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Evans-Tibbs Collection

Photographer:
Apeda Studio (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Camuzzi, M.  Search this
Harris & Ewing  Search this
Creator:
Sommariva, Emilio, Photographer, 1883-1956  Search this
Harris, Fred (photographer)  Search this
Names:
Anderson, Marian, 1897-1993  Search this
Evanti, Lillian, Mme. (Lillian Evans Tibbs), 1890-1967  Search this
Garrison, William Lloyd, 1805-1879  Search this
Jones, Lois Mailou, 1905-1998  Search this
Moton, Robert Russa, 1867-1940  Search this
Murray, Daniel Alexander Payne, 1852-1925  Search this
Tibbs, Thurlow Evans, Jr., (1952-1997)  Search this
Extent:
25.54 Linear feet (46 boxes; 3 cabinet drawers)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photograph albums
Sheet music
Letters (correspondence)
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Oberlin (Ohio)
Date:
circa 1850-1997
Biographical/Historical note:
The Evans-Tibbs collection form part of the family papers acquired from the Evans-Tibbs Collection museum, which closed in 1996, and centers around the life of Lillian Evans Tibbs. The museum was formerly the home of Evans, the first African American woman to sing opera with an organized European company. She was born in Washington, DC to a cultured, well-educated, middle-class family. Her mother was Annie Lillian Evans, a music teacher in the DC public school system, and her father was Wilson Bruce Evans, organizer and first principal of Armstrong Technical High School in Washington, DC. Hiram Revels, the first black U.S. senator, was her great-uncle and two other family members are credited with taking part in John Borwn's raid on Harper's Ferry. She married Howard University music professor, Roy W. Tibbs in 1918. Her stage name, Madame Evanti, is a combination of her last name and her husband's. Evans had one child, Thurlow Tibbs Sr., and two grandchildren, Diane Elizabeth and Thurlow Evans Tibbs. Thurlow Jr., operated the Evans-Tibbs Collection museum until 1996, a year before his death.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American families  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photograph albums
Sheet music
Letters (correspondence)
Citation:
Evans-Tibbs collection, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of the Estate of Thurlow E. Tibbs, Jr.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-016
See more items in:
Evans-Tibbs Collection
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-016
Online Media:

William Page and Page Family papers

Creator:
Page, William, 1811-1885  Search this
Names:
National Academy of Design (U.S.)  Search this
Beecher, Henry Ward, 1813-1887  Search this
Beecher, Thomas Kinnicut, 1824-1900  Search this
Briggs, Charles F. (Charles Frederick), 1804-1877  Search this
Curtis, George William, 1824-1892  Search this
Cushman, Charlotte, 1816-1876  Search this
Fenton, Rueben  Search this
Garrison, William Lloyd, 1805-1879  Search this
Hicks, Thomas, 1823-1890  Search this
Lowell, James Russell, 1819-1891  Search this
O'Donovan, William Rudolph, 1844-1920  Search this
Olmstead, Bertha  Search this
Olmstead, Mary  Search this
Page, Sophia Stevens, 1827-1892  Search this
Page, William, 1811-1885  Search this
Perry, E. W. (Enoch Wood), 1831-1915  Search this
Phillips, Wendell, 1811-1884  Search this
Scranton, William Walker  Search this
Shaw, Francis George, 1809-1882  Search this
Stark, William, 1825-1873  Search this
Sumner, Charles, 1811-1874  Search this
Tilton, Theodore, 1835-1907  Search this
Wilmarth, Lemuel Everett, 1835-1918  Search this
Extent:
11.06 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Sketches
Poems
Drawings
Diaries
Date:
1815-1947
bulk 1843-1892
Summary:
The papers of the portraitist and art theorist William Page and the Page family measure 11.06 linear feet and date from 1815 to 1947, bulk 1843-1892. In addition to the papers of William Page, the papers include documents related to Page's wife's career as a writer and records documenting their personal lives and the lives of their family members. Types of documents found include personal documents and artifacts, correspondence, essays, lectures, diaries, poems, notes and notebooks, financial records, legal records, published works, clippings, catalogs, photographs, and artwork.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of the painter William Page and the Page family measure 11.06 linear feet and date from 1815 to 1947, with the bulk of papers dating from 1843 to 1892. Papers contain records related to the life and career of William Page, president of the National Academy of Design from 1871 to 1873 and prominent portraitist and art theorist of his day. Also found are records related to his wife's career as a writer and records documenting their personal lives and the lives of their family members. Types of documents found include personal documents and artifacts, correspondence, essays, lectures, diaries, poems, notes and notebooks, financial records, legal records, published works, clippings, catalogs, photographs, and artwork.

Correspondence includes the personal and professional correspondence of William and Sophia Page, and their parents, siblings, and children. Significant correspondents include Thomas Hicks, Enoch Wood Perry, William Stark, Theodore Tilton, Lemuel Wilmarth, Wendell Phillips, William Walker Scranton, Francis G. Shaw; James Russell Lowell, Charles Frederick Briggs, George W. Curtis, Charlotte Cushman, Thomas K. Beecher, Mary Olmsted, and Bertha Olmsted.

