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Carol and Katie Davis Collection of Adams Morgan Ephemeral

Extent:
1.29 Linear feet (1 box)
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Ephemera
Newspapers
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- 20th century
Adams Morgan (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1973-1974
Summary:
Carol and Katie Davis Collection of Adams Morgan Ephemera, which dates from 1973-1974 and measures 1.29 linear feet, documents the growth and flourishing of neigborhood activism in Washington, DC both before and after the arrival of Home Rule. The collection includes copies of The Columbian newspaper, the self-proclaimed "Community Newspaper of Adams Morgan," also published as "Noticierio Columbian."
Scope and Contents:
Carol and Katie Davis Collection of Adams Morgan Ephemera, which dates from 1973-1974 and measures 1.29 linear feet, documents the growth and flourishing of neigborhood activism in Washington, DC both before and after the arrival of Home Rule. The collection includes copies of The Columbian newspaper, the self-proclaimed "Community Newspaper of Adams Morgan," also published as "Noticierio Columbian." Present in the collection are also flyers, brochures, and a report which documents the organization's efforts to fight the impending gentrification, speculation, and displacement that was threatening the neighborhood in the 1970s.
Biographical / Historical:
Adams Morgan Organization (AMO), founded in 1972 by neighborhood advocates Marie Nahikian, Walter Pierce, Topper Care, Josephine "Jo" Butler, Edward G. Jackson Sr., Charlotte Fillmore, and Milton Kotler among others, tackled urgent issues in their community like real estate speculation and residential displacement. AMO convened regular and well-attended assembly meetings where residents shared an equal vote with AMO's elected chairperson and 25 representatives. When the Advisory Neigbhorhood Commissions (ANCs) were created as part of DC's transition to Home Rule, AMO served as a model of how local self-government could thrive. The tenant protections that AMO advocated for-including the 1975 Rental Accommodations Act, the 1978 Residential Real Property Transfer Excise Tax, and the 1980 Rental Housing Conversion and Sale Act-have helped preserve what affordable housing has remained in the District of Columbia.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at ACMarchives@si.edu
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Community activists  Search this
Urban Life  Search this
Community Organizations  Search this
Genre/Form:
Ephemera -- 20th century
Newspapers
Citation:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives,Smithsonian Institution,gift of Carol and Katie Davis.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-084
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa73a67ffb4-db5f-412e-b407-878e68a6f04a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-084
Online Media:

Philip G. Freelon Architectural Archive

Creator:
Freelon, Philip G., 1953-2019  Search this
Names:
American Institute of Architects  Search this
Freelon Adjaye Bond/SmithGroup  Search this
Freelon Bond Architects  Search this
Freelon Group  Search this
Hampton University (Va.)  Search this
Harvard University  Search this
Massachusetts Institute of Technology  Search this
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. School of Architecture  Search this
National Museum of African American History and Culture  Search this
National Organization of Minority Architects (U.S.)  Search this
North Carolina Board of Architecture  Search this
NorthStar Church of the Arts  Search this
PPG Industries, Inc.  Search this
Perkins & Will  Search this
Adjaye, David, 1966-  Search this
Bond, J. Max, Jr.  Search this
Freelon, Allan Randall, 1895-1960  Search this
Extent:
5.1 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Place:
North Carolina -- United States
United States of America -- North Carolina -- Durham County -- Durham
United States of America -- Massachusetts -- Suffolk County -- Boston
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia County -- Philadelphia
United States of America -- New York -- New York
Date:
bulk 1939-2017
Scope and Contents:
The Philip G. Freelon Architectural Archival Collection documents the life and career of architect, educator, cultural heritage preservation advocate and artist Philip G. Freelon. The collection highlights his distinguished career from its inception to his role as the "architect of record" for the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Freelon was one of the leading African American architects of his generation and he created a focus designing and constructing buildings that paid reverence to African Americans and other underrepresented communities. This collection is comprised of business records, photographic materials, ephemera, correspondence, architectural drawings, and clippings.
Arrangement:
The materials in this collection have been separated into seven series. The materials have been ordered and organized based on the content and chronology. Within each series and sub-series, the folders are organized as close to the collection's original order as when it was acquired.
Biographical / Historical:
Philip Goodwin Freelon was born March 26, 1953, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Allan Freelon, Jr. and Elizabeth Neal Freelon. Freelon was greatly influenced by his grandfather, Allan Freelon Sr., a notable Harlem Renaissance visual artist, educator, and civil rights activist. His grandfather's values and artistry inspired him to create a career that focused on creating historical and cultural spaces in African American communities. Freelon attended high school at the former predominantly white elite all-boys school, Central High School located in upper North Philadelphia from 1967 to 1971. His attendance at this school during of the Civil Rights Movement afforded him the unique experience that inspired him to attend a historically Black college (HBCU). Freelon selected Hampton Institute (Hampton University) to develop his veneration of the composition and design of the buildings that held cultural and artistic treasures. Located in the Tidewater area of Virginia, Hampton was renowned among HBCUs for its architecture program. His professor and mentor at Hampton, John Spencer, pushed Freelon academically as he moved easily through the school's curriculum. After two years at Hampton, Spencer helped Freelon transition to a more challenging program at North Carolina State University (NCSU) in Raleigh, North Carolina. Freelon graduated in 1975 with a bachelor's in environmental design in architecture.

