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Andropogon virginicus L.

Collector:
Mark T. Strong  Search this
J. Parrish  Search this
Rod Simmons  Search this
Greg Zell  Search this
Microhabitat Description:
Western border of small lake near railroad right-of-way.  Search this
Place:
Roaches Run Waterfowl Sanctuary, W side of George Washington Memorial Parkway, just N of Reagan National Airport, along Potomac River, 0.7 km W of Gravelly Point, Arlington, Virginia, United States, North America
Collection Date:
11 Sep 2006
Common name:
Broomstraw
Sage Grass
Sedge Grass
beaked panic grass
broomsedge bluestem
Taxonomy:
Plantae Monocotyledonae Poales Poaceae Panicoideae
Published Name:
Andropogon virginicus L.
Barcode:
00936316
USNM Number:
3526512
See more items in:
Botany
Flowering plants and ferns
DC Flora
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3d0d23f19-ae59-4608-a874-c3d387261b05
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_2843225

MS 4821 Anthropological Society of Washington records

Creator:
Anthropological Society of Washington (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Extent:
32 Boxes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1879-1993
Summary:
The record of the Anthropological Society of Washington concern its organization, membership, and management of its business affairs. Records of its early meetings include not only minutes but also summaries--and at times almost complete papers--of its talks and discussions. Often these are manuscripts written by the speakers. There are also small quantities of documents concerning many of the national and local developments in which the society was involved. In addition, documents of the 1950s and 1960s concern the society's special publications and special programs that often involved appearances by outstanding anthropologists from outside Washington.
Scope and Content Note:
These papers reflect the activities of the Anthropological Society of Washington, D. C. (ASW) for the years 1879 through 1993. The collection includes the constitution and by-laws; minutes of meetings, including abstracts of papers read; correspondence; reports of the Curator; records of the Treasurer; records of the Secretary; data concerning ASW history abstracted from its records; publications of the ASW; publications relating to the history of the ASW and its affiliates; publications by and about early members of the ASW which have been placed in different National Anthropological Archives' (NAA) collections; Secretary's records (1950 - 1976); records of the Treasurer (1953 - 1975); records and photographs regarding the exhibit "Anthropology and the Nation's Capitol"; sound recordings (1971, 1974); records of the Secretary, (1920 - 1923; John P. Harrington); general and financial records (1977 - 1992); and, records of the President (1991 - 1993; William C. Sturtevant).

Portions of the collection were donated to the NAA at different times. Series One through Ten comprised the original donation which was made in 1968. The second deposit, Series Eleven through Sixteen, and the third deposit, Series Seventeen, were made at later dates. The entire collection is comprised of thirty-two boxes of material.

The records concern ASW organization, membership and management. Records of its early meetings include not only minutes but also summaries - and, at times, almost complete papers - of talks and discussions. Often the speakers wrote these manuscripts. There are also some documents concerning the national and local developments in which the ASW was involved. In addition, documents of the 1950s and 1960s concern special publications and special programs that often involved appearances by outstanding anthropologists from outside Washington. Persons whose correspondence and other materials are in the records include Lewis Allen, William H. Babcock, Frank Baker, Ralph L. Beals, John W. Bennett, Margaret C. Blaker, Daniel G. Brinton, Franz Boas, John G. Bourke, Robert J. Braidwood, Solon J. Buck, George F. Carter, Joseph B. Casagrande, John M. Cooper, Stewart Culin, Frank H. Cushing, Frances Densmore, George Devereux, George A. Dorsey, Cora Du Bois, George S. Duncan, Loren C. Eiseley, Clifford Evans, William N. Fenton, J. Walter Fewkes, Regina Flannery, Alice C. Fletcher, Robert H. Fletcher, Weston Flint, Daniel Folkmar, Theodore Gaus, Thomas F. Gladwin, Pliny E. Goddard, Joseph H. Greenberg, William C. Haag, Alfred I. Hallowell, Paul Haupt, J. N. B. Hewitt, Frederick Webb Hodge, Walter Hough, Ales Hrdlicka, Olive E. Hite, William Henry Jackson, Neil M. Judd, Clyde Kluckhohn, Eugene I. Knez, Margaret L. Lantis, Thomas J. Larson, Carl Lumholtz, Arthur MacDonald, Bela C. Maday, Otis T. Mason, R. H. Mathews, Washington Matthews, George C. Maynard, Ernst Mayr, Betty J. Meggars, John C. Merriam, Truman Michelson, Warren K. Moorehead, WJ McGee, Joseph D. McGuire, James Mooney, George P. Murdock, Marshall T. Newman, P. B. Pierce, Eric K. Reed, Saul H. Riesenberg, Frank H. H. Roberts, Jr., Adolph H. Schultz, Frank M. Setzler, Lauriston Sharp, Antonio Carlos Simoens da Silva, Albert C. Spaulding, Frederick Starr, Julian H. Steward, T. Dale Stewart, Willima Duncan Strong, William C. Sturtevant, John R. Swanton, Robert M. Tatum, Cyrus Thomas, William Wallace Tooker, George L. Trager, L. B. Tuckerman, Waldo R. Wedel, J. S. Weiner, Erminie Wheeler Voeglin, Leslie A. White, Arnold M. Withers, and Richard B. Woodbury.
Arrangement:
SERIES 1. CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS

SERIES 2. MINUTES (INCLUDING ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS READ)

