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Authentic Music of the American Indian

Collection Creator:
Asch, Moses  Search this
Distler, Marian, 1919-1964  Search this
Folkways Records  Search this
Extent:
1 Phonograph record (analog, 33 1/3 rpm, 12 in.)
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Phonograph records
Date:
1970
Contents:
Fast Cheyenne war dance --Ponca Helushka dance --Fast Sioux war dance --Arikara war dance --My enemy, I came after your good white horse --Fast Cheyenne war dance -- Omaha Helushka --Ponca war dance --New Taos war dance song --Kiowa slow war dance --Kiowa fast war dance --Bloody knife's warrior song --Chief's honoring song -- The old glory raising on Iwo Jima --Korea memorial song -- Navajo hoop dance song --I'm in love with a Navajo boy -- Navajo dance song --Crow push dance song --Pawnee hand game song --Shawnee stomp dance --49 dance song -- The prisoner's song --Girl who is afraid of boys --The bear dance --Mountain by the sea --The Mescalero trail --Montana grass song --Apache mountain spirit song --Lightning song -- Sun dance song [2 versions] --Ute sun dance --Song of the black mountain --Song of the green rainbow --Navajo Yei-be-chai chant --Zuni buffalo dance --Hopi basket dance --Our father's thoughts are shining down --Ceremonial song.
Local Numbers:
FW-ASCH-LP-2830

Everest.3450/3
Publication, Distribution, Etc. (Imprint):
Everest 1970
General:
Recordings of various Indian tribes war dances, honor songs, social, folk and ceremonial songs and chants. Descriptive notes ([8] p.) laid in container. Performer(s): Sung and played by various native performers.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. No duplication allowed listening and viewing for research purposes only.
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for additional information.
Topic:
American Indian  Search this
Collection Citation:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.ASCH, Item FW-ASCH-LP-2830
See more items in:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection
Moses and Frances Asch Collection / Series 9: Audio Recordings / LP
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk52d0eab13-c4f0-4b9a-a804-26885b9bda2b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-asch-ref17464

Harvest of Hope: 5 Ben Nighthorse Campbell

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2013-12-20T14:08:37.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_b4fVwMrsBv4

A Promise Kept: 11 – Wilson Pipestem, Esq.

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2019-09-25T19:57:23.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_z7IyMfl6XB8

A Promise Kept: 14 – Duke Ray Harjo II

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2019-09-25T20:03:24.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_ib0c5A7qaKQ

MS 4558 Alice Cunningham Fletcher and Francis La Flesche papers

Creator:
La Flesche, Francis, 1857-1932  Search this
Fletcher, Alice C. (Alice Cunningham), 1838-1923  Search this
Correspondent:
La Flesche family  Search this
Aldrich, Charles F.  Search this
Alexander, Hartley B.  Search this
Allen, James T.  Search this
Andrews, Gleorge L.  Search this
Armstrong, S.C.  Search this
Ashley, Robert H.  Search this
Atkins, John D.C.  Search this
Boas, Franz, 1858-1942  Search this
Bowditch, Charles P. (Charles Pickering), 1842-1921  Search this
Brinton, Daniel G. (Daniel Garrison), 1837-1899  Search this
Brown, George LeRoy  Search this
Burlin, Natalie Curtis, 1875-1921  Search this
Cadman, Charles Wakefield, 1881-1946  Search this
Copley, John T.  Search this
Dall, William Healey, 1845-1927  Search this
Dawes, E.S.  Search this
Densmore, Frances, 1867-1957  Search this
Dixon, Roland Burrage, 1875-1934  Search this
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Dunbar, John Brown, 1841-1914  Search this
Ellinwood, F.F.  Search this
Farabee, William Curtis, 1865-1925  Search this
Farley, Caryl E.  Search this
Farley, Rosalie La Flesche  Search this
Farwell, Arthur  Search this
Fellowes, R.S.  Search this
Fewkes, Jesse Walter, 1850-1930  Search this
Fillmore, John Comfort, 1843-1898  Search this
Fillmore, L.H.  Search this
Fillmore, Thomas Hill  Search this
Freire-Marreco, Barbara W. (Barbara Whitchurch), 1879-1967  Search this
Gay, E. Jane  Search this
Griffith, Elmer C.  Search this
Guthrie, William Norman  Search this
Hale, Horatio, 1817-1896  Search this
Hall, C.C.  Search this
Hall, Charles Lemon, 1847-1940  Search this
Hearst, Phoebe Apperson, 1842-1919  Search this
Heth, H.  Search this
Hewett, Edgar L. (Edgar Lee), 1865-1946  Search this
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Hodge, Frederick Webb, 1864-1956  Search this
Holmes, William Henry, 1846-1933  Search this
Hough, Walter, 1859-1935  Search this
Jackson, Sheldon, 1834-1909  Search this
Johnston, Catherine M.  Search this
Kincaid, William  Search this
La Flesche, Joseph  Search this
Lummis, Charles Fletcher, 1859-1928  Search this
MacCurdy, George Grant, 1863-1947  Search this
Mason, Otis T., 1838-1908  Search this
Matthews, Washington, 1843-1905  Search this
McBeth, Kate C., 1832-1915  Search this
McBeth, Sue L., -1893  Search this
McCown, S.M.  Search this
McGee, W J, 1853-1912  Search this
McGuire, Joseph D. (Joseph Deakins), 1842-1916  Search this
Mead, Frances K.  Search this
Merriam, C. Hart (Clinton Hart), 1855-1942  Search this
Merrick, Fannie  Search this
Merrick, Jessie  Search this
Moon, Karl  Search this
Moore, Homer  Search this
Morgan, Caroline S.  Search this
Morgan, John T.  Search this
Murie, James R.  Search this
Myers, John L.  Search this
Nuttal, Maria Magdalena  Search this
Pepper, George H. (George Hubbard), 1873-1924  Search this
Petter, W.H.  Search this
Pettigrew, Frederick W., 1850-1901  Search this
Picotte, Susan La Flesche  Search this
Pratt, Richard Henry, 1840-1924  Search this
Price, Hiram  Search this
Proctor, Edna Dean, 1829-1923  Search this
Putnam, F. W. (Frederic Ward), 1839-1915  Search this
Quinn, Daniel  Search this
Robertson, Alice M.  Search this
Rogers, Emily F.  Search this
Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917  Search this
Seymour, Thomas Day  Search this
Spofford, Ainsworth Rand, 1825-1908  Search this
St. Cyr, Julia  Search this
Starr, Frederick  Search this
Stuart, James  Search this
Talbot, Emily  Search this
Teller, W.J.  Search this
Thaw, William  Search this
Tozzer, Alfred M. (Alfred Marston), 1877-1954  Search this
Wallaschek, Richard  Search this
Westcott, Edith  Search this
Wilkinson, G.W.  Search this
Wilkinson, Hattie M.  Search this
Willoughby, Charles Clark  Search this
Names:
Carr, Lucien, 1829-1915  Search this
Radin, Paul, 1883-1959  Search this
Extent:
19 Linear feet (50 boxes)
Culture:
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Sioux  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Quechua  Search this
Quapaw Indians  Search this
Ho-Chunk (Winnebago)  Search this
Mexicans  Search this
Wichita  Search this
Zapotec  Search this
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Apache  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Hitchiti Seminole  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Caddo  Search this
Biloxi Indians  Search this
Omaha  Search this
Osage  Search this
Oto  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Ajachemem (San Juan de Capistrano Luiseño)  Search this
Chaticks Si Chaticks (Pawnee)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Alaska
Date:
1873-1939
Summary:
These papers reflect the professional lives of Alice Cunningham Fletcher (1838-1923), an ethnologist with the Peabody Museum of Harvard and collaborator with the Bureau of American Ethnology, and Francis La Flesche (1856-1923), an anthropologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology. Due to the close professional and personal relationship of Fletcher and La Flesche, their papers have been arranged jointly. The papers cover the period from 1874 to 1939. Included in the collection is correspondence, personal diaries, lectures, field notes and other ethnographic papers, drafts, musical transcriptions, publications by various authors, maps and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
These papers reflect the professional lives of Alice Cunningham Fletcher (1838-1923), an ethnologist with the Peabody Museum of Harvard University and collaborator with the Bureau of American Ethnology, and Francis La Flesche (1856-1923), an anthropologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology. Due to the close professional and personal relationship of Fletcher and La Flesche, their papers have been arranged jointly. The papers cover the period from 1874 to 1939. Included in the collection is correspondence, personal diaries, lectures, field notes and other ethnographic papers, drafts, musical transcriptions, publications by various authors, maps and photographs.

The papers have been divided into three general categories: the papers of Alice Cunningham Fletcher, the papers of Francis La Flesche, and the ethnographic research of Fletcher and La Flesche. The first two categories represent personal and professional materials of Fletcher and La Flesche. The third section holds the majority of the ethnographic material in the collection.

Of primary concern are Fletcher and La Flesche's ethnological investigations conducted among the Plains Indians, particularly the Omaha and Osage. Fletcher's Pawnee field research and her allotment work for the Bureau of Indian Affairs among the Omaha, Nez Perce, and Winnebago are represented in the collection. A substantial portion of the ethnographic material reflects Fletcher and La Flesche's studies of Native American music. Much of the correspondence in the papers of Fletcher and La Flesche is rich with information about the situation of Omaha peoples in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Also included in the collection are documents related to Fletcher's work with the Archaeological Institute of America and the School for American Archaeology. Additionally, substantial amounts of Fletcher's early anthropological and historical research are found among her correspondence, lectures, anthropological notes, and early field diaries. La Flesche's literary efforts are also generously represented.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into the following 3 series: 1) Alice Cunningham Fletcher papers, 1873-1925; 2) Francis La Flesche papers, 1881-1930; 3) Papers relating to the anthropological research of Alice Fletcher and Francis La Flesche, 1877-1939.