Later in the fall of 1975, Freelon enrolled at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to pursue a master's in architecture. During the summers, Freelon worked with one of former his NC State professors at the architectural firm of John D. Latimer and Associates. After graduating from MIT in 1977, Freelon returned to North Carolina to take his Architecture Registration Examination (ARE), becoming the firm's youngest person to receive licensure. He also began teaching classes at his alma mater, NC State. It was there that Freelon met his future wife, Nnenna Pierce. Pierce, a Massachusetts native was attending Simmons College in Boston at the time. The connection was immediate, and the pair was married in 1979 and welcomed their first son, Deen in 1980. After a brief employment for a large Texas firm 3/D International, Freelon returned to Durham to join O'Brien Atkins Associates. He was the firm's youngest partner, eventually serving as principal and vice president of architecture. Freelon worked on a wide variety of projects throughout the state including learning centers, university buildings, churches, and parking garages. Along with Freelon's budding career, his family was expanding as well. Phil and Nnenna welcomed their daughter Maya in 1982 and their son, Pierce in 1983. During this time, Freelon was being highly recognized for his work. The American of Institute of Architects (AIA) awarded him the Honor Award for his design of Terminal 2 of the Raleigh-Durham International Airport, which has since been rebuilt.

By the end of the decade, Freelon and his wife Nnenna needed a change of pace. Nnenna pursued a professional career in music while Phil took a break from his career to expand his skillset and reinforce his intellectual approach to design. In 1989, Freelon was granted the Loeb Fellowship for one year of independent study at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. He also pursued a longtime hobby of furniture design, calling the practice "small architecture". He received industry awards like first prize in the PPG Industries, Inc. Furniture Design Competition as well as AIA Honor Award for conference table designs. With a year away from the field to clarify his vision, Freelon opened his own firm, simply titled, the Freelon Group in 1990. Beginning as a one-man operation, the Freelon Group grew to become one of the largest African American owned architectural firms in the country with over 50 employees, forty percent of which were women, and thirty percent were people of color. With freedom within his own firm, Freelon focused on designing learning centers, libraries and museums and vowed to never build anything that did not bring cultural and intellectual value to a community.

Over the next twenty years, Freelon would assert himself as a force in designing notable cultural institutions and community-driven projects in and around the country including the Sonja Haynes Stone Center at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC), Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture (Baltimore, MD), Museum of African Diaspora (San Francisco, CA), Harvey B. Gantt for African American Arts and Culture (Charlotte, NC), the Anacostia and Tenley-Friendship branches of the District of Columbia Public Library , National Center for Civil Rights and Human Rights (Atlanta, GA), Mississippi Civil Rights Museum (Jackson, MS) and Emancipation Park (Houston, TX). Alongside his architectural career, Freelon served as a lecturer and adjunct professor at several colleges and universities including North Carolina State University, Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), University of Maryland College Park, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Syracuse University, and the Florence, Italy program at Kent State University. Freelon was awarded a full-time appointment as professor of Professional Practice at MIT in 2008. The Professional Practice (4.222) course was a requirement for the master's in architecture and he used examples from his extensive career and personal experience to illustrate legal, ethical, and management concepts. Nnenna's music career was also thriving. She would go on to record twelve albums and be nominated for six Grammys. This fusion of education, the arts, and music inspired another generation of Freelons: their son, Pierce Freelon is a hip-hop artist, educator, and political activist; daughter Maya Freelon is a visual artist; and son Deen Freelon is a professor.