SERIES 4. REPORTS OF THE CURATOR

SERIES 5. RECORDS OF THE TREASURER

SERIES 6. RECORDS OF THE SECRETARY

SERIES 7. DATA CONCERNING THE HISTORY OF THE ASW ABSTRACTED FROM ITS RECORDS

SERIES 8. PUBLICATIONS OF THE ASW

SERIES 9. PUBLICATIONS RELATING TO THE HISTORY OF THE ASW AND ITS AFFILIATES

SERIES 10. PUBLICATIONS BY AND ABOUT EARLY MEMBERS OF THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON

SERIES 11. SECRETARY'S RECORDS, 1950 - 1976

SERIES 12. RECORDS OF THE TREASURER, 1953 - 1975

SERIES 13. RECORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHS REGARDING THE EXHIBIT "ANTHROPOLOGY AND THE NATION'S CAPITOL"

SERIES 14. SOUND RECORDINGS, 1971 - 1974

SERIES 15. RECORDS OF THE SECRETARY, 1920 - 1923: J. P. HARRINGTON

SERIES 16. GENERAL AND FINANCIAL RECORDS, 1977 - 1992

SERIES 17. RECORDS OF THE PRESIDENT, 1991 - 1993:
Biographical/Historical note:
The Anthropological Society of Washington (ASW) was founded in a series of meetings beginning February 10, 1879. It was formally organized on February 17, 1879. On December 13, 1887, it was incorporated in the District of Columbia. According to its original charter, its purpose was to encourage "the study of the natural history of man, especially with reference to America". Membership was open to all who were interested in anthropology. There was some discussion as to a name for the society; some favored the title "The Archaeological and Ethnological Society," but the name "The Anthropological Society of Washington" was finally adopted.

It was provided that all business of the Society should be conducted by a council, afterward called a board of managers. In this way the Society's meetings, except the annual meetings when officers were elected, could be devoted entirely to anthropologic work. The vice-presidents were the officers on whom mainly depended the work of the Society. They presided over their respective sections and represented them in the council, and papers pertaining to the subject of a particular section were referred to the council by the vice-president representing that section.

Founded in 1879, only ten years later, the ASW boasted a membership of over 200 individuals. From its beginning, the ASW has been essentially a local organization serving the needs of anthropologists in the capital city. Since government-sponsored anthropology centered in Washington - in the earlier days largely at the Smithsonian Institution, and, later, extending to other agencies and, in the 20th century, to local area universities - the talks and discussions have involved leading anthropologists involved in original work at the forefront of their disciplines. It followed that ASW's early membership, in spite of its essentially local nature, was nationally and internationally known. Furthermore, in the "American Anthropologist", the ASW established the first American journal of national scope concerned exclusively with anthropology, and the publication provided an outlet for anthropologists throughout the country.

During the early decades of the twentieth century, with the American Ethnological Society (AES) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and its Section H (Anthropology), the ASW played a role in the founding of the American Anthropological Association (AAA), the organization to become the major national organization for English-speaking North American anthropologists. The influence of the Washingtonians was particularly evident in the fact that the AAA became a general membership organization rather than restricted to professionals. Arrangements were thus possible for ASW membership to bring automatic AAA affiliation, a fact allowing the ASW, with its large nonprofessional membership, to exert considerable influence over the national organization. Before AAA establishment, Section H of the American Association for the Advancement of Science moved to make the "American Anthropologist" a truly national journal in 1898. The "Anthropologist" was placed under two owners, (WJ McGee, of Washington, and Franz Boas, of New York) and a board of managers drawn from anthropologists of Washington and other major cities. With the founding of the AAA in 1902, it took over the journal as the official organ of the AAA, ASW, and AES.

Yet another instance of ASW influence came during the 1940's, when many anthropologists were in federal service. It was these anthropologists who perceived AAA weakness: its large nonprofessional membership and its failure to bring many professionals onto its roster. They readily understood these as handicaps in influencing post-World War II federal policies affecting the social sciences. ASW initially provided the manpower, forum, and funds for a drive toward a more professional association. The ASW did this despite adjustments in its relations with the AAA that, of necessity, followed.

On the local scene, ASW was a founding organization of the Joint Commission of Scientific Societies, which eventually developed into the Washington Academy of Sciences. In 1899, it absorbed the members of the Washington-based Women's Anthropological Society of America. It also played a part in founding the Social Science Federation of Washington. In addition, the ASW became involved in movements of local interest that ranged from opposition to the anti-vivisectionism of the local Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals to an interest in the George Washington Memorial Fund and the improvement of the dwellings of the poor.
Provenance:
The original collection (1879-1965; 17 boxes) was deposited in the SOA Archives (now the National Anthropological Archives {NAA}) September 19, 1968 by Clifford Evans, Smithsonian Office of Anthropology, in accordance with a letter to Evans from Conrad C. Reining, President, ASW, September 13, 1968. The records had been in the custody of Dr. Evans since 1956, when he served as chairman of a committee to review and arrange the records. In 1968, Evans recommended to the ASW that the records be placed in the NAA Archives. Other deposits since.
Restrictions:
The Anthropological Society of Washington Records are open for research.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Citation:
Anthropological Society of Washington Records, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4821
See more items in:
MS 4821 Anthropological Society of Washington records
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4821

Erbe, Gustav, Jr.

Collection Creator:
Jacques Seligmann & Co  Search this
Container:
Box 34, Folder 10
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1934-1937
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, 1904-1978, bulk 1913-1974. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Jacques Seligmann & Co. records
Jacques Seligmann & Co. records / Series 1: Correspondence / 1.3: General Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-jacqself-ref9647
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George Washington Memorial Library

Collection Creator:
Jacques Seligmann & Co  Search this
Container:
Box 40, Folder 40
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1953
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, 1904-1978, bulk 1913-1974. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Jacques Seligmann & Co. records
Jacques Seligmann & Co. records / Series 1: Correspondence / 1.3: General Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-jacqself-ref9845
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  • View George Washington Memorial Library digital asset number 4

Sphenopholis intermedia (Rydb.) Rydb.