Series 1: Alice Cunningham Fletcher papers is divided into the following 10 subseries: 1.1) Incoming correspondence, 1874-1923 (bulk 1882-1923); 1.2) Outgoing correspondence, 1873-1921; 1.3) Correspondence on specific subjects, 1881-1925; 1.4) Correspondence between Fletcher and La Flesche, 1895-1922; 1.5) Publications, 1882-1920; 1.6) Organizational records, 1904-1921; 1.7) General anthropological notes, undated; 1.8) Lectures, circa 1878-1910; 1.9) Diaries, 1881-1922; 1.10) Biography and memorabilia, 1878-1925.

Series 2: Francis La Flesche papers is divided into the following 6 subseries: 2.11) General correspondence, 1890-1929; 2.12) Correspondence on specific subjects, 1881-1930; 2.13) Publications, 1900-1927; 2.14) Literary efforts, undated; 2.15) Personal diaries, 1883-1924; 2.16) Biography and memorabilia, 1886-1930.

Series 3: Papers relating to the anthropological research of Alice Fletcher and Francis La Flesche is divided into the following 12 subseries: 3.17) Alaska, 1886-1887; 3.18) Earth lodges, 1882, 1898-1899; 3.19) Music, 1888-1918; 3.20) Nez Perce, 1889-1909; 3.21) Omaha, 1882-1922; 3.22) Osage, 1896-1939; 3.23) Pawnee, 1897-1910; 3.24) Pipes, undated; 3.25) Sioux, 1877-1896; 3.26) Other tribes, 1882-1922; 3.27) Publications collected, 1884-1905, undated; 3.28) Photographs, undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Alice Cunningham Fletcher (1838-1923) was an ethnologist with the Peabody Museum of Harvard and collaborator with the Bureau of American Ethnology. Francis La Flesche (1856-1923) was an anthropologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology.

Chronology of the Life of Alice Cunningham Fletcher

1838 March 15 -- Born in Havana, Cuba

1873-1876 -- Secretary, American Association for Advancement of Women

1879 -- Informal student of anthropology, Peabody Museum, Harvard University

1881 -- Field trip to Omaha and Rosebud Agencies

1882 -- Assistant in ethnology, Peabody Museum, Harvard University

1882 -- Helped secure land in severalty to Omaha Indians

1882-1883 -- Begins collaboration with Francis La Flesche on the Peabody Museum's collection of Omaha and Sioux artifacts

1883-1884 -- Special Agent, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Omaha Agency

1886 -- Bureau of Education investigation of Alaskan native education

1887-1888 -- Special Disbursing Agent, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Winnebago Agency

1889-1892 -- Special Agent for allotment, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Nez Perce Agency

1890-1899 -- President, Women's Anthropological Society of America

1891-1923 -- Mary Copley Thaw Fellow, Peabody Museum, Harvard University

1892-1893 -- Department of Interior consultant, World's Columbian Exposition

1896 -- Vice-President, Section H, American Association for the Advancement of Science

1897 -- Collaborator, Bureau of American Ethnology

1899-1916 -- Editorial board, American Anthropologist

1900 -- Published Indian Story and Song from North America

1901-1902 -- Advisory committee, Anthropology Department, University of California at Berkeley

1903 -- President, Anthropological Society of Washington

1904 -- Published The Hako: A Pawnee Ceremony with James Murie

1904 -- Member, ethnology section, Louisiana Purchase Exposition

1905 -- President, American Folk-lore Society

1908-1913 -- Chair, Managing Committee of School of American Archaeology

1911 -- Honorary Vice-President, Section H, British Association for Advancement of Science

1911 -- Published The Omaha Tribe with Francis La Flesche

1913 -- Chair Emeritus, Managing Committee of School of American Archaeology

1915 -- Published Indian Games and Dances with Native Songs Arranged from American Indian Ceremonials and Sports

1923 April 6 -- Died in Washington, D.C.

Chronology of the Life of Francis La Flesche

1857 December 25 -- Born on Omaha Reservation near Macy, Nebraska

1879 -- Lecture tour, Ponca chief Standing Bear

1881 -- Interpreter, Senate Committee on Indian Affairs

1881-1910 -- Clerk, Bureau of Indian Affairs

1891 -- Informally adopted as Fletcher's son

1892 -- LL.B., National University Law School

1893 -- LL.M., National University Law School

1900 -- Published The Middle Five: Indian Boys at School

1906-1908 -- Marriage to Rosa Bourassa

1910-1929 -- Ethnologist, Bureau of American Ethnology

1911 -- Published The Omaha Tribe with Alice Fletcher

1921 -- Published The Osage Tribe, Part One

1922 -- Member, National Academy of Sciences

1922-1923 -- President, Anthropological Society of Washington

1925 -- Published The Osage Tribe, Part Two

1926 -- Honorary Doctor of Letters, University of Nebraska

1928 -- Published The Osage Tribe, Part Three

1932 -- Published Dictionary of the Osage Language

1932 September 5 -- Died in Thurston County, Nebraska

1939 -- Posthumous publication of War Ceremony and Peace Ceremony of the Osage Indians
Related Materials:
Additional material related to the professional work of Fletcher and La Flesche in the National Anthropological Archives may be found among the correspondence of the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) and the records of the Anthropological Society of Washington.

Sound recordings made by Fletcher and La Flesche can be found at the Library of Congress. The National Archives Records Administration hold the Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), including those relating to allotments in severalty for the Nez Perce by Alice Fletcher. The Nebraska Historical Society has diaries, letters and clippings regarding the La Flesche family, including correspondence of Francis La Flesche and Fletcher. The Radcliffe College Archives holds a manuscript account of Alice Fletcher's four summers with the Nez Perce (1889-1892). Correspondence between Fletcher and F. W. Putnam is also located at the Peabody Museum Archives of Harvard University.
Separated Materials:
Ethnographic photographs from the collection have been catalogued by tribe in Photo Lot 24.

Glass plate negatives from the collection have been catalogued by tribe in the BAE glass negatives collection (Negative Numbers 4439-4515).
Provenance:
The papers of Alice Cunningham Fletcher and Francis La Flesche have been received from an undocumented number of sources. Portions of Fletcher's ethnographic papers were donated to the archives by Mrs. G. David Pearlman in memory of her husband in 1959.
Restrictions:
The Alice Cunningham Fletcher and Francis La Flesche papers are open for research.

Access to the Alice Cunningham Fletcher and Francis La Flesche papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Pipes -- American Indian  Search this
Earth houses  Search this
Music -- American Indian  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 4558 Alice Cunningham Fletcher and Francis La Flesche papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4558
See more items in:
MS 4558 Alice Cunningham Fletcher and Francis La Flesche papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw364f28c11-4526-4a7d-9d44-1db060dad721
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4558
Online Media:

Native Americans

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The continuing traditions of the original inhabitants of this nation were presented in the Native Americans area by representatives of the more than 200 Native American communities throughout the United States. Working with the Smithsonian, they had examined their traditions and created the programs, speaking to their way of life today and their hopes for the future.

The Native Americans area was designed with Native traditions in mind. The entire area lay within a circle that represented the wholeness of life, emphasizing that, in Native philosophy, everything is interrelated. A corn field formed the outlying circle; corn, the contribution of Native Americans to the peoples of the world, is regarded as the gift of Mother Earth. With squash and beans sharing the field, the entire area was thus surrounded by the three staple foods of the Southwest, the "three sisters" of the Iroquois. The Learning Center, designed by architect Dennis Sun Rhodes, Arapaho, faces East, the direction of sunrise and of life, and visitors were intended to proceed inside sunwise, in a circle. In its design and in its presentations of music, crafts, dance, and discussion, the Native Americans area honored the first Americans.

Building upon six years of programming during preceding Festivals, the Bicentennial presentations presented a region-by-region overview of American Indian folklife:

June 16-20, Northeast (Six Nations, Iroquois, Mohawk, Seneca, Onandaga, Tuscarora, Algonkian, Passamaquoddy, Penobscot, Shinnecock, Hassanamisco, Nanticoke, Susquehanna, Wampanoag, Narragansett, Gay Head, Mohegan, Schaghticoke)

June 23-27, Great Lakes (Oneida, Ojibwa)

July 1-5, Southeast (Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, Seminole, Tuscarora, Muskogee, Tunica-Biloxi of Louisiana, Mattaponi, Houma Tribe of Louisiana, Alabama Creek, Lumbee)

July 7-11, Southern Plains (Comanche, Kiowa, Kiowa Apache, Omaha, Pawnee, Ponca, Southern Cheyenne)

July 14-18, Prairie (Sac and Fox)

July 21-25, Northern Plains (Northern Cheyenne)

July 28-August 1, Northwest Coast (Alaska Federation of Natives, Confederated Tribes of Siletz, Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation)

August 4-8, Southwest (San Juan Pueblo, Navaho, White Mountain Apache, Comanche)

August 11-15, Plateau (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakima Indian Nation, Ute, Klamath)

August 18-22, Basin (Northern Paiute, Southern Paiute, Washo, Western Shoshone, Walker River Paiute)

August 25-29, Northern California (Miwok, Wintun, Pomo, Yurok, Karok, Tolowa, Hupa, Klamath, Tchinook, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla, Quileute)

September 2-6, Arctic (Alaska Federation of Natives)

Lucille Dawson served as program coordinator, assisted by Thomas Kavanagh. The multi-year program was shaped by the Native Americans Advisory Group, including Louis Bruce, Rayna Green, Dell Hymes, Clydia Nahwooksy, Alfonso Ortiz, and William Sturtevant.
Participants:
Northeast

