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Henry and Nancy Rosin Collection of Early Photography of Japan

Collector:
Rosin, Henry D., Dr.  Search this
Rosin, Nancy  Search this
Creator:
Lyman, Benjamin Smith, 1835-1920  Search this
Ueno, Hikoma, 1838-1904  Search this
Beato, Felice, b. ca. 1825  Search this
Stillfried, Raimund, Baron von, 1839-1911  Search this
Underwood & Underwood  Search this
Names:
Japanese tea ceremony  Search this
Meiji, Emperor of Japan, 1852-1912  Search this
Shōken, Empress, consort of Meiji, Emperor of Japan, 1850-1914  Search this
Extent:
616 Items (approximate count)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Mammoth plates
Photographs
Photograph albums
Stereographs
Cartes-de-visite
Photographic prints
Place:
Japan
Japan -- 1890-1900
Kyoto (Japan)
Tokyo (Japan)
Yokohama-shi (Japan)
Date:
1860 - ca. 1900
Scope and Contents:
Assembled by collectors Dr. Henry D. Rosin and Nancy Rosin to document nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century photography of Japan. Includes albumen prints, portions handcolored, some signed and numbered in the negative. Taken by photographers Felice Beato (b. ca. 1825), Baron Raimon von Stillfried (1938-1911), Kusakabe Kimbei (active 1880s), Ueno Hikoma (1838-1904), Ogawa Kazumasa (1860-1929) and unknown photographers to depict architecture, landscapes, formal studio portraits, and daily activities.
Arrangement:
Organized chronologically by the creators.
Biographical / Historical:
Henry and Nancy Rosin were collectors of Japanese photography of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Local Numbers:
FSA A1999.35
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Topic:
Ainu  Search this
Photography of women  Search this
Streets -- Japan  Search this
Temples -- Japan  Search this
Samurai  Search this
Sumo wrestlers  Search this
Religion  Search this
Genre/Form:
Mammoth plates
Photographs -- 1850-1900
Photograph albums
Stereographs -- 1860-1900
Cartes-de-visite
Photographic prints
Citation:
Henry and Nancy Rosin Collection of Early Photography of Japan. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Purchase and partial donation.
Identifier:
FSA.A1999.35
See more items in:
Henry and Nancy Rosin Collection of Early Photography of Japan
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1999-35
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Online Media:

Perú: Pachamama

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Crisscrossed with paths connecting communities across geography and history, Peru boasts a stunning vertical landscape that integrates a diversity of ecosystems and cultures. Peru is one of the world's most biodiverse nations, containing ninety microclimates across extreme variances of altitude. The coastal, rain-forested, and mountainous environments provide abundant resources, including major exports such as fish, copper, and asparagus. Many culturally and historically significant areas are popular tourist destinations that encompass complex layered histories.

The uniqueness of Peru's diversity lies in the connectedness of its landscape in the form of rivers, roads, and pathways that existed long before the Inka Empire (fifteenth–sixteenth centuries) and Spanish colonization (sixteenth–nineteenth centuries). Across its different altitudes and climates, communities exchange commodities and practices, shaping deeply rooted but constantly changing daily customs and celebrations. The influx and movement of people between and beyond borders also influence and transform these exchanges.

The 2015 Peru program featured projects, organizations, and groups whose cultural expressions highlight these social, cultural, and economic exchanges. It demonstrated how the networks of celebration and community, crops and markets, textile and craft production, foodways and technology, and music and dance forge the diverse cultural heritage of the country.

Visitors to the Peru Festival program could experience these unique connections through cooking and craft demonstrations, music and dance performances, moderated discussions, ritual and celebratory processions, and other participatory activities. In addition, there was a robust involvement with Peruvian American and diaspora communities. The public had the opportunity to learn, to eat, to dance, to shop, to witness these vibrantly connected cultures, and to create their own connections with Peruvian artists and specialists on the National Mall and beyond.

Olivia Cadaval and Cristina Díaz-Carrera were Curators for the Smithsonian; Rafael Varón Gabai was Curator and Consultant to MINCETUR. Valentina Pilonieta-Vera was Program Coordinator; Alexia Fawcett was Community Engagement Manager, and Betty Belanus was Family Activities Curator. A Curatorial Advisory Committee included: Madeleine Burns, Marjorie Hunt, Mary Linn, Luis Guillermo Lumbreras, Giancarlo Marcone, Soledad Mujica, Diana N'Diaye, Luis Repetto, Marcela Ríos, Daniel Sheehy, Jorge Ortiz Sotelo, Milagritos Saldarriaga, Francisco Tumi, and Madeleine Zúñiga. A Community Advisory Group included: Catherine Cabel Chicas, Nelly Carrión, Billy Castillo, Kristy Chavez-Fernandez, Fabiana Chiu-Rinaldi, María del Carmen Cossu, Miguel García, Elmer Huerta, Vicky Leyva, Doris Loayza, Ana Noriega, Elena Tscherny, and Ricardo Villanueva.

The program was co-presented and co-sponsored by the Republic of Peru Ministry of Foreign Trade and Tourism (MINCETUR). Additional support was provided by the staff of the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian, directed by Kevin Gover (Pawnee), coordinated by Amy Van Allen; Washington Dulles international Airport and the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture. The program received federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. Special media support is provided by Telemundo Washington DC, BrightYoungThings.com, Latin Opinion Baltimore Newspaper, Orange Barrel Media, WAMU 88.5, El Tiempo Latino, Washington Hispanic, Washington Blade, El Tiempo Hìspano (MD-DE-PA), CTM Media Group, El Zol 107.9, Digital Conventions, and Greater Washington Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Support for the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage's welcoming ceremony was provided, in part, by Avocados From Peru and Pisco Portón (in-kind).
Researchers, coordinators, and presenters:
Michelle Banks, Victor Boluarte, Nilda Callañaupa, Nadia Calmet, Violet Cavicchi, Xóchitl Chávez, Rodrigo Chocano Paredes, Fabiana Chiu-Rinaldi, Eduardo Díaz, Alfredo DiNatale, James Early, Mariá Regina Firmino-Castillo, Alexandro Hernández, Ingrid Huamaní, Rosa María La Madrid, Javier León, Doris Loayza, Raúl Mancilla Mantilla, Ana Noriega, Federico Serapio Ollero Delgado, Renzo Ortega, Víctor Piminchumo, Marco Arturo Ramírez Colombier, Ana Maria Reyes Albarracin, Deisi Rivadeneira, María Angélica Rodríguez Ibañez, Silvia Salgado, Emily Socolov, Naomi Sturm, Leonardo Tello, Jaime Urrutia, Roger Valencia, Cynthia Vidaurri, Fredi Villagarcia Aquise, Alfredo Villar, Holly Wissler, Ranald Woodaman
Participants:
URBAN MUSIC AND DANCE

Pedro Tolomeo "MONKY" Rojas Meza, 1961-, artist, painter, Lima, Peru

Elliot "Túpac" Urcuhuaranga Cárdenas, 1978-, artist, muralist, Lima, Peru

Brus Mauricio Rubio Churay, 1983-, artist, Loreto, Peru

Los Wembler's de Iquitos -- Los Wembler's de IquitosElmer Alberto Sánchez Casanova, 1952-, guitarist, Iquitos, Loreto, PeruBonar Jair Sánchez León, 1969-, guitarist, Iquitos, Loreto, PeruRonald Jair Sánchez Casanova, 1949-, vocalist, Iquitos, Loreto, PeruRoger Montalván Rodríguez, 1952-, vocalist, Iquitos, Loreto, PeruCarlos Antonio Vázquez Yaicate, 1962-, conga, bongo, guiro player, vocalist, Iquitos, Loreto, PeruGelner Misael Sánchez Casanova, 1956-, timbales player, Iquitos, Loreto, PeruCalixto Alvarado Santillán, 1953-, drummer, musician, Iquitos, Loreto, PeruDanger Runer Sánchez Alvarado, 1971-, guitarist, Iquitos, Loreto, Peru

Q'ESWACHAKA BRIDGE

Basilio Puma Janampa, 1972-, Huinchiri community president, engineer, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Victoriano Arizapana Huayhua, 1963-, Huinchiri engineer, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Eleuterio Ccallo Tapia, 1959-, Huinchiri engineer, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Alejandrina Huillca Puma, 1973-, Huinchiri rope braider, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Cayetano Ccañahuire Puma, 1952-, Huinchiri Pacco ritual master, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Benecio Vilca Vilca, 1962-, Huinchiri builder, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Beltrán Eustaquio Huillca Janampa, 1969-, Choccayhua town mayor, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Jesús Huamani Zosa, 1972-, Chaupibanda builder, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Alejandrino Ponciano Mamani Armuto, 1970-, Chaupibanda builder, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Alejandrina Ayma de Mamani, 1958-, Ccollana Quehue rope braider, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Paulo Cesar Oroche Taype, 1972-, Ccollana Quehue engineer, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Tiburcio Flores Quispe, 1970-, Ccollana Quehue builder, Canas, Cusco, Peru