Collector:
Mark T. Strong  Search this
J. Parrish  Search this
Rod Simmons  Search this
Greg Zell  Search this
Microhabitat Description:
tidal swamp along SW border of small lake  Search this
Place:
Roaches Run Waterfowl Sanctuary, W side of George Washington Memorial Parkway, just N of Reagan National Airport, along Potomac River, 0.7 km W of Gravelly Point, Arlington, Virginia, United States, North America
Collection Date:
11 Sep 2006
Common name:
slender wedge grass
slender wedgescale
Taxonomy:
Plantae Monocotyledonae Poales Poaceae Pooideae
Published Name:
Sphenopholis intermedia (Rydb.) Rydb.
Barcode:
00936332
USNM Number:
3504496
See more items in:
Botany
Flowering plants and ferns
DC Flora
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/30c43db28-ffdd-4a07-94d9-5bdcacebd321
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_2843241

Records

Topic:
Smithsonian scientific series
North American Wildflowers
Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Office of the Secretary  Search this
Extent:
57.93 cu. ft. (5 record storage boxes) (104 document boxes) (2 half document boxes) (1 12x17 box) (oversize materials)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Clippings
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1890-1929
Descriptive Entry:
This record unit documents the growth and management of the Smithsonian from 1890 to 1929. Of special interest is the Institution's entry into the field of the fine arts through the creation of the National Gallery of Art and the Freer Gallery of Art. The Smithsonian continued to pursue a wide variety of other interests as well. Thus, the records deal with the following topics, among others: aviation; the American School of Archaeology in China; the Carnegie Institution of Washington, D.C.; the Cinchona Botanical Station, Jamaica; many international congresses; numerous national and international expositions, especially the Panama-California Exposition, 1912-1916, and the Panama-Pacific Exposition at San Francisco, 1914-1915; the George Washington Memorial Association; the Harriman Alaska series; the Kahn Foundation for Foreign Travel of American Teachers; the Koren Expedition to Siberia; the Langley-Wright aerodrome controversy; the Montezuma solar observatory at Calama, Chile; solar observations at Mount Harqua Hala, Arizona, and Mount Wilson, California; the Naples Zoological Station; the National Academy of Sciences; the National Research Council; publication of Mary Vaux Walcott's North American Wildflowers; the Biological Survey of the Panama Canal Zone; the Alfred Duane Pell Collection; the Research Corporation; the Roosevelt African Expedition; seismological studies; the Charles D. and Mary Vaux Walcott Research Fund; the Smithsonian Scientific Series; grants from the Hodgkins Fund; the Langley Aerodynamical Laboratory; and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The records include correspondence, minutes, announcements, publications, fiscal records, photographs, manuscripts, and news clippings.
Historical Note:
These records document the administration of the Smithsonian Institution during the tenure of Charles D. Walcott, its fourth Secretary, who served from 1907 to 1927. This period gave a deceptive appearance of strength to the Institution's life. Walcott himself, perhaps the last of the nineteenth-century scientist-politicians to combine a distinguished scientific reputation and polished ease in the world of political Washington, lent the Institution considerable support from his wide experience and many friends among the powerful of the day. The Institution's staff also boasted an able corps of scientists and senior administrators. Several new programs were developed during these years--the National Gallery of Art (now the National Museum of American Art) and the Freer Gallery of Art, in particular. These two galleries gave the Smithsonian its first real grounding in fine arts and rounded out the vision of the Institution as a place hospitable to all fields of learning.

Yet with the benefit of hindsight, these accomplishments can be seen to have masked real weakness, described either as the Smithsonian's failure to adapt its perception of itself to the changing world or as a lack of money.

When the Smithsonian was created in 1846 the corpus of its endowment was somewhat more than $500,000.00. It had few rivals elsewhere in the country. However, with the growth of large-scale private philanthropy after the Civil War, the Smithsonian's means shrank steadily in comparison to the endowments of leading institutions like the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale or new entrants like Stanford and the University of Chicago. No doubt this situation developed in part because the Smithsonian had no real alumni. It received a few small gifts from well-to-do members of its own staff and one moderate gift from Thomas George Hodgkins, a naturalized English eccentric. For all else it relied on small appropriations from the federal government, for which it performed certain services such as curating the collections of the National Museum. Coupled with meager financial resources was the Regents' suspicion of new and nonscientific endeavors. It is likely, for instance, that the Regents would have refused Charles Lang Freer's gift of a gallery of oriental art in 1906, had Theodore Roosevelt not obliged them to accept it. In the same way, the gift of certain patents on electrostatic precipitators by Frederic G. Cottrell in 1911 was politely shunted onto other shoulders, leaving the Smithsonian a remote beneficiary of the income. The Smithsonian's aloofness was in sharp contrast to the willingness of other institutions to accept such gifts. How this attitude arose is not clear. Perhaps it was an unconscious extension of Joseph Henry's early determination to associate the Smithsonian's name only with "worthy" purposes. However that may be, the Smithsonian was very late in the field in trying to augment its endowment. Walcott had begun to plan a campaign to raise $10,000,000.00--documented in record unit 46--which collapsed with his untimely death in 1927. Thus the Institution was to enter the era of the Depression in very straitened circumstances.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Seismology  Search this
Paleontology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Clippings
Black-and-white photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 45, Smithsonian Institution, Office of the Secretary, Records
Identifier:
Record Unit 45
See more items in:
Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0045

Folder 4 (formerly in Box 25, Folder 13): George Washington Memorial Association, Printed Matter: Pamphlets, Brochures, Programs - Auditorium designs

