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Jerome Caja papers, circa 1920-1995

Creator:
Caja, Jerome D., 1958-1995  Search this
Type:
Sketchbooks
Moving images
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Jerome Caja papers, circa 1920-1995. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Gay artists  Search this
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Theme:
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)6515
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)215774
AAA_collcode_cajajero
Theme:
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_215774
Online Media:

The last two weeks of June

Creator:
Myers, Andrew  Search this
Subject:
National Endowment for the Arts  Search this
Type:
Videorecording
Place:
San Francisco, Calif.
Date:
not before 1990
Citation:
Andrew Myers. The last two weeks of June, not before 1990. Jerome Caja papers, circa 1920-1995. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Gay artists  Search this
Gay communities  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)11810
See more items in:
Jerome Caja papers, circa 1920-1995
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_11810

Jerome Caja papers

Creator:
Caja, Jerome, 1958-1995  Search this
Extent:
7.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Moving images
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Date:
circa 1920-1995
Summary:
The papers of painter Jerome Caja measure 7.9 linear feet and date from circa 1920 to 1995. The papers document his career as an artist in San Francisco through biographical material; correspondence with family, friends, art organizations, and galleries; poetry, prose, and other writings; exhbiition announcements, newspaper and magazine clippings, and other printed materials, gallery and exhibition files; artwork, including sketchbooks and numerous small paintings, sketches and drawings, photographs; audiovisual materials including film reels, vido and audio cassettes.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter Jerome Caja measure 7.9 linear feet and date from circa 1920 to 1995. The papers document his career as an artist in San Francisco through biographical material; correspondence with family, friends, art organizations, and galleries; poetry, prose, and other writings; exhbiition announcements, newspaper and magazine clippings, and other printed materials, gallery and exhibition files; artwork, including sketchbooks and numerous small paintings, sketches and drawings, photographs; audiovisual materials including film reels, vido and audio cassettes.

Biographical Material includes a family history, a short autobiography, school documents from elementary through college, yearbooks, identifications and certificates. Correspondence includes letters numerous letters from parents, letters from some brothers, and letters from friends. Writings consist primarily of short plays and skits by Caja, prose and poetry, a journal, and writings by friends. Gallery and Exhibition Files consist of correspondence, inventory and price lists, exhibition announcements and catalogs, and contracts from museums and galleries where Caja did exhibitions or auctions. Personal Business Records consist of price lists, invoices, receipts for works he sold to individuals or institutions. Printed Materials consist of newspaper and magazine clippings detailing Caja's exhibition or his involvement in the gay scene of San Francisco. There are also books with inscriptions that were given to Caja by friends, and there are publication materials that belonged to Caja.

Artwork primarily consists of numerous small drawings and sketches in ink, chalk, and nail polish. Also included are sketchbooks of Caja's drawings and oversized paintings and sketches. Photographs primarily consist of personal photos of Caja and his family during his childhood, photos of his grand parents and geat grandparents, and photos of nieces and nephews. There are also photos and slides of his ceramic work and some of his paintings and sketches. The majority of the photos are of Caja taking part in various events around San Francisco. Audio-Visual Materials consists of video cassettes, audio cassettes, and motion picture reels. Videos document Caja reading his book, Caja taking part in events in San Francisco, his artwork, and a movie that he was featured in. Audio cassettes consist primarily of music, but also of Caja reading stories. Film material consists of people working in an artist's workshop, a pool party, and a satirical narrative between children and their mother.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as nine series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1949-1994 (0.4 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1980-1995 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1980-1995 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 4: Gallery and Exhibition Files, 1982-1995 (0.4 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 5: Personal Business Records, 1990-1995 (0.2 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1960-1995 (1.3 linear feet; Box 2-3, Box 9)

Series 7: Artwork, circa 1980-1995 (1.7 linear feet: Box 4-5, Box 9, OV 13-15, Artifact)

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1920-1995 (1.8 linear feet; Box 5-6, Box 9, OV 14)

Series 9: Audio-Visual Material circa 1980-1995 (1.4 linear feet; Box 7-8, FC 16-23)
Biographical / Historical:
Jerome Caja (1958-1995) was a painter who worked primarily in San Francisco, CA. Caja was born in Ohio in 1958 and attended Clevaland State University. He moved to San Francisco in the 1980s and attended the San Francisco Art Institute from which he graduated in 1984. Caja pushed the boundaries of gender, performance, and art in the nightclub scene in San Francisco during the late 1980s and early 1990s. Caja died from complications related to HIV in 1995, during height of the AIDS-Art-Activism era in San Francisco.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Jerome Caja conducted by Paul Karlstrom, August 23-September 29, 1995, and Letters from Jerome Caja to Anna van der Meulen, 1995.
Provenance:
The Jerome Caja papers were donated in two installments from 1994 to 1995. The first installment was donated by Jerome Caja in 1994, and the second installment was donated by Anna van der Meulen, executor of Caja's estate, in 1995.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Topic:
Gay artists  Search this
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Moving images
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Jerome Caja papers, circa 1920-1995. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.cajajero
See more items in:
Jerome Caja papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9c2f9d6a7-e986-4ec0-aad0-03ec1851addc
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cajajero