Writings include the essays and lectures of William Page, as written by him and revised by Sophia Page in the late 1870s, as well as Sophia's writings as a columnist in Europe in the 1850s. Notes, notebooks, diaries, and poems are also found. Personal Business Records include business records related to the sale and exhibition of artwork as well as financial and legal documents. A small number of memoranda and documents related to Page's work at the National Academy of Design are also found. Printed Materials include exhibition catalogs, published works by William and Sophia Page, and clippings and articles about Page.

Photographs consist mainly of portraits, most of them mounted cabinet photographs or cartes-des-visites, some of which appear to have been used as studies for Page's painted portraits. Among those pictured are William Page, James Russell Lowell, Henry Ward Beecher, Reuben Fenton, Wendell Phillips, Charles Sumner, William R. O'Donovan, and William Lloyd Garrison. Many of the photographic portraits are unidentified. Artwork includes sketches, drawings, prints, and a small number of notes made by Page in the course of painting portraits.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 7 series. Glass plate negatives are housed separately and closed to researchers.

Series 1: Biographical Materials and Artifacts, 1847-1917 (Box 1; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1815-1942 (Boxes 1-4, 9-10; 3.2 linear feet)

Series 3: Notes and Writings, 1839-1888, 1949 (Boxes 4-5, OV 10; 1.3 linear feet)

Series 4: Personal Business Records, 1848-1932 (Boxes 5 and 9; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 5: Printed Materials, 1845-1938 (Boxes 5-7, 9, OV 11; 1.6 linear feet)

Series 6: Photographs, 1845-1947 (Boxes 7-9, OV 12, MGP 5-6; 1.4 linear feet)

Series 7: Artwork, 1856-1874 (Box 8, OV 13-16, rolled documents 17-19; 0.6 linear feet and 3 rolled documents)
Biographical Note:
The painter William Page was born in 1811 in Albany, NY. He attended public schools in New York City, and after working briefly in the law firm of Frederick de Peyster, was placed in the studio of the painter/engraver James Herring in 1825, where he received his first formal art training. He took classes at the National Academy of Design the year it was formed, in 1826, under Samuel F.B. Morse, and in 1827 he was awarded one of the National Academy's first annual student prizes.

Page joined the Presbyterian church and attended Phillips Academy and Amherst with the intention of becoming a minister, but his artistic ability won out, and by 1830 he was painting commissioned portraits in Albany, Rochester, and New York. He married Lavinia Twibill in 1833, and they had three daughters between 1834 and 1839. He joined the American Academy and served on its board of directors in 1835. He exhibited at the American Academy, the National Academy of Design, the Boston Athenaeum, and other venues throughout the 1830s. Favorable reviews brought steady portrait commissions, including John Quincy Adams and the New York governor William L. Marcy. He was made a full member of the National Academy in 1837.

In the 1840s, Page's reputation and maturity as a painter grew. His first wife left him around 1840, and in 1843 he married Sarah Dougherty. The couple moved to Albany, Boston, and back to New York seeking portrait commissions and patronage. He became friends with the poet James Russell Lowell and the writer and publisher Charles Frederick Briggs, two writers and editors who helped to promote his artwork in Boston and New York and published his theoretical writings. In 1844, Lowell dedicated his first published book of poetry to Page, and the following year, Briggs published a series of articles by Page in the Broadway Journal, entitled "The Art of the Use of Color in Imitation in Painting." The series described Page's arduous experiments with color and glazes, and his ideas about correspondences between spirituality and the natural world as expressed in art.

In 1850, Page traveled to Florence, Italy, where he painted several copies of the works of Titian in the galleries of the Uffizi and Pitti palaces, studying his use of color and further developing his own experimental techniques. He became friends with the sculptor Hiram Powers, who introduced him to the writings of Emmanuel Swedenborg, a Christian metaphysician whose ideas fueled Page's interest in the spiritual aspects of art. In 1852, Page moved to Rome, a city with an international artists' community and a strong market for art. Page found a loyal following in Rome's large circle of American ex-patriates, including the sculptors Thomas Crawford and Harriet Hosmer, the actress Charlotte Cushman, and the poets Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, all of whom sat for portraits by Page.

In 1854, Page's second wife left him amidst public scandal, and he sank deep in debt to his bankers at Packenham and Hooker, an English firm that by 1856 had a lien on all the paintings in his studio. That same year Page met Sophia Stevens Hitchcock, an American widow traveling in Rome with Bertha Olmsted, Frederick Law Olmsted's sister. Hitchcock was from Barnet, Vermont and came to Europe after her first husband died in 1852 after only a year of marriage. She traveled to England and Paris, where she wrote regular columns on local customs and events for the New York Tribune that were published under the by-line "An American Woman in Paris." She and Page met in Rome in 1856, and in October 1857, after Page traveled back the United States to obtain a divorce from Sarah Dougherty, he and Sophia married.

The couple stayed in Rome until 1860. His wife's three brothers, all businessmen, helped to promote his artwork in Europe and America. Page's paintings of this period include several Venus subjects, one of which was championed by his most loyal patrons, who raised $3000 by subscription to buy the painting for the Boston Athenaeum. A later Venus painting was rejected from the Paris salon for indecency, a controversy that was later leveraged for publicity in a touring exhibition in the United States.