Collection Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Office of the Secretary  Search this
Container:
Box 107 of 112
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 45, Smithsonian Institution, Office of the Secretary, Records
See more items in:
Records
Records / Series 3: RECORDS RELATED TO CABINET DEPARTMENTS AND OTHER GOVERNMENT OFFICES, 1902-1926. / Box 107
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0045-refidd1e14808

Folders 18-20 George Washington Memorial Association, correspondence, 1907, 1909

Collection Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Office of the Secretary  Search this
Container:
Box 24 of 112
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 45, Smithsonian Institution, Office of the Secretary, Records
See more items in:
Records
Records / Series 1: CORRESPONDENCE, 1890-1929. Arranged alphabetically and chronologically. / Box 24
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0045-refidd1e4906

Folders 1-12 George Washington Memorial Association, correspondence, 1910-1929

Collection Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Office of the Secretary  Search this
Container:
Box 25 of 112
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 45, Smithsonian Institution, Office of the Secretary, Records
See more items in:
Records
Records / Series 1: CORRESPONDENCE, 1890-1929. Arranged alphabetically and chronologically. / Box 25
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0045-refidd1e4925

Folder 13 George Washington Memorial Association, printed matter: pamphlets, brochures, programs (oversize, removed to Box 107)

Collection Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Office of the Secretary  Search this
Container:
Box 25 of 112
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 45, Smithsonian Institution, Office of the Secretary, Records
See more items in:
Records
Records / Series 1: CORRESPONDENCE, 1890-1929. Arranged alphabetically and chronologically. / Box 25
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0045-refidd1e4936

Charles D. Walcott Collection

Creator::
Walcott, Charles D. (Charles Doolittle), 1850-1927  Search this
Extent:
108.59 cu. ft. (16 record storage boxes) (84 document boxes) (1 half document box) (1 12x17 box) (2 16x20 boxes) (8 5x8 boxes) (oversized materials and framed panoramas)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scientific illustrations
Diaries
Field notes
Black-and-white negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Glass negatives
Nitrate materials
Date:
1851-1940 and undated
Introduction:
The Charles D. Walcott Collection Papers (Record Unit 7004) were given to the Smithsonian Institution by his wife, Mary Vaux Walcott, with certain more recent additions.

The Archives would like to thank Dr. Ellis L. Yochelson, United States Geological Survey, and Frederick J. Collier, Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History, for their assistance in transferring items from the Walcott family and the Department for inclusion in this collection.
Descriptive Entry:
The Charles D. Walcott Collection documents his personal, professional, and official life as well as activities of his family. Included are papers from his scientific and educational activities at the local and national levels, his career as a paleontologist, his administrative career with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and to a lesser extent with the Smithsonian, and material on one of his sons' participation in World War I. Some of the collection postdates Walcott's life, including condolences to his family, an unpublished biography, correspondence between the biographer and Mrs. Walcott, and paleontological field notes by some of his colleagues.

For records relating to Walcott's family there are diaries; photographs; and correspondence with his children, his last two wives, and other family members. There is a considerable amount of material consisting of correspondence, photographs, memorabilia, publications, and official documents from the French and German governments concerning Benjamin Stuart Walcott's involvement with the Lafayette Flying Corps in France during World War I and efforts to establish a memorial in France for the Corps. Other personal records include legal documents; personal financial records; and family correspondence concerning financial investments in power companies, the prolonged illness and death of his son Charles, the death of his wife, Helena, and his daughter's travels through Europe.

Walcott's professional life is divided between his service with the USGS and the Smithsonian. Documenting his USGS years are photographs; speeches; scrapbooks; reports and correspondence from his work on forest reserves, the investigation of scientific work conducted by the federal government, and land reclamation; and annual reports. Walcott's Smithsonian career is documented primarily by correspondence written while serving as honorary curator of paleontology and Acting Assistant Secretary in charge of the United States National Museum. One scrapbook includes extensive correspondence from scientists, government officials, and friends upon the occasion of Walcott's appointment as Secretary of the Smithsonian. For a more complete record of Walcott's association with the Smithsonian, the records of the Office of the Secretary (Record Units 45 and 46), records of the Assistant Secretary, Acting (Record Unit 56), and two special series relating to the budget (Record Unit 49) and to the Research Corporation (Record Unit 51) should be consulted.

For Walcott's career as a paleontologist, there is documentation in his field notes; publications of his as well as those of others in related areas; manuscripts; diaries; and photographs, including panoramic views of the Rockies in Alberta, British Columbia, and Montana. In addition, there are paleontological field notes by Ray T. Bassler, Charles Elmer Resser, and Edward Oscar Ulrich.

Walcott's role in promoting and developing national science policy is partially covered in the records relating to his involvement in the National Academy of Sciences, National Research Council, Washington Academy of Sciences, and the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Included are legal documents, correspondence, committee minutes, reports, proceedings, financial statements, membership lists, and related materials. Additional material on the Washington Academy of Sciences can be found in Record Unit 7099. Records documenting Walcott's involvement in the administration and development of the other organizations exist at those institutions. His affiliation with the George Washington Memorial Association is documented with correspondence, trustees' minutes, histories of the Association, and drawings and plans for a building. For other national developments there is correspondence covering Walcott's participation on the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.

Other types of materials in this collection include certificates, diplomas, awards, and occasionally correspondence concerning his election to honorary and professional societies and the receipt of honorary degrees, and scrapbooks and diaries which touch on events throughout his life.