In 2001, George W. Bush established a commission to create a new museum on the National Mall. Freelon wanted to enter his firm to participate in the international design competition. Freelon would partner with famed African American New York City architect, J. Max Bond, Jr. and by 2006 the two officially formed the Freelon Bond Architects.The Freelon Bond group submitted their proposal and soon after were elected to create programming and pre-design work for the museum. When the official design competition for the museum was announced in 2008, UK-based architect David Adjaye joined the team as the lead designer, and along with the partnering firm SmithGroup, the new architectural team became Freelon Adjaye Bond/SmithGroup. The three black architects combined a variety of distinctive elements from Africa and the Americas to create the building's unique, historically significant design. The Freelon Group served as the "architect of record" and were responsible for ensuring that key design ideas were upheld. Freelon and key firm members such as Zena Howard were active as on-site project managers during the museum's construction process to certify that the building would be developed according to plan. Freelon, Adjaye, and Bond were tasked with taking the collective history of the African American experience-- generations of pain, triumph, and perseverance-- and forming it into a structure. The team looked to African sources, such as Yoruban architecture, for inspiration. They sought to connect the building's design to the geographic and cultural roots of African Americans. Their design choices also reference the contributions of enslaved and free black metalworkers made to the landscape of the American South. Their goal was to make the museum an extension of its contents, and an expression of the stories told inside. By the groundbreaking for NMAAHC in 2012, Freelon had been appointed to the U.S. Commission of the Fine Arts by President Barack Obama. In an effort to broaden his resources and expand his firm, The Freelon Group merged with Perkins & Will, a firm originating in Chicago that grew to have offices across the United States. Freelon was appointed the managing director and later lead design director at the firm's North Carolina offices in Charlotte and Durham in 2014. By the next year, Freelon understood that his work in architecture and education was a necessary voice to preserve, which he did through donation of the bulk of his personal papers to his alma mater, NC State University. The year 2016 proved to be a year of triumph for Freelon as NMAAHC opened its doors on September 24th to much jubilation and celebration. That same year, Freelon's legacy was further cemented as the Phil Freelon Fellowship Fund was established at Harvard University Graduate School of Design, a fellowship designed to broaden opportunities for African Americans and other underrepresented communities in architecture and design.

Unfortunately, this triumphant year was met with difficulty as Freelon was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive disease that affects the nervous system. He would continue to work and lecture for the next two years until it became too challenging. One of those projects was the renovation and opening of The NorthStar Church of the Arts in early 2019. A passion project with his wife and son, Pierce, a former church was renovated and repurposed as an arts and cultural space for all. This space was created in an effort to support the Durham cultural community as it began to feel the effects of gentrification. When Freelon lost his battle with ALS on July 9, 2019, in his home in Durham, North Carolina, the family requested that in lieu of flowers that donations be sent to the NorthStar Church to continue the center's mission and Phil's dream to give back to the Durham community.

Historical Timeline

1953 -- Philip Goodwin Freelon was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Allan Freelon Jr. and Elizabeth Neal Freelon.

1971 -- Freelon graduated from Central High School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and entered School of Architecture, Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia as a design student.

1973 -- Freelon transferred to College of Design at the North Carolina State University in Raleigh.

1975 -- Graduated with a Bachelor's in Environmental Design in Architecture from NC State University. He received the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Book Award for Outstanding Work in Architectural Design. In the fall, he began his master's program in architecture at MIT.

1976 -- Began working as aide for architectural firm, John D. Latimer and Associates.

1977 -- Graduated with a Master's in Architecture and Design from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT.)

1978 -- Freelon became youngest architect to pass the North Carolina Architecture Registration Exam. Freelon started teaching at North Carolina State University.

1979 -- Married Chinyere "Nnenna" Pierce. Freelon began working for, 3/D International in Houston, Texas.

1980 -- Son Deen Freelon was born.

1981 -- Freelon returned to Durham, NC to join O'Brien Atkins Associates as the firm's youngest partner.

1982 -- Daughter Maya Freelon was born.

1983 -- Son Pierce Freelon was born.

1989-1990 -- Received Loeb Fellowship for independent study at Harvard University. Freelon received AIA Honor Award for American Airlines Terminal 2 at Raleigh-Durham Airport, NC (RDU).

1990 -- Freelon left O'Brien Atkins Associates to open his own firm The Freelon Group.