Six Nations, Iroquois

Mohawk

Mary Adams, basket maker

Mike Adams, basket maker

Sally Ann Adams, basket maker

Richard Hill, headdress maker

Stan Hill, bone carver

Tammy Hill, craft sales

Mary Longboat, cornhusk worker

Margaret Torrence, basket maker

Cam Wilson, silversmith

Mark Wilson, craft sales

Wanda Wilson, dancer

Oneida

Eula Chrisjohn, cornhusk worker

Irving Chrisjohn, cornhusk worker

Richard Chrisjohn, Sr., wood carver

Richard Chrisjohn, Jr., wood carver

Onondaga

Andrea Jimerson, dancer

Marty Jimerson, dancer

Huron Miller, project coordinator

James Skye, wood carver

Guy Williams, dancer

Ruby Williams, dancer

Tim Williams, dancer

Seneca

Helen Harris, dancer

Linda Harris, dancer

Philman Harris, drum and rattle maker

Steve Harris, dancer

Hazel Jimerson, dancer

Lester Jimerson, dancer

Mamie Jones, dancer

Paul Jones, dancer

Kevin Johnny John, dancer

Mike Johnny John, dancer

Vera Miller, beadworker

Rodney Pierce, dancer

Marlene Thomas, dancer

Hazel Thompson, gancer

Phillip Thompson, dancer

Natie Watt, basket maker

Ruth Watt, basket maker

Tuscarora

Louise Henry, beadworker

Oscar Moses, Lacrosse stick maker

Kevin Patterson, Lacrosse stick maker

Wes Patterson, Lacrosse stick maker

Edward Sayer, finger weaving

Wilmer Wilson, 1925-2002, craft sales manager

Algonkian

Chuck Comanda, canoe maker

Mary Comanda, canoe maker

William Comanda, canoe maker

Ojibwa

Audrey Pawis, quill worker

Discussants

Asenith D. Vogt, coordinator

Joseph A. Nicholas, discussant, Passamaquoddy

Andy Akins, discussant, Penobscot

Charles Jennings, discussant, Penobscot

Brian Miles, discussant, Pequot

Eva Smith, discussant, Shinnecock

Diane Bess, discussant, Shinnecock

Lois Wilcox, discussant, Hassanamisco

Kenneth Clark, discussant, Nanticoke

Kathy Clark, discussant, Nanticoke

Jody Hale, discussant, Susquehanna

Lydia Hale, discussant, Susquehanna

Edith Andrews, discussant, Wampanoag

Naomi Andrews, discussant, Wampanoag

Alberta Wilcox, discussant, Narragansett

Lloyd Wilcox, discussant, Narragansett

Helen Attaquin, discussant, Gay Head, Aquinnah Wampanoag

Mother Helen Attaquin, discussant, Gay Head, Aquinnah Wampanoag

Stilson Fands, discussant, Mohegan

Trudy Lamb, discussant, Schaghticoke

George Mitchell, Commissioner of Indian Affairs for the State of Maine

Southeast

Cherokee

Wanda Barr, dance leader

Mike Daniels, pottery

Cecil Hall, discussant

Don Mabray, discussant

Frank Mclemore, discussant

Eva Nordwell, discussant

Eunice Old Field, weaver

Knohovtee Scott, jewelry, silversmith

Ross Swimmer, discussant

Dick Spahr, head cook

Mary Lou Spahr, cook

Mrs. Ross Swimmer, discussant

Anicl Barr, dancer

Sheila Barr, dancer

Brenda Johnson, dancer

Jeanette Reese, dancer

Gina Pritchett, dancer

Michelle Ummtukee, dancer

Chickasaw

Aaron Christy, guide

Hazel Christy, dancer, beadwork

Overton James, discussant

Emma Mose, dancer

Buster Ned, dancer

Calvin Ned, dancer

Rhonda Ned, dancer

Wanda Ned, dancer, beadwork

Bienum Pickens, dancer, stickball, drummer

Adam Sampson, singer, dancer, stickball

Richard Sampson, dancer, stickball

Junior Thomas, dancer

Mary Wallace, dancer

Mrs. Overton James

Choctaw

Clelland Billy, stickball

Glendale Billy, food, cook

David Gardner, discussant

Lucinda Gibson, arts and crafts

Eula Goings, cook

Hugh Jefferson, stickball, discussant

Ray Jefferson, stickball

Louise Isscomer, beading

Myrtle Lowman, basket weaving

Sherrin Matlock, discussant

Mrs. David Gardner, discussant

Creek

Claude Cox, discussant

Paul Culley, 1925-, dancer

Wynena Evans, beadwork, singer

Brian Fife, dancer, discussant

Margaret Freeman, cook

Hepsey Gilroy, looming, dancer

Solomon McCombs, artist

Buddy Scott, silversmith, dancer

Genda Scott, basket weaving, dancer

Gene Timothy, discussant, food, Lacrosse

Mrs. Claude Cox, discussant

Seminole

Beulah Bemo, arts and crafts

Mallene Davis, singer, dancer; Miss Indian Oklahoma

Kelly Haney, artist, dancer, stickball

Samantha Hooper, education guide, dancer

Ida Little, food, shell shaker, dancer

Terry Little, cook

H. T. Miller, stomp dancer, stickball

Tom Palmer, stomp dancer, stickball

Ida Lee Redbird, shell shaker, dancer

Jennie Lee Rice, shell shaker, dancer

Ed Tanyan, discussant

Mrs. Ed Tonyan, discussant

Cherokee

William Crow, wood carver

Betty Crow, bead worker

Tuscarora

Ernest Carter, discussant

Benjamin Maynor, discussant

Muskogee

Angela Lyles, discussant

Ann Taylor Tate, discussant

Tunica-Biloxi of Louisiana

Rose Marie Gallardo, discussant

Mary Vercher, discussant

Mattaponi

Chief Curtis Custalow, discussant

Gertrude Custalow, discussant

Houma Tribe of Louisiana

Steve Cheramie, discussant

Randolph Francis, discussant

Alabama Creek

Connie S. Tullis, discussant

Buford L. Rolin, discussant

Lumbee

Donna Chavis

Sonya Allen

Southern Plains

Carla Allrunner, dancer

Richard Asenap, program coordinator

Joe Attocknie, 1911-1984, singer, flute player

Rosalie Attocknie, 1926-2011, artist

Bobbi Bradley, artist

Hawana Bradley, artist

Ronald Burless, artist

Ed Chappabitty, singer

Evelyn Chappabitty, singer

Florence Chasenah, beadworker

Gerald Chasenah, dancer

James Chasenah, singer

Kim Chasenah, dancer

Wallace Coffey, narrator, dancer

James Cox, narrator, tribal chairman

Marie Cox, craftsperson

Sam Devenney, historian, photographer

Jamie Franklin, dancer

Rita Franklin, dancer

Patty Hall

Carol Hall

Melvin Kerchee, singer, dancer

Melvin Kerchee, Jr., dancer

Nettie Kerchee, 1921-2003, dress maker, bead worker

Diane Motah, craftsperson

Lee Motah, historian, narrator

Haddan Nauni, singer

Rose Nauni, craftsperson

Leslie Niedo, bead worker

Frank Oberly, narrator

Mary Oberly, craftsperson

Sam "Doc" Peweardy, singer

Bill Poafpybitty, graphics, sculptor

Richard Ralph Poafpybitty, 1963-1996, actor

Sarah Pohosucut, historian

Henry Pratt, flute player, dancer, singer

Leonard Riddles, artist

Kenneth Saupitty, narrator

Gene Sovo, war dancer

Junior Sovo, war dancer

Margie Sovo, moccasin maker

Jerome Tahawah, singer

Edmond Tate, dancer

Joyce "Doc" Tate Nevaquaya, 1932-1996, flute player, dancer, artist

Jermone Tahawah, singer

May Tonips, beadworker, graphics, sculptor

Rick Tosee, dancer

George Wallace, singer

Juanita Wallace, singer

Eva Watchataker, beadworker

George "Woogee" Watchataker, dancer, flute player

Junior Weryackwe

Eva Weryackwe

Patricia Whitewolf, shawl maker

Sheryle Whitewolf, dancer

Elmer Winnerchy, 1917-1986, singer

Evelyn Winnerchy, 1917-1996, dancer

Prairie

Sac & Fox Tribe

Bill Grass

John Gakey

Shannon Franklin

Omer Jefferson, Jr.

Kate Walker

Winnie Gibson

Delphine Foreman

Sarah Riley

Sharon Byers

Bill Foreman

Jerry Nanaeto

Kimberly Nanaeto

Harriet Nanaeto

Barbara Hawkins

Kartherine Franklin

Ronnie Harris

Sandy Harris

R.J. Harris

Merle Boyd

Tammy Boyd

Pamela Boyd

Mabel Harris

George Harris

Leona Starr

Jimmy Starr

James L. Starr

Leota Black

Carl Butler

Cecil Littlehead

Clarissa Littlehead

Oma Patrick

Irene Harris

Georgianna LeClair

Teresa LeClair

Larry Blanchard

Linda Standing

Karen "Candy" Hunter

Henry O. Hunter

Douglas Franklin

Dino Riley

George Switch

Jessica Patterson

Muriel Patterson

Valerie Patterson

Carol Patterson

Frances Coker

Richard Mullake

Kay Kay Goodeagle

Mary Clark

Donald Marland

Mary Mack

Guy Wakalee

Huge Wakalee

Marilyn Thurman

Herschel Tiger

Jack Thorpe

Lee Bass, Jr.

Elmer Manatowa, Jr.

Northern Plains

Northern Cheyenne

Harry Littlebird, Sr., gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Annie Joyce Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Richard Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game

Serena Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Limona Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Rose Ann Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Ginger Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Theresa Brady, dancer, gourd dance, arts & crafts, cook

Curtis Brady, dancer, gourd dance, hand game

Steve Brady, dancer, gourd dance, hand game

Eggonn Brady, dancer, gourd dance, hand game

Elsie Wick, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Donna Wick, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Christine Wick, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

James Wick, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Dennis Wick, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Ernest King, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Grover Wolfvoice, 1890-1978, hand game, arts & crafts

Dale Brady, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Joe Lonewolf, dancer, gourd dance, arts & crafts, singer

Crawford Lonewolf, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, singer

Charles Brady, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Arnie Brady, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Hilda Manley, dance, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

James Littlebird, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Harriet Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Geofredo Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, singer

Clinton Birdhat, dancer, hand game, singer

Marlene Belly Mule, dancer, gourd dance, arts & crafts, cook

Ruth Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Stacey Gwen Littlebird, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Rose Medicine Elk, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

John Medicine Elk, Sr., gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

John Killsontop, Sr., gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Rose Killsontop, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Mike Bearcamesout, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Robert Bearchum, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Robert Redwoman, hand game, arts -- & -- crafts, singer

Mary Redwoman, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Elmer Fightingbear, dancer, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Tommy Rockroads, dancer, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Dave Glenmora, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Wilson Brady, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Tim Littleboy, dancer, hand game, arts & crafts

Webby Runsabove, dancer, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Billy Runsabove, dancer, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Fernando Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Steve Littlebird, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer, coordinator

Northwest Coast

Les Houck

Merle Holmes

Charles Rick

Charles McKnight

Edmund Ben

Delores Pigsley

Archie Ben

Paul Jackson

Shirley Walker

Raymond Ben

Judy McKnight

Melvin McKnight

Bunni Houck

Jerry Running Foxe

Paulene Rick

Joe McKnight

Randy Rick

Boby Dumont

Victoria Ben

Dave Harley

Carlene Easter

Delbert Bell

Caroline Easter

Alaska Federation of Natives

Judy Brady

Herman Davis

Ruth Farquhar

Sharon Frank

Larry Garrity

Laura Eliz Joseph

Larry Judy

Alice Kitka

Marla Kitka

Donna Lang

Dorothy Lord

Tim McGraw

Lillian Nielsen

Mike Spoon

Martin Strand, Jr.