See also the online exhibition "Beauty in Service to Science: The Panoramas of Charles D. Walcott."
Historical Note:
Charles D. Walcott (1850-1927) was born in New York Mills, New York, and attended the Utica public schools and Utica Academy, but never graduated. He demonstrated an early interest in natural history by collecting birds' eggs and minerals; and, while employed as a farm hand, he began collecting trilobites. These he later sold to Louis Agassiz at Harvard's Museum of Comparative Zoology. Walcott began his professional scientific career in November 1876 when he was appointed as an assistant to James Hall, New York's state geologist. On July 21, 1879, Walcott joined the United States Geological Survey (USGS) as an assistant geologist. Shortly after arriving in Washington, D. C., he was sent to southwestern Utah to make stratigraphic sections. His later field work with the Survey included expeditions to the Appalachians, New England, New York, eastern Canada, and several Middle Atlantic states, as well as other parts of southwestern and western United States. From 1882 to 1893 he worked with the Survey's invertebrate Paleozoic paleontological collections, and in 1893 he was appointed Geologist in charge of Geology and Paleontology. He also served as an honorary curator of invertebrate Paleozoic fossils at the United States National Museum (USNM) from 1892 to 1907, and as Acting Assistant Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution in charge of the USNM from 1897 to 1898. His fieldwork from this period resulted in several major publications, including The Paleontology of the Eureka District (1884), a study of fossils in Nevada; The Fauna of the Olenellus Zone (1888) concerning early North American Cambrian fossils; Correlation Papers on the Cambrian (1890); and Fossil Medusae (1898). In 1894 Walcott was appointed Director of the USGS. Serving until 1907, he greatly expanded the functions of the agency and was successful in increasing federal appropriations. In 1891 Congress had given the President the authority to establish public forests, but it was not until 1897 that the administration of the forest reserves was placed under the USGS. Walcott was instrumental in having legislation passed to enforce the preservation of forest reserves and to add additional land to the reserve program. His predecessor at the USGS initiated an arid land reclamation program in 1888 which Walcott continued as part of his forest reserve program. In 1902 he established the Hydrographic Branch to administer the program; but four years later the Branch, since renamed the Reclamation Service, became a separate federal agency. He also created the Division of Mineral Resources to experiment with coal combustion. In 1907 it was renamed the Bureau of Mines. At the request of President Theodore Roosevelt in 1903, Walcott served as chairman of a committee to study the scientific work being conducted by the federal government.

Walcott was appointed Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution on January 31, 1907, and resigned from the USGS in April 1907. His administration at the Smithsonian was marked by numerous accomplishments, including the completion of the National Museum Building (now the National Museum of Natural History) in 1911. He was also successful in convincing Detroit industrialist Charles Lang Freer to donate his extensive Oriental art collection and money for a building during his lifetime rather than after Freer's death, as was originally intended. Walcott also set up the National Gallery of Art (predecessor to the National Museum of American Art) as a separate administrative entity in 1920. To administer Frederick G. Cottrell's gift of patent rights to his electrical precipitator, the Research Corporation was formed in 1912, with revenue from this patent, as well as future ones, to be used to advance scientific research at the Smithsonian and other educational institutions. Walcott served on the Corporation's Board of Directors for several years. To further increase the Smithsonian's endowment, Walcott was planning a major fundraising effort; but this was not pursued following his death an February 9, 1927. In 1922, he and his wife established a fund in their names at the Smithsonian to support paleontological research.

Despite his many administrative responsibilities as Secretary, Walcott was able to find time to continue his research and collecting of fossils from the Cambrian and Ordovician periods, with primary focus on the Canadian Rockies. In 1909 he located Cambrian fossils near Burgess Pass above Field, British Columbia. The following season he discovered the Burgess shale fauna, which proved to be his greatest paleontological discovery. Most of this research was published in various volumes of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections from 1908-1931. His one major publication during this period was Cambrian Brachiopoda, published in 1912. Walcott continued to return to the Canadian Rockies for most seasons through 1925, when he made his last field expedition. As one of the foremost scientific figures in Washington, Walcott helped to establish several organizations with international renown and restructure existing national organizations. In 1902, Walcott, along with several other prominent individuals, met with Andrew Carnegie to establish the Carnegie Institution of Washington as a center for advanced research and training in the sciences. Walcott served the Institution in several administrative capacities. He was also instrumental in convincing Carnegie that the Institution should have laboratories built for scientists rather than use his gift solely for research grants.

Elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1896, Walcott played a role in having the Academy become more actively involved in national science policy by serving in many official capacities. In addition to serving on innumerable committees, he held the offices of treasurer, vice president, president, and council member. He was also appointed to two presidential committees--Timber Utilization and Outdoor Recreation--in 1924 and was reappointed to both in 1926. He was the Academy's first recipient of the Mary Clark Thompson Medal. Following his death, his wife established the Charles Doolittle Walcott Fund for achievements in Cambrian research.

In 1916 the Academy, at the request of President Woodrow Wilson, created the National Research Council within the Academy to assist the federal government in the interest of national preparedness. Walcott, as one who met with Wilson, became actively involved in the organization of the Council by sitting on many of its committees, including one which planned for the present headquarters of the Council and the Academy. Walcott contributed significantly to the development of American aviation. He pressed for the establishment of the National Advisory Committee for Aviation, which was a predecessor of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. He was instrumental in establishing air mail service, organizing the Committee on Aerial Photographic Surveying and Mapping, and writing the Air Commerce Act of 1926. Besides his scientific activities, Walcott lent his influence to other groups, such as the George Washington Memorial Association. That group attempted to create a memorial to Washington by forming an institution to promote science, literature, and the arts, just as Washington had proposed should be done.