1991 -- Won first prize in the PPG Furniture Design Competition.

1992 -- Won the AIA Honor Award for Conference Table Designs.

2001 -- Won the AIA Firm Award for The Freelon Group and the AIA Design Award for Parking Structure, RDU Airport. Began attending meetings of President George W. Bush's commission on new National Mall museum dedicated to African American history and culture.

2003 -- Freelon merged his firm with New York architect Max Bond to create Freelon Bond Architects.

2004 -- Sonja Haynes Stone Center at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC) was completed.

2005 -- Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture (Baltimore, MD) and Museum of African Diaspora (San Francisco, CA) were both completed.

2008 -- UK-based architect David Adjaye and Washington, DC based architecture firm, Smithgroup joined the team, creating the Freelon Adjaye Bond Group/SmithGroup Freelon began teaching at MIT's school of Architecture and Design.

2009 -- Freelon Adjaye Bond/Smithgroup won the official design for the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). Harvey B. Gantt for African American Arts and Culture (Charlotte, NC) was completed.

2010 -- Anacostia branch of the District of Columbia Public Library (Washington, DC) was completed.

2011 -- Tenley-Friendship branch of the District of Columbia Public Library (Washington, DC) was completed.

2012 -- Construction began on NMAAHC.

2014 -- The Freelon Group merged with Perkins & Will, a much larger architectural firm. Freelon became managing director and lead design director of the North Carolina branches in Durham and Charlotte. National Center for Civil Rights and Human Rights (Atlanta, GA) was completed.

2016 -- Freelon was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

2017 -- Mississippi Civil Rights Museum (Jackson, MS) and Emancipation Park (Houston, TX) were completed.

2019 -- Freelon died in his home in Durham, North Carolina at age 66 on July 9.
Related Materials:
Phil Freelon Papers, 1975-2019 at North Carolina State University Libraries.
Provenance:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Philip G. Freelon.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access to collection materials requires an appointment.
Rights:
The NMAAHC Archives can provide reproductions of some materials for research and educational use. Copyright and right to publicity restrictions apply and limit reproduction for other purposes.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Business  Search this
Construction  Search this
Entrepreneurship  Search this
Local and Regional  Search this
Design  Search this
Education  Search this
Photographs  Search this
Museums  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Citation:
Philip G. Freelon Archival Collection, 1939-2017. National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAAHC.A2017.51
See more items in:
Philip G. Freelon Architectural Archive
Archival Repository:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/io3ba3ca2a2-5495-45cf-801c-f3d66a7002fd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmaahc-a2017-51

Brand New: Art and Commodity in the 1980s

Creator:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2018-01-30T22:09:26.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, modern  Search this
See more by:
hirshhornmuseum
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
YouTube Channel:
hirshhornmuseum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_q48MJSK0Wp8

Chocolate City No More: Changing Demographics & Gentrification of Washington, D.C

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2015-12-08T00:59:58.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
See more by:
Anacostia_Community_Museums
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
YouTube Channel:
Anacostia_Community_Museums
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_feGIOEoBaGc

Beverly Price Family Home Movies

Former owner:
Price, Beverly  Search this
Collection Creator:
National Museum of African American History and Culture (U.S.)  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Home movies
Date:
circa 2013
Scope and Contents:
The Beverly Price Family Home Movies consist of a regular 8mm home movie documenting family and friends gathered in a Washington DC neighborhood impacted by gentrification.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is available online for open research.
Collection Rights:
The Great Migration Home Movie Study Collection is a product of and owned by the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution.

Copyright for all works are retained by the creators of the original analog materials.
The contents of the Great Migration Home Movie Project are made available to the public for the purposes of education and scholarly research. The home movies digitized through the project are not available for commercial licensing. Educational and scholarly use may be considered on an individual basis.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Families  Search this
Gentrification  Search this
Genre/Form:
Home movies
Collection Citation:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Earl W. and Amanda Stafford Center for African American Media Arts. Supported by the Center for the Digitization and Curation of African American History.
See more items in:
Great Migration Home Movie Study Collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/io3bffdd7bf-4bae-437d-9bd6-41efa3acdef3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmaahc-sc-0001-ref921