MARINERA DANCE

Carlos Alfredo DiNatale Hernández, 1977-, dancer, choreographer, Surquillo, Lima, Peru

Giancarlo Julio Bozzo Cumpa, 1979-, dancer, Pasadena, California

Sonia Porras Roca, dancer

Ronald Manuel Fernández de la Rosa, 1964-, dancer, Moche, Trujillo, Peru

María Isabel "Sissy" Soria Muratta, 1972-, dancer, Peru

Giuliana del Rocio Sánchez Dávila, 1980-, dancer, Peru

Lucy de Mantilla, composer, vocalist

Guillermo Javier Martínez Vargas, 1985-, vocalist, percussionist, guitarist, Huanchaco, Trujillo, Peru

Marcelino Santiago "Coco" Linares Zegarra, 1955-, lead guitarist, Peru

Julie Anna Freundt Lopez, 1965-, lead vocalist, Surquillo, Lima, Peru

Eda Benilde Arroyo Peche, 1963-, filigree artisan, Lima, Peru

Manuela Jacquelina Ayasta Caicedo, 1964-, embroiderer, Monsefú, Lambayeque, Peru

Margarita Mechán Lluen, 1960-, belt weaver, Monsefú, Lambayeque, Peru

Margarita Guzmán de Gonzales, 1951-, hat weaver, cook, Monsefú, Lambayeque, Peru

RADIO UCAMARA

Leonardo Tello Imaina, 1975-, director, Peru

María Nieves Nashnato Upari, 1953-, Ikuari School instructor, Nauta, Loreto, Peru

José Manuel Huaymacari Tamani, 1947-, Ikuari School instructor, Nauta, Loreto, Peru

Danna Gaviota Tello Morey, 2000-, Ikuari School student, Nauta, Loreto, Peru

FIESTA DE LA VIRGEN DEL CARMEN

Víctor Germán Boluarte Medina, 1965-, Contradanza captain, Cusco, Peru

Mario Palomino Coll Cárdenas, 1949-, musician, Urubamba, Cusco, Peru

Ricardo Vargas Luna, 1973-, musician, Cusco, Peru

José Eduardo Venero Noriega, 1964-, musician, Cusco, Peru

Silverio Soto Qquehuarucho, 1968-, musician, Cusco, Peru

John Karin Del Solar Torres, 1963-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Yuri Anibal Boluarte Medina, 1968-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Camilo Ernesto Félix Villasante, 1976-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Yvan Pablo Zamalloa Cornejo, 1970-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Héctor Villasante Vega, 1982-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Hans Eleazar Del Solar Peña, 1981-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Socrates Bernable Villasante, 1963-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Erick Aparicio Ramos, 1982-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Jorge Bouroncle Villasante, 1960-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Reinaldo Ever Rojas Corrales, 1954-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Juan Abel Salazar Gutiérrez, 1983-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Eliot Alcibiades Zamalloa Cornejo, 1965-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Fabricio Yabar Morales, 1977-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

DANZA SARAWJA

Genoveva Silveria Coaila Catacora, 1951-, dancer, vocalist, Moquegua, Mariscal Nieto, Peru

Ricardina Maria Catacora Quispe, 1952-, dancer, vocalist, Moquegua, Mariscal Nieto, Peru

Marina Elena Catacora Quispe, 1955-, dancer, vocalist, Moquegua, Mariscal Nieto, Peru

Julia Dora Catacora Quispe, 1961-, dancer, vocalist, Moquegua, Mariscal Nieto, Peru

Rafael Manuel Sosa Alvarado, 1949-, dancer, charango musician, Moquegua, Mariscal Nieto, Peru

Placido Arturo Rospigliosi Zeballos, 1959-, dancer, charango musician, Moquegua, Mariscal Nieto, Peru

CABALLITOS DE TOTORA RAFTS

Ángel Antenor Piminchumo Domínguez, 1960-, artisan, fisherman, Huanchaco, La Libertad, Peru

Eduardo Mateo Valderrama Piminchumo, 1994-, artisan, fisherman, Trujillo, La Libertad, Peru

Anatalia Alejandrina Gonzalez Gutierrez, 1956-, artisan, cook, Huanchaco, La Libertad, Peru

Eloisa Margarita Piminchumo Domínguez, 1959-, artisan, cook, Huanchaco, La Libertad, Peru

CUSCO TEXTILES

Timoteo Ccarita Sacaca, 1955-, weaver, Cusco, Peru

Damian Huaman Mojonero, 1967-, weaver, cook, Cusco, Peru

Rosa Bernadeth Pumayalli Quispe, 1988-, weaver, cook, Cusco, Peru

Leandra Gutiérrez Sallo, 1983-, weaver, cook, Cusco, Peru

Delia Sallo Huaman, 1967-, weaver, cook, Cusco, Peru

Ángel Ligorio Callañaupa Alvares, 1952-, weaver, painter, Cusco, Peru

Quintina Huanca Quispe, 1959-, weaver, singer, Cusco, Peru

Epifania Choque Quispe, 1967-, weaver, farmer, Cusco, Peru

CRAFTS AND MUSIC: HUANCAYO AND AYACUCHO

Huancayo Artisans

Katya Milagros Canto Lazo, gourd carver, Cochas Grande Tambo, Huancayo, Peru

Blanca Violeta Canto Lazo, 1988-, gourd carver, Cochas Grande Tambo, Huancayo, Peru

Ayacucho Artisans

Alfonso Sulca Chávez, 1944-, weaver, Ayacucho, Peru

Jang Ludmir Araujo Ayala, 1978-, tin craftsperson, Huamango, Ayacucho, Peru

Germán Nilo Prado Mayorga, 1949-, mask maker, Peru

Alfredo López Morales, 1958-, retablo artisan, Ayacucho, Peru

Mamerto Sánchez Cárdenas, 1942-, ceramicist, Peru

Deniss Sánchez Aparicio, 1981-, ceramicist, Lima, Peru

Trío de la Estudiantina Municipal de Ayacucho

Felicitas Inés Ascarza de Cuba, 1950-, singer, Ayacucho, Peru

Estanislao Medina Ramos, 1955-, musician, Ayacucho, Peru

Pedro Cconislla Bellido, 1940-, musician, Ayacucho, Peru

AFRO-PERUVIAN MUSIC AND DANCE

Félix Roberto Arguedas Caycho, 1948-, composer, guitarist, Lima, Peru

José Antonio Ballumbrosio Guadalupe, 1976-, dancer, violinist, France

Nadia Ysabel Calmet Calmet, 1982-, choreographer, dancer, Santiago de Surco, Lima, Peru

Miguel Ángel Ballumbrosio Guadalupe, 1975-, dancer, percussionist, Dampmart, France

Wladimir Félix Coronado Enríquez, 1991-, dancer, percussionist, Chincha, Ica, Peru

Ronald Augusto Yllesca Chávez, 1986-, dancer, percussionist, Chincha, Ica, Peru

María Catalina Robles Izquierdo, 1968-, dancer, percussionist, Lima, Peru

Rosario Sonia Goyoneche Narciso, 1966-, vocalist, Lima, Peru

LA CHACRA: QUINOA FARMING

Renee Gutiérrez Quispe, 1984-, farmer, artisan, musician, Peru

Ana María Ccahuin Berrocal, 1984-, farmer, cook, artisan, singer, Ayacucho, Peru

Ives Sandra Gálvez Huamán, 1987-, farmer, cook, artisan, singer, Ayacucho, Peru

John Sayas Coras, 1983-, farmer, artisan, Ayacucho, Peru

WACHIPERI COMMUNITIES

Victorio Dariquebe Gerewa, 1962-, community leader, Pilcopata, Cusco, Peru

Odette Marlid Ramos Dumas, 1991-, artisan, cook, Pilcopata, Cusco, Peru

Nely Margot Ninantay Yonaje, 1986-, scholar, Pilcopata, Cusco, Peru

Marisabel Dumas Ramos, 1984-, trilingual interpreter, healer, Pilcopata, Cusco, Peru

Sofía Solisonquehua Untamay, 1980-, healer, Pilcopata, Cusco, Peru

Sergio Pacheco Hambeo, 1967-, healer, Pilcopata, Cusco, Peru

COMMUNITY DAY PARTICIPANTS & GROUPS

Marianella Dayan Villavicencio (Dayan Aldana), Centreville, Virginia

María Luisa Alvarado

Billy Castillo, Rockville, Maryland

Aymar Ccopacatty, 1979-, recycled art, West Kingston, Rhode Island

Kristy Chavez-Fernandez, 1980-, DJ, McLean, Virginia

Celia Coleto

Martin Correa

Miguel García, foodways, Woodbridge, Virginia

Elmer Huerta, foodways

Adela Hinostroza, 1974-, Reisterstown, Maryland

Vicky Leyva

Milagros López Loli

Wilde Moran, 1958-, Centreville, Virginia

Leandro Reyes

Brenda Salas

Víctor Ruíz, dancer

Arturo Uchima, foodways, Washington, D.C.