Martina Strand

Marlene Thomas

Cynthia Williams

Ethel Williams

Karin Williams

Janice Williams

Isabella Brady

Ethel Makinen

George Ramos

Marie Thiemeyer

Margy Johnson

Southwest

Amos Beatty

Jimmy Thompson

Charles Henry

Ron Quay

Wilkie Dazen

John Chissay

Mike Cooley

Pat Cooley

Bruce Cooley

Theresa Truesdell

Myrna Tessay

Wilfred Peaches

Manuelita Early

Jerry Lupe

Mike Truesdell

Bernice Endfield

Lula Machuse

Azlie Lupe

Pheobe Gooday

Nelson Lupe, Sr.

Shirleen Bullock

Beverly Machuse

June Marie Dale

Ophelia Peaches

Maria Endfield

Umatilla

Traditional Long House Group from Pendleton, Oregon

Edith K. McCloud, narrator, bead worker

Lillian E. Hoptowit, craftsperson, bead worker

Terry L. Hoptowit, dancer

Rosie McCloud, dancer

Eliza B. Nez, dancer

Joseph P. Tias, dancer

Bernadette B. Nez, dancer

Anthony G. Hoptowit Sr., crafts

Anna Marie Brown, buckskin worker

James Hoptowit, dancer

Donna B. Nikolaide, dancer, assist.

Willard D. Showay, singer

Arthur Williams, singer, crafts-beadwork

Lonnie R. Selam Sr., singer

William A. Johnson Sr., feather worker

Mrs. Arthur Williams, bead worker

Phillip Jackson, dancer, assist.

Eliza Bill, coordinator

Norma June Mosquito, dancer

Beksee Mosquito, singer, drummer

John Willard Hoptowit, dancer

Maisie McCloud, dancer

David Dean McKay, dancer

Babette Cowapoo, dancer

Ellen Taylor, dancer

Julie Taylor, dancer

Alberta Taylor, dancer

Ellen Johnson, bead worker

Cidric Bill, dancer

Anthony G. Hoptowit Jr., dancer

Emile Bill, dancer

Robert Bill, dancer

Sheila Bill, dancer

Sonny Gail McCloud, dancer

Angie McCloud, dancer

Raphael Bill, dancer, assist.

Veva E. Bill, storyteller

Sylvester Selam, dancer

Gabriel Selam, singer

Sandy Sampson, dancer, narrator, sign language

The Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakima Indian Nation of Toppenash, Washington will also be featured. Simon Sampson is the coordinator.

We will feature the Ute Reservation led by Gwen Mojado, the Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada led by Harold Wyatt, and the Klamath Tribe of Oregon led by Leonard Norris.

Northern California

Miwok Tribe

William Franklin, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Cora Franklin, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Margaret Villa, dancer, lecturer, jewelry maker

Theresa Coy, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Carl Mathiesen, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Inez Mathiesen, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

David Franklin, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Ronnie Franklin, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

James Franklin, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Norman Franklin, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Robert Coy, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Elaine Barber, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Dorothy Stanley, food demonstration, lecturer

Dwight Zutchke, dancer, lecturer

Wintun Tribe

Mary Norton, food sales

Frances McDaniel, basket maker

Pomo Tribe

Elsie Allen, 1899-1990, basket maker, Ukiah, California

Yurok Tribe

Elaine Glairy, jewelry maker

Mary Birchfield, food sales

Ollie Foseide, 1921-, basket maker, Hoopa, California

Warren Abbott, food sales, dancer

Lareta James, dancer, singer

Dewey George, 1899-1985, boat maker, dance leader, McKinleyville, California

Rosie Silva, dancer, singer

Julius Aubrey, boat making assistant, dancer

Oscar Taylor, net maker, singer, dancer

Eileen Figueroa, basket maker, singer

Sam Jones, 1913-1996, stick game player

Mark Sundberg, stick game player, dancer, canoe assistant

Lisa Sundberg, dancer, jewelry maker

Joy Sundberg, Northern California coordinator, lecturer

Karok Tribe

Charlie Tom, singer, drummer, dancer

Jo Peters, 1923-, jewelry maker, basket maker, lecturer, Hoopa, California

Tammy Peters, dancer, jewelry maker

Laura George, guide, assistant

Lorna Dodge, lecturer, guide, assistant

Tolowa Tribe

Billy Richards, dancer

Mark Richards, dancer

Nicole Richards, dancer

Loren Bommelyn, 1956-, lead singer, Fort Dick, California

Fred Moorehead, lead singer

Betty Green, dance assistant

Kim Richards, dancer

Tanya Richards, dancer

Ronnie Richards, dancer

Marvin Richards, dancer

Denise Lopez, dancer, guide

Denise Richards, dancer, guide

Pam Mattz, dancer

Joan Richards, food sales

Darlene Richards, food sales

Lorene Richards, dancer

William Richards, food sales

Viola Richards, food sales

Bill Bommelyn, dancer

Walter Richards, singer

Lila Moorehead, sand bread maker, cook

Hupa Tribe

Merve George, band leader, dancer

Eleanor Abbott, language class leader

Andy Andrioli, lecturer, guitar player, dancer

Kim Yerton, dancer, learning center assistant

Janice Yerton, learning center assistant

Endora Saxson, dancer

Mike Waterman, drummer

Doug Duncan, lead guitar player

George Disdy, guitar player

Ann Taylor, assistant

Pat Andrioli, assistant

Paiute Tribe

Joseph Saulque, lecturer, historian

Film and Video Presentation

Vern Korbe

Carol Korbe

Dick O'Rourke

Lorraine O'Rourke

Brian Tripp

Dolly Tripp

Daniel O'Rourke

Klamath Tribe

Leonard Norris, Jr., Coordinator

Cecil L. Gallagher

Nick Kimbal

Charlie Bates

Rhonda Jimenez

LaNell L. Jackson

Rose Mary Tree Top

Jean Tina Bates

Bill L. Jackson

Anna Marie Jackson

Valgene Teeman

Marc McNair

Tchinook Tribe of Oregon

Karleen F. McKenzie

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla

Leslie Minthorn, Coordinator

Quileute Tribe

Robert Bojorcas, 1943-, Coordinator, Eugene, Oregon
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1976, Series 6
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5faad8354-a427-4717-95e3-f0b878e67f3a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1976-ref44

Native Americans

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Beginning with the first Festival in 1967, Native American presentations demonstrated the vitality of craft traditions, culinary arts, song and dance, and folklore. The 1974 Native American program marked the fifth year in a series of regional programs, to culminate in the Bicentennial Festival in 1976 with a comprehensive national program. More than 90 participants joined the Festival, primarily from the Western States of California, Utah, Nevada, Idaho, and Colorado; special programs on sports and games brought tribal members from elsewhere in the country.

Among the tribes participating in the 1974 Festival were (from California) the Tolowa, Pomo, Hoopa, Yurok, Karok, Luiseno, Maidu, Cahuilla, as well as (from the Basin and Plateau States) Paiute, Shoshone, Kaibab, Northern Ute, Ute Mountain, Southern Ute, and Nez Perce. Sports and games were presented by Creek, Cherokee, Eskimo, Acoma, Athabaskan, Jemez, and Laguna participants. Pomo basket makers, Karok netmakers, Yurok canoe carvers, a Tolowa reed boat weaver, and cooks from Yurok, Hoopa, Karok and Cahuilla tribes of California demonstrated crafts and foodways.

Performances took place in a California plank house and a Basin/Plateau tipi, with workshops and discussions in a Learning Center, and sports and games in a dedicated area. The Learning Center was a multimedia venue designed as an introduction to contemporary Indian communities and their traditional backgrounds. Such topics as the Indian Family, Native Community, and Contributions to America were discussed by participants, while Festival visitors could attend language classes, learn Indian songs, and view photographs of contemporary and historic Native Americans.

Carole Parker served as program coordinator, assisted by Thomas Kavanagh; the California program was coordinated by Joy Sundberg (Yurok); the Basin/Plateau program, by Jim Jefferson (Southern Ute); and the sports and games, by Matt Waconda and Ethan Bigpond. The multi-year program was shaped by the Native Americans Advisory Group, including Louis Bruce, Clydia Nahwooksy, Dell Hymes, William Sturtevant, Samuel Stanley, Herman Viola, Carnes Burson, and Robert Byington. Major sponsors for the 1974 program included the Public Information Office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Department of the Army, the Coalition of Eastern Native Americans and the Louisiana Pacific Redwood Corporation.