Oral history interview with Lyle Ashton Harris

Interviewee:
Harris, Lyle Ashton, 1965-  Search this
Interviewer:
Fialho, Alex, 1989-  Search this
Names:
American Academy in Rome -- Students  Search this
California Institute of the Arts -- Students  Search this
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Wesleyan University (Middletown, Conn.) -- Students  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Baker, Houston A., Jr., 1943-  Search this
Barton, Nancy, (Artist)  Search this
Basquiat, Jean-Michel, 1960-1988  Search this
Butler, Cornelia H.  Search this
Carby, Hazel V.  Search this
Collier, Jim  Search this
Gates, Henry Louis, Jr.  Search this
Geer, Tommy  Search this
Goldin, Nan, 1953-  Search this
Gonzalez-Torres, Felix, 1957-1996  Search this
Gray, Todd, 1954-  Search this
Grayson, John, 1943-  Search this
Hemphill, Essex  Search this
Julien, Isaac  Search this
Lord, Catherine, 1949-  Search this
Mapplethorpe, Robert  Search this
Mays, Vickie M.  Search this
O'Dench, Ellen  Search this
O'Meally, Jackie  Search this
O'Meally, Robert G., 1948-  Search this
Riggs, Marlon T.  Search this
Seeley, J.  Search this
Sekula, Allan  Search this
Tate, Greg  Search this
Tilton, Jack  Search this
Watson, Simon  Search this
Wilson, Millie  Search this
Woodman, Francesca, 1958-1981  Search this
Extent:
6 Items (Sound recording: 6 sound files (8 hr., 6 min.), digital, wav)
95 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
England -- London -- Description and Travel
Ghana -- Description and Travel
Netherlands -- Amsterdam -- Description and Travel
New York (N.Y.) -- Description and Travel
Tanzania -- Description and Travel
Date:
2017 March 27-29
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Lyle Ashton Harris, conducted 2017 March 27 and 29, by Alex Fialho, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Harris's studio and home in New York, New York.
Harris speaks of his childhood in the Bronx; his family's influence on his race-consciousness; living in Tanzania for two years as a child and the effects on his understanding of race and sexuality; his grandfather's extensive photographic archive; contact with the South African diaspora through his step-father; attending Wesleyan University; formative experiences in London, Amsterdam, and New York in the mid-1980s; his education and development as a photographer; attending CalArts and encountering West Coast AIDS activism; encountering systemic racism in Los Angeles; close friendships with Marlon Riggs and Essex Hemphill; exhibitions of his work in New York in the early 1990s; the production of his Ektachrome Archive and his impulse to photograph daily life; his work on the Black Community AIDS Research and Education (Black C.A.R.E.) project in Los Angeles; participating in the Whitney Museum's Independent Study Program; being diagnosed with HIV and remaining asymptomatic; attending the Dia Black Popular Culture Conference in 1992; photographing and mounting "The Good Life" in 1994 and "The Watering Hole" in 1996; issues of blackness and queerness in his photographic work; his residency at the American Academy in Rome in 2000; moving to Accra, Ghana for seven years in 2005; his pedagogy as an art professor; his thoughts on the lack of voices of color in the Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic Oral History Project and in the larger power structures of the art world; and his hope that his artistic legacy will be evaluated in its proper context. Harris also recalls Jackie and Robert O'Meally, Jay Seeley, Ellen O'Dench, Francesca Woodman, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Jim Collier, Robert Mapplethorpe, Allan Sekula, Hazel Carby, Isaac Julien, Catherine Lord, Millie Wilson, Todd Gray, John Grayson, Tommy Gear, Marlon Riggs, Essex Hemphill, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Nancy Barton, Vickie Mays, Connie Butler, Greg Tate, Henry Louis Gates, Houston Baker, Nan Goldin, Jack Tilton, Simon Watson, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Lyle Ashton Harris (1965- ) is an artist who works in video, photography, and performance in New York, New York. Alex Fialho (1989- ) is a curator and arts writer and works as Programs Director for Visual AIDS in New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Performance artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Photographers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Video artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
AIDS activists  Search this
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
Racism  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Gay artists  Search this
African American art -- African influences  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American photographers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.harris17
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9559d7597-04b4-4644-b6ae-bca2bdb27f88
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-harris17
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Jim Hodges

Interviewee:
Hodges, Jim, 1957-  Search this
Interviewer:
Carr, C.  Search this
Names:
Fort Wright College of the Holy Names  Search this
Pratt Institute -- Students  Search this
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Arning, Bill  Search this
Chatham, Rhys  Search this
Feher, Tony, 1956-  Search this
Fuller, Marnie  Search this
Gonzalez-Torres, Felix, 1957-1996  Search this
Hoffman, Nancy, 1944-  Search this
Kaiser, Karen  Search this
McCarty, Lynn  Search this
Montano, Linda, 1942-  Search this
Morris, Bob  Search this
Nechvatal, Joseph  Search this
Nyzio, David, 1958-  Search this
Reynolds, Hunter, 1959-  Search this
Safranek, Doug, 1956-  Search this
Smith, Scott  Search this
Vallenciano, Robert  Search this
Extent:
16 Items (Sound recording: 16 sound files (3 hr., 44 min.), digital, wav)
87 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 March 9-May 25
Scope and Contents:
Oral history interview with Jim Hodges, conducted 2017 March 9 and May 25, by Cynthia Carr, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Hodges' studio in Queens, New York.
Hodges speaks of his childhood in Spokane, Washington; exposure to art-making in high school and at Fort Wright College; attending Pratt Institute in 1983; his first New York gallery job in 1984; discovering his sexuality and becoming interested in queer life and history; the early years of the AIDS crisis; taking a studio with the Dannheisser Foundation; his body of work in mixed media; his gallery exhibitions in the late 1980s and early '90s; becoming sober in 1990; and the influence of the AIDS crisis on his artwork and art-making process. Hodges also recalls Karen Kaiser, Scott Smith, Marnie Fuller, Davie Nyzio, Lynn McCarty, Robert Vallenciano, Bob Morris, Linda Montano, Joseph Nechvatal, Rhys Chatham, Nancy Hoffman, Hunter Reynolds, Tony Feher, Bill Arning, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Doug Safranek, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Jim Hodges (1957- ) is an installation artist in New York, New York. Cynthia Carr (1950- ) is a writer in New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Art -- Exhibitions  Search this
Artists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Installations (Art)  Search this
Mixed media (Art)  Search this
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Gay artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.hodges17
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9b9961c06-6188-4bf5-85b8-65197d690c0b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hodges17
Online Media:

Kay WalkingStick Symposium 09 - Angela Miller

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2015-11-10T18:58:02.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_vtv0dIi5XTU

Letters from Jerome Caja to Anna van der Meulen, 1995

Creator:
Caja, Jerome D., 1958-1995  Search this
Citation:
Letters from Jerome Caja to Anna van der Meulen, 1995. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Gay artists  Search this
Communities (LGBTQ)  Search this
Cross-dressers  Search this
Theme:
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)6252
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)216576
AAA_collcode_cajajerl
Theme:
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_216576

Oral history interview with Jerome Caja, 1995 August 23 and September 29

Interviewee:
Caja, Jerome D., 1958-1995  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Jerome Caja, 1995 August 23 and September 29. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Painters -- California -- San Francisco -- Interviews  Search this
Sculptors -- California -- San Francisco -- Interviews  Search this
Gay artists  Search this
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Cross-dressers  Search this
Communities (LGBTQ)  Search this
Drag queens  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12295
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)215891
AAA_collcode_caja95
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_215891
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Jerome Caja

Interviewee:
Caja, Jerome, 1958-1995  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J.  Search this
Extent:
77 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1995 August 23 and September 29
Scope and Contents:
An interview of artist Jerome Caja conducted 1995 August 23-1995 September 29, by Paul J. Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art.
Discussion of Caja's illness from AIDS; his loss of sight and the role of memory in "seeing"; the effects of AIDS on his work; his working procedures, goals; the meaning of his work; support of his family, while not acknowledging his homosexuality; attitude toward audience; art as communication of self; the San Francisco gay community and his experiences as a gay artist; growing up in Cleveland with ten brothers, his strong religious background; art training at Cleveland State.
Moving to San Francisco; experiences at the San Francisco Art Institute, where he received an MFA in 1986; his teachers Sam Tchakalian and Richard Shaw; switching from ceramics to painting; recollections with Anna van der Meulen (present at this session) of their meeting and friendship; influences on his work, especially lifestyle as a drag queen; clowns in his work; desire for anonymity; theme of gender in work; his friend Charlie who died in 1991, the subject of a memorial show "Remains of Day" at Southern Exposure Gallery in San Francisco; importance of religion in his work; mysticism, philosophy in work; small works, miniatures and his bottle cap paintings; exhibitionism in life and art; his inclusion in the "Bad Girls West" exhibition at UCLA; the future of his works and participation in history.
Biographical / Historical:
Jerome D. Caja (1958-1995) was a painter and sculptor of San Francisco, California. Caja grew up in Ohio,and studied at the Cuyahoga Community College and Cleveland State University before enrolling at the San Francisco Art Institute. His art was an expression of his involvement in the flamboyant San Francisco drag queen community, using raw materials such as eyeliner, lipstick and nail polish.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 7 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 39 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Painters -- California -- San Francisco -- Interviews  Search this
Sculptors -- California -- San Francisco -- Interviews  Search this
Gay artists  Search this
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Cross-dressers  Search this
Communities (LGBTQ)  Search this
Drag queens  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.caja95
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9329436f9-5251-49d4-aaaa-7d3ace6f77c8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-caja95
Online Media:

Letters from Jerome Caja to Anna van der Meulen

Creator:
Caja, Jerome, 1958-1995  Search this
Extent:
7 Items
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1995
Scope and Contents:
Four letters and two postcards written to van der Meulen, Caja's closest friend and executor, during the final years of his life. Also included are Caja's handwritten "House Rules," coined by Caja for visitors coming into his studio/home.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, sculptor; San Francisco, Calif. Caja grew up in Ohio, and studied at the Cuyahoga Community College and Cleveland State University before enrolling at the San Francisco Art Institute. His art was an expression of his involvement in the flamboyant San Francisco drag queen community, using raw materials such as eyeliner, lipstick and nail polish.
Provenance:
Donated 1999 by Anna van der Meulen, friend and executor of Caja's estate.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Painters -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Sculptors -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Topic:
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Gay artists  Search this
Communities (LGBTQ)  Search this
Cross-dressers  Search this
Function:
Artists' studios
Identifier:
AAA.cajajerl
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw945b7a2f1-6762-4338-ac5f-5b770cffdf37
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cajajerl

The Shamrock Bar: Photographs and Interviews by Carol Burch-Brown

Photographer:
Burch-Brown, Carol  Search this
Names:
Shamrock Bar (Bluefield, W.Va.)  Search this
Kilkelly, Ann  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (2 boxes )
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Transcripts
Compact discs
Digital images
Oral history
Interviews
Place:
Appalachian Region
West Virginia -- 1990-2000
Bluefield (W.Va.)
Date:
1997-2003
Summary:
The collection documents a working class "gay" bar, the Shamrock Bar, Bluefield, West Virginia, 1997-2000, through photographs and oral history interviews.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of Carol Burch-Brown's photographs (200 photoprints, mostly silver gelatin on fiber-base paper, but including more than a dozen digital prints), copies of tape-recorded interviews (on 26 compact discs), and transcripts of interviews (3 volumes plus a compact disc containing Word files) made at the Shamrock Bar, Bluefield, West Virginia, 1997-2002, documenting a working-class gay bar. The photographs include "drag" performances, pageants, and other activities at the bar. Many show performers applying makeup and donning costumes, including the use of prosthetic breasts. Pictures taken in the bar are often in a soft-focus, slightly blurred, high-contrast, impressionistic style. There are a number of sharp-focus portraits, however, and exterior views of the building, its neighborhood, and the town are sharply focused, detailed documentary images.

Names (usually pseudonyms or stage names) which turn up in the interviews include: Natasha Michaels, Nikki Eaves, Shea West, Cortney Collins, Taylor Made, India Dream, Clinton, Tiffany Aver, Terba Devero, Roxie Morehead, and Dorothy. The performer "Bunny" is actually the photographer's friend and colleague, Ann Kilkelly. Many of these persons are also shown in the photographs, as is Helen Compton.

Note: The audio compact disks are not original recordings, and may be played by researchers directly.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into three series.

Series 1: Photoprints

Series 2: Text (including transcripts of interviews)

Series 3: Compact discs
Biography:
Carol Burch-Brown is Professor of Art and Humanities at Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia, and is a photographer, painter, and musician. Photographer and co-author with David Rigsbee, Trailers, University Press of Virginia, 1996.
Historical:
During its heyday, the Shamrock Bar in Bluefield, West Virginia was a gathering place for gays and lesbians. The photographer reported in March 2003, before donating this collection, that Miss Helen Compton, proprietor of the Shamrock, had died and the establishment had been closed.
Other Title:
It's Reigning Queens in Appalachia
Provenance:
Colection donated by Carol Burch-Brown, December 2003.
Restrictions:
Collection open for research on site by appointment. Unprotected photographs must be handled with gloves.
Rights:
Reproduction restricted due to copyright. Requests will be referred to the photographer.
Topic:
Bisexuality  Search this
Working class  Search this
Homosexuality  Search this
Bars (Drinking establishments)  Search this
Gay artists -- Interviews  Search this
Lesbian and gay experience  Search this
Transvestism  Search this
Transvestites  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- Black-and-white photoprints -- Silver gelatin -- 1990-2000
Transcripts
Compact discs
Photographs -- Digital prints -- 20th century
Digital images
Oral history -- 1990-2000
Interviews -- 1980-2000
Citation:
The Shamrock Bar: Photographs and Interviews by Carol Burch-Brown, 1997-2003, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Gift of the artist.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0857
See more items in:
The Shamrock Bar: Photographs and Interviews by Carol Burch-Brown
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep84adec4f5-b063-4386-a233-ab46b9cbb361
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0857
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Angel Rodriguez-Diaz

Interviewee:
Rodriguez-Diaz, Angel, 1955-  Search this
Interviewer:
Cordova, Cary  Search this
Creator:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Names:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Alvarez, Candida, 1955-  Search this
Anthes, John  Search this
Briseño, Rolando, 1952-  Search this
Cisneros, Sandra  Search this
Min, Yong Soon, 1953-  Search this
Molina, Antonio J. (Antonio José), 1928-  Search this
Morris, Robert, 1931-2018  Search this
Pace, Linda  Search this
Ramos Otero, Manuel  Search this
Roche-Rabell, Arnaldo, 1955-  Search this
Sward, Robert, 1933-  Search this
Tofino, Nitsa  Search this
Extent:
7 Sound discs (Sound recording, master (7 hr., 45 min.), digital, 2 5/8 in.)
6 Cassettes (Sound recording, duplicate)
94 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound discs
Cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2004 April 23-May 7
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Angel Rodriguez-Diaz conducted 2004 Apr. 23-May 7, by Cary Cordova, for the Archives of American Art, in San Antonio, Tex.
Rodriguez-Diaz speaks of his mother's upbringing and her untimely death from cancer; his childhood and schooling in Santurce, Puerto Rico, particularly his art experiences; his parents' conversion to Pentecostalism; the importance of travel in Puerto Rican culture; attending the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras; discovering his sexuality during adolescence; living in New York City; the city's gay scene on Christopher Street; exploring his identity as a Puerto Rican American; his jobs at mannequin factories; and his gradual ingratiation into the New York art world, mostly through Robert Morris. Rodriguez-Diaz also mentions his relationship with Rolando Briseño; the motifs in his paintings, such as mirrors and masks; witnessing the Tompkins Square Park riots of 1988; organizing a strike at his mannequin factory; contracting the HIV virus from a partner; Mexican art cinema; the cultural and historical similarities of Mexico and Puerto Rico; moving to San Antonio; choosing the models for his "Goddess" series; Anglo/Latino conflict within the San Antonio art scene; the commodification of Mexican culture in San Antonio; the spiritual importance of portraiture; the history of Puerto Rican artwork and culture, particularly native cultures; and the Smithsonian's acquisition of his painting, "The Protagonist of an Endless Story." Rodriguez-Diaz also recalls Antonio Molina, Sandra Cisneros, Arnoldo Roche-Rabell, John Anthes, Manuel Ramos Otero, Nitsa Tofino, Candida Alvarez, Soon Yong Ming, Robert Sward, Linda Pace, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Angel Rodriguez-Diaz (1955- ) is an artist from San Antonio, Tex. Cary Cordova (1970- ) is an art historian from Austin, Tex.
General:
Originally recorded on 7 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 12 digital wav files. Duration is 7 hr., 46 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Painters -- Texas -- San Antonio -- Interviews  Search this
Artists -- Puerto Rico -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- Puerto Rico  Search this
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Gay artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.rodriga04
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9287733dd-f9ce-4f12-80aa-7db5facce5ce
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rodriga04
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Rolando Briseño

Interviewee:
Briseño, Rolando, 1952-  Search this
Interviewer:
Cordova, Cary  Search this
Creator:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Names:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Amado, Jesse, 1951-  Search this
Barraza, Santa  Search this
De Syzslo, Fernando  Search this
Del Viller, Melita  Search this
Kanjo, Kathryn  Search this
Mazuca, Roland  Search this
Mondini-Ruiz, Franco, 1961-  Search this
Orozco, Sylvia, 1954-  Search this
Pace, Linda  Search this
Ramirez, Chuck  Search this
Von Honts, Jackie  Search this
Extent:
73 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2004 March 16-26
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Rolando Briseño conducted 2004 March 16 and 26, by Cary Cordova, for the Archives of American Art, in San Antonio, Texas.
Briseño speaks of his family background; as a child going to Mexico during the summer; growing up in San Antonio; visiting the Witte Museum, taking art classes there; Jackie von Honts, a special tutor of Briseño; scholarship to Cooper Union in New York; Catholicism; Melita del Villar and realizing "Christian mythology"; exchange program with University of Texas, Austin and La Pontifica Universidad Católica del Peru, Lima, Peru; calling himself Chicano; passion for food; traveling around Europe; politics and its influence; coming to terms with his sexuality; graduate school at Columbia University; interest in boxing; involvement in Con Safo; working on a computer as opposed to painting; and the Historic and Design Review Commission of San Antonio. Briseño also recalls Roland Mazuca, Fernando de Syzslo, Santa Barraza, Sylvia Orozco, Kathryn Kanjo, Linda Pace, Jesse Amado, Chuck Ramirez, Franco Mondini-Ruiz, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Rolando Briseño (1952-) is an artist from San Antonio, Texas. Cary Cordova (1970-) is an art historian from Austin, Texas.
General:
Due to technical problems the interview was recorded on both compact disc and mini disc.
Originally recorded on 2 sound discs and 2 compact discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 6 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 26 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Painters -- Texas -- San Antonio -- Interviews  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Catholicism  Search this
Computer Art  Search this
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Gay artists  Search this
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.brisen04
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw928221474-79d2-4b81-a945-2dba8a76ba6d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-brisen04
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Avram Finkelstein

Interviewee:
Finkelstein, Avram, 1952-  Search this
Interviewer:
Carr, C.  Search this
Names:
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
23 Items (sound files (7 hrs.), digital, wav)
148 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2016 April 25-May 23
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Avram Finkelstein conducted 2016 April 25-May 23, by Cynthia Carr, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Finkelstein's home and studio in Brooklyn, New York.
Finkelstein speaks of his childhood on Long Island; attending the School of the Museum of fine Arts in Boston; moving to New York in the late 1970s; losing his first partner, Don Yowell, to AIDS; the genesis and distribution of his many AIDS activist posters; the beginnings and actions of ACT UP and Gran Fury; the context of the 1990s culture wars; the mishandling of HIV/AIDS as a public health issue in the 1980s and 1990s; his personal transformation as a result of living through the AIDS crisis; and his work on Flash Collective. Finkelstein also recalls Nan Goldin, David Armstrong, P.L. DiCorcia, Jorge Socarras, Lou Molette, Richard Goldstein, Larry Kramer, Chris Lione, Simon Doonan, Mark Simpson, Don Moffett, Todd Haynes, Robert Vasquez, Loring McAlpin, Michael Nesline, Tom Kalin, Amy Heard, Mark Harrington, Richard Deagle, Julie Tolentino, Lola Flash, Davod Meieran, Patrick Moore, Maria Maggenti, Sean Strub, Eric Sawyer, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Avram Finkelstein (1952- ) is an artist, writer, and activist in New York, New York. Cynthia Carr (1950- ) is a writer in New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Activists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Gay artists  Search this
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.finkel16
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9cecf516f-a5a3-42f6-ace6-8ffb2ca641c9
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-finkel16
Online Media:

DC Cowboys Dance Company Records

Creator:
DC Cowboys Dance Company  Search this
Extent:
7.5 Cubic feet (22 boxes, 3 oversize folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Articles
Photographs
Correspondence
Press releases
Business records
Dvds
Financial records
Compact discs
Date:
undated
1994-2012
Summary:
The records of the DC Cowboys Dance Company, an all-male, gay, non-profit dance company based in Washington, DC. that was active from 1994-2012. They peformed nationally and internationally live and on television, "celebrating diversity through dance."
Scope and Contents:
The DC Cowboys Dance Company Records contain the business and financial papers of the company, such as memoranda and correspondence; choreography routines; printed materials such as press releases and articles; fundraising materials; photographs; audiovisual materials; and the pre-recorded music used for their various dance routines. The records are arranged chronologically in three series.

Series 1: Company Files, 1994-2013, undated, is arranged chronologically by year and maintains the original order received from the donor. The files cover the entire life of the company and its peformances within the United States as well as internationally. The files contain correspondence, contracts, dance routines, fundraising initiatives, event information and advertising materials, travel and lodging arrangements, tourist information, and photographs.

Series 2: Financial, 1996-2011, undated, is arranged chronologically. The files contain receipts, money receipt books, financial statements, balance sheets and those materials related to the financial aspect of running the company.

Series 3: Audiovisual, 1994-2012, undated, contains compact discs (189) of pre-recorded music used for the company's various dance routines. The music was prepared for each booking and most often identified with the title of the booking and the date. Much of the music on these discs is under copyright since they are recordings done by original artists or professional covers of songs that were contemporary with the company's performance during any given year. There are also DVDs (five) detailing the production of varous fund raising DC Cowboys calendars and one audio cassette tape.
Arrangement:
This collection is divided into three series.

Series 1: Company Files, 1994-2013, undated

Series 2: Financial, 1996-2011, undated

Series 3: Audiovisual, 1994-2012, undated
Biographical / Historical:
"History of the DC Cowboys Dance Company - Celebrating diversity through dance"

The DC Cowboys Dance Company, an all-male, gay dance company, entertained audiences around the world from 1994 to 2012. Internationally acclaimed, the DC Cowboys specialized in providing exciting, high-energy, jazz-style, dance entertainment which spanned all musical genres, from contemporary country to club dance party, pop, to classic Broadway numbers for all types of occasions. Shows were customized to the venue—both gay-specific and mainstream events—and featured anywhere from one song to multiple sets of three to four songs each. Combining a little traditional country-western with jazz, musical theater and a masculine sex appeal, the DC Cowboys' high-energy choreography made the company one of the most-sought after gay dance groups in the world.

Founder and Artistic Director Kevin Platte started the dance company in August 1994 after seeing a similar gay, country-western dance group in California. Platte recruited 11 dancers—mostly friends—from a Washington, D.C., gay, country-western bar named Remington's. He approached the best dancers based on watching them two-step and line-dance at the bar. The dancers formed the troupe for the sole purpose of performing at the Atlantic States Gay Rodeo Association's (ASGRA) annual rodeo in Washington, D.C., in September 1994.

Platte thought the performance would be a one-time event. But based on an overwhelming reception, the dancers decided to continue the group. This required weekly rehearsals, the creation of a dance "repertoire" and a larger commitment from the dancers. Of the original 12 members, only six were up to the task. These six original members then had to find more dancers and identify other performance venues. Mainstay venues soon included the Capital Pride Festival every June and the Atlantic Stampede Gay Rodeo event every September.

In September 1995, Metro Weekly placed them on the cover of their magazine, giving them greater exposure and more clout. The Cowboys used this coverage as a catalyst to build the brand and identity. All the while, the DC Cowboys remained volunteers and amateurs, performing solely for the love of it. Each dancer maintained a "day job," and the group only rehearsed in the evenings once or twice a week. As the warmer months seemed to be their busiest, the dancers would use the colder months to build up the repertoire and practice. Every year, rehearsals would cease for the months of November and December for the existing dancers. However new recruits that were successful in the annual auditions attended "bootcamp" rehearsals during those months to learn some of the existing repertoire. In January, the existing and new members started rehearsing together as the new season began.

During the early years, the dancers paid for all expenses out of their own pockets, and monthly dues were collected to pay for group expenses. The group would often pay for the opportunity to perform. To supplement these expenses, the group began fundraising through a monthly bar night at different gay nightclubs. Once their reputation grew, venues and events began to pay for the company's entertainment services and patron club members donated funds to support the organization and their mission. These funds allowed the organization to pay for all of their expenses including dancer costuming. In addition, the group sold merchandise which included T-shirts, performance DVDs as well as their sexy DC Cowboys calendars. Three of the more popular calendars featured the dancers without clothes in artistic poses and included the "making of the calendar" DVD.

In 1996, Platte added a charitable element to the organization. He created a mission statement which said the company would provide free entertainment to any HIV/AIDS charitable organization. Over the years, the company also directly raised funds for HIV/AIDS organizations by sharing the profits of their calendar sales. The DC Cowboys raised millions of dollars through performances for national and local non-profit organizations such as: Washington, D.C. AIDS Ride; Washington, D.C. AIDS Walk; Chase Brexton Clinic of Baltimore, Maryland; Northern Virginia AIDS Ministry; Human Rights Campaign; Whitman Walker Clinic of Washington, D.C.; Food and Friends of Washington, D.C.; Mautner Project; Gay Latino Benefits in Metro D.C.; Harford County AIDS/Cancer Benefit, Maryland; NYFD Benefit for the New York City Fire Department.

In 1996, the company received a grant from the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts, honoring the company for its valued contribution to the Washington, D.C. arts community. The company always maintained a tax-deductible status as a 501c3 non-profit organization with a small board of directors.

During their 18-year tenure, the DC Cowboys provided an outlet for gay artists and performers in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. The company included 85 dancers, eight choreographers and three stage-managers. The company performed at 458 events in five countries. The DC Cowboys' crowd-pleasing, sexy dance style had been described as "Will Rogers Follies meets Bob Fosse." The group famously described themselves on America's Got Talent in 2008 as "Think Brokeback meets Broadway," which became a popular line echoed around the world. Their growth and popularity were attributed to their unique and high quality entertainment which was often copied in other cities but never equalled. In addition the dancers were talented, good-looking men who were friendly and approachable to their many fans. Their farewell season tour in 2012 visited all of their favorite performance venues and locations around the world and was dedicated to their fans who were instrumental to their success.

Typical performance venues included Pride Festivals in New York City, Washington, D.C., Baltimore, and Charlotte, North Carolina; Headliners on the Gay Rodeo circuit in Washington, D.C., Las Vegas, San Diego, Atlanta, Chicago, Calgary, and Texas; Halloween in New Orleans; Mr. Gay All-American Finals; Gay Men's Chorus of Washington, Washington, D.C., concerts and events; Whitman Walker Volunteer Appreciation at Constitution Hall, Washington, D.C.; PFLAG's Gala Dinner, Washington, D.C.; HRC (Human Rights Campaign) Leadership Dinner cruise aboard the Spirit of Washington, Washington, D.C.; Human Rights Campaign National Dinner, Washington, D.C. - special reception for major donors; Annual Chef's Best Dinner & Auction for Food and Friends, Washington, D.C..

Performance highlights included America's Got Talent television show, season 3, NBC, semifinalists (2008); Closing Ceremonies of the Gay Games VII at Wrigley Field in Chicago (2006); RSVP's Caribbean Fantasy gay cruise (2005); Arts grant recipient from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts (1996);The Sziget Festival in Budapest, Hungary (2009--012); Dales' Great Getaway television show, ITV London, England (2012); The Podge and Rodge television show, RTE, Dublin, Ireland (2010)."

Source

This history of the DC Cowboys Dance Company was supplied by its founder, Kevin Platte.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Kevin P. Platte, founder and Artistic and Executive Director of DC Cowboys Dance Company in 2013.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research use. Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs, negatives, and slides.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions. Fees for commercial reproduction.
Topic:
Gays  Search this
Gay business enterprises  Search this
Homosexuality  Search this
Cowboys  Search this
Dance companies  Search this
Dance  Search this
Genre/Form:
Articles -- 1990-2000
Photographs -- 21st century
Correspondence -- 1990-2000
Press releases -- 1990-2000
Business records -- 1990-2000
Articles -- 21st century
DVDs
Photographs -- 1990-2000
Financial records -- 21st century
Financial records -- 1990-2000
Correspondence -- 21st century
Compact discs
Press releases -- 21st century
Business records -- 21st century
Citation:
DC Cowboys Dance Company Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1312
See more items in:
DC Cowboys Dance Company Records
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8fcfb748b-0411-4008-8f12-3a8587b6f82d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1312
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Nayland Blake

Interviewee:
Blake, Nayland, 1960-  Search this
Interviewer:
Fialho, Alex, 1989-  Search this
Names:
ACT UP San Francisco (Organization)  Search this
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
59 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2016 November 25-26
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Nayland Blake, conducted 2016 November 25-26, by Alex Fialho, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Blake's home in Brooklyn, New York.
Blake speaks of growing up in a bi-racial family in New York City; visiting museums, art exhibits and shows, and going to the theatre with their parents; attending Charlotte Moorman's Avant Garde Festivals as a teenager; relating their emerging sexuality to the television shows Batman, The Addams Family, and Star Trek; the decision to attend Bard College; the influence of Times Square Show; co-organizing Bard's first gay and lesbian alliance; attending California Institute of the Arts and the different culture they experienced there; their struggle to make explicitly gay work without it being beefcake; not feeling connected to a gay community in Los Angeles but feeling camaraderie with other artists; their decision to move to San Francisco; first hearing about HIV/AIDS while at CalArts and experiencing the first loss of a friend in San Francisco; the undercurrent of more and more men testing positive in their community; the long two-week wait to receive test results; the generational split within the gay community and how that was squashed by the epidemic; the subjects of mortality and mourning in gay art and how that changed the reception of gay artists; the gay and lesbian shows Extended Sensibilities and Against Nature; the organization of ACT UP San Francisco and subsequent split into ACT UP SF, ACT UP Golden Gate, and ACT UP San Francisco; the "imperiled and heightened physicality" Blake began using in their work; participating in Art Against Aids on the Road; directly addressing the frequency of AIDS deaths in their piece Every 12 Minutes; the social network of caregivers that rallied to support those dying from AIDS through home care and food delivery; curating In A Different Life; the pleasure in curating shows; The Shreber Suite installation pieces; purchasing Wayland Flowers' puppet Madame at auction; being a child of the '60s and believing sex is an expression of one's cultural identity; feeling attacked by the dismissive and oppressive Republican government in the 1980s; the extensive symbolism and meaning in their bunny themed work; the technology boom's affect on the Bay Area and their return to New York City; the show Double Fantasy about their relationship with their partner Philip Horvitz; teaching at International Center for Photography and their work in the kink community; the distance their students have to the HIV/AIDS epidemic; and their identification as an American artist. Blake also recalls Jeff Preiss, Cliff Preiss, William Hohauser, Debra Pierson, Nancy Mitchnick, Jake Grossberg, Robert Kelly, Kathy Acker, Gerry Pearlberg, Kathe Burkhart, Judie Bamber, Catherine Opie, Nancy Barton, Julie Ault, William Olander, Robert Glueck, Kevin Killian, Dodie Bellamy, D-L Alvarez, Stephen Evans, Michael Jenkins, Richard Hawkins, Ann Philbin, Rick Jacobsen, Amy Sholder, David Wojnarowicz, Rudy Lemcke, A.A. Bronson, Philip Horvitz, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Nayland Blake (1960-) is a performance artist and installation artist in New York, New York. Alex Fialho (1989-) is a curator and arts writer who is the Programs Director for Visual AIDS in New York, New York.
General:
Originally recorded as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 5 hr., 49 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Installations (Art)  Search this
Performance artists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.blake16
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw97a70d548-59b6-40ed-83e3-54d0fb340c9c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-blake16
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Joey Terrill

Interviewee:
Terrill, Joey, 1955-  Search this
Interviewer:
Fialho, Alex, 1989-  Search this
Names:
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
9 Items (sound files (6 hr.,13 min.) Audio, digital, wav)
92 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2017 December 30-31
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Joey Terrill conducted 2017 December 30 and 31, by Alex Fialho, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Terrill's home and studio in Los Angeles, California.
Terrill speaks of his family and upbringing in Los Angeles; early exposure to '60s politics and working-class Chicano activism; early exposure to art-making; early understanding and experience of his queerness; attending Cathedral High School and Immaculate Heart College; moving to New York in 1980; making and distributing the first batch of Maricón and Malflora T-shirts; contemporary appreciation and revitalization of his work; the genesis, production, distribution, reissue, and legacy of Homeboy Beautiful; his seroconversion in 1980; exhibiting his Chicanos Invade New York series in 1980; memories of the early AIDS crisis and ensuing activism; testing HIV-positive in 1989, and subsequent developments in his art; his relationships with Mundo Meza, Jack Vargas, Ray Navarro, Gerardo Velazquez, Alice Armendariz, Teddy Sandoval, Carlos Almaraz, and Harry Gamboa, Jr; contributing an essay to the Art AIDS America catalogue; his still life painting practice; his 2013 retrospective at ONE Archives; ideas for an new anniversary issue of Homeboy Beautiful; his current and ongoing AIDS activism with AIDS Healthcare Foundation; and his hopes for future assessments of his legacy. Terrill also recalls Carlton Dinnall, Patssi Valdez, Jim Aguilar, Gronk, Roberto Legorreta, Willie Herrón, Terry Saunders, Richard Crawford, Sister Corita Kent, Joey Arias, Steven Fregoso, Victor Durazo, Richard T. Rodriguez, David Frantz, Ondine Chavoya, Paul Polubinskas, Daniel Ramirez, Efren Valadez, Carole Caroompas, Skot Armstrong, Greg Poe, Rea Tajiri, Richard Gildart, John Henninger, Craig Brown, Chris Brownlie, Richard Starr, Paul Coleman, Steven Muñoz, Roger Horwitz, Dr. Eugene Rolgolsky, Jef Huereque, Beto Araiza, Miguel Angel Reyes, Guillermo Hernandez, Monica Palacios, Robert Gil de Montes, Eddie Dominguez, Simon Doonan, Jonathan Katz, Rob Hernandez, Dan Guerrero, Diane Gamboa, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Joey Terrill (1955- ) is an artist in Los Angeles, California. Alex Fialho (1989- ) is a curator and arts writer who is the Programs Director for Visual AIDS in New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Artists -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Gay artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.terril17
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9dcead001-f363-4f52-b8b5-c31164b97794
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-terril17
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Frank Holliday