José Victorio, foodways, Baltimore, Maryland

Martín Zuñiga

100 Cajoneros

Abya Yala Arte y Cultura -- Abya Yala Arte y CulturaMilagros AlbrechtCarlos AnayaPatricia AranibarMillery BeltranSteve CotaquispeRosa Manozzi-BustamanteTracy MerinoElva NavarroBen Rosen, 1968-, New York, New YorkLuis Vargas

Grupo Etnia -- Grupo EtniaFernando Cabrejo, 1961-, Germantown, MarylandCarlos HurtadoLuis Enrique LevanoMariela MarineroOscar QuispeWalter Suarez

Inkarayku -- InkaraykuElva Ambia Rebatta, Brooklyn, New YorkCarlose Moises AmbiaElva Ambia Jimenez, Brooklyn, New YorkErico Benavente, 1973-, Pelham, New YorkAndres Jimenez, Rego Park, New YorkAdam Negrin, 1983-, Dix Hills, New YorkBen Rosen, 1968-, New York, New York

New Inca Son -- New Inca SonOmar ClavijoRene QuisbertWalter RojasMarianne Ruggiero

Cabanaconde City Colca – USA

Centro Cultural Peru

Papalca

Rancho San Miguel de Aquia

Sentimiento Peruano
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives; please submit this form. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2015 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2015, Series 2
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2015 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2015-ref18

General Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Beaux, Cecilia, 1855-1942  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 19
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1888 July-September
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Cecilia Beaux papers, 1863-1968. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Cecilia Beaux papers
Cecilia Beaux papers / Series 2: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-beauceci-ref710
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Stamp Stories: Trains

Creator:
National Postal Museum  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2021-03-30T20:10:31.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Postal service;Letter mail handling;Stamp collecting  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNPM
Data Source:
National Postal Museum
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNPM
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_uGnu5kvbJkc

Chicago Transit Authority Train Car | History Time

Creator:
National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
Lesson Plans
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2021-05-14T17:32:17.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
Topic:
American History  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianAmHistory
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianAmHistory
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_1_21qWt7lUM

Go-Go Music | History Time

Creator:
National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
Lesson Plans
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2021-05-14T17:32:15.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
Topic:
American History  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianAmHistory
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianAmHistory
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_kHJnPilL9vY

Dr. Max Liboiron "BabyLegs" | Nature–Design Triennial

Creator:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2019-07-03T20:37:31.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Design  Search this
See more by:
cooperhewitt
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
YouTube Channel:
cooperhewitt
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_9UD6tNSGyzE

A World of Sand | Nature–Design Triennial

Creator:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2019-07-02T14:39:43.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Design  Search this
See more by:
cooperhewitt
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
YouTube Channel:
cooperhewitt
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_ly4NRYgmuNM

Passing the Torch: Senegalese Metalsmithing Across Geography and Gender

Creator:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2021-06-27T15:00:09.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
Topic:
Cultural property  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianfolklife
Data Source:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianfolklife
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_Vfxg9L8saSw

Aleut

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Yatchmeneff, Ivan  Search this
Martin, Fredericka I.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
7.29 Linear feet ((20 boxes))
Culture:
Unangan (Aleut)  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Narratives
Manuscripts
Place:
Saint Paul Island (Alaska)
Date:
1941-1949
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Alaska/Northwest Coast series contains Harrington's Aleut research. The materials primarily consist of vocabulary, texts, and grammar.

Harrington used the dictionary portion of Veniaminov (1846) as the basis for compiling his Aleut vocabulary. Photostatted entries were pasted up, one to a page, and reheard with native speakers. Ivan Yatchmeneff provided retranscriptions in Russian characters and retranslations in English, doing much of the writing himself. Excerpts from Jochelson (1919) and a number of nonlinguistic publications were frequently interspersed with the field data.

A portion of the rechecked vocabulary was arranged numerically by Veniaminov's Aleut entry. The remaining entries were organized semantically and supplemented by original notes. The categories dealing with ethnobotany, ethnozoology, and placenames are particularly extensive and include rough sketches, maps, and references to several collections of specimens.

Most of the texts are native stories in Aleut and English, obtained from Ivan Yatchmeneff and several others on St. Paul Island. The remainder were obtained from Alexandra Gromoff during her stay in New York. She frequently translated English texts written by Fredericka Martin Berenberg, who added marginalia and interlinear notes and forwarded the material on to Harrington.

Harrington began his work on grammar by translating and rehearing Veniaminov (1846) with the aid of Father Baranoff and Ivan Yatchmeneff. Later, in the summer of 1947, he asked Berenberg to work with Alexandra Gromoff in order to clarify certain grammatical points. Because Gromoff was undergoing an operation at the time, he referred to the completed inventory as the "Hosp[ital] Questionnaire. "

Harrington's own grammatical write-up was left in outline form. It consists of handwritten drafts of an introduction and notes for each chapter, many of which cite the published works or manuscripts of other linguists. In 1948 he submitted a typescript titled "Unalaska Aleutian Grammar" [former B.A.E. ms. 4783] for review as a potential publication of the B.A.E. Although it contains an introduction and a detailed table of contents and is supplemented by semantic word lists, this later draft is also far from complete.
Biographical / Historical:
Although very few of John P. Harrington's Aleut field notes are dated, his annual reports and correspondence, particularly that with Fredericka Martin Berenberg, indicate that he worked on St. Paul Island, Alaska, from October through December of 1941, writing up the material at later periods in Washington, D.C. (probably 1943 and again 1947 to 1949). Ivan Alexis Yatchmeneff (abbreviated Я, Yach., Yatch.), a speaker of the Unalaska dialect, was the primary source of linguistic information. A number of nonnatives traveling or living in the Aleutians provided him with cultural and botanical information.

Harrington had several collaborators throughout his work. John Paul Marr (Jackie, Jacq.), his field assistant during the late 1930s and early 1940s, accompanied him to the Aleutians to aid with the collection of plant and animal specimens, the review of secondary source materials, and the preparation of sound recordings. Makary A. Baranoff (Baranov, Fr. B.), a Russian priest on St. Paul Island, collaborated in the translation of Ivan Veniaminov's (1846) Opyt grammatiki and commented upon much of the linguistic data reelicited from Ivan Yatchmeneff. Fredericka Martin Berenberg (Mrs. Ber., Mrs. B., Freddie), who later edited The Aleut Language by Richard H. Geoghegan, shared her knowledge of the inhabitants, local history, and geography during Harrington's stay. After leaving the island, she continued to correspond with him, and in the late 1940s brought Alexandra Gromoff (Alex., Alec., Alice, A.), to live with her and attend college in New York State. Harrington managed to work briefly with Gromoff during several weekends in August and September 1948, although most of his work was done through Berenberg.

Harrington's study of Aleut relied heavily upon the work of the Russians Ivan Veniaminov (Ven.) and Waldemar I. Jochelson (Joch.). He also elaborated upon the historical and placename information obtained from a number of publications pertaining to the islands.

Harrington's only publication on Aleut is a review (1947) of The Aleut Language.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Aleut language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ethnozoology  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Narratives
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 1.1
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 1: Native American History, Language, and Culture of Alaska and the Northwest Coast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref12321
Online Media:

Nicola/Thompson

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Teit, James Alexander, 1864-1922  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
0.41 Linear feet ((1 box))
Culture:
Indians of North America -- British Columbia  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Nlaka'pamux (Thompson River Salish)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Narratives
Manuscripts
Place:
Nicola River Valley (B.C.)
Date:
circa 1941-circa 1942
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Alaska/Northwest Coast series contains Harrington's research on Nicola and Thompson, consisting of comparative vocabulary, outline and notes for write-up, and notes from interviews regarding James A. Teit.