The following year (1975) saw the last regional Native American program, with the Bicentennial Festival providing a national overview, including some participants who returned from previous years.
Participants:
California

Tolowa

Sheryl Bommelyn, dancer

Loren Bommelyn, dancer

Kara Brundin, dancer

Brenda Green, dancer

John Green, dancer, singer

Carl James, dancer

Samuel Lopez, 1886-1977, singer

Billy Richards, dancer

Mark Richards, dancer

Marvin Richards, dancer, singer

Nicole Richards, dancer, cook

Don Stunrick, dancer

Pomo

Elsie Allen, 1899-1990, basket maker

Dewey Barnes, 1932-2006, fishtrap maker

Rose Barnes, 1929-, dancer

Elvina Brown, dancer

James Brown II, dancer

James Brown III, dancer

Kenneth Fred, 1929-, singer, dancer

Bernadine Hopper, 1918-1999, dancer

Nelson Hopper, Pomo, shell jeweler, Finley, California

Hoopa

Eleanor Abbott, basket maker

Warren Abbott, dancer

Anthony Risling, 1912-2004, fishnet maker

Yurok

George Blake, bow maker, Eureka, California

Ella Johnson, basket maker

Sam Jones, 1913-1996, salmon cook

Walter Lara, Yurok, canoe carver, Eureka, California

Ella Norris, 1892-1982, Wiyot-Yurok, salmon cook, Crescent City, California

Josephine Peters, 1923-2011, jeweler

Pamela Peters, dancer

Mark Sundberg, dancer

Lisa Sundberg, cook, dancer

Tom Williams, canoe carver

Karok

Francis Davis, Sr., 1929-, fishnet maker

Luiseno

Villiana Hyde, 1903-1994, discussant

Maidu

Gladys Mankins, 1912-1985, bead worker, dancer

Seymore Smith, 1891-, singer

Cahuilla

Katherine Saubel, cook

Basin/Plateau

Paiute

Marie Brown, bead worker, cook

Stannard Frank, 1923-1989, discussant

Lily George, 1911-1977, Paiute, tule boat maker, Ely, Nevada

Madaline Kaamasee, doll maker

Lena Murphy, dancer

Marjorie Stark, Paiute, 1911-2001, basket maker, Ely, Nevada

Shoshone

Ella Bear, 1907-1983, hide tanner

Jimmy Dan, dancer, singer

Agnes Gould, 1925-1991, dancer

Audrey Gould, bead worker

Austin Gould, dancer, singer

Vincent Ponzo, buckskin worker

Kaibab

Dan Bullets, 1906-1990, Kaibab, hide tanner, Fredonia, Arizona

Alva Drye, Kaibab, basket maker, Fredonia, Arizona

Lucille Jake, 1920-1997, Kaibab, bead worker, basket maker, Fredonia, Arizona

Lita Sigmiller, Kaibab, basket maker, Fredonia, Arizona

Northern Ute

Irene Coch, bead worker, dancer

Loya Gardner, 1913-2004, dancer

Maxine Natchez, dancer

Ute Mountain

Cliff Duncan, pow wow MC

Bonnie Hatch, Ute Mountain, dancer, Towaoc, Colorado

Sarah Hatch, Ute Mountain, dancer, potter, Towaoc, Colorado

Danny Tallbird, 1926-1996, Cheyenne, dancer, Towaoc, Colorado

Ruby Tallbird, 1934-2004, Ute Mountain, buckskin worker, Towaoc, Colorado

Tony Tallbird, Ute Mountain, dancer, Towaoc, Colorado

Southern Ute

Ramona Eagle, Southern Ute, dancer, Ignacio, Colorado

Dan Jefferson, dancer

Tim Jefferson, dancer

Bonnie Kent, 1918-1989, Southern Ute, dancer, Ignacio, Colorado

Elsie Kent, dancer

Nez Perce

Randall Ellenwood, dancer

Wilfred Halfmoon, dancer

Owen Slickapoo, dancer

Allen Slickpoo, discussant

Sports and Games

Creek

Paul Culley, 1931-1993, Creek, stickball, Wetumka, Oklahoma

Paula Culley, 1963-, Creek-Seminole, stickball, Wetumka, Oklahoma

Jeannie Fixico, 1953-, Creek, stickball, Seminole, Oklahoma

Emma Lowe, 1942-, Creek, stickball, Holdenville, Oklahoma

Larry Soweka, 1945-, Creek, stickball, Henryetta, Oklahoma

Cherokee

George Dixon, 1946-, Cherokee, archer, Muskogee, Oklahoma

Larry Rackliff, 1952-, Cherokee, archer, Tahlequa, Oklahoma

Lyman Vann, 1907-1985, Cherokee, archer, Tulsa, Oklahoma

Pete Vann, 1948-, archer

Eskimo

Laura Bergt, sports

Les Bodfish, sports

Reggie Joule, sports

Roger Kunayak, sports

Acoma

Gordon Joe, 1955-, Acoma, track runner, Paraje, New Mexico

Athabaskan

Fred Titus, sports

Jemez

Steven Gachupin, 1942-, Jemez, track coach, Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico

Laguna

Emmet Hunt, 1948-, Laguna-Acoma, cross country coach, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Bruce Allen Romero, 1959-, track, Paguate, New Mexico

Meldon R. Sanchez, 1959-, runner, San Fidel, New Mexico
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1974 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1974, Series 6
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1974 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5f59ccba9-abe4-47b0-9617-7edbbf544066
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1974-ref577

Grover Sanderson collection

Creator:
Eaglewing, Chief  Search this
Extent:
17 Film reels (2 hours 35 minutes, black-and-white silent; 3700 feet, 35mm)
Photographs
Culture:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Klamath  Search this
Apache  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Film reels
Photographs
Silent films
Place:
North America
Date:
circa 1926-1932
Scope and Contents:
Outtakes shot of tribes of the western, southwestern, and northern United States. Footage includes Klamath, Karuk, Yurok, Hupa, Navajo, Zuni, Hopi, Chippewa, Apache, and Cheyenne, and Sioux and is believed to have been shot in conjunction with the edited film INTERTRIBAL INDIAN LIFE AND CULTURE. Shots of ethnographic interest include Hupa foodways, arrowmaking, and basketry; fishing with dip nets along the Klamath River; Klamath or Hupa ceremonial dances including the bear, deer, and otter dances; Karuk and Yurok ceremonial dances including the jump, hoop, and brush dances; Apache devil dancers and Pueblo Eagle dance at Window Rock; sun dance lodge and ceremony (probably Cheyenne); Chippewa ceremony of the Grand Medicine Society, Red Lake Reservation near Cass Lake and Black Duck, Minnesota; marathon race and wrestling matches at Klamath Reservation; and pow-wow footage of Plains Indians (unidentified).

Collection also includes associated texts and black-and-white photographs and negatives shot by Grover Sanderson aka Eagle Wing, ca. 1930s. Often prints are duplicates of negatives but some negatives and prints are unique, with no copies.

Legacy Keywords: Food preparation cooking acorn mush weewish Hupa ; Food gathering acorns Hupa ; Cradleboard Hupa Northern California ; Dancing ceremonial Deer Dance deer effigies otter pelts Hupa Northern California ; Headdress ceremonial dancing flicker feather Hupa Northern California ; Curing ceremony Chippewa Minnesota ; Adornment necklaces shell Hupa Klamath Northern California ; Mortuary practices burial huts Northern California ; Arrows hafting of Hupa Northern California ; Basketry manufacture of use of Hupa Northern California ; Fishing dip nets Hupa Klamath Northern California ; Gambling Hupa gambling game Northern California ; Cemeteries burials above ground Northern California ; Effigies deer effigy Hupa ceremonial dance Northern California ; Sports wrestling running Indian Days Hupa ; Scouts boy scouts and Indians ; Dancing Devil Dancers Apache Window Rock ; Ceremony Sun Dance raising centerpole Northern Plains ; Ceremony Grand Medicine Society Chippewa Red Lake Reservation ; Language and culture

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or Anthropology Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Local Number:
HSFA 1984.18.1
Provenance:
Received from Jack Richard Sanderson, Sr. in 1984 and an unknown donor in 2008.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
silent films
Citation:
Grover Sanderson collection, Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
HSFA.1984.18
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc99383c8a9-2b77-4511-b265-da2854a8658c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-hsfa-1984-18
Online Media:

Lakota texts by George Bushotter

Translator:
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Creator:
Bushotter, George, 1864-1892  Search this
Bruyier, John  Search this
Collection Creator:
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Extent:
Pages (ca. 3,500 pages)
Culture:
Lakota (Teton/Western Sioux)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Date:
1887
Scope and Contents:
259 texts; numbers 189 and 253, as well as parts of 223 and 224 are by John Bruyier, 1888. Interlinear translations by Dorsey, aided by Bushotter and Bruyier.

Lakota text contents: 1. Sword Keeper and his brother. The latter meets Two Faces, a mythic giant. 8 pages and 3 pages (notes) and 1 page partial translation. 2. The Mythic Buffalo. 10 pages. 3. Two Faces. Explains the origin of arrows, pipes, axes, knife-sharpeners, beads, etc. 14 pages. 4. Three brothers who had a witch sister. 17 pages. (incomplete) 5. Children, a bad old woman cannibal, and Spider (the Mythic Trickster). 12 pages. 6. Spider, animals, and women. 15 pages and 6 pages. 7. A man and his ghost wife. 9 and 5 pages. 8. Two against one: a ghost story with a song. 10 pages. 9. A man, a female ghost, and a male ghost who wrestled with the man. 15 pages. 10. Ghost on the hill, who could not be hit by arrows. 8 pages. 11. Treatment of the sick, burial customs. 22 pages and 4 pages (notes) and 2 pages and 1 sketch. 12. The man who came to life again. 14 and 2 (translation) pages. Note by Bruyier at end. 13. The man and woman in the moon. 6 pages. 14. Man, two in the lodge, female ghost, and the friendly wolf. 8 pages. 15. The man who spared the wolf cubs. 11 pages. 16. The Thunder Being and the Unkcegila (a mastadon ?) 12 pages. 17. Waziya, the northern giant who brings snow. 4 pages. 18. Buffalo people who attacked the Indian people. 10 pages. 19. Spider and the land turtle. 29 pages. 20. The man and his two sons. 18 pages and 2 pages (notes). 21. The turtle who wished to fly. 10 pages. 22. The man who could become a grizzly bear. 6 pages. 23. How the Indians cured the sun. 3 pages. 24. Spider and the horned water monster. 7 pages. 25. The strange lake with large subaquatic animals. 6 pages. 26. The warrior surrounded by a serpent. 4 pages. 27. The one-eyed serpent with short legs and large body. 3 pages. 28. Why they pray to stones, the sun, etc. 9 pages.