The Pages returned to the United States in 1860 and settled in Tottenville, New York. They had six children between 1858 and 1870. Page had a studio at Eagleswood, NJ, and later in the Studio Building on 10th Street in Manhattan, where he held a large exhibition in 1867. In the 1860s, he painted a self-portrait and a companion portrait of Sophia set in Rome, as well as a series of civil war heroes including Robert Gould Shaw, Winfield Scott, and David Farragut. Photographs played a consistent part in Page's technique of portraiture, and he is known to have worked with the photographer Matthew Brady, who attended art classes early on with Page, as well as the photographers Sarony and Charles Williamson, who taught classes on drawing from enlarged photo-transparencies. Brady photographs taken for Page include David Farragut and Reuben Fenton.

Page lectured frequently on Titian and Venetian art, a subject in which he was considered an expert, and on painting technique and his philosophical ideas about nature, art, and spirituality. In 1871, Page was elected the president of the National Academy of Design, a post he held until 1873, but his poor health following a collapse in 1872 limited his accomplishments in office. Despite these limitations, he continued to paint, including portraits of General Grant, an idealized portrait of the president based on early photographs and Charles Sumner. He also became interested in portraiture of William Shakespeare around this time, and his studies resulted in a book, Shakespeare's Portraits, a bust based on existing portraiture, and a full-length portrait entitled "Shakespeare Reading," based on Page's measurements of a supposed death mask in Darmstadt, Germany, which he went to inspect against the advice of his doctor in 1874.

In 1877, another collapse left Page incapacitated for the remainder of his life. Sophia Page tried editing and publishing his writings and lectures, but with little success. Page died in 1885. A life marked by personal scandal ended the same, when two of his daughters from his first marriage contested his will, tying up his estate in a lengthy and public probate trial. Their suit was dismissed in 1889, and Sophia Page died in 1892.

This biography relies heavily on Joshua Taylor's William Page: The American Titian (1957).
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds materials lent for microfilming (reel 1091) including letters from Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning, Lydia Maria Child, Charlotte Cushman, James Russell Lowell, Charles A. Dana, and others. Lent material was returned to the donor and is This material is not described in the container listing of this finding aid.
Provenance:
A portion of the collection was donated to the Archives of American Art by Mrs. Lesslie S. (Pauline Page) Howell, William Page's grandaughter, in 1963. William S. Page, Pauline Page Howell's nephew, donated additional papers in 1964 and 1973. Pauline Page Howell and William S. Page also loaned a group of letters to the Archives in 1964 which were microfilmed on reel 1091 and then returned to the donors. Mrs. Howell's son, William Page Howell, donated material in 1980.

Letters of Charles F. Briggs to James Russell Lowell (Series 2.2) were a part of Pauline Page Howell's 1963 donation to the Archives of American Art. They had been given to Mrs. Howell by Charlotte Briggs, daughter of Charles F. Briggs, because of her father's lifelong friendship with William Page. Letters from Lowell to Briggs are in the James Russell Lowell papers in Houghton Library at Harvard University.
Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Works of art  Search this
Portrait painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Portrait painting -- 19th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sketches
Poems
Drawings
Diaries
Citation:
William Page and Page Family papers, 1815-1947, bulk 1843-1892. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.pagewill
See more items in:
William Page and Page Family papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-pagewill
Online Media:

Collection of William Lloyd Garrison's The Liberator, 1831-1833

Editor:
Knapp, Isaac, 1804-1843  Search this
Garrison, William Lloyd, 1805-1879  Search this
Extent:
2 Linear feet (3 Boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Newspapers
Place:
Boston (Mass.)
Date:
1831-1833
Summary:
This collection contains issues of William Lloyd Garrison's abolitionist newspaper The Liberator dating from 1831-1833, including the inaugural issue.
Biographical/Historical note:
Prior to the Civil War, William Lloyd Garrison (1805--1879) was the one of the most prominent abolitionists in the country. Garrison and Isaac Knapp founded the American abolitionist newspaper, The Liberator. Garrison was a pivotal force in both the New England and American Anti-Slavery societies. "I am in earnest-- will not equivocate-- will not excuse-- will not retreat a single inch--and I will be heard!" he proclaimed in 1831, in the first issue of The Liberator. One of the first opponents of slavery to demand complete and immediate freedom for African Americans, Garrison published The Liberator for over 35 years, finally ceasing publication with the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment abolishing slavery.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Abolitionists -- United States  Search this
Antislavery movements -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Newspapers -- 19th century
Citation:
Collection of William Lloyd Garrison's The Liberator, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.10-012.2
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-10-012-2