Interviewee:
Holliday, Frank  Search this
Interviewer:
Kerr, Theodore  Search this
Names:
Andy Warhol's Factory (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Club 57 (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
North Carolina School of the Arts -- Students  Search this
School of Visual Arts (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Basquiat, Jean-Michel, 1960-1988  Search this
Beckley, Bill, 1946-  Search this
Bidlo, Mike  Search this
Collum, Bill  Search this
Esper, William  Search this
Garibay, Art  Search this
Haring, Keith  Search this
Lowe, Michael  Search this
Milk, Harvey  Search this
Murray, Elizabeth, 1940-  Search this
Post, Henry  Search this
Taafe, Philip  Search this
Extent:
5 Items (Sound recording: 5 sound files (5 hr., 18 min.), digital, wav)
136 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 January 24-26
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Frank Holliday conducted 2017 January 24 and 26, by Theodore Kerr, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Holliday Studios in New York, New York.
Holliday speaks of a beautiful relationship with his Grandmother Holliday; growing up in suburbia with a glamorous mother and industrialist father; being encouraged to draw and paint constantly to keep busy and out of trouble; realizing at a young age that art can bring happiness and cheer to others; feeling free and open until society told him he was different and the resulting need to protect himself by trying to be super-masculine; attending junior high in Greensboro, North Carolina during integration and becoming a young politician bringing people and groups together; studying ballet at the North Carolina School of the Arts during high school; continuing his study in New York City until visiting the Museum of Modern Art and deciding he was destined to be a painter; moving to San Francisco at age 18 to live among gay people; the utopian counter-culture that existed before AIDS; making art constantly through photography, film, painting; the theft of much of his early work over the years; realizing he needed to return to New York to escape his street-oriented lifestyle in San Francisco; attending School of Visual Arts; studying gay men semiotically through signs and social cues with Keith Haring and Bill Beckley; working at Warhol's Factory on Union Square and Interview magazine; the genesis of Club 57; imagining his sets at Club 57 as installations with live people; the appeal of his projects being anti-everything; learning about a "gay cancer" and his then-boyfriend becoming sick and dying from an unknown brain issue; living under the assumption that he was HIV-positive for eight years before falling extremely ill with pneumonia; learning of his HIV/AIDS diagnosis two weeks before "the cocktail" came out in 1996; his breakthrough show "Trippin' in America" in 2001; the process of getting sober six years before his diagnosis; learning to make art without the feeling the need to rely on drugs for creativity; meeting his partner of nineteen years and learning to feel worthy of love; self-hatred and homophobia after getting sober; gaining a tremendous respect and appreciation for the gay community living bravely just as they were; witnessing the World Trade Center towers collapse on 9/11; answering a Craigslist ad and being cast in a movie; acting in several films including "American Gangster;" trading three years of acting lessons with Bill Esper for one painting; how acting helped with his painting; comparing his body being tuned to painting as a dancer's is to music; how living with AIDS has made him very aware of the physical-ness of his body and what it means to be alive; the importance of leaving his mark on his art; academia taking over the art world; feeling looked over in retrospectives of AIDS artists, but identifying more as a human with a disease than as an "AIDS artist;" and purposefully leaving room in his paintings to allow the viewer to enter and experience. Holliday also recalls Harvey Milk, Michael Lowe, Mike Bidlo, Philip Taaffe, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Art Garibay, Henry Post, Bill Collum, and Elizabeth Murray.
Biographical / Historical:
Frank Holliday (1957- ) is a painter in New York. New York. Theodore Kerr (1979- ) is a writer and organizer in New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Actors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Photography  Search this
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Gay artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.hollid17
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9a02e4cfb-73d5-404f-b9a8-3b75c9039667
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hollid17
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Franco Mondini-Ruiz

Interviewee:
Mondini-Ruiz, Franco, 1961-  Search this
Interviewer:
Cordova, Cary  Search this
Creator:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Names:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Amado, Jesse, 1951-  Search this
Briseño, Rolando, 1952-  Search this
Casey, Mike  Search this
Cisneros, Sandra  Search this
Diaz, Alejandro  Search this
Herzberg, Julia P.  Search this
Jaukkuri, Maaretta  Search this
Judd, Donald, 1928-1994  Search this
Lozano, Danny  Search this
Moffatt, Tracey  Search this
Romo, Ito, 1961-  Search this
Taylor, Frederieke  Search this
Tracy, Michael, 1943-  Search this
Extent:
93 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2004 July 7-8
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Franco Mondini-Ruiz conducted 2004 July 7-8, by Cary Cordova, for the Archives of American Art, in Alameda and San Antonio, Tex.
Mondini speaks of his parents' disparate backgrounds; his repressed childhood in Boerne, Tex.; his family's electronics store; discovering that his brother was actually his half-brother; attending undergrad and law school at St. Mary's in San Antonio, Tex.; his Catholic rearing; raising his Latino consciousness during and after law school; his life as a successful lawyer; his ingratiation into both rich white and Latino cultures; his partying and coming-out as a gay man; his making of art as a counterpoint to his office work; advice for young Latino artists; the importance of cheap art; exoticizing of Mexican culture by Anglos; quitting law and his experience living in Mexico City; and being diagnosed with HIV. Mondini-Ruiz also speaks of opening his Infinito Botanica and how he operated it; American drug culture; San Antonio's cityscape and his "utopic" hope for it; his "Blue Star on Houston" exhibition; drug use; his show at Bard College as his big break; living with Alejandro Diaz; homosexual and Mexican rococo aesthetics; his exhibit at the 2000 Whitney Biennial and moving to New York City; the importance of found art; the universality of class and race struggles; the problems with over-materialization of artwork; his "Ballroom" show in Marfa, Tex. and the issues confronting that city's arts patronage; his making of the "Spurs Installation"; his new anti-materialistic mindset; and the patterns within his career. Mondini-Ruiz also recalls Michael Tracy, Ito Romo, Rolando Briseno, Sandra Cisneros, Jesse Amado, Donald Judd, Frederieke Taylor, Julia Herzberg, Danny Lozano, Maaretta Jaukkuri, Tracey Moffat, Mike Casey, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Franco Mondini-Ruiz (1961- ) is an artist in New York. Legal name is Gino Francisco Mondini. Interviewer Cary Cordova (1970-) is an art historian from Austin, Tex.
General:
Originally recorded on 5 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 9 digital wav files. Duration is 5 hrs., 12 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Lawyers -- Texas -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Technique  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Gay artists  Search this
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.mondin04
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw962984fb6-cb64-424b-ad5f-ab2402835ff4
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mondin04
Online Media:

Edward Brooks de Celle papers relating to Scott Burton

Creator:
De Celle, Edward Brooks  Search this
Names:
Burton, Scott, 1939-1989  Search this
Thompson, Mark, 1952-  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1980-1982
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Scott Burton (1 cassette; 21 p. transcript, incomplete) Mar. 1980, San Francisco, Calif., conducted by De Celle for publication in the newspaper, The Advocate; and two letters from Mark Thompson, 1980, editor for The Advocate, concerning the interview. Also included are exhibition announcements, clippings, an ArtWeek article on Burton by Robert McDonald, 1980; and reviews about Burton's artwork as well as his performance piece, "Individual Behavior Tableaux," at the University Art Museum, Berkeley, Calif., March 2, 1980.
In the interview, Burton discusses his work and that of several colleagues, including artists who have influenced him. Burton addresses the intereraction between gay culture and the art world establishment.
Biographical / Historical:
De Celle is an art dealer in San Francisco, Calif; Burton a sculptor (1939-1989), New York City.
Provenance:
Donated 1996 by Edward Brooks de Celle.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Artists -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Gay artists  Search this
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.deceedwa
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw991a813f0-05e5-4db9-b6cb-d97807a10389
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-deceedwa

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