Walcott was married three times - to Lura Ann Rust (d. 1876), to Helena Breese Stevens (d. 1911), and to Mary Morris Vaux (d. 1940). By his second wife he had four children: Charles Doolittle, Sidney Stevens, Helen Breese, and Benjamin Stuart. Charles died while a student at Yale, and Benjamin was killed in action in France while flying for the Lafayette Flying Corps. In 1914 Walcott married Mary Morris Vaux, who, while accompanying him on his field trips, studied and painted North American wildflowers. Her work was published in five volumes by the Smithsonian in 1925.

Although Walcott never received an academic degree, he was the recipient of numerous honorary degrees from colleges and universities in the United States and Europe. His colleagues recognized his contribution to paleontology by awarding him the Bigsby and Wollaston Medals from the Geological Society of London; the Gaudry Medal of the Geological Society of France; and the Hayden Medal from the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. He also served as a founder and president, 1899-1910, of the Washington Academy of Sciences; president of the Cosmos Club, 1898; president, 1915-1917, of the Washington Branch of the Archeological Institute of America; and president, 1925-1927, of the American Philosophical Society.
Chronology:
March 31, 1850 -- Born in New York Mills, New York

1858-1868 -- Attended public schools in Utica, New York, and Utica Academy

1863 -- Began collecting natural history specimens

1871 -- Moved to Trenton Falls, New York, to work on William P. Rust's farm and began collecting trilobites

January 9, 1872 -- Married Lura Am Rust

1873 -- Sold collection of fossils to Louis Agassiz at Harvard's Museum of Comparative Zoology

January 23,1876 -- Lura Ann Walcott died

November 1876 -- Appointed assistant to Janes Hall, state geologist of New York

1876 -- Joined American Association for the Advancement of Science

July 21, 1879 -- Appointed Assistant Geologist, United States Geological Survey (USGS)

1879 -- Assisted Clarence Edward Dutton in Grand Canyon region in south-central Utah and the Eureka district in Nevada

July 1, 1882 -- Placed in charge of Division of Invertebrate Paleozoic Paleontology at USGS

1882 -- Elected Fellow of American Association for the Advancement of Science

-- Field work in Nevada and Grand Canyon

1883 -- Promoted to Paleontologist, USGS

-- Field work in Grand Canyon and Cambrian studies in Adirondacks and northwestern Vermont

1884 -- Field work in Cambrian fossils in western Vermont; coal deposits in central Arizona; and Lower Paleozoic of Texas' central mineral region; Published first major paper The Paleontology of the Eureka District (USGS Monograph 8)

1885 -- Field work on Cambrians in Highland Range of central Nevada; Permian fossils of southwestern Utah; and Cambrian fossils in Wasatch Mountains near Salt Lake City

1886 -- Published "Classification of the Cambrian System in North America"

-- Cambrian field work in northern New York and western Vermont

1887 -- Cambrian field work in New York, western Massachusetts, and southwestern Vermont

1888 -- Married Helena Breese Stevens; Attended International Geological Congress in London; Placed in charge of all invertebrate paleontology at USGS; Published The Fauna of the Olenellus Zone which discusses Cambrian fossils in North America; Field work in Wales and on Canadian-Vermont border

May 17, 1889 -- Son Charles Doolittle born

1889 -- Cambrian field work in North Carolina, Tennessee, Mohawk Valley of New York, Vermont, and Quebec

1890 -- Published Correlation Papers on the Cambrian; Cambrian strata field work in New York and Vermont and Ordovician strata field work in Colorado Springs, Colorado

1891 -- Field work in New York, Colorado, and Appalachians from Virginia to Alabama

October 2, 1892 -- Son Sidney Stevens born

1892 -- Placed in charge of all paleontological work at USGS; Field work in southern Pennsylvania and western Maryland

1892-1907 -- Honorary curator of invertebrate Paleozoic fossils at United States National Museum (USNM)

January 1, 1893 -- Appointed Geologist in charge of Geology and Paleontology, USGS

1893 -- Vice President, Section E (Geology and Geography), American Association for the Advancement of Science; Examined Lower Paleozoic rocks in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee; Prepared paleontological exhibition for Chicago's Columbian Exposition

August 20, 1894 -- Daughter Helen Breese born

1894 -- Placed in charge of all paleontological collections at USNM; Appointed Director, USGS; Field work in central Colorado and White Mountain Range in California and Nevada

1895 -- Cambrian field work in Montana, Idaho, and Massachusetts

July 8, 1896 -- Son Benjamin Stuart born

1896 -- Joined National Academy of Sciences (NAS); Field work in eastern California and western Nevada and Franklin Mountains near El Paso, Texas

January 27, 1897 -- Appointed Acting Secretary in Charge of the USNM

1897 -- Conducted examination of forest reserves and national parks in Black Hills, Big Horn Mountains, and Inyo Mountains

June 30, 1898 -- Resigned as Acting Assistant Secretary in Charge of the USNM

1898 -- Field work in Lexington, Virginia; Teton Forest Reserve, Wyoming; Belt Mountains near Helena, Montana; and Idaho; President of the Cosmos Club, Washington, D.C.; Published Fossil Medusae (USGS Monograph 30)

1899 -- Field work in Newfoundland, New Brunswick, and Quebec; One of the founders of the Washington Academy of Sciences

1899-1911 -- President of the Washington Academy of Sciences

1900 -- Field work in Montana and Rhode Island

1901 -- Field work in Pennsylvania

January 4, 1902 -- One of the founders of the Carnegie Institution of Washington (CIW) and Secretary of the Board of Incorporators

1902 -- Member of the Advisory Committee on Geology and Advisory Committee on Geophysics of CIW

1902-1905 -- Secretary of Board of Trustees and of Executive Committee of CIW

1902-1922 -- Member, Executive Committee of Board of Trustees of CTW

1902-1923 -- Member of Council of NAS

1902-1927 -- Member, Board of Trustees, CIW

1903 -- Head of Board of Scientific Surveys, CIW; Field work in Uinta Mountains, Utah; House Range of western Utah; Snake River Range of eastern Nevada; Chairman of committee to study scientific work conducted by federal government

1904-1913 -- Honorary Curator, Department of Mineral Technology, USNM

1905 -- Field work in Montana's Rocky Mountains and Cambrian fossils of Utah's House Range

January 31, 1907 -- Appointed Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution

April 1907 -- Resigned as Director of the USGS

1907 -- Field work at Mount Stephen, Castle Mountains, Lake Louise, and Mount Bosworth in British Columbia

1907-1917 -- Vice President of NAS

1908 -- Field work in Montana, British Columbia, and Alberta

1909 -- Found Cambrian fossils near Burgess Pass above Field, British Columbia

1910 -- Found Burgess shale fauna

June 20, 1911 -- National Museum Building (now the National Museum of Natural History) completed

July 11, 1911 -- Wife Helena died in train accident in Bridgeport, Connecticut

1911 -- Field work in British Columbia

1912 -- Field work in Alberta and British Columbia; Published Cambrian Brachiopoda (USGS Monograph 51)

April 7, 1913 -- Son Charles Doolittle died

1913 -- Burgess shale work in Robson Park district, British Columbia, and in Jasper Park, Alberta

June 30, 1914 -- Married Mary Morris Vaux

1914 -- Field work in Glacier, British Columbia, and White Sulphur Springs and Deep Creek Canyon, Montana

1914-1927 -- Vice Chairman, Board of Trustees, CIW

1915 -- Living algae field work in Yellowstone National Park and West Gallatin River; fossil field work in Arizona 1915-1917; President, Washington Branch of the Archeological Institute of America

1915-1919 -- Chairman, Executive Committee of National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

June 30, 1916 -- Elected member of National Research Council (NRC)

October 1916 -- Freer Gallery of Art building construction begun

1916 -- Field work in British Columbia and Alberta

1916-1923 -- First Vice Chairman, NRC

December 12, 1917 -- Son Benjamin Stuart died in military action in France

1917 -- Appointed member of NRC's Executive Committee, Aeronautics Committee, and Geology and Paleontology Committee; Chairman, NRC's Military Committee; Burgess shale field work around Lake MacArthur and in Vermilion River Valley

1917-1922 -- Chairman, Executive Committee, CIW

1917-1923 -- President, NAS

June 1918 -- Helped organize National Parks Educational Committee (became National Parks Association in 1919)

1918 -- Field work in Alberta; Member, NRC's Interim Committee; Chairman, NRC's Military Division and Section on Aeronautics

1918-1919 -- Chairman, National Parks Educational Committee

1919 -- Field work in Alberta; Chairman, NRC's Committee on Scientific Men as Reserve officers in Reorganized Army; Chairman, NRC's Committee on Removal of Offices of National Research Council; Chairman, NRC's Committee on Representation of United States at International Meetings to be held at Brussels

1919-1920 -- Member, NRC's Committee on General Policy and Solicitation of Funds; Chairman, NRC's Government Division

1919-1922 -- Member, NRC's Committee on Federal Grants for Research; Chairman, NRC's Committee on Publication of "The Inquiry" Results

1919-1924 -- Member, NRC's Research Information Service

1919-1925 -- Member, NRC's Executive Board

1919-1926 -- Member, National Parks Association's Executive Committee

1919-1927 -- Chairman, National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

-- Chairman, NRC's Division of Federal Relations; Member, NRC's Executive Committee of Division of Federal Relations

1920 -- Field work in Alberta

1920-1921 -- Member, NAS's Federal Relations Committee

1920-1922 -- Chairman, Committee on Budget (jointly with NAS and NRC); Member, NRC's Committee on Building Stone and Committee on Building Plans

1921 -- Field work in Alberta

1921 -- Freer Gallery of Art building completed; Received first Mary Clark Thompson Medal from NAS

1921-1924 -- President, National Parks Association

1921-1927 -- Chairman, NRC's Executive Committee of Division of Federal Regulations

1922 -- Field work in Alberta and British Columbia; Established Charles D. and Mary Vaux Walcott Fund at Smithsonian

1922-1923 -- Member, NRC's Committee on Stabilization of Permanent Foundations; Chairman, Committee on Finance (jointly with NAS and NRC)

1922-1925 -- Member, NRC's Committee on Building; Member, NRC's Committee on Policies

1923 -- Field work in Alberta and British Columbia; President, American Association for the Advancement of Science; Freer Gallery of Art opened

1923-1924 -- Chairman, Committee on Dedication of the New Building (jointly with NAS and NRC)

1923-1925 -- Member, NRC's Interim Committee; Member, Executive Committee, Committee on Exhibits in the New Building (jointly with NAS and NRC)

1923-1927 -- Second Vice Chairman, NRC

1924 -- Field work in Alberta and British Columbia

1924-1925 -- Member, Committee on Exhibits (jointly with NAS and NRC)

1925 -- Field work in Alberta; Life Member, American Association for the Advancement of Science

1925-1927 -- President, American Philosophical Society

1926 -- Helped draft Air Commerce Act of 1926

1926-1927 -- Board of Trustees, National Parks Association

February 9, 1927 -- Died in Washington, D.C.
Topic:
Geology  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Paleontology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scientific illustrations
Diaries
Field notes
Black-and-white negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Glass negatives
Nitrate materials
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7004, Charles D. Walcott Collection
Identifier:
Record Unit 7004
See more items in:
Charles D. Walcott Collection
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7004

Folder 4 Map, drawings and plans for the George Washington Memorial Association Building, undated. (From Box 43, Folder 18; See Series 17)

Collection Creator::
Walcott, Charles D. (Charles Doolittle), 1850-1927  Search this
Container:
Box 92 of 117
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7004, Charles D. Walcott Collection
See more items in:
Charles D. Walcott Collection
Charles D. Walcott Collection / Series 22: MISCELLANEOUS OVERSIZE. / Box 92
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7004-refidd1e10761

Folder 7 George Washington Memorial Association, Charter Member, 1899.