19th century African-American Literature Collection

Names:
African Methodist Episcopal Church  Search this
First African Baptist Church (Savannah, Ga.)  Search this
Knights of Pythias  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Garrison, William Lloyd, 1805-1879  Search this
Extent:
3.4 Linear feet ((30 books))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Books
Date:
circa 1800 - circa 1898
Summary:
This collection, which dates from the 19th century, contains 30 books written by or concerning African-Americans. The books are largely non-fiction and include material relating to African-American churches and evangelists, fraternal organizations, prominent members of the African-American Community, former slaves, education and self-improvement. Also present are several volumes of poetry, a tax ledger and a volume concerning patents.
Formatted Contents note:
Life and times of Frederick Douglass, written by himself -- Duplicate copy of the souvenir from the Afro-American league of Tennessee to Hon. James M. Ashley of Ohio... -- Myrtilla Miner, a memoir -- A narrative of the life and travels of Mrs. Nancy Prince -- A list of patents granted by the United States from April 10, 1790... -- Comly's spelling and reading book -- Poems written during the progress of the abolition question in the United States... -- The Black phalanx -- Progress of a race; or, the remarkable advancement of the Afro-American Negro from the bondage of slavery... -- Africa and America; addresses and discourses -- A discourse, delivered on the death of Capt. Paul Cuffe -- An apology for African Methodism -- History of the Knights of Pythias -- The college of life; or, practical self-educator, a manual of self-improvement for the colored race... -- The Rev. J.W. Loguen, as a slave and as a freeman -- Behind the scenes -- The story of Archer Alexander from slavery to freedom, March 30, 1863 -- From slave cabin to pulpit: the autobiography of Rev. Peter Randolph -- Uncle Tom's story of his life from 1789-1877 -- Poems on various subjects, religious and moral -- Men of mark: eminent, progressive and rising -- [Tax ledger] -- A memorial discourse by Rev. Henry Highland Grant -- My recollections of African M.E. Ministers -- William Lloyd Garrison: the abolitionist -- Annals of the First African church in the United States of America... -- How to get and keep churches out of debt... -- Code and the discipline of the African Methodist Episcopalian Zion Church -- History of the First African Baptist Church -- An autobiography: the story of the Lord's dealings with Mrs. Amanda Smith, the colored evangelist.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans -- Social conditions  Search this
African American religious leaders  Search this
Slavery -- United States  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
Slaves  Search this
American poetry -- African American authors  Search this
African Americans -- Social life and customs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Books
Citation:
19th century African-American literature collection, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-107
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-107

William Lloyd Garrison

Names:
Garrison, William Lloyd, 1805-1879  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Apeda Studio (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Camuzzi, M.  Search this
Harris & Ewing  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sommariva, Emilio, Photographer, 1883-1956  Search this
Harris, Fred (photographer)  Search this
Extent:
1 photographic_print_mounted_on_cardboard (6 1/2 x 4 1/4 inches)
Container:
Box 6, Folder 24
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic_print_mounted_on_cardboard
Photographs
Date:
circa 1870
Biographical:
William, but best known as Lloyd Garrison (1805-1879), started his career and service as a fourteen year old boy, selling homemade molasses and wood to support his family. Garrison later began working as an apprentice compositor for a local paper and acquired the skills that would later allow him to write and publish articles nationally. In 1828, Garrison edited for the National Philanthropist, joined the Abolitionist movement, and by 1830 he completely rejected colonization. Garrison later began writing and reporting in his column the incidents of kidnapping, whippings, and even murders, which later placed him in jail. Garrison, on his own, started the anti-slavery newspaper, The Liberator and co-founded the American Anti-Slavery Society, and began public speaking where he burned a copy of the Constitution on July 4 condemning slavery. After the abolition of slavery, Garrison continued activism and retired from writing publicly, but continued to write to his children until his final days.
General:
Dr. and Mrs. Evans, compliments of Francess Garrison written on verso of photograph.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Abolitionists -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Collection Citation:
Evans-Tibbs collection, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of the Estate of Thurlow E. Tibbs, Jr.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-016, Item PH2003.7063.368
See more items in:
Evans-Tibbs Collection
Evans-Tibbs Collection / Series 5: Photographs / Prominent Friends and Associates
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-016-ref189

Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass, an American slave /written by himself.

Author:
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Author of introduction, etc.:
Garrison, William Lloyd, 1805-1879  Search this
Extent:
1 Book (7 1/4 x 4 1/2 x 3/4 inches.)
Container:
Box 2
Type:
Archival materials
Books
Books
Narratives
Date:
1845
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Abolitionists -- United States  Search this
African American abolitionists  Search this
Antislavery movements -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Narratives
Collection Citation:
Collection on Frederick Douglass, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Collection on Frederick Douglass materials
Collection on Frederick Douglass materials / Series 2: Publications
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-046-ref511

Twelfth Baptist Church of Boston

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Vance, Jim  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Twelfth Baptist Church (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
United States  Search this
Burns, Anthony, 1834-1862  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Garrison, William Lloyd, 1805-1879  Search this
Grimes, Leonard A., 1815-1873  Search this
Minkins, Shadrach  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Narration
Place:
Boston (Mass.)
United States
United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865
Date:
circa 1987
Scope and Contents:
Narrator Jim Vance presents a very short history of the Twelfth Baptist Church of Boston and the life of Reverend Leonard Grimes. The church's and reverend's work with the Underground Railroad and antislavery movement, and after the passing of Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 are highlighted. The arrests of Shadrach and Anthony Burns are also addressed. Members of the Twelfth Baptist Church wanted the right to bear arms as part of the Union Forces during the Civil War; William L. Garrison and Frederick Douglass argued for this right.
Narration only. Might be part of Climbing Jacob's Ladder Audiovisual Records. Production elements: AV003356 and AV003428 [narration]. AV003356: begins at 000115 [first minute of recording related to The Times of Richard Allen]. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Twelfth Baptist Church of Boston might be related to the Climbing Jacob's Ladder: The Rise of Black Churches in Eastern American Cities, 1740 - 1877 exhibition which explored the growth and central role of African American churches during the 18th- and 19th-centuries in the eastern United States: Boston, Savannah, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, and Richmond. The exhibition was organized by the Anacostia Museum and held there from October 1987 to October 1988.;Twelfth Baptist Church of Boston was formed by a small group of dissentients who split from the First African Baptist Church in 1848. It served as an anti-slavery meetinghouse, and provided refuge and spiritual guidance to free blacks and fugitive slaves. Twelfth Baptist Church of Boston was also known as the Fugitives Church or the Church of the Fugitive Slave.;Reverend Leonard Grimes was pastor of the Twelfth Baptist Church of Boston from 1848 to 1874. Born to free parents in Leesburg, Virginia, Grimes first became involved in the antislavery movement through his work with the Underground Railroad in Washington, D.C.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003428
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American churches  Search this
Churches  Search this
Church history  Search this
Religion  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Slaves  Search this
Fugitive slaves  Search this
Antislavery movements  Search this
African American abolitionists  Search this
Abolitionists  Search this
Jacob's ladder (Biblical dream)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Narration
Series Citation:
Climbing Jacob's Ladder audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-036, Item ACMA AV003356
See more items in:
Climbing Jacob's Ladder: the Rise of Black Churches in Eastern American cities, 1740 - 1877 Exhibition Records
Climbing Jacob's Ladder: the Rise of Black Churches in Eastern American cities, 1740 - 1877 Exhibition Records / Series 3: Audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-036-ref889

Frederick Douglass Home

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Frederick Douglass Memorial Home  Search this
United States.. Army. Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, 54th (1863-1865)  Search this
Brown, John, 1800-1859  Search this
Bruce, Blanche Kelso, 1841-1898  Search this
Cardozo, Francis Lewis, 1837-1903  Search this
Douglass, Anna Murray, -1882  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Douglass, Helen, 1838-1903  Search this
Garrison, William Lloyd, 1805-1879  Search this
Langston, John Mercer, 1829-1897  Search this
Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865  Search this
Sewall, May Wright, 1844-1920  Search this
Twain, Mark, 1835-1910  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (cartridge, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Narration
Place:
United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865
Talbot County (Md.)
New Bedford (Mass.)
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Rochester (N.Y.)
United States
England
Date:
1973
Scope and Contents:
Narrator provides an overview of abolitionist Frederick Douglass' life, work, and spirit from his birth as a slave in Talbot County, Maryland to his death in Washington, D.C. Douglass' experiences with racial prejudice and segregation as well as his involvement in the Underground Railroad and civil rights movements, including women's rights, are explored. Douglass lived in New Bedford (Mass.), Rochester (N.Y.), the neighborhood of Anacostia in Washington, D.C., and England, where he fled for two years after writing "The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass" in 1845. Douglass and his son Frederick Jr. recruited black men for the Civil War while his sons Lewis and Charles joined the 54th Massachusetts Regiment. While championing many reform causes, Douglass worked alongside William Lloyd Garrison, John Brown, Blanche Kelso Bruce, John Mercer Langston, Francis Cardozo, and May Wright Sewall.
Narration. Part of ACM Museum Events, PR, and Ceremonies Recordings. AV002692-1 and AV002692-2: same content. AV002692-1: sound beeps throughout recording. Dated 19731201.
Biographical / Historical:
Frederick Douglass Memorial Home was built between 1855 and 1859 for John Welsh Van Hook, an architect from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in Uniontown (also known as Anacostia). In 1877, Frederick Douglass purchased the home and 9 3/4 acres of land, which he named Cedar Hill. Over several years, Douglass purchased additional land and converted the home into a 21 room mansion. In 1900, Douglass' second wife, Helen Pitts Douglass, urged U.S. Congress to charter the Frederick Douglass Memorial and Historical Association, which received the property in 1903 upon Helen's death. On September 5, 1962, the Frederick Douglass estate became a part of the National Park Service. Groundbreaking ceremonies for a visitor center were held in September 1980. The visitor center opened to the public in February 1982. Douglass' home and estate became a National Historic Site in 1988 and underwent several restorations between 1922 and 2007.;Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) was born into slavery on Maryland's Eastern Shore but fled north in 1838 to settle in Massachussetts. He soon became an abolitionist in the antislavery movement, and by the mid-1840s his commanding eloquence in offering firsthand testimony to the oppressions of slavery had transformed him into one of the movement's most persuasive spokesmen. Douglass' reforming zeal remained strong all his life. After the Civil War put an end to slavery, he continued to be a leading defender of the rights of African Americans during Reconstruction.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV002692-2
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American abolitionists  Search this
Abolitionists  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Civil rights leaders  Search this
Antislavery movements  Search this
Civil rights movements  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Underground Railroad  Search this
Racism  Search this
Race discrimination  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Slaves -- Emancipation  Search this
Women's rights  Search this
Historic sites  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Narration
Collection Citation:
Anacostia Community Museum Programs and Projects, 1967-1989, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-023, Item ACMA AV002692-1
See more items in:
Museum Events, Programs, and Projects, 1967-1989
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-023-ref514