Vocabulary entries were not arranged by Harrington into his usual semantic categories, but were kept together by interview. Nicola terms were frequently elicited with their Thompson equivalents. Words cover animals, plants, geography, material culture, tribenames, and placenames. Also interspersed are a few phrases, notes and sketch maps from two placename trips, summaries of myths in English, and biographical data concerning the informants and others. One interview was based in part on a rehearing of Franz Boas' (1924) "Vocabulary of the Athapascan Tribe of Nicola Valley, British Columbia." At a later date (1942) comparative Athapascan data--Rogue River and Chasta Costa from Wolverton Orton (Wolv., RR, Wolve Chastac.) and Coquille from Coquille Thompson (Thomp.)--was added to these notes.

Harrington's write-up is little more than an outline for an article. It includes a section on informants and some vocabulary excerpted from the field notes. The designation "Nic. for write-up" is misleading as data for Thompson is also given throughout. Several references are made to information from published sources (Dawson 1892, Morice 1932).

During his last two days in Nicola Valley, Harrington visited Mrs. James A. Teit in order to copy Teit's manuscript "Notes on the Early History of Nicola Valley." This section contains notes on their discussions of Teit's work and local history. It also includes comments by an unidentified man Harrington met at Spence's Bridge as well as a photograph of Teit.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington's work in Merritt and Canford, British Columbia, during the summer of 1941 was part of a continuing effort to trace the origin and relationships of the Athapascan languages, which he often referred to comprehensively as "Chilcotin." In late August to early September--dates given are August 27, August 31, and September 1--he recorded data from speakers of the Lytton (L., Lyt., Upper Th.) dialect of Thompson River Salish, who also remembered a little Nicola Valley Athapascan (Nic., st. for stuwix-mux, southern Chilcotin).

He first worked with Billy Ernest (Billy), 80-year-old chief of the Canford Indians. He also conducted separate interviews with Mrs. Louey Jonah (Mrs. J.) and her husband (Mr. J.), an unidentified "Old Lady," and Louie Charlie, who gave remembered information from Johnny Jackson, said to have been a stuwix speaker, deceased for some five years. Harrington considered his best source of information to be Billy Ernest's sister, Matilda Shackler (Mat.), with whom he reheard much of the data. His interpreter for many of the sessions was Johnny Martin (Martin, Johnny). Nonlinguistic information was obtained from James A. Teit's widow and an unidentified "half-breed at Spence's Bridge."
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Athapascan languages  Search this
Ntlakyapamuk language  Search this
Chastacosta language  Search this
Coquille language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Narratives
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 1.4
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 1: Native American History, Language, and Culture of Alaska and the Northwest Coast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref12617

Coast Yuki/Northern and Central Pomo/Kato

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1.45 Linear feet ((4 boxes))
Culture:
Yuki  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Kato Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Maps
Place:
California -- History
Date:
1942-1943
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northern and Central California series contains Harrington's research on Coast Yuki, Northern and Central Pomo, and Kato.

The section on Northern Pomo vocabulary and ethnographic notes pertain to an interview Harrington had with George Campbell. Included in the notes are Northern Pomo terms for numbers and some cultural items. Descriptions were given for the construction of the flute, drum, and musical bow and for the use of certain foods. Harrington also noted information about other residents of the area, possibly with the intention of working with them at some future time.

The comparative vocabulary files are grouped by semantic areas and consists primarily of Coast Yuki with some Northern Pomo equivalences. Many glosses are accompanied by ethnographic notes. There are a few comments on field data obtained by Dr. J.W. Hudson, a medical doctor who worked with the Indians around Ukiah.

The subseries also contains an inventory of placenames in Coast Yuki, Northern Pomo, and Kato. Most of the data came from the Sherwood speakers. The study was done in part by reeliciting names collected by Dr.J. W. Hudson, Alfred L. Kroeber (1925), and Samuel A. Barrett (1908). Harrington also appears to have referred to a Geological Survey map. Sketch maps by Jim and Lucy Cooper are included in the notes. The material dealing with the coast is arranged geographically from north to south and reaches from the southernmost Athapascan region to Coast Miwok territory. Some inland placenames from the Eel River, Sherwood, and Willits regions are included as well. The Sherwood-Coast trail is also mentioned.

In addition, there are notes from rehearings of placenames in Samuel A. Barrett's "The Ethno-Geography of the Pomo and Neighboring Indians," placename notes from J.W. Hudson; the article on Coast Yuki geography in Alfred L. Kroeber's "Handbook of the Indians of California; and Droeber's Esselen vocabulary.

Other materials include abstracts of myths written in English; biographical notes on various speakers and others; and miscellaneous notes. The miscellanous files include a few descriptive notes on the history of the area, including comments on some photographs which several of the informants showed to Harrington. The photos are not present in the collection.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington obtained data on the Coast Yuki, Northern and Central Pomo, and Kato languages by extending a trip to record Athapascan in Washington and Oregon down into the Petrolia, Ukiah, Sherwood, and Laytonville areas of northern California. The fieldwork was done during December 1942 and January 1943.

Harrington obtained a significant amount of material from a number of Pomo speakers. In the Ukiah area he located Jim Cooper and his wife, Lucy (not to be confused with Lucy Perez), both of Sherwood descent. Present at the same sessions was George Stewart, another Northern Pomo speaker, who had spent his early years at Round Valley before returning to the Sherwood region. Harrington also worked briefly on Central Pomo with Harvey James (also called James Harvey), a Point Arena man living near Ukiah.

Harrington recorded a lesser amount of Kato data during a stopover in Laytonville, where he worked with Chief Gil Ray and his sister, Martina Bell.

Additional ethnographic and general background information came from Mark A. Carpenter and his wife, from Robert and Genevieve Renick, and from Willie Sloan.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Yuki language  Search this
Pomo languages  Search this
Kato language  Search this
Esselen language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Cahto  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Maps
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 2.3
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 2: Papers Relating to the Native American history, language and culture of northern and central California
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref13172
Online Media:

Lake and Coast Miwok/Southeastern Pomo/Wappo

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
3 Boxes
Culture:
Mewuk (Miwok)  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Wappo  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Date:
1942
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northern and Central California series contains Harrington's field notes on Lake and Coast Miwok, Southeastern Pomo, and Wappo that he gathered in Middletown, California in 1942.

The entire set of field notes consists of a partially arranged vocabulary based, at least in part, on a rehearing of Samuel A. Barrett's (1908) "The Ethno-Geography of the Pomo and Neighboring Indians." Much of the general vocabulary seems to have been elicited for comparison with numbered lexical items given in the Moquelumnan vocabulary on pages 68 to 80 of that work. The tribenames and placenames were evidently excerpted from various parts of the text as well as from the accompanying map. In addition, he conducted rehearings of the brief vocabulary collected on the Drake expedition, which was published in Barrett. Also included are comments on several items from C. Hart Merriam's (1910) Dawn of the World, several pages of Harrington's observations on the phonetics of the languages, and a few comparisons with Patwin and Rumsen (Carm.). Intermixed with the linguistic data are miscellaneous ethnographic notes and biographical facts about the informants.

The linguistic items are marked in a number of ways--sometimes simply with the name of the informant, at other times by a variety of terms or abbreviations. Lake Miwok items are marked "Knight's lang[uage]," "Middletown lang.," "Coy[ote] Val[ley] lang.," or oloyomi. Coast Miwok terms are labeled "Bod." for Bodega and "Southern" or "Marshall" for Marin. Southeastern Pomo words are marked variously as "Sulphurbank," "Sbank," "Sulphurb," or xamfo. Wappo is referred to alternately as "Mishawa(l)" or the "Alexander Valley language."
Biographical / Historical:
During a prolonged period of work on the west coast frorn Washington to northern California in the fall and winter of 1942, John P. Harrington spent several days in Middletown, California. There he recorded several dialects of Miwok, as well as Southeastern Pomo and Wappo. He worked mainly with Henry Knight, who knew Lake, Bodega, and Marin Miwok, in addition to the two neighboring languages. Harrington obtained Wappo and Pomo data from Knight's father, Jake, and Lake Miwok data from his wife, Martha, and son, James. Additional Bodega terms were provided by Maggie Smith Johnson. A few miscellaneous notes came from Francisco Norato, a resident of the Lakeport area.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Miwok languages  Search this
Southeastern Pomo language  Search this
Wappo dialect  Search this
Wintun languages  Search this
Ohlone language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 2.5
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 2: Papers Relating to the Native American history, language and culture of northern and central California
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref13246

Kiowa

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
26 Boxes
Culture:
Kiowa  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Manuscripts
Narratives
Place:
Devils Tower National Monument (Wyo.)
Date:
1916-1948
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Plains series contains Harrington's Kiowa research, primarily consisting of vocabulary, comparative vocabulary, a dictionary, linguistic notes, grammar, and texts.