29. The mountain in which was a large serpent.. 6 pages. 30. Adventures of a man and his wife.. 8 pages. 31. Spider and the Prairie Chicken. 6 pages. 32. Adventure of RAbbit Carrier. 6 pages. 33. The woman who turned to a fish from her waist down. 22 pages. 34. Spider and the Rabbit; how the latter made snow. 5 pages. 35. The male ghost and his living wife. 8 pages. 36. The man with the magic sword, and the one with the powerful breath. 6 pages. 37. Swift Runner (he who tied stones to his legs). 10 pages. 38. The man who was rescued by eaglets. 10 pages. 39. The Double-woman. 5 pages. 40. Spider and the mice. 14 pages. 41. Spider and the ducks--how they got red eyes. 13 pages and 1 sketch. 42. Spider and the Rabbit; how the latter lost his long tail. 11 pages. 43. The man who ressembled the man in the moon. 11 pages. 44. The young lover who was rescued by the girl. 12 pages. 45. The warriors who met Heyoka (Sunflower) who was singing and dancing. 2 pages. 46. The flying Santee (a ghoul). 8 pages. 47. How the Santees first saw buffalo. 8 pages. 48. How the Lakotas went against the Rees. 5 pages. 49. Adventures of the Short Man. 8 pages. 50. Smoke Maker's adventures: a war story. 7 pages. 51. Fight between the Lakota and the Blackfeet. 4 pages (incomplete) 52. Fight between two unarmed men and a grizzly bear. 8 pages. 53. Treatment of an Omaha spy caught by the Lakotas. 6 pages. 54. The wild man, a nude cannibal. 4 pages. 55. He who uses the earth as an ear. 7 pages. 56. Why horses are called, in Lakota, "mysterious dogs." 7 ages. 57. The man who could understand ravens. 5 pages. 58. Of the two small stones that were servants of the people. 6 pages. (Brief note at the end appears to be in Swanton's hand.) 59. The Wahanksica, a strange animal. 3 pages. 60. The animal in the Missouri River which breaks up the ice in the spring of the year. 4 pages.

61. How thw wind brought sickness to Medicine Butte Creek. 6 pages. 62. Beliefs about day and night. 6 pages. 63. The man in the forest and his contest with ghosts. 8 pages. 64. The feast in honor of the Anti-Natural God. 18 pages. 65. Of the Heyoka man who dreamed of his death by lightening. 13 pages. 66. Fight between the Lakota and the Blackfeet. 6 pages. 67. Of the mysteriousman who knew about the distant war party, 5 pages. 68. Of the wise man who caught his eloping wife. 8 pages. 69. How the Rees or Blackfeet came against the Lakotas. 5 pages. 70. Origin of the buffalo. 5 pages. 71. The Sun Dance. A. 98 pages and 3 figures. B. 9 pages. C. 4 pages. D. 7 pages and 1 diagram. E. 6 pages. F. 4 pages. G. 14 pages. H. 3 pages and 2 diagrams. I. 3 pages. 72. The man who could lengthen his arm at will. 7 pages. 73. What a young man must do before he can marry. 11 pages. 74. How the Crows surrounded some Lakotas. 12 pages. 75. A raid on a Lakota camp. 4 pages. 76. Story of a warrior who was not wounded. 9 pages. 77. Fight between the Lakota and white soldiers. 20 pages. 78. Of the Santees, and their fondness for certain foods. 4 pages. 79. What the Lakota thought of the first white people whom they saw. 13 pages. 80. Belief respecting lakes. 6 pages. 81. Belief about this world. 7 pages. 82. The calumet dance. 39 pages and 2 diagrams. 83. How they honor the dead (the Ghost Feast). 15 and 2 and 18 pages. 84. Men who are arrow and bullet proof. 8 pages. 85. Of love potions, etc. 5 pages. 86. The acts of a wounded warrior. 7 pages. 87. Actors clothed in buffalo robes with the hair out detect wrongdoers. 11 pages. 88. Those who imitate the elk. 14 pages. 89. Why a man may not speak to his mother in law. 11 pages. 90. Rules for feasting, smoking, and visiting. 11 pages. 91. Of certain boyish customs. 8 pages. 92. A ghost story. 7 pages. 93. Origin of the white people. 10 pages. 94. Games and their seasons. 10 pages. 95. Education of a boy. 10 pages. 96. Of youth killed in battle, and of his faithful horse. 12 pages. 97. The people who lived in the north. 7 pages and 2 sketches. 98. The ghost woman and the robin. 9 pages. Note at end by Bruyier. 99. The Flying serpent whose touch was fatal. 5 pages. 100. Origin of twins. 5 pages. 101. George Bushotter's autobiography. 117 pages. 102. Belief concerning a loved one who has been called by a ghost. 7 pages. 103. Fight between two gamblers near Chamberlain, Dakota. 7 pages.

104. The singing elk. 7 pages. 105. Belief about Spider. 9 pages. 106. War of the Lakota against the Omaha. 7 pages. 107. Narrow escape of Bark Bird's Tail (a Lakota). 5 pages. 108. Busnotter's cousin's war adventure. 11 pages. 109. How certain men (doctors, priests, etc.) have become mysterious. 16 pages. 110. How the Lakota fought the Cheyennes and Black Men (Commanches ?). 22 pages. 111. Rules of etiquette for brothers, sisters, cousins. 21 pages. 112. Ghost story. 5 pages. 113. The habits of beavers. 8 pages. 114. Spider and the old woman who fed all the animals. 24 pages. 115. The handsome man who was rescued from a pit by a wolf. 32 pages. 116. Trick of a myth-teller. 9 pages. 117. Of thistles. 4 pages. 118. How Indians regard the past and their ancestors. 22 pages. 119. The grass dance. 12 pages. 120. The Big Belly Society. 6 pages. 121. The Mandan Society. 10 pages. 122. "Following one another," a Lakota game. 7 pages. 123. "They make it run by pushing," a Lakota game. 46 pages and 2 (colored) diagrams. 124. Horse racing. 5 pages. 125. Hitting the moccasin, a game. 9 pages. 126. Shooting at the cactus, a gane. 5 pages. 127. Hitting the bow, a game. 5 pages. 128. Shooting at bunches of grass, a game. 5 pages. 129. Shooting at the lights of an animal, a game. 6 pages. 130. Taking captives from one another, a game. 9 pages. 131. Trampling on the beaver, a game. 6 pages. 132. "Howi ! Howi !" a ring game for boys or youths. 12 pages. 133. "They touch not one another," a game. 6 pages. 134. Game with a long grass which has a long, sharp beard. 6 pages. 135. The old woman accuses them," a game. 8 pages. 136. A game with slings. 5 pages. 137. "Goose and her children," a game. 10 pages. 138. Buffalo horn game. 7 and 1 page. 139. A stick which is hurled. 5 and 1 page and 2 figures. 140. "Making the wood dance by hitting it," a game. 8 pages. 41. "Making the wood jump by hitting it," a game. 8 pages. 142. "Making the bow glide by throwing," a game. 6 pages. 143. Coasting. 8 pages. 144. Game of ball. 12 pages. 145. "Shotting at an arrow set up," a game. 7 pages. 146. Grizzly bear game. 12 pages. 147. Deer game. 10 pages. 148. "Running towards one another," a game. 9 pages. 149. "They cause one another to carry packs on their backs," a game. 10 pages. 150. "They hit one another with mud," a game. 10 pages. 151. Hitting the ball, a game. 11 pages. 152. A game with a rawhide hoop. 43 pages and 2 figures. 153. Game of earthen horses. 8 pages. 154. "They slide by pushing," a game. 14 pages. 155. "They kick at one another," a game. 14 pages.

156. "The hoop is made to roll in the wind," a game. 9 pages. 157. [Popgun game.] Missing July, 1966. (not on microfilm made 1958) 1 page illustration found July, 1968. 158. Wrestling. 8 pages. 159. Courting the girls. 9 pages. 160. Game with bow and small wood-pointed arrows. 10 pages. 161. Swinging. 10 pages. 162. "Taking Places from one another," a game. 9 pages. 163. "Playing with small things," a game. 18 pages. 164. Pinching the backs of hands, a game. 11 pages. 165. "Scattering them," a game. 9 pages. 166. "Who shall get threr first," a game. 10 pages. 167. Hopping. 9 pages. 168. Throwing arrows by hand, at a target. 6 pages. 169. Ghost game. 21 pages. 170. Hide and seek. 13 pages. 171. Jumping down from a high object. 12 pages. 172. Plumstone game. 18 pages. 173. Odd or even ? A game with sticks. 12 pages. 174. Throwing chewed leaves into the eyes, a game. 7 pages. 175. Game with the ankle-bones of a deer. 12 pages. 176. Native wooden harminicon, played by boys. 14 pages and 5 figures. 177. Mysterious game. 17 pages. 178. Playing doctor. 10 pages. 179. Pretending to be dead, a game. 10 pages. 180. Hunting young birds in summer. 12 pages. 181. Hunting eggs in spring. 10 pages. 182. Going to make a grass lodge. 11 pages. 183. Scrambling for presents. 11 pages. 184. Sitting on wooden horses, a game. 8 pages. 185. Making a bone turn and hum by twisting a cord. 15 pages and 2 figures. 186. "String twisted in and out among the fingers." 8 pages. 187. Tumbling and somersault. 7 pages. 188. "Game with large things." 17 pages. 189. About two young men who were friends. 51 pages. By Bruyier. 190. A bird that foretells cold weather. 14 pages. 191. Cause of scrofulous sore on the neck. 10 pages. 192. Meaning of ringing sounds in the ears. 10 pages. 193. The Brave and Fox societies. 18 pages and 4 sketches. 194. Dog Society. 31 pages and 2 sketches and 1 page drawing.