Minutes

Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents  Search this
Extent:
8.70 cu. ft. (9 document boxes) (7 12x17 boxes) (1 16x20 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
1846-1995
Descriptive Entry:
These records are the official minutes of the Board. They are compiled at the direction of the Secretary of the Smithsonian, who is also secretary to the Board, after approval by the Regents' Executive Committee and by the Regents themselves. The minutes are edited, not a verbatim account of proceedings. For reasons unknown, there are no manuscript minutes for the period from 1857 through 1890; and researchers must rely on printed minutes published in the Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution instead. Minutes are transferred regularly from the Secretary's Office to the Archives. Minutes less than 15 years old are closed to researchers. Indexes exist for the period from 1907 to 1946 and can be useful.
Historical Note:
The Smithsonian Institution was created by authority of an Act of Congress approved August 10, 1846. The Act entrusted direction of the Smithsonian to a body called the Establishment, composed of the President; the Vice President; the Chief Justice of the United States; the secretaries of State, War, Navy, Interior, and Agriculture; the Attorney General; and the Postmaster General. In fact, however, the Establishment last met in 1877, and control of the Smithsonian has always been exercised by its Board of Regents. The membership of the Regents consists of the Vice President and the Chief Justice of the United States; three members each of the Senate and House of Representatives; two citizens of the District of Columbia; and seven citizens of the several states, no two from the same state. (Prior to 1970 the category of Citizen Regents not residents of Washington consisted of four members). By custom the Chief Justice is Chancellor. The office was at first held by the Vice President. However, when Millard Fillmore succeeded to the presidency on the death of Zachary Taylor in 1851, Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney was chosen in his stead. The office has always been filled by the Chief Justice since that time.

The Regents of the Smithsonian have included distinguished Americans from many walks of life. Ex officio members (Vice President) have been: Spiro T. Agnew, Chester A. Arthur, Allen W. Barkley, John C. Breckenridge, George Bush, Schuyler Colfax, Calvin Coolidge, Charles Curtis, George M. Dallas, Charles G. Dawes, Charles W. Fairbanks, Millard Fillmore, Gerald R. Ford, John N. Garner, Hannibal Hamlin, Thomas A. Hendricks, Garret A. Hobart, Hubert H. Humphrey, Andrew Johnson, Lyndon B. Johnson, William R. King, Thomas R. Marshall, Walter F. Mondale, Levi P. Morton, Richard M. Nixon, Nelson A. Rockefeller, Theodore Roosevelt, James S. Sherman, Adlai E. Stevenson, Harry S. Truman, Henry A. Wallace, William A. Wheeler, Henry Wilson.

Ex officio members (Chief Justice) have been: Roger B. Taney, Salmon P. Chase, Nathan Clifford, Morrison R. Waite, Samuel F. Miller, Melville W. Fuller, Edward D. White, William Howard Taft, Charles Evans Hughes, Harlan F. Stone, Fred M. Vinson, Earl Warren, Warren E. Burger.

Regents on the part of the Senate have been: Clinton P. Anderson, Newton Booth, Sidney Breese, Lewis Cass, Robert Milledge Charlton, Bennet Champ Clark, Francis M. Cockrell, Shelby Moore Cullom, Garrett Davis, Jefferson Davis, George Franklin Edmunds, George Evans, Edwin J. Garn, Walter F. George, Barry Goldwater, George Gray, Hannibal Hamlin, Nathaniel Peter Hill, George Frisbie Hoar, Henry French Hollis, Henry M. Jackson, William Lindsay, Henry Cabot Lodge, Medill McCormick, James Murray Mason, Samuel Bell Maxey, Robert B. Morgan, Frank E. Moss, Claiborne Pell, George Wharton Pepper, David A. Reed, Leverett Saltonstall, Hugh Scott, Alexander H. Smith, Robert A. Taft, Lyman Trumbull, Wallace H. White, Jr., Robert Enoch Withers.