Collection Creator::
Walcott, Charles D. (Charles Doolittle), 1850-1927  Search this
Container:
Box 92 of 117
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7004, Charles D. Walcott Collection
See more items in:
Charles D. Walcott Collection
Charles D. Walcott Collection / Series 22: MISCELLANEOUS OVERSIZE. / Box 92
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7004-refidd1e10795

Folder 8 George Washington Memorial Association, Certificate for Donation, 1919.

Collection Creator::
Walcott, Charles D. (Charles Doolittle), 1850-1927  Search this
Container:
Box 92 of 117
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7004, Charles D. Walcott Collection
See more items in:
Charles D. Walcott Collection
Charles D. Walcott Collection / Series 22: MISCELLANEOUS OVERSIZE. / Box 92
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7004-refidd1e10806

Folder 7 G, 1886-1925. Correspondents include Henry Gannett, Helen Garfield, James Rudolph Garfield, George Washington Memorial Association, Grove Karl Gilbert, Daniel Coit Gilman, Robert H. Goddard, Henry S. Graves, and Gilbert Hovey Grosvenor.

Collection Creator::
Walcott, Charles D. (Charles Doolittle), 1850-1927  Search this
Container:
Box 1 of 117
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7004, Charles D. Walcott Collection
See more items in:
Charles D. Walcott Collection
Charles D. Walcott Collection / Series 1: PERSONAL CORRESPONDENCE, 1873-1928 AND UNDATED. / Box 1
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7004-refidd1e1224

Folder 6

Collection Creator::
Walcott, Charles D. (Charles Doolittle), 1850-1927  Search this
Container:
OVERSIZE of 117
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7004, Charles D. Walcott Collection
See more items in:
Charles D. Walcott Collection
Charles D. Walcott Collection / Series 8: DEGREES AND HONORS, 1892-1927. / OVERSIZE
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7004-refidd1e3218

GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION CORRESPONDENCE AND RELATED MATERIALS, 1898-1924 AND UNDATED.

Collection Creator::
Walcott, Charles D. (Charles Doolittle), 1850-1927  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Note:
The George Washington Memorial Association (GWMA) was incorporated in 1898 by a group of women to establish in Washington, D. C., a national university as envisioned by George Washington in his farewell address in 1799. In 1899, the Washington Academy of Sciences, with a similar idea, approached the GWMA to work on this common goal. Both organizations agreed that Washington, D. C., needed an organization that would utilize scientific and other resources of the federal government for research and would provide graduate training not available in other academic institutions. The Washington Memorial Association, as chartered in 1901, was a private foundation independent of federal support to meet these two goals. Walcott, as Director of the United States Geological Survey and President of the Academy, was one of the incorporators and was elected to the Board of Trustees on May 27, 1901, and President of the Board on June 2, 1901. The Secretary of the Smithsonian was a member of the Advisory Board. Various attempts to raise funds for the building were unsuccessful, including the proposed erection of a building for the George Washington University in 1904 and a proposed new cultural center under the administration of the Smithsonian Board of Regents as authorized in a bill signed by President Wilson in 1913. For the latter, the cornerstone was laid in 1921 for the George Washington Victory Memorial Building on the present site of the National Gallery of Art but the building was never constructed. These records include minutes of several meetings between the GWMA and the Washington Academy of Sciences in 1901; histories of the GWMA program for an architectural competition as well as architectural sketches and drawings; correspondence, particularly with Susan Whitney Dimock, President of the GWMA; a copy of the 1913 bill authorizing the construction of the Victory Memorial Building; and organizational records including by-laws, charter, and preamble.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7004, Charles D. Walcott Collection
Identifier:
Record Unit 7004, Series 17
See more items in:
Charles D. Walcott Collection
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7004-refidd1e6918

Box 43

Collection Creator::
Walcott, Charles D. (Charles Doolittle), 1850-1927  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7004, Charles D. Walcott Collection
See more items in:
Charles D. Walcott Collection
Charles D. Walcott Collection / Series 17: GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION CORRESPONDENCE AND RELATED MATERIALS, 1898-1924 AND UNDATED.
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7004-refidd1e6932

Folder 1 Correspondence: B-C, undated.

Collection Creator::
Walcott, Charles D. (Charles Doolittle), 1850-1927  Search this
Container:
Box 43 of 117
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7004, Charles D. Walcott Collection
See more items in:
Charles D. Walcott Collection
Charles D. Walcott Collection / Series 17: GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION CORRESPONDENCE AND RELATED MATERIALS, 1898-1924 AND UNDATED. / Box 43
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7004-refidd1e6939

Folders 2-3 Correspondence: Mrs. Susan Whitney Dimock, 1909-1919, 1921, and undated.

Collection Creator::
Walcott, Charles D. (Charles Doolittle), 1850-1927  Search this
Container:
Box 43 of 117
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7004, Charles D. Walcott Collection
See more items in:
Charles D. Walcott Collection
Charles D. Walcott Collection / Series 17: GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION CORRESPONDENCE AND RELATED MATERIALS, 1898-1924 AND UNDATED. / Box 43
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7004-refidd1e6950

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