Abstract barrios the crises of Latinx visibility in cities Johana Londoño

Author:
Londoño, Johana 1982-  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (xxii, 306 pages) illustrations (some color)
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
History
Place:
United States
États-Unis
Date:
2020
Topic:
Hispanic American neighborhoods--History  Search this
Hispanic Americans--Social life and customs  Search this
Hispanic Americans--Ethnic identity  Search this
Urban policy--History  Search this
City planning--Social aspects  Search this
Gentrification--History  Search this
Quartiers hispaniques--Histoire  Search this
Américains d'origine latino-américaine--Mœurs et coutumes  Search this
Politique urbaine--Histoire  Search this
Embourgeoisement (Urbanisme)--Histoire  Search this
SOCIAL SCIENCE--Ethnic Studies--Hispanic American Studies  Search this
Ethnic relations  Search this
Gentrification  Search this
Hispanic American neighborhoods  Search this
Urban policy  Search this
Relations interethniques  Search this
Restrictions & Rights:
Use copy Restrictions unspecified
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1155917

ARTLAB - The Salon: Episode 1 ft. A'Lelia Bundles and Wanda Henderson

Creator:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden  Search this
Type:
Interviews
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2019-10-25T21:10:44.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, modern  Search this
See more by:
hirshhornARTLAB
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
YouTube Channel:
hirshhornARTLAB
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_My2MwIU0P-A

Oral history interview with Peter Cramer and Jack Waters

Interviewee:
Cramer, Peter Francis  Search this
Waters, Jack  Search this
Interviewer:
Kirwin, Liza  Search this
Names:
ABC No Rio (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Artist's Spaces Archives  Search this
Collaborative Projects, Inc.  Search this
New York (N.Y.). Dept. of Housing Preservation and Development  Search this
Acierno, Lou  Search this
Gamper, Christa  Search this
George, Carl  Search this
Gonzalez-Torres, Felix, 1957-1996  Search this
Howland, Becky  Search this
Karlen, Joan  Search this
Keene, Michael  Search this
Kurtti, George  Search this
Moore, Alan  Search this
Schloss, Arlene  Search this
Smith, Kiki, 1954-  Search this
Taylor, Brad  Search this
Taylor, Brian  Search this
Extent:
73 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2007 September 6-October 9
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Peter Cramer and Jack Waters conducted 2007 September 6 and October 9, by Liza Kirwin, for the Archives of American Art, in conjunction with the Artists' Spaces Archives Project, at Allied Productions, Inc. Studio in New York, New York.
Cramer and Waters, former co-directors of ABC No Rio, speak of their family and educational backgrounds; dance studies; forming their own company POOL (Performance On One Leg) and their "umbrella" non-profit group Allied Productions; their performance "Seven Days of Creation" at ABC No Rio; "crisis management" of ABC No Rio's building at 156 Rivington Street; Colab [Collaborative Projects]; residents in the building including Bobby G and the Acosta family; programs located at ABC No Rio's including the Naked Eye Cinema, Open Mike, Z Club, hardcore Matinee (punk music), and others; seeking grants; incorporating as a non-profit organization; fostering a queer aesthetic; AIDS and the art community; ABC No Rio's traveling exhibitions and performances; gentrification on the Lower East Side; ongoing conflicts with New York City's Department of Housing, Preservation and Development (owner of the building); management of ABC No Rio's Board; community outreach; NEA funding and the "culture wars"; and the "burnout factor" of running ABC No Rio. They also recall Lou Acierno, Charas/El Bohio Cultural and Community Center, Christa Gamper, Carl George, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Becky Howland, Joan Karlen, Michael Keane, George Kurtti, Alan Moore, The Pyramid Club, Arlene Schloss, Kiki Smith, Brad Taylor, Brian Taylor, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Peter Cramer is an interactivist artist from New York, New York. Jack Waters is a media artist from New York, New York. Liza Kirwin is the curator of manuscripts at the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 5 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 22 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript is available on the Archives of American Art's website.
Occupation:
Multimedia artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
African American societies  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.cramer07
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw938df3c5e-d2b4-46fc-a61b-990331306b1b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cramer07
Online Media:

Representing Diaspora & Diverse Blackness in Museology - Revisiting Our Black Mosaic Symposium

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2015-11-19T15:24:16.000Z
YouTube Category:
People & Blogs  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
See more by:
Anacostia_Community_Museums
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
YouTube Channel:
Anacostia_Community_Museums
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_9hEea23XUEM