Regents on the part of the House of Representatives have included: Edward P. Boland, Frank T. Bow, William Campbell Breckenridge, Overton Brooks, Benjamin Butterworth, Clarence Cannon, Lucius Cartrell, Hiester Clymer, William Colcock, William P. Cole, Jr., Maurice Connolly, Silvio O. Conte, Edward E. Cox, Edward H. Crump, John Dalzell, Nathaniel Deering, Hugh A. Dinsmore, William English, John Farnsworth, Scott Ferris, Graham Fitch, James Garfield, Charles L. Gifford, T. Alan Goldsborough, Frank L. Greene, Gerry Hazleton, Benjamin Hill, Henry Hilliard, Ebenezer Hoar, William Hough, William M. Howard, Albert Johnson, Leroy Johnson, Joseph Johnston, Michael Kirwan, James T. Lloyd, Robert Luce, Robert McClelland, Samuel K. McConnell, Jr., George H. Mahon, George McCrary, Edward McPherson, James R. Mann, George Perkins Marsh, Norman Y. Mineta, A. J. Monteague, R. Walton Moore, Walter H. Newton, Robert Dale Owen, James Patterson, William Phelps, Luke Poland, John Van Schaick Lansing Pruyn, B. Carroll Reece, Ernest W. Roberts, Otho Robards Singleton, Frank Thompson, Jr., John M. Vorys, Hiram Warner, Joseph Wheeler.

Citizen Regents have been: David C. Acheson, Louis Agassiz, James B. Angell, Anne L. Armstrong, William Backhouse Astor, J. Paul Austin, Alexander Dallas Bache, George Edmund Badger, George Bancroft, Alexander Graham Bell, James Gabriel Berrett, John McPherson Berrien, Robert W. Bingham, Sayles Jenks Bowen, William G. Bowen, Robert S. Brookings, John Nicholas Brown, William A. M. Burden, Vannevar Bush, Charles F. Choate, Jr., Rufus Choate, Arthur H. Compton, Henry David Cooke, Henry Coppee, Samuel Sullivan Cox, Edward H. Crump, James Dwight Dana, Harvey N. Davis, William Lewis Dayton, Everette Lee Degolyer, Richard Delafield, Frederic A. Delano, Charles Devens, Matthew Gault Emery, Cornelius Conway Felton, Robert V. Fleming, Murray Gell-Mann, Robert F. Goheen, Asa Gray, George Gray, Crawford Hallock Greenwalt, Nancy Hanks, Caryl Parker Haskins, Gideon Hawley, John B. Henderson, John B. Henderson, Jr., A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., Gardner Greene Hubbard, Charles Evans Hughes, Carlisle H. Humelsine, Jerome C. Hunsaker, William Preston Johnston, Irwin B. Laughlin, Walter Lenox, Augustus P. Loring, John Maclean, William Beans Magruder, John Walker Maury, Montgomery Cunningham Meigs, John C. Merriam, R. Walton Moore, Roland S. Morris, Dwight W. Morrow, Richard Olney, Peter Parker, Noah Porter, William Campbell Preston, Owen Josephus Roberts, Richard Rush, William Winston Seaton, Alexander Roby Shepherd, William Tecumseh Sherman, Otho Robards Singleton, Joseph Gilbert Totten, John Thomas Towers, Frederic C. Walcott, Richard Wallach, Thomas J. Watson, Jr., James E. Webb, James Clarke Welling, Andrew Dickson White, Henry White, Theodore Dwight Woolsey.
Topic:
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Museum trustees  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 1, Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents, Minutes
Identifier:
Record Unit 1
See more items in:
Minutes
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0001
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
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Online Media:

The Abolitionists / American Experience Films presents ; written, produced & directed by Rob Rapley ; an Apograph Productions Inc. film for American Experience ; a production of WGBH

Film director:
Rapley, Rob  Search this
Film producer:
Grimberg, Sharon  Search this
Actor:
Brooks, Richard 1962-  Search this
Huff, Neal  Search this
Serralles, Jeanine  Search this
Sheil, Kate Lyn  Search this
Smith, T. Ryder  Search this
Narrator:
Platt, Oliver  Search this
Film editor:
Chimples, John  Search this
Tunsil, Aljernon  Search this
Cinematographer:
Cragg, Tim  Search this
Composer:
Phillips, Tom 1952-  Search this
Artistic director:
Mitterlehner, Akeime  Search this
Hughes, R. Mark  Search this
Viola, Elise  Search this
Costume designer:
Newhall, Deborah  Search this
Set designer:
Williams, Jim  Search this
Production company:
American Experience Films  Search this
Apograph Productions  Search this
WGBH (Television station : Boston, Mass.)  Search this
WGBH Educational Foundation  Search this
Film distributor:
PBS Distribution (Firm)  Search this
Subject:
Garrison, William Lloyd 1805-1879  Search this
Douglass, Frederick 1818-1895  Search this
Grimké, Angelina Emily 1805-1879  Search this
Stowe, Harriet Beecher 1811-1896  Search this
Brown, John 1800-1859  Search this
Physical description:
1 videodisc (approximately 180 min.) : sound, color with black and white sequences ; 4 3/4 in
Type:
Video recordings
Drama
DVDs
DVD-Video discs
Documentary television programs
Historical television programs
History
Nonfiction television programs
Television programs for the hearing impaired
Feature films
Place:
United States
Date:
2013
Topic:
Slavery--History  Search this
Abolitionists  Search this
Antislavery movements  Search this
Call number:
video 001550
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1093035

The Liberator [microform]

Author:
Garrison, William Lloyd 1805-1879  Search this
Physical description:
35 v. ill. 39-64 cm
Type:
Microforms
Periodicals
Place:
United States
Date:
1831
1865
1831-1865
Topic:
Slavery  Search this
Slavery--Anti-slavery movements  Search this
Call number:
mfm 2838
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_450931

The moral crusader, William Lloyd Garrison; a biographical essay founded on "The story of Garrison's life told by his children", by Goldwin Smith, D.C.L

Author:
Smith, Goldwin 1823-1910  Search this
Subject:
Garrison, William Lloyd 1805-1879  Search this
Physical description:
200 pages frontispiece (portrait) 21 cm
Type:
Electronic resources
Date:
1892
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1064047

William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children ..