195. "Killing by Hitting," or "Taking the Buffalo paunch," a society of women. 12 pages. 196. Scalpdance society. 16 pages and 1 sketch. 197. Night dance. 18 pages. 198. Mysterious society. 16 pages. 199. Grizzly Bear dance. 19 pages. 200. Belief about the Kildeer. 13 pages. 201. The acts of a leader. 17 pages. 202. Return of the night hawk in the spring. 7 pages. 203. Belief concerning the Ski-bi-bi-la, a small grey bird which says Gli Hunwo ?" ("Coming home ?). 16 pages. Also earlier version of the same, with mistakes. 10 pages. 204. About hanging the "tablo" ("shoulder blade") at the door of the lodge. 7 pages. 205. Trying to excell others. 12 pages. 206. Scolding or whipping a woman. 12 pages. 207. How Indian paints are made. 18 pagrs. 208. Acting like the buffalo bull. 9 pages and 1 page drawing. 209. Law about bowls. 9 pages. 210. Meaning of a rooster's crowing. 8 pages. 211. The taking apart of fetishes. 24 pages. 212. How one man drowned another. 21 pages. 213. Concerning warts. 8 pages. 214. Of a woman who qas killed by mosquitoes. 32 pages. 215. Concerning hermaphrodites. 22 pages. 216. Belief concerning the grebe or dabchick. 10 pages. 217. Rules for eating dogs. 8 pages. 218. Bushotter's recollections of a certain famine. 219. Why Lakota men should not wear women's moccasins. 16 pages. 220. Customs relating to bowls. 10 pages. 221. Meanings of various kinds of twitchings. 10 pages. 222. "Kicking out his elder brother's teeth." 10 pages. 223. How a boy wounded his grandfather in the scrotum. 13 pages. Bruyier's revision of the same. 13 pages. 224. Legend of the nude Spider woman. 12 pages. About the woman who was deceived by the grizzly bear, with an account of the prairie hen. 20 pages. By Bruyier. 225. "Punishment of the prairie." 19 pages.

226. Part of the punishment of a murderer. 12 pages. 227. About a foolish wife. 42 pages. 228. How a ghost stunned Bushotter's father. 21 pages. 229. Occasions for scolding wives. 12 pages. Half-page corrected sentence at end by Buyier. 230. Setting out food, etc. for ghosts. 16 pages. 231. Concerning widows and widowers. 30 pages. 232. About a newborn child. 9 pages. 233. Tatala, a humorist. 6 pages. 234. Vegetal lore. 16 pages. 235. About the year when the stars fell (1833). 18 pages. 236. Concerning shells used as necklaces. 8 pages and 2 sketches. 237. Game with a ball of mud. 8 pages. 238. "Throwing fire at one another." 11 pages. 239. Punishment of a liar. 8 pages. 240. Invocation of the Thunder. 13 pages. 241. About spiders. 15 pages. 242. The mysterious imitation of ghosts. 14 pages. 243. What they carry when they migrate. 20 pages. 244. What happened when the Lower Brules went to a mountain. 24 pages. 245. Concerning guardian spirits. 16 pages. 246. About the Thunderers (People dwelling in the clouds.) 25 pages. 247. About lizards, frogs, etc. rained from the sky. 11 pages. 248. Deer Women. 28 pages. 249. Bird societies. 31 pages. 250. Ways od dancing. 26 pages. 251. About gashing the limbs when mourning. 7 pages. 252. On Fellowhood. 16 pages. 253. Ceremonies at birth. 8 pages. Bruyier's revision. 5 pages. 254. Bushotter's stepfather's prophetic gifts. 15 pages. 255. The recovery of Bushotter's younger brother. 14 pages. 256. Why a son or daughter acts in a childish manner. 9 pages. 257. Giving birth to one child while still nursing another. 13 pages. 258. Courting. 48 pages and 3 page color folding drawing and 1 page drawing. 259. Heyoka woman. 8 pages.
Biographical / Historical:
Historical data on the Bushotter texts. 1927: May 24. Stories 102-189 sent to Franz Boas, at Columbia. 1928: March 15. Stories 137-189 returned. April 17. 16 miscellaneous sheets sent to Boas. May 14. All the remaining Bushotter material returned. 1936: June 26. All the Bushotter texts sent to Boas. 1939: July 11. Stories 102-259 returned. 1942: April 16. Stories 1-101 returned. 1966: Survey by R. J. DeMallie showed all stories present with the exception of last part of Number 4, last part of Number 51, and all of Number 157. A few illustrations are also missing.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS.4800: (3.1.1.3) [103]
Local Note:
Old number 2632 (Parts 1-3)
autograph document signed
Collection Restrictions:
The James O. Dorsey Papers are open for research. Access to the James O. Dorsey Papers requires an appointment
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Lakota dialect  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 4800 James O. Dorsey papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers / Series 1: Siouan-Catawban / 1.2: Dakota
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a9ec836e-eaf4-41da-8dc1-8cc89ae21490
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms4800-ref1779

Lakota texts by George Bushotter, Stories 56-110 and 1513

Creator:
Bushotter, George, 1864-1892  Search this
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Bruyier, John  Search this
Collection Creator:
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Extent:
793 Pages ((11 folders))
Culture:
Lakota (Teton/Western Sioux)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Pages
Manuscripts
Folklore
Date:
1887
Scope and Contents:
These 55 stories form a portion of Lakota texts by George Bushotter collected by James Dorsey in Manuscript 4800: (3.1.1.3) [103]. Interlinear translations are by Dorsey, aided by Bushotter and Bruyier. Each story is numbered. 56.) Why horses are called, in Lakota, "mysterious dogs." 57.) The man who could understand ravens. 58.) Of the two small stones that were servants of the people. (Brief note at the end appears to be in Swanton's hand.) 59.) The Wahanksica, a strange animal. 60.) The animal in the Missouri River which breaks up the ice in the spring of the year. 61.) How the wind brought sickness to Medicine Butte Creek. 62.) Beliefs about day and night. 63.) The man in the forest and his contest with ghosts. 64.) The feast in honor of the Anti-Natural God. 65.) Of the Heyoka man who dreamed of his death by lightening. 66.) Fight between the Lakota and the Blackfeet. 67.) Of the mysteriousman who knew about the distant war party. 68.) Of the wise man who caught his eloping wife. 69.) How the Rees or Blackfeet came against the Lakotas. 70.) Origin of the buffalo. 71.) The Sun Dance. Includes figures and diagrams. 72.) The man who could lengthen his arm at will. 73.) What a young man must do before he can marry. 74.) How the Crows surrounded some Lakotas. 75.) A raid on a Lakota camp. 76.) Story of a warrior who was not wounded. 77.) Fight between the Lakota and white soldiers. 78.) Of the Santees, and their fondness for certain foods. 79.) What the Lakota thought of the first white people whom they saw. 80.) Belief respecting lakes. 81.) Belief about this world. 82.) The calumet dance. Includes 2 diagrams. 83. How they honor the dead (the Ghost Feast). 84.) Men who are arrow and bullet proof. 85.) Of love potions, etc. 86.) The acts of a wounded warrior. 87.) Actors clothed in buffalo robes with the hair out detect wrongdoers. 88.) Those who imitate the elk. 89.) Why a man may not speak to his mother in law. 90.) Rules for feasting, smoking, and visiting. 91.) Of certain boyish customs. 92.) A ghost story. 93.) Origin of the white people. 94.) Games and their seasons. 95.) Education of a boy. 96.) Of youth killed in battle, and of his faithful horse. 97.) The people who lived in the north. Includes 2 sketches. 98.) The ghost woman and the robin. 9 pages. Note at end by Bruyier. 99.) The Flying serpent whose touch was fatal. 100.) Origin of twins. 101.) George Bushotter's autobiography. 102.) Belief concerning a loved one who has been called by a ghost. 103.) Fight between two gamblers near Chamberlain, Dakota. 104.) The singing elk. 105.) Belief about Spider. 106.) War of the Lakota against the Omaha. 107.) Narrow escape of Bark Bird's Tail (a Lakota). 108.) Busnotter's cousin's war adventure. 109.) How certain men (doctors, priests, etc.) have become mysterious. 110.) How the Lakota fought the Cheyennes and Black Men (Commanches ?). 1513) Transcription of beginning of text 109. Also note from W. H. Holmes to J. N. B. Hewitt requesting the latter to identify the manuscript. Formerly MS 1513.
Arrangement:
The stories are organized in folders in the following manner: 56-60; 61-65; 66-70; 71; 72-79; 80-84; 85-91; 92-100; 101; 102-110.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS.4800: (3.1.1.3) [103, 56-110 & 1513]
Local Note:
MS 4800: (3.1.1.3) [103] was arbitrarily broken up into multiple records to facilitate accessibility of digital slideshows.
Collection Restrictions:
The James O. Dorsey Papers are open for research. Access to the James O. Dorsey Papers requires an appointment
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Lakota dialect  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Folklore
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 4800 James O. Dorsey papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers / Series 1: Siouan-Catawban / 1.2: Dakota / Lakota texts by George Bushotter
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b1b1f7d2-f591-4693-b75a-357cbc9cea01
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms4800-ref2265

A Promise Kept: 10 – Tina Kuckkahn-Miller, Esq.