Delegate

Published by:
MelPat Associates, American, 1965 - 1986  Search this
Created by:
C. Melvin Patrick, American, died 1985  Search this
Subject of:
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, American, founded 1909  Search this
National Urban League, American, founded 1910  Search this
Sigma Phi Rho Fraternity, American, founded 1978  Search this
National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education, American, founded 1969  Search this
Association of Black Women Attorneys, American, founded 1976  Search this
National Urban Affairs Council, American, founded 1971  Search this
Raymond A. Jordan Jr., American, born 1943  Search this
National Association of Market Developers, American, founded 1953  Search this
The Links, Incorporated, American, founded 1946  Search this
Northside Center for Child Development, Inc., founded 1946  Search this
National Newspaper Publishers Association, American, founded 1827  Search this
Prince Hall Freemasonry, founded 1784  Search this
Chi Delta Mu Fraternity, Inc., American, founded 1913  Search this
Top Ladies of Distinction, Inc., American, founded 1964  Search this
Lambda Kappa Mu Sorority, Inc., American, founded 1937  Search this
Carats, Inc., American, founded 1959  Search this
Chi Eta Phi Sorority, Inc., American, founded 1932  Search this
National United Church Ushers Association of America, Inc., American, founded 1919  Search this
Iota Phi Lambda Sorority, Inc., American, founded 1929  Search this
National Medical Association, American, founded 1895  Search this
Dr. Leslie L. Alexander, Jamaican American, 1917 - 2002  Search this
Smithsonian Institution, American, founded 1846  Search this
National Sorority of Phi Delta Kappa, Inc., American, founded 1923  Search this
Morehouse College, American, founded 1867  Search this
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, American, founded 1913  Search this
Shriners International, American, founded 1870  Search this
Dr. Benjamin Elijah Mays, American, 1894 - 1984  Search this
Count Basie, American, 1904 - 1984  Search this
National Coalition of 100 Black Women, American, founded 1981  Search this
National Bankers Association, American, founded 1927  Search this
369th Veterans Association, American  Search this
One Hundred Black Men, Inc., American, founded 1963  Search this
Association for the Study of African American Life and History, American, founded 1915  Search this
Signed by:
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., American, founded 1906  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 10 13/16 × 8 7/16 × 9/16 in. (27.5 × 21.4 × 1.5 cm)
Type:
magazines (periodicals)
Place made:
Harlem, New York City, New York, United States, North and Central America
Place depicted:
Martha's Vineyard, Oak Bluffs, Dukes County, Massachusetts, United States, North and Central America
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1985
Topic:
African American  Search this
Advertising  Search this
Associations and institutions  Search this
Black Enterprise  Search this
Black Press  Search this
Business  Search this
Communities  Search this
Fraternal organizations  Search this
Fraternities  Search this
Government  Search this
HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities)  Search this
Journalism  Search this
Labor  Search this
Mass media  Search this
Men  Search this
Political organizations  Search this
Politics  Search this
Professional organizations  Search this
Religion  Search this
Social life and customs  Search this
Sororities  Search this
U.S. History, 1969-2001  Search this
Urban life  Search this
Women  Search this
Women's organizations  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Anne B. Patrick and the family of Hilda E. Stokely
Object number:
2012.167.19
Restrictions & Rights:
Public domain
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Documents and Published Materials-Published Works
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5ee110782-b949-43b4-bbec-56a00d4f086e
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2012.167.19
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  • View <I>Delegate</I> digital asset number 1

Black Mosaic of Wash DC: unpacking multiple “Black” identities

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2015-11-19T15:23:45.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
See more by:
Anacostia_Community_Museums
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
YouTube Channel:
Anacostia_Community_Museums
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_aMCx6T_Fxos

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Mary Kimbrough

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her store in Los Angeles, CA., Mary Kimbrough (born 1941 CA) - a collector of objects of African descent and sister of Jackie Ryan also interviewed - spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Kimbrough expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. As a store owner, she talked about her community and gentrification. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Kimbrough talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Kimbrough described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19980425.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000159_B
General:
Title created by ACM staff based on project name and interviewee's name transcribed from physical asset.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Communities  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Mary Kimbrough, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000159_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa74e2ad434-ef8b-47e1-b96d-c8473906817e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref9