Author:
Garrison, Wendell Phillips 1840-1907  Search this
Garrison, Francis Jackson 1848-1916  Search this
Subject:
Garrison, William Lloyd 1805-1879  Search this
Physical description:
4 v. fronts., illus., plates, ports., facsims. 24 cm
Type:
Electronic resources
Date:
1885
1889
1885-1889
Call number:
CT275.G24 G2
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_13610

Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass, an American slave / written by himself

Author:
Douglass, Frederick 1818-1895  Search this
Garrison, William Lloyd 1805-1879  Search this
Subject:
Douglass, Frederick 1818-1895  Search this
Physical description:
xvi, 125 pages, [1] leaf of plates : portrait ; 19 cm
Type:
Biography
Place:
Maryland
Date:
1846
Topic:
Slavery  Search this
Slaves' writings, American  Search this
African American abolitionists  Search this
Abolitionists  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1059514

Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass, an American slave / written by himself

Author:
Douglass, Frederick 1818-1895  Search this
Contributor:
Garrison, William Lloyd 1805-1879  Search this
Phillips, Wendell 1811-1884  Search this
Former owner:
Brown, Lucy L. DSI  Search this
Publisher:
Anti-Slavery Office  Search this
Subject:
Douglass, Frederick 1818-1895  Search this
Physical description:
xvi, 125, [1] pages, [1] leaf of plates : portrait ; 20 cm
Type:
Biography
Biographies
Autobiographies
Place:
United States
Maryland
Date:
1846
19th century
Topic:
Slave narratives  Search this
Abolitionists  Search this
African American abolitionists  Search this
Slaves  Search this
Antislavery movements  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Slaves--Social conditions  Search this
Fugitive slaves  Search this
Plantation life--History  Search this
Call number:
E449 .D749 1846
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1115656

Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass, an American slave / written by himself

Author:
Douglass, Frederick 1818-1895  Search this
Contributor:
Garrison, William Lloyd 1805-1879  Search this
Phillips, Wendell 1811-1884  Search this
Publisher:
Anti-Slavery Office  Search this
Subject:
Douglass, Frederick 1818-1895  Search this
Physical description:
xvi, 125, [1] pages, [1] leaf of plates : portrait ; 18 cm
Type:
Biography
Autobiographies
Biographies
History
Engravings
Publishers' cloth bindings (Binding)
Place:
United States
Maryland
Date:
1845
19th century
Topic:
Slave narratives  Search this
Abolitionists  Search this
African American abolitionists  Search this
Slaves  Search this
Antislavery movements  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Slaves--Social conditions  Search this
Fugitive slaves  Search this
Plantation life--History  Search this
Call number:
E449 .D749 1845
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_408353

Growing up abolitionist : the story of the Garrison children / Harriet Hyman Alonso

Author:
Alonso, Harriet Hyman  Search this
Subject:
Garrison family  Search this
Garrison, William Lloyd 1805-1879 Family  Search this
Physical description:
viii, 409 p., [12] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm
Type:
Biography
Place:
United States
Date:
2002
C2002
19th century
Topic:
Abolitionists  Search this
Antislavery movements--History  Search this
Call number:
CT275.G2399 A46 2002
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_685839

All on fire : William Lloyd Garrison and the abolition of slavery / Henry Mayer

Author:
Mayer, Henry 1941-2000  Search this
Subject:
Garrison, William Lloyd 1805-1879  Search this
Physical description:
xxi, 707 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm
Type:
Biography
Place:
United States
Date:
1998
19th century
Topic:
Abolitionists  Search this
Antislavery movements--History  Search this
Call number:
CT275.G24 M39 1998
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_549491

William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879 [by] Wendell Phillips Garrison and Francis Jackson Garrison

Author:
Garrison, Wendell Phillips 1840-1907  Search this
Garrison, Francis Jackson 1849-1916  Search this
Subject:
Garrison, William Lloyd 1805-1879  Search this
Physical description:
4 v. facsims., ports. 24 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1969
1885
Call number:
CT275.G24 G2 1969
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_556248

Documents of upheaval; selections from William Lloyd Garrison's the Liberator, 1831-1865. Edited by Truman Nelson

Author:
Garrison, William Lloyd 1805-1879  Search this
Nelson, Truman John 1912-  Search this
Physical description:
xxii, 294 p. 21 cm
Type:
Sources
Place:
United States
Date:
1966
[1966]
Topic:
Slavery--History  Search this
Antislavery movements  Search this
Slavery--Periodicals  Search this
Call number:
E449.L68X 1966
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_421253

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