Some of the vocabulary gathered between 1918 and 1920 remains in slipfile form, arranged semantically (former B.A.E. mss. 2289pt. and 2297pt.). Subjects include animals, material culture, plants, and personal categories. During 1945 and 1946, Harrington reorganized his Kiowa notes based on a continuing enlargement of the earlier semantically arranged vocabulary, adding such categories as astronomy, geography, minerals, months, placenames, rank, relationship terms, songs, and tribenames (former B.A.E. ms. 4622pt.). The etymology of some personal names and a partial draft and notes for a proposed paper on "Human Terms" form part of the vocabulary material. The geographic terms were provided by Parker McKenzie and, according to correspondence, most of the relationship terms may also be McKenzie's work. Some of the latter's letters are cut and mounted on separate sheets of paper, others were copied by Harrington, and many are identified with the symbol "<U+2642>." Miscellaneous material includes photocopies of fragments from Robert M. Lowie's "A Note on Kiowa Kinship Terms and Usages," mounted, annotated, and reheard with Keahtigh. A few tribenames elicited from Guy Quoetone (data from him are labeled "Guy Kiowa") and Kiowa Charlie in March and April of 1946 add randomly to the earlier lists.

The comparative vocabulary section contains Tewa comparisons based on Harrington's 1927 accumulation of information from Tewa speaker Eduardo Cata (former B.A.E. ms. 4705pt.). Harrington also used Tewa terms from his "Ethnogeography of the Tewa Indians" (1916), as well as Kiowa terms from James Mooney's "Calendar History of the Kiowa Indians" (1918). In addition, there are a few brief comparisons of Kiowa with Navajo, Paiute (eight pages), and Siouan (two pages).

His dictionary files consist of a manuscript and related notes. The manuscript contains most but not all of the lexical portion of "Vocabulary of the Kiowa Language" with an addition of further entries which were apparently written at a later date.

Among his linguistic notes is a partial draft written in 1916 titled ''The Language of the Kaekua or Kiowa Indians." From 1918 to 1920 while in Anadarko and in Washington, Harrington accumulated extensive information (about 700 pages) on Kiowa vocabulary, grammar, and texts. In 1922 he began a paper on "Notes on the Kiowa Language." He later collated this material in Washington, and in 1928 published a synthesis titled "Vocabulary of the Kiowa Language." The publication encompassed grammatical information with Tewa comparisons, a glossary of lexical terms , and a Kiowa text, (former B.A.E. mss. 4705pt., 2289pt., and 2297pt.).

Documented among the grammar files is Harrington's interest in Kiowa intonation, a title he gave to an unpublished manuscript for which Perry Keahtigh provided information. Their work on this aspect of Kiowa grammar proceeded from September to November 1944, and included recording sessions at the Library of Congress.

There is another unpublished manuscript titled "Kiowa, Pueblo Language of the Plains." This is probably the manuscript that underwent many revisions and rehearings before being published in 1948 as "Popular Account of the Kiowa Indian Language." It encompassed only a minute portion of the ambitious and comprehensive grammar which Harrington had originally envisioned. Because of the diligent reworking of the information, it is rather difficult to determine in what sequence the drafts were created. In order to eliminate as much confusion as possible, all the grammatical drafts of the 1940s are placed together, followed by notes that most nearly reflect the outline of the 1948 publication. Phonetics and morphology are dealt with in detail. Included is brief information on syntax, Indian native language, Spanish and English loanwords, foreign words, slang, and polysynthetic words based on Robert W. Young's "Language: Interesting Side-views of Its Study." (April 1937).

The text section contains over twenty brief stories of Seindei, the culture hero, provided by Delos K. Lonewolf and George Hunt in 1924. Some are in Kiowa and English, some in English only. One myth was given in English by a Comanche Indian named Albert Attock. This textual material was formerly cataloged as part of B.A.E. ms. 4705. There are various versions of Lonewolf's "The Udder-angry Travelers-off" text which appeared in "Vocabulary of the Kiowa Language," "Three Kiowa Texts," and "Popular Account of the Kiowa Indian Language." Frequent rehearings with Keahtigh in November 1945 preceded the last-named publication. Additional material for "Three Kiowa Texts" contains extensive annotations by McKenzie and a few further rehearings from Keahtigh. Laura D. Pedrick translated the Lord's Prayer; a "Church Song" in Kiowa (former B.A.E. ms. 4705pt.) came from Mr. Light (not further identified). There are several texts edited by McKenzie for collaboration with Harrington. They include Enoch Smoky's "Bear Girl Story," recorded March 26,1946, and Hunting Horse's "Mad Girl Story," heard on February 24, 1946 (former B.A.E. ms. 4622pt.). On March 31, 1940, Kiowa Charlie, with the help of Guy Quoetone and Lonewolf, dictated still another Devils Tower myth.

Harrington's Kiowa files also contain other notes and information about Devils Tower in the Black Hills of Wyoming. This evolved into his 1939 publication, "Kiowa Memories of the Northland." The bulk of the Devils Tower material was originally listed as B.A.E. ms. 6070.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington's search for a relationship between Kiowa and the Tanoan languages led to a substantial accumulation of and career-long interest in Kiowa grammatical, linguistic, and textual material. His study resulted in eight publications on Kiowa, the first appearing in 1910 and the last in 1948.

Early in 1918 Harrington worked in Washington, D.C., with Delos and Ida Lonewolf, (the latter abbreviated "Mrs. L."), who were accompanied by their youngest son, Theodore. In June 1918, Harrington conducted fieldwork at the Kiowa Agency in Anadarko, Oklahoma. Interviews were held with James Waldo (W.): Enoch Smoky, head of the peyote cult among the Kiowa; Parker McKenzie (McK): Laura D. Pedrick (also referred to as "Mrs. P" and"L. Pro "); and several others. The primary focus of his work at that time was to collect linguistic data needed for comparative studies, especially with the Tanoan languages. From mid-1919 through 1920 Harrington remained at Bureau of American Ethnology headquarters, during which time he sorted and reorganized the Kiowa notes. While in Washington, D.C., in 1924, he elicited Kiowa texts from the Lonewolfs and from George Hunt, who was regarded as a superb tribal historian.

"Vocabulary of the Kiowa Language," published in 1928, unfortunately reflects only a small portion of the information he had amassed during his early work. In his notes, Harrington referred to this publication as the "Dictionary," "Dict.," or "Bulletin." He was evidently not pleased with the work. As he wrote to Parker McKenzie in later years: "It has a lot of idiosyncracies in it which are absolutely incorrect. They [the B.A.E.] forced me to publish, and so I did-to my chagrin now."

In the summer of 1939, Harrington and Parker McKenzie renewed their acquaintance during a visit which Harrington made to Anadarko. They reminisced just a few hours on that occasion. Shortly afterwards they began an exchange of letters which lasted almost into 1950. McKenzie's exposure to linguistic method in their early work together had awakened an abiding interest in the preservation of Kiowa. Thus, he was willing to impart what he had discovered in his efforts to analyze the language. This exchange allowed Harrington to collect updated material for the paper which he eventually published on January 1, 1948, titled "Popular Account of the Kiowa Indian Language."

From September 1944 to early 1947, Harrington elicited additional grammatical information and reheard his earlier notes in work sessions with Perry A. Keahtigh (also referred to as "Keah."). Keahtigh married a daughter of Enoch Smoky around 1930. Knowing that his father-in-law had worked with Harrington in 1918, Keahtigh sought out the linguist when he returned to the East Coast in the 1940s. They worked evenings and weekends while Harrington was detailed to the Office of Censorship as part of a volunteer war effort by members of the Smithsonian staff. Keahtigh provided a wealth of linguistic information during 1945 and most of 1946, his work dwindling off in 1947 as Harrington's manuscript neared completion.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Kiowa language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Navajo language  Search this
Northern Paiute language  Search this
Southern Paiute language  Search this
Siouan languages  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Manuscripts
Narratives
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 5.1
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 5: Papers relating to the Native American History, Language and Culture of the Plains
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14726
Online Media:

Nahuatl

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
14 Boxes
Culture:
Nahua  Search this
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Folklore
Narratives
Date:
1951
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Mexico/Central America/South America series contains Harrington's Nahuatl research. The materials consist of linguistic notes, grammar, texts, and miscellaneous notes.

His linguistic notes form the largest section of this subseries. A semantically arranged vocabulary was elicited from Alfonso Hernandez Catarina. The categories of lexical items include phenomena, directions, seasons, astronomy, time, plant parts, plants, animal parts, animals, age-sex, rank, relationship, material culture, religion, tribenames, and placenames. A "Flood Story" in English is also included. In addition, there are some phrases, information on phonetics and grammar, and a little ethnographic data. There are references to secondary sources such as Simeon, Carochi ("Car."), and "Gar."

Arcadio Sagahon was also a major contributor. Harrington recorded eighteen pages of basic vocabulary with him. There is also a section of randomly arranged vocabulary based on an examination of rock and plant specimens, with occasional references to "Arc's book" (not further identified). Some equivalent terms were provided by Tiburcio Jaimez.

A compilation of several sets of word lists on numbered pages resulted from a number of linguistic sessions with Tiburcio Jaimez. These include commentary on a book by Cardenas (abbreviated "Card.") which is not further identified. Harrington also elicited Jaimez's aid in rehearing the source referred to as "Gar." They developed fairly extensive annotations to pages 40 to 51 of that work, and the section on verbs. In addition, Jaimez provided commentary on the book Raices etimologicas del idioma nahuatl by Pedro Barra y Valenzuela.

Additional linguistic data were furnished by Tomas Perez Escobar and Jose Farias Galindo. A general, unsorted vocabulary which Harrington recorded from Escobar, with a few comments from Arcadio Sagahon, is supplemented by a sizable section of notes in his own hand. Sentences in Nahuatl are each followed by a Spanish translation. Farias provided vocabulary during a number of sessions in which he was accompanied by Captain Santos Acevedo Lopez. There is also a small file of miscellaneous vocabulary given together by Farias and Arcadio Sagahon.

Many of the data from the preceding groups of field notes were brought together in a comprehensive semantic arrangement. In addition, Harrington compiled lists of words in English and Spanish as a questionnaire for eliciting Maya words. (In fact, this section is headed by a sheet with the label "Questionnaire for Az[tec].")

A final section of linguistic notes includes miscellaneous shorter vocabularies, a four-page word list, and Harrington's questionnaire. A "Coyotepec Vocabulary" of nineteen pages was recorded from Francisco Pinera Martinez. It includes Xochimilco equivalences, commentary by Jose Farias Galindo, and a reference to Mr. Sanchez. Notes from a "Cuautla Trip" include a short vocabulary (seven pages) from an unidentified informant and miscellaneous notes on people and places. A twenty-three page basic vocabulary and a few phrases were recorded from Jose Fortino. Harrington later obtained a few Xochimilco glosses and a little commentary by Arcadio Sagahon. The sixteen pages of notes, resulting from a trip Harrington took to Tepotzotlan with Farias and "Arc," contain miscellaneous data and references to an unnamed informant. A basic vocabulary and some short sentences were elicited from Jose Barreraon May 2, 1951, under the heading "Tete. Voc." It is unclear whether the language referred to is Tetelcingo or Tetela but it was presumably related to the language of Tezcoco. The seventy pages of data, which include some Xochimilco terms and information on the country, are supplemented by two pages obtained from "Juan while waiting for the bus." The material was reheard with Farias, Perez, and Sagahon at a later date. There are nine pages of data from an interview with Albino (Alvino) Cortes. There is a mention of Frederico Hernandez, and Miguel Romero was also present during the recording of the "Aztec vocabulary." Lexical items were recorded from Munoz (alternate spelling Munos), Romero, and Juan Ramos of Puebla, near Vera Cruz City. There are also four pages of notes in an unidentified hand and a questionnaire used by Harrington in his linguistic work. It includes a little data from "Alf." and "Arc."

Notes on Nahuatl grammar include excerpts from a number of published sources, primarily Whorf, Simeon, and Carochi. The topics covered include phonetics (one section is labeled "Phonetics Tibd"), syntax, verb, noun, pronoun, numeral, adjective, adverb, postposition, conjunction, and interjection. The principal informants cited are Arcadio Sagahon and Tomas Perez Escobar. Additional information was provided by Alfonso Hernandez Catarina, Tiburcio Jaimez, Tomas Perez Escobar, Jose Farias Galindo, and Captain Acevedo. One page of the grammar is in Farias' handwriting. Several pages are marked "Tete."

The major sets of Nahuatl texts which Harrington recorded were assigned by him to one of two categories: "Finished" or "Not yet gone over." The first designation indicates that the Nahuatl phonetic transcription of a given text was refined with the original speaker--and sometimes reheard by others--and that it was accompanied by a complete Spanish translation and possibly notes. There are references to Matlapa and Jalpilla forms. The predominant contributor was Arcadio Sagahon. Alternate versions of each text were also given by Tiburcio Jaimez and Alfonso Hernandez. All of the stories have to do with animals and many appear to be translations of fables rather than native texts: "The Sky Is Falling" (Chicken Little), "La Zorra y el Queso" (The Fox and the Cheese). The texts labeled "Not gone over" appear to have been recorded from Hernandez and Jaimez but not reviewed with Sagahon. The stories include "The Girl and the Head of the Birds," "The Queen Bee and the Drone," and the lengthy "La Vida de un Indigena." A miscellaneous set of texts at the end of the series represents an attempt at a translation of the Lord's Prayer by Hernandez and Sagahon and a poem evidently written by the latter.

Harrington also compiled several miscellaneous files of data on Nahuatl. The first, consisting of notes from the period 1922 to 1927, includes bibliographic references, a list of "Aztek" words from Ben Elson in Vera Cruz, and a partial English translation of Carochi's grammar by Paul Vogenitz. Other files -which contain some typed and handwritten notes prepared by others-include background notes on the geography, history, and language of the Nahuatl; bibliographic references; maps; and a list of "persons and addresses." The latter contains some biographical data on Harrington's informants. There are also reports from Carlos Morales and copies of letters which reflect Harrington's efforts to contact Nahuatl speakers.
Biographical / Historical:
Harrington conducted fieldwork on Nahuatl--also referred to as Aztec--during a six-month period in 1951. In March he left Washington, D.C., arriving at the Hotel Fornos in Mexico City on March 25. He remained there until early September. Most of his informants were found locally, although he did make a number of side trips into the surrounding regions.

During the course of his study he worked with speakers of a number of dialects. He distinguished between the various forms he recorded by the use of abbreviations: "Az." or "Cl. Az." referred to Classical Aztec and "Naw." to Nahuatl. "Fed. Dist." was used for Federal District, "Xoch." for Xochimilco, "MA" for Milpa Alta, "V.C." for Vera Cruz, and "Mat(l)." for Matlapa. Terms from the Valley of Mexico were noted variously by the markers "Valle de Mex.," "V de M.," or "V of M." Some comparisons were occasionally made with Cahuilla (Cah.) words.

Harrington made use of a number of secondary sources throughout his study. The primary works which he consulted included the Dictionnaire de La langue nahuatl ou mexicaine by Remi Simeon, Arte de La lengua mexicana by Horacio Carochi, and a source referred to as "Gar."--possibly by Angel Maria Garibay Kintana or Jose I. Davila Garibi. He evidently had plans to prepare an annotated version of Simeon's Nahuatl-French dictionary. An assistant aided him in photostatting and pasting each entry on a separate card. Preliminary steps were taken to provide English glosses but no new Nahuatl data were appended to them.

The first informant whom Harrington contacted was Miguel Romero. They worked together on March 26 and 27 and April 1. He spoke with Salome Perez on March 27 and interviewed Tomas Perez Escobar on an almost daily basis from March 28 through April 28. The latter, referred to variously as "Professor Perez," "Perez," and "Tomas," was from the Valley of Mexico. Sessions were conducted intermittently with Frederico Hernandez Mota and Professor Jose Farias Galindo in April and May. Farias (Far.) was a Nahuatl speaker teaching elementary school in Mexico City and Xochimilco. Harrington also noted that he was the translator of the Mexican national anthem into Nahuatl and that he published poetry. In several sessions he was accompanied by Santos Acevedo Lopez, a captain in the Mexican army, who also typed a number of sheets for Harrington.

Harrington's financial records for May 22 mention receipts for payment signed by Tiburcio Jaimez and Arcadio Sagahon, indicating that he probably worked with them at least during the latter part of May. Jaimez, usually referred to by the abbreviation "Tib.," was born and raised in the pueblo of San Francisco Calixtlahuacan.

The field notes indicate that Harrington worked with another major informant, Professor Alfonso Hernandez Catarina, beginning in July. Born at Coxcatlan, "Alf." had been living for some nine years at Ciudad Santos, San Luis Potosi.

Among secondary informants with whom Harrington consulted were Professor Gregorio Cruz (Cruz, Ruz), of the Colegio Administrativo at Toluco, who was teaching school in Tenango;Jose Fortino, a resident of Teskitote Ranch; and Professor Camarena of Toluca. Others mentioned were Francisco Pinera Martinez (middle name alternately spelled Pireda), E[fraim] Sanchez, Pablo Yadieis, and Juan Baloria.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Nahuatl language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Zoology -- nomenclature  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Folklore
Narratives
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 7.2
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 7: Mexico/Central America/South America
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15100
Online Media:

Wiyot/Yurok/Mattole

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Reichard, Gladys Amanda, 1893-1955  Search this
Voegelin, C. F. (Charles Frederick), 1906-1986  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1.04 Linear feet ((3 boxes))
Container:
Box 1045
Culture:
Wiyot  Search this
Yurok  Search this
Hupa  Search this
Mattole  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Maps
Place:
California
Date:
1926, 1942
Scope and Contents note:
Microfilm Reel: 1
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northern and Central California series contains John P. Harrington's research on Wiyot, Yurok, and Mattole. Throughout his notes, Wiyot is abbreviated Sul. for Sulaatlak and, rarely, Wiy. Yurok is abbreviated Yur. or Trin[idad] lang[uage], and Mattole is abbreviated M. or B[ear] R[iver] Mat.

The Wiyot vocabulary consists of thirteen pages of numbers and terms for counting obtained during an interview with Amos Riley at Indianola on March 5, 1926. The name for Eel River is given and there are several references to two other Wiyot speakers, Jerry and Birdie James.

The comparative vocabulary section consists of lexical items semantically arranged. The majority of the terms are Wiyot forms given by Birdie James and Amos Riley, although some equivalences in Yurok from James and in Mattole from Theodore Prince are interspersed. A variety of vocabulary is given, with tribenames and placenames being the most numerous. The data in these last two categories are particularly detailed and include etymologies, references to Indian trails, a few rough sketch maps, and comments on names excerpted from several secondary sources (Reichard 1925; Nomland and Kroeber 1936).

Another set of files is composed of comments from Yurok and Wiyot speakers on published placename data from T. T. Waterman (1920) and Llewellyn L. Loud (1918). The first section, labeled "C. W. on Wat.," contains comments by Charlie Williams on tribenames and placenames given in the text and on associated maps (Rectangles A, B, H. I, J, K) in Waterman's "Yurok Geography." While most of the locations discussed are in the region of the Klamath River mouth, places in Tolowa, Wiyot, and Hupa territory are also mentioned. Unmarked forms are presumably Yurok names from Williams. His data were partially checked over with Birdie James, who gave both Yurok and Wiyot terms. A few comments were added by Orick Bob. The second section of rehearings is keyed to Rectangles H, I, J, and K in Waterman. Many of the placenames treated are in the Redwood Creek area near the home of Yurok speaker Orick Bob. Bob also volunteered a few terms for animals and tribes. The third section features comments of Birdie James on placenames given by Waterman, and by Loud in his "Ethnogeography and Archaeology of the Wiyot Territory." Harrington also utilized a number of maps (Belcher 1921; U. S. C. & G. S. 1940) in his work. A brief compilation of miscellaneous vocabulary found with the placename data appears at the end.

To serve as a questionnaire for his work with Isaac Duncan and Johnny Jackson, Harrington gleaned placenames from Goddard's "The Bear River Dialect of Athapascan" and Nomland's "Sinkyone Notes" and "Bear River Ethnography." Many of the Mattole terms he obtained are unlabeled, making it difficult at times to determine who provided the data. Most of the placenames are from the Bear River and Mattole River regions; in addition there are a limited number from the Eel River area and beyond. Stories, miscellaneous vocabulary, and biographical notes are also included.

A small section of miscellaneous notes appears at the end of the field data. Included are biographical notes on the informants and others, notes from the Hupa speaker, Dusky, a few observations by Harrington on the phonetics of the languages, general information on Gladys A. Reichard's work, and notes from a conversation with C. F. Voegelin regarding Yurok, Nootka, and Algonquian.
Biographical / Historical:
During his work on Karok in the spring of 1926, John P. Harrington recorded a brief vocabulary in Wiyot from Amos Riley of Indianola, California. It was not until sixteen years later that he returned to the area to make a more thorough study of that language and the related Yurok. He simultaneously recorded a lesser amount of Mattole data for comparison with other languages of the Northwest Coast and California which he had been recording.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Wiyot language  Search this
Yurok language  Search this
Mattole language  Search this
Nootka language  Search this
Algonquian languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Phonetics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Toponymy  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Maps
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies / 8.2: Supplemental Material on Northern and Central California
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15215
Online Media:

Karok/Shasta/Konomihu

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Maddux, Phoebe  Search this
Roberts, Helen H. (Helen Heffron), 1888-1985  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
49 Boxes
Container:
Box 1046
Culture:
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Karuk (Karok)  Search this
Shasta  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Field notes
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Date:
circa 1925-1933
Scope and Contents note:
Microfilm Reel: 1
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northern and Central California series contains Harrington's research on Karok, Shasta, and Konomihu. Materials include notes on vocabulary, grammar, placenames, and basketry; biographical data on various Karok people; texts consisting of stories, myths, formulas, songs, and ethnographic accounts; notes from rehearings of secondary sources; and notes and drafts of Harrington's writings. There are also notes from his interviews with Sandybar Jim, Francisco Capitan, Fritz Hanson, Mrs. Grant, and Fannie Orcutt.

The section of Karok vocabulary is extensive and includes terms for cosmography/minerals, plants, animals, kinship, geography, material culture, and tribenames. The list of plant names also include information on botanical specimens that Harrington collected in the field. A mixture of Shasta and Karok vocabulary can be found elsewhere in the subseries, covering natural history, material culture, kinship and rank, tribenames, and placenames. Etymologies and ethnographic data can be found in both sections for some of the vocabulary.

The section on Karok grammar is also fairly large. The notes include observations he made on the language while working with Fritz Hanson and Sylvester Donohue in 1926. Most of the notes were rechecked with Phoebe Maddus in 1928-1929. There are also miscellaneous vocabulary and short sentences with glosses and translations, elicited to illustrate a variety of phonetic and grammatical principles.

Harrington's notes on placenames include a set of diaries of trips he made throughout Karok territory. He also conducted a detailed study of the Konomihu region of Salmon River. Information that he gathered include etymologies, physical descriptions, locations, and related ethnographic data.

The scope of subjects covered in Harrington's ethnographic notes is broad and mostly reflect his work with Maddux. There are descriptions of life in the living house and sweat house, dress, and food preparation. Various ceremonies, dances, doctoring songs, and formulas are discussed. A wide variety of customs, practices, and beliefs, are mentioned as well as biographical information and anecdotes relating to Maddux and fellow members of her tribe.

Maddux also dictated in Karok stories, myths, formulas, and ethnographic accounts. Some include English translations or summaries. The stories include numerous tales about Coyote and other mythical figures. The formulas include prayers and recitatives, as well as chants used as medicine. The ethnographic texts concern such topics as gathering sugarpine nuts, bear hunting, and marriage customs. Partial transcriptions of Karok and Konomihu songs also form a substantial part of the textual material.
Biographical / Historical:
Much of John P. Harrington's major work of recording Karok vocabulary and ethnographic notes was undertaken during an uninterrupted period of six and one-half weeks from late March to early May 1926. Part of the work was conducted in cooperation with Helen H. Roberts, the ethnomusicologist. The principal Karok speaker that Harrington worked with at the time was Fritz Hanson, a speaker of the Katimin dialect, who was considered to be especially knowledgeable regarding material culture and tribenames. Sylvester Donohue acted as interpreter. Lesser amounts of data were given by Donohue's younger brother, Ben, and a number of other speakers.

Harrington first officially requested permission to work on the ethnology of the Karok in May 1928. In August of that year he returned to the Klamath and Salmon River area. It was at this time that he began working extensively with Phoebe Maddux. Maddux, whose mother was a native doctor, had been raised at Ishipishrihak (Ishi Pishi), a village on the northwest bank of the Klamath River opposite Katimin. While in the region, Harrington obtained sizable vocabularies of the Shasta and Konomihu languages from a Mrs. Grant (further unidentified) and her older sister, Susan Brizelle, both of whom worked with Roland B. Dixon, Jaime de Angulo, and Helen H. Roberts. Daughters of a Konomihu mother and a French father, the women apparently had also learned some Shasta from their maternal grandmother, a Cherokee, who, after her capture, had adopted the "Etna language" (Scotts Valley Shasta).

In October 1928 Harrington brought Phoebe Maddux back with him to Washington, D.C., where she remained until July of the following year when they began the return trip to the west coast via Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. During this lengthy period, Maddux reheard the Karok notes obtained from Hanson, furnished much grammatical information, dictated numerous texts, and examined many artifacts and specimens in the collections of the U. S. National Museum. In addition, she commented upon the Shasta and Konomihu notes, particularly the placename data. In April, Harrington and Maddux were authorized to meet with Franz Boas in New York City for the purpose of making several wax cylinder recordings of the Karok language. En route to Maddux's home in late July 1929, Harrington and Maddux stopped at Eureka, California, to work briefly with Fannie Orcutt, an Orleans Karok woman.

Harrington returned briefly to his study of the Shasta and Konomihu languages in October 1933 when his presence in Takelma territory facilitated a second visit with Brizelle. At that time he "touched up" his earlier notes by adding language identifications and once again rechecked the material. Brizelle's brother, Henry, and her son, Johnny, were also present at these sessions.

Nonlinguistic information was provided by Carl Langford, Harrington's host in the area, and F. B. McCann, as well as by a variety of specialists in the natural sciences. He was assisted in much of the work by George W. Bayley of Santa Barbara, a friend who had helped in the excavation of the Burton Mound some years earlier.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Karok language  Search this
Shasta language  Search this
Konomihu language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnomusicology  Search this
Basket making  Search this
Karuk  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Field notes
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies / 8.2: Supplemental Material on Northern and Central California
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15223
Online Media:

Chemehuevi

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
27 Boxes
Container:
Box 1050
Culture:
Chemehuevi  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1910-1946
Scope and Contents note:
Microfilm Reel: 3
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Chemehuevi.

Materials from his early field work in 1910 and 1911 consist of vocabulary organized into catagories including tribenames, geographic terms, placenames, plants (mainly cacti), and shells as adornment. Among the tribenames are a number of Mohave and Diegueno equivalences, as well as a good bit of Mohave ethnohistory, based on Alfred L. Kroeber's "Shoshonean Dialects of California" and T. T. Waterman's "Religious Practices of the Diegueno Indians." Certain notes indicate the availability and use of the records of Barbara Freire-Marreco. Harrington also accumulated notes for a proposed review of Waterman's "The Phonetic Elements of the Northern Paiute Language," into which he put some of his recently acquired Chemehuevi phonetics.

Carobeth's field notes are also present in this subseries. The bulk of the lingustic and ethnographic data was amassed from her work with George Laird. Harrington copied her notes onto slips, some of which he arranged semantically. The topical vocabulary includes terms for cosmography, geography, age/sex, kinship, material culture, plants, animals, animal parts, and tribenames. There are smaller sections for minerals, names of places and persons, colors, religion, and history.

A section of grammar notes includes excerpts from Carobeth's notes, Edward Sapir's manuscript titled "Southern Paiute, an Illustrative Sketch" (B.A.E. ms. 1751), and from other secondary sources. There are also excerpts from Ben Paddock, Ruby Eddy, and Kitanemuk and Serrano speakers. The organizational pattern is loosely based on Sapir's manuscript.

The subseries also contains a set of thirty-size texts (of which number thirty is missing), each with related notes. In most cases there are typed versions, interlinear translations, handwritten notes, and free English translations. This material was intended for publication, possibly in the form of a primer. This section also contains the Lord's Prayer, notes on song, textlets, and folklore.

Some miscellaneous notes include Chemehuevi names extracted from a June 30, 1918 census of the Mohave Indians of the Colorado River Agency; quotations for the proposed Chemehuevi publication from little-used secondary sources and interviews with colleagues; texts related to sketches; notes and questions to be reheard or clarified; and general linguistic and ethnographic miscellany. There is also an article from fieldwork undertaken in 1934, probably by Harrington's daughter Awona and Carobeth. Notes in an unidentified handwriting list as informants Satania Lopez (Susie), Jerome Booth, George Snyder, and Mukewine.

The last section of this subseries consists of field notes from his research in 1946. There is a comparative vocabulary based on Harrington's Serrano information from Juan Lozada and on Edward Sapir's Paiute terms in "Southern Paiute, a Shoshonean Language." Lucy Mike (referred to as Mrs. Lucy and who also knew Walapai) and Luisa gave Chemehuevi equivalences. There are also notes on placename trips, rehearings of tribenames, and some ethnographic and anecdotal notes
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington first conducted research on Chemehuevi in 1910-1911, collecting information from Jack Jones, George Johnson, and Ohue. In 1919 and 1920, Carobeth, his wife at the time, accumulated extensive data from George Laird, Annie Laird, and Ben Paddock. These notes formed the backbone of Harrington's Chemehuevi material, which was copied, organized, and often reheard in Washington in 1920. Harrington renewed his research in 1946, initiating a search for surviving Chemehuevi speakers. He connected with a number of speakers and embarked with them on placename trips from Barstow to Needles, Searchlight, Nelson, and Las Vegas.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Chemehuevi language  Search this
Mohave language  Search this
Diegueño language  Search this
Serrano language  Search this
Southern Paiute language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies / 8.3: Supplemental Material on Southern California/Basin
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15262
Online Media:

Records Relating to Lectures

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
2 Boxes
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Lecture notes
Date:
1910-1915
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Notes and writings on special linguistic studies series contains materials relating to Harrington's lecturing experiences, including preparatory notes, several sets of lecture notes, and a small file of student papers. Preparatory notes for some of Harrington's classes are contained in a small notebook labeled "Notebook B." It includes numerous bibliographic references and reading notes from such anthropologists as Waldemar Bogoras, Waldemar Jochelson, and Franz Boas. Harrington used marginal notations to flag any sources of data on the Ainu. For his course on the Indians of the Southwest there are only seven pages of notes. These include an outline of the course and a list of illustrations which Harrington wished to have made by Kenneth M. Chapman, an artist at the School of American Archaeology. The course notes for the Indians of the Northwest consist of a mixture of outlines, verbatim texts of lectures, bibliography, and reading notes. There are relatively small files on the Chukchee, Siberian Indians, Eskimo, and Aleut, and an especially large section on the Ainu. The notes for the evening lecture series on "The Siberian Origin of the American Indian" include the text of Harrington's talks with commentary on forty-nine slides. The subject headings are: (1) Whence?, (2) Ainu, (3) Eastern Siberian Indians, (4) Eskimos, (5) Indians of the Northwest-especially Haida and Kwakiutl, and (6) Washington and Oregon of yesterday. There are also rough notes on the origin of the American Indian and data on comparative mythology. The file of notes for Harrington's class on linguistics appears to have been compiled and used over an extensive period. The largely unorganized notes cover the physical aspects of speech, animal communication, gesture and sign language, the language of children, writing, and phonetics. They also touch on field methods. There is a large file of bibliographic references and a set of eight charts for illustrative purposes. The student papers were submitted to Harrington by students in his class on linguistics. Filed with Harrington's lecture notes is a set of notes for a proposed exhibit which he evidently prepared while working at the Panama-California Exposition. These include an outline, slips with ideas, and a twenty-three page proposal titled "The Linguistic Laboratory" which gives detailed physical descriptions of the various parts of the exhibit. Among the concepts which he planned to cover in the exhibit were the origin, geography, and classification of languages, the development of writing, and the use of modern inventions such as the typewriter and kymograph.
Biographical / Historical:
Early in his career John P. Harrington was asked to lecture in a number of academic settings. From February to March 1910, Harrington taught a class on the Indians of the Southwest at the University of Colorado at Boulder and then appeared on the lecture circuit in Denver and Colorado Springs. He returned to Boulder to repeat the course from October to November and again in September and October of the following year.

From June to August 1910 he taught two classes in the summer school session at the University of Washington in Seattle. The titles of the classes given in his vitae are "The Science of Language" and "The Indians of the Northwest." During this period he also presented a series of evening lectures under the auspices of the Seattle Society of the American Institute of Archaeology. The six illustrated talks dealt with "The Siberian Origin of the American Indian."

Harrington also taught classes in linguistics while working for the School of American Archaeology and the Panama-California Exposition from 1912 to 1915.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Education  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Function:
Exhibitions
Genre/Form:
Lecture notes
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 8.16
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15657

[Small indoor classroom scene. Active no. 7871 : stereo interpositive.]

Publisher:
Underwood & Underwood  Search this
Collection Creator:
Underwood & Underwood  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (5" x 8".)
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Stereoscopic photographs
Local Numbers:
RSN 22160
General:
Currently stored in box 3.2.22 [226].
Orig. no. 01786.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but is stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. The original glass plate is available for inspection if necessary in the Archives Center. A limited number of fragile glass negatives and positives in the collection can be viewed directly in the Archives Center by prior appointment. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Children  Search this
Classrooms  Search this
International education  Search this
geography  Search this
Maps  Search this
Schools  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 1900-1910 -- Interpositives -- Glass
Stereoscopic photographs
Collection Citation:
Underwood &Underwood Glass Stereograph Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Underwood & Underwood Glass Stereograph Collection
Underwood & Underwood Glass Stereograph Collection / Series 3: Underwood & Underwood glass plates / 3.2: Underwood and Underwood Positives / RSN Numbers 22107-22207
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0143-ref19927

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