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2019-09-25T19:57:42.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_hr6vmsZKSLI

Stick Ball, Buffalo Hair:Buckskin; Used in Ceremony, Ghost Dance: Woman's Game of Gu-Ga-Hawat

Extent:
1 Glass negative (007 in x 009 in)
Culture:
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA INV 06105700 ; OPPS NEG 00244
Local Note:
Pub: 14th Ann Rept Fig 90, P 964
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.176, Item BAE GN 00244 06105700
See more items in:
Bureau of American Ethnology negatives
Bureau of American Ethnology negatives / Glass Negatives / Photographer not recorded
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c12e3e71-0b2d-49fc-8b10-890925d8c6b0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-photolot-176-ref417

Native American Public Programs photograph collection relating to Native American artists and art

Collector:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Native American Public Programs  Search this
Ringlero, Aleta Pima  Search this
Photographer:
Smithsonian Institution. Office of Printing and Photographic Services  Search this
Clark, Chip, 1947-2010  Search this
Hansen, Carl C.  Search this
Hart, Alan  Search this
Long, Eric  Search this
Minor-Penland, Laurie  Search this
Penland, Dane  Search this
Strauss, Richard  Search this
Taccone, Christina  Search this
Vargas, Rick  Search this
Names:
Lewis, Lucy M.  Search this
Extent:
5,750 Prints (circa, silver gelatin (including contact prints))
12 Color transparencies
10 Color negatives
3,500 Color slides (circa)
67 Color prints
4 Negatives (acetate)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Paiute  Search this
Jemez Pueblo  Search this
Mewuk (Miwok)  Search this
Yurok  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Tlingit  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl)  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Tohono O'odham (Papago)  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Onondaga  Search this
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Kutzadika'a (Mono Paiute)  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Laguna Indians  Search this
Makah  Search this
White Mountain Apache  Search this
Seneca  Search this
Minneconjou Lakota (Minniconjou Sioux)  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Minitari (Hidatsa)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
Cayuse  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Payómkawichum (Luiseño)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Hunkpapa Lakota (Hunkpapa Sioux)  Search this
Mohawk  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Color transparencies
Color negatives
Color slides
Color prints
Negatives
Date:
1989-1993
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs documenting Native American Public Programs events, including images of Native American artists and examples of their work during demonstrations and lectures at the National Museum of Natural History. Photographs were mostly made by Smithsonian photographers, including Carl C. Hansen, Richard Strauss, Chip Clark, Laurie Minor-Penland, Eric Long, Alan Hart, Rick Vargas, Dane Penland, and Christina Taccone. Included are a large number of photographs of Don Tenoso (Hunkpapa), an artist-in-residence at the National Museum of Natural History, and performances by James Luna (Luiseno/Digueno), Guillermo Gomez-Pena (Chicano), and Coco Fusco. Crafts and arts depicted include beadwork, basket weaving, dollmaking, peyote fanmaking, weaving, hand games, quilting, clothing making, leatherwork, woodcarving, saddlemaking, sculpture, painting, story-telling, and performance art. There are also images of Dolores Lewis Garcia and Emma Lewis Garcia (daughters of Acoma potter Lucy M. Lewis) and their pottery, Joallyn Archambault with artists, and the 1990 American Indian Theater Company reception.

Other depicted artists include Maynard White Owl Lavadour (Cayuse/Nez Perce), Evangeline Talshaftewa (Hopi), Lisa Fritzler (Crow), Marian Hanssen, Vanessa Morgan (Kiowa/Pima), Marty Good Bear (Mandan/Hidatsa), Katie Henio and Sarah Adeky (Navajo), Geneva Lofton and Lee Dixon (Luiseno), Chris Devers (Luiseno), Mary Good Bear (Mandan), Robert and Alice Little Man (Kiowa), Lisa Watt (Seneca), Jay McGirt (Creek), Bill Crouse (Seneca), Kevin Johnny-John (Onondaga), Rose Anderson (Pomo), Francys Sherman and Margaret Hill (Mono), Thelene Albert and Annie Bourke (White Mountain Apache), Bob Tenequer (Laguna), Jimmy Abeyeta (Navajo), Lou Ann Reed (Acoma), Melissa Peterson (Makah), Jennifer and Kallie Keams Musial (Navajo), Joyce Growing Thunder-Fogarty and Juanita Fogarty (Assiniboine/Sioux), David Neel (Kwakiutal), Mervin Ringlero (Pima), Jhon Goes-In-Center (Oglala), D. Montour (Delaware/Mohawk), Rikki Francisco (Pima), Annie Antone (Papago), Angie Reano-Owen (Santo Domingo Pueblo), Carol Vigil (Jemez), Gregg Baurland (Miniconjou), Greg Colfax (Makah), Lydia Whirlwind-Soldier (Sicangu Dakota), Martin Red Bear (Oglala), Michael Rogers (Paiute), Alta Rogers (Yurok/Paiute), Dorothy Stanley (Miwok), Lisa Little Chief (Dakota), Tom Haukaas (Sicangu Dakota), Nora Navanjo-Morsie (Santa Clara Tewa), Seneca Women's Singing Society, Molly Blankenship and Martha Ross (Eastern Cherokee), Julia Parker (Miwok/Pomo), Candy and Claudia Cellicion (Zuni), Sally and Lorraine Black (Navajo), Carmen Quinto-Plunkett (Tlingit), Ina McNeil (Hunkpapa), and Ellen and Faye Quandelancy (Zuni), and Rikki Francisco (Pima).
Biographical/Historical note:
Native American Public Programs was founded in 1989 as a part of the Department of Education in the National Museum of Natural History. Under the directorship of Aleta Ringlero, its main activity was the arranging of demonstrations by Native American artists and craftsmen in the exhibition areas of the museum.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 91-26
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Audio of James Luna's lecture for the Native American Public Programs office held in National Anthropological Archives in MS 7514.
Dolls made by Don Tenoso for the Native American Public Programs office held in Department of Anthropology collections in accession 390905.
Additional photographs of Tenoso held in the Smithsonian Institution Archives in SIA2009-2222 and 90-13726.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Art  Search this
Handicraft  Search this
Citation:
Photo Lot 91-26, Native American Public Programs photograph collection relating to Native American artists and art, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.91-26
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw380668afd-9cb5-4658-9c1c-491584e12125
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-91-26

James Mooney photographs

Creator:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Extent:
11.75 Linear feet (Photographic prints: albumen, gelatin silver Negatives: glass, cellulose nitrate )
Culture:
Apache  Search this
Caddo  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Powhatan  Search this
Dakota (Eastern Sioux)  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Wichita  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Mattaponi  Search this
Pamunkey  Search this
Nansemond  Search this
Chickahominy  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Mexico
Date:
circa 1872-1920
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs made during James Mooney's fieldwork with Apache, Arapaho, Caddo, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Comanche, Dakota/Lakota, Hopi, Kiowa, Navaho, Powhatan, and Wichita communities, as well as in Mexico. Photographs document individuals and families, gatherings, ceremonies and dances, daily activities, games, crafts, landscapes, and burials.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or Anthropology Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Biographical / Historical:
James Mooney (1861-1921) was an American ethnographer whose research focused on Native North Americans. The son of Irish Catholic immigrants, Mooney was born in Richmond, Indiana. His formal education was limited to the public schools of the city; most of his knowledge of anthropology and ethnography was self-taught, largely through his field experience working with various Native communities.

In 1885, Mooney began working for the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) under John Wesley Powell. There, he carried out ethnographic research for more than 30 years. He was a very early adopter of photography and made thouands of photographs in the course of his fieldwork.

Mooney married Ione Lee Gaut in 1897, and had six children. He died in 1921 in Washington, D.C. from heart disease.

For fuller biographies of Mooney see George Ellison's introduction to the 1992 edition of Mooney's History, Myths, and Sacred Formulas of the Cherokees, as well as The Indian Man: A Biography of James Mooney by L.G. Moses (2002).

Chronology

February 10, 1861 -- Born

1878 -- Graduated high school, then taught public school for 1 year

1879 -- Joined the staff of The Richmond Palladium

April 1885 -- Joined the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE)

May-June 1885 -- Worked with Cherokee Chief N. J. Smith on Eastern Cherokee grammar

Summer 1886 -- Worked with Chief Smith (in D.C.)

Summer 1887 -- First trip to the Eastern Cherokee of the Great Smokey Mountains to study language, collect material culture, and document activities including the Green Corn Dance and Cherokee ball games (3.5 months)

Winter/Spring 1888 -- Studied Iroquoian and Algonquian synonymies and published articles on the Irish and the Cherokee, collected and studied Cherokee sacred formulae

1889 -- Visit to Cherokee (worked with Swimmer, worked on his maps of place names/mound sites, witnessed ball play and the Green Corn Dance, gathered plants and collected objects for the Smithsonian

December 1890 -- Visited Oklahoma Territory to complete research with Western Cherokee, witnessed the Ghost Dance at the Cheyenne/Arapaho Reservation for the first time

1891 -- "The Sacred Formulas of the Cherokee" published Visit to Cherokee in Oklahoma Territory

April 1891 -- Delegated to collect material for Chicago Exposition. Collected for the next 2 years while studying the Ghost Dance

May 1891 -- Photographed Kiowa Mescal (Peyote) Ceremony Headed west for a four month collecting trip for the Chicago exposition, commissioned model tipis and summer houses from the Kiowa

1891-1893 -- Observed/participated in three ghost dances during three seasons of fieldwork among Arapaho, Sioux, Kiowa, and Cheyenne communities

1892 -- Photographed Kiowa Mescal (Peyote) Ceremony and Oglala Sioux Ghost Dance

Winter 1892 -- Began intensive field study of Kiowa winter counts and Kiowa heraldry Among the Navajo and Hopi, making collections for Chicago Exposition

Fall 1893 -- Returned to Oklahoma Territory to observe and record Arapaho Sun Dance. Also studied the Hopi Kachina Dance, the Wichita Corn Dance, and possibly also the Arapaho Ghost Dance

May 1895 -- "Siouan Tribes of the East" published

1895 -- Trip to the Southwest, visited Hopi and Navajo communities

1896 -- "The Ghost Dance Religion and the Sioux Outbreak of 1890" published

January 1897 -- At Anadarko

September 28, 1897 -- Married Ione Lee Gaut

Fall 1898 -- Trip to Southwest, visited Hopi and Navajo communities

1898 -- Attended Omaha Fair, helped plan 'Congress of Indians', supervised Frank Rinehart, who photographed many of the Indian delegates to the fair Calendar History of the Kiowa Indians published

Fall 1899 -- For three weeks in the fall traveled with DeLancey Gill to William Co, VA to study and photograph Mattapony and Pamunkey communities; Gill took pictures while Mooney did census work before traveling to the Chickahominy River

1900 -- Myths of the Cherokee published

Spring 1900 -- Studied communities of the Powhatan Confederacy in VA; traveled to VA again with Gill to visit the Pamunkey and Mattapony communities for more pictures and to complete census, then traveled to area south of Portsmouth to find the rural settlement of the Nansemond.

Fall 1901 -- Cooperative agreement with Field Museum and J. Owen Dorsey; Studied Kiowa for BAE, studied Cheyenne for Field Museum (focused on heraldry). This project, with Dