates new growth as long as the ground has sufficient moisture. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 MAM 24.1 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
62
Frame value is 24.
Slide No. V 4 MAM 24.1 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Mammals  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24436
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7da06a2a3-ed04-4228-9b8c-934c585da015
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16614

Western white-bearded wildebeests, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Several races of wildebeest (also called gnu) exist. The species that forms the large herds of the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem of Tanzania and Kenya is known as the western white-bearded wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi). The brindled or blue race occurs south of the Zambezi River; the eastern white-bearded race inhabits Kenya and Tanzania east of Gregory Rift. The head of the wildebeest is large and box-like and both males and females have curving horns. The front end of the body is heavily built, the hindquarters slender and the legs spindly. The coat is gray and has a black mane and a beard which may be black or white. Wildebeest occupy the plains and acacia savannas of eastern Africa. When there is enough food for wildebeests to remain relatively sedentary, herds form in the typical fashion of social ungulates: bachelor herds and territorial males with a group of females and offspring. The wildebeest's blunt muzzle and wide row of incisors are adapted for large bites of short grasses. Wildebeests are water dependant and grazing, trampling and manuring the grasses on which they feed stimulates new growth as long as the ground has sufficient moisture. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 MAM 24.2 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
62
Frame value is 27.
Slide No. V 4 MAM 24.2 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Mammals  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24437
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo74064212e-d7d9-4ade-835d-36e81856c1e1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16615

Western white-bearded wildebeests, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Several races of wildebeest (also called gnu) exist. The species that forms the large herds of the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem of Tanzania and Kenya is known as the western white-bearded wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi). The brindled or blue race occurs south of the Zambezi River; the eastern white-bearded race inhabits Kenya and Tanzania east of Gregory Rift. The head of the wildebeest is large and box-like and both males and females have curving horns. The front end of the body is heavily built, the hindquarters slender and the legs spindly. The coat is gray and has a black mane and a beard which may be black or white. Wildebeest occupy the plains and acacia savannas of eastern Africa. When there is enough food for wildebeests to remain relatively sedentary, herds form in the typical fashion of social ungulates: bachelor herds and territorial males with a group of females and offspring. The wildebeest's blunt muzzle and wide row of incisors are adapted for large bites of short grasses. Wildebeests are water dependant and grazing, trampling and manuring the grasses on which they feed stimulates new growth as long as the ground has sufficient moisture. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 MAM 24.6 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
63
Frame value is 14.
Slide No. V 4 MAM 24.6 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Mammals  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24441
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7f036b024-e18e-4fd0-8dee-26880d5f6867
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16619

Eastern white-bearded wildebeest, Lake Manyara National Park, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Several races of wildebeest (also called gnu) exist. The species that forms the large herds of the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem of Tanzania and Kenya is known as the western white-bearded wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi). The brindled or blue race occurs south of the Zambezi River; the eastern white-bearded race inhabits Kenya and Tanzania east of Gregory Rift. The head of the wildebeest is large and box-like and both males and females have curving horns. The front end of the body is heavily built, the hindquarters slender and the legs spindly. The coat is gray and has a black mane and a beard which may be black or white. Wildebeest occupy the plains and acacia savannas of eastern Africa. When there is enough food for wildebeests to remain relatively sedentary, herds form in the typical fashion of social ungulates: bachelor herds and territorial males with a group of females and offspring. The wildebeest's blunt muzzle and wide row of incisors are adapted for large bites of short grasses. Wildebeests are water dependant and grazing, trampling and manuring the grasses on which they feed stimulates new growth as long as the ground has sufficient moisture. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 MAM 24.7 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Frame value is 5.
Slide No. V 4 MAM 24.7 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Mammals  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24442
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7b1d79579-ec24-4fc6-9a9a-16bd26a75f33
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16621

Eastern white-bearded wildebeests, Lake Manyara National Park, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Several races of wildebeest (also called gnu) exist. The species that forms the large herds of the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem of Tanzania and Kenya is known as the western white-bearded wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi). The brindled or blue race occurs south of the Zambezi River; the eastern white-bearded race inhabits Kenya and Tanzania east of Gregory Rift. The head of the wildebeest is large and box-like and both males and females have curving horns. The front end of the body is heavily built, the hindquarters slender and the legs spindly. The coat is gray and has a black mane and a beard which may be black or white. Wildebeest occupy the plains and acacia savannas of eastern Africa. When there is enough food for wildebeests to remain relatively sedentary, herds form in the typical fashion of social ungulates: bachelor herds and territorial males with a group of females and offspring. The wildebeest's blunt muzzle and wide row of incisors are adapted for large bites of short grasses. Wildebeests are water dependant and grazing, trampling and manuring the grasses on which they feed stimulates new growth as long as the ground has sufficient moisture. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to early August 1966.
Local Numbers:
V 4 MAM 24.8 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Frame value is 14.
Slide No. V 4 MAM 24.8 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Mammals  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 24443
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7e74891f4-0f33-4943-896d-3c452d3f9242
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref16622

Patterson's eland, near Livingstone, Zambia

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Negatives (photographic) (b&w, 35 mm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Place:
Africa
Zambia
Date:
1947
Scope and Contents:
Patterson's Eland is a large rather cow-like antelope weighing as much as 900 kgs and measuring nearly two meters to the top of the hump. In color the females are reddish-fawn and the males are grey. Both sexes have lateral stripes round the barrel of the body and a conspicuous tuft of dark hair on the dewlap. Both males and females have heavily spiraled or corkscrew horns which grow straight back from the head. Eland, like cattle, are very susceptible to rinderpest, a disease of livestock, and were nearly wiped out at the turn of the century when a severe epidemic struck East Africa. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Life magazine and traveled to Africa from January 8, 1947 to end of June 1947.
Local Numbers:
Negative number 24658, C-4A, 19.
General:
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Typed index card reads, "V 5 Zam. Zambia. near Livingstone. Patterson's eland in foreground. Burchell's zebra and gnu in background. 3/1947. EE. neg.no. 24658, C-4A, 19." The card was written in 1977-79 by Archives staff using source provided by photographer.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Natural landscapes  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EENG 08343
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Zambia
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo71bd4f42d-8cf8-445e-b065-44ea45ccb8d7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref35421

Burchell's zebras, near Livingstone, Zambia

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Negatives (photographic) (b&w, 35 mm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Place:
Africa
Zambia
Date:
1947
Scope and Contents:
A relative of the horse family (Equidae) the zebra is a gregarious animal moving in herds of 20 to 100 or more. They often move with wildebeest and occasionally hartebeest or roan. This rather casual symbiosis with other species allows them to pool their defensive alertness and they usually have differing food preferences so grazing is not too competitive. Interestingly, the stripes of a zebra are unique on each animal, like fingerprints. Burchell's zebra, the subspecies found in Luangwa Valley has evenly spaced dark and light stripes as compared to those found in the south and east of Africa having broad light stripes with faint shadow stripes between the thin dark lines. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Life magazine and traveled to Africa from January 8, 1947 to end of June 1947.
Local Numbers:
Negative number 24658, C-4A, 20.
General:
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Typed index card reads, "V 5 Zam. Zambia. near Livingstone. Burchell's zebra, Sable antelope and gnu in game reserve. 3/1947. EE. neg.no. 24658, C-4A, 20." The card was written in 1977-79 by Archives staff using source provided by photographer.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Natural landscapes  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EENG 08344
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Zambia
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo74a1fcd35-7b66-4a18-9b97-733c03d45098
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref35422

Head of a brindled Gnu showing a rudimentary light chevron from The game animals of Africa.

Language:
English
Type:
Prints
Publication Place:
London
Date:
1908
Publication Date:
1908
Topic:
World Cultures  Search this
Hinduism  Search this
India  Search this
Cows  Search this
Publisher:
R. Ward
Image ID:
SIL-gameanimalsofafr00lyde_0161
Catalog ID:
347906
Rights:
No Copyright - United States
See more items in:
See Wonder
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:silgoi_103662

Ape Riding a Gnu

Artist:
Antoine-Louis Barye, French, b. Paris, 1795–1875  Search this
Medium:
Bronze
Dimensions:
9 1/8 X 10 3/4 X 4 IN. (23.1 X 27.3 X 10.0 CM.) INCL BASE H: 1 1/8 IN. (2.8 CM.); WT: 8 LB. (3.6 KG.)
Type:
Sculpture
Date:
(c. 1845)
Credit Line:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1966
Accession Number:
66.382
See more items in:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Collection
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/py2a954fb28-4c62-4fdc-adf2-e80aa709683f
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:hmsg_66.382

Hacking diversity the politics of inclusion in open technology cultures Christina Dunbar-Hester

Author:
Dunbar-Hester, Christina 1976-  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (xiv, 274 pages) illustrations
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
Date:
2020
Topic:
Hacktivism  Search this
Computers and women  Search this
Open source software--Social aspects  Search this
Multiculturalism  Search this
Ordinateurs et femmes  Search this
Logiciels libres--Aspect social  Search this
Multiculturalisme  Search this
multiculturalism  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1156449

The Gnu

Object Name:
Print
Other Terms:
Print; Wood Engraving
ID Number:
GA.11657
Catalog number:
11657
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Graphic Arts
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a6-2fb6-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_807268

White-Bearded Wildebeest , Female

Creator:
Unknown  Search this
Subject:
National Zoological Park (U.S.)  Search this
Physical description:
5x7;
Type:
Glass negatives
Date:
1910
Circa 1910s
Local number:
SIA Acc. 14-167 [NZP-0679]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
No Known Copyright
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_382466

White-Bearded Gnus, or Blue Wildebeests, at National Zoological Park

Creator:
Schroeder, Francine  Search this
Subject:
Smithsonian Institution Office of Printing and Photographic Services  Search this
National Zoological Park (U.S.)  Search this
Physical description:
Color slides; 35mm;
Type:
Color transparencies
Date:
1973
February 1973
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-009 [73-3787]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
No Known Copyright
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_395215

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By