Oral History Interview with Sandy Allen

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2007
Scope and Contents:
Anacostian Resident Sandy Allen described the sites in far southeast Washington, D.C. (Ward 8) where she leads visitors on sightseeing tours, and how Anacostia has changed from her childhood in the 1980s to today (2007). She talked about her contributions to East of the River (EOR) communities as an activist and elected official, including combating gentrification in southeast D.C; and how she pictures the future of southeast D.C. through its changes. Allen explained why and how the community and family deteriorated, and how community activism changed in the community. She talked about past and present community leaders; and the top and upcoming issues for EOR communities, including the development of housing and sports stadiums.
Interview created in conjunction with the Anacostia Community Museum's 40th Anniversary Oral History Project and the exhibition, 'East of the River: Continuity and Change.' Dated 20070504
General:
Title created by ACM staff based on project/exhibition name and interviewee's name.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
Community development, Urban  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
East of the River: Interview with Sandy Allen, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-052, Item ACMA AV005191
See more items in:
East of the River: Continuity and Change Exhibition Records
East of the River: Continuity and Change Exhibition Records / Series 3: Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa72e476cfb-2338-4ff9-af98-f51ef6563953
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-052-ref539

Oral History Interview with Absalom Jordan

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2007
Scope and Contents:
Absalom F. Jordan, Jr. talked about growing up in northwest Washington, D.C.; his experience in the Air Force; when and how he came to activism, specifically justice and racism; his involvement with the Black United Fund; gentrification in Washington, D.C.; community organizing; and his life and work in southeast Washington, D.C.
Interview created in conjunction with the Anacostia Community Museum's 40th Anniversary Oral History Project and the exhibition, 'East of the River: Continuity and Change.' Dated 20070504
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Interview with Absalom Jordan, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-052, Item ACMA AV005341
See more items in:
East of the River: Continuity and Change Exhibition Records
East of the River: Continuity and Change Exhibition Records / Series 3: Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7ed22a436-e0ca-4b4b-a1e8-4b5a77d1e93b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-052-ref552

Where International Becomes Local: Immigration in the DC Metro Area

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2015-11-20T01:53:42.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
See more by:
Anacostia_Community_Museums
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
YouTube Channel:
Anacostia_Community_Museums
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_6HqzGLLNLP8

Places On The Move: Gentrification (Anacostia Museum and Mark Puryear)

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2016 July 08
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Samir Meghelli; Mark Puryear Washington, D.C., has been undergoing what people are calling "gentrification overdrive." Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum curator Dr. Samir Meghelli and Smithsonian Folklife curator Mark Puryear will engage visitors in a discussion of what gentrification means to the evolving communities of D.C. and how it impacts our sense of place and cultural heritage.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2016 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2016, Item SFF2016_0708_OTM_OTM_0003.wav
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2016 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2016 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 3: On the Move: Migration and Immigration Today / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk52ed2333c-b492-4054-b771-142aebbd0c4b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2016-ref1061

Audio Log Sheets

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2016 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2016 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2016 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 4: Sounds of California / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk57a4226c6-5f70-4203-8c59-0e3f6852f8b3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2016-ref1389
3 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Audio Log Sheets digital asset number 1
  • View Audio Log Sheets digital asset number 2
  • View Audio Log Sheets digital asset number 3

Audio Log Sheets

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 4: On The Move / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5e871ee6c-988a-4aec-97fe-ac1f8a7dced6
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref1019
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Audio Log Sheets digital asset number 1

Migration Talk Stories

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 June 29
Scope and Contents:
Les Walker (presenter); Antoaneta Tileva ;Anthropologist Antoaneta Tileva, a doctoral candidate at American University, leads a conversation on gentrification and the economic displacement of African American communities in D.C. Her current research focuses on local neighborhoods that are later populated by immigrants from East Africa and Latin America. This session is presented by the American Anthropological Association.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0629_OTM_Story_Circle_0003
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 4: On The Move / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5bd230b32-866b-41ed-9947-1f36215ab8e3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref919

Redefining Home: A Roundtable Discussion

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 July 03
Scope and Contents:
Sebi Medina Tayac (presenter); Tom Fong; Alyssa Berrios; Michael Morris; MASPAZ; CHELOVE ;In this session, artists of different traditions and generations discuss the social and symbolic meanings of home  sharing the ways in which these ideas inform their sense of identity, community, and creative practices. Participants include CHELOVE (AKA Cita Sadeli), MASPAZ (AKA Federico Frum), Alyssa Berrios, Michael Morris.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0703_OTM_Story_Circle_0005
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 4: On The Move / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5b05c1625-edb8-4fa9-8c06-9a9b7f192ba1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref963
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Redefining Home: A Roundtable Discussion digital asset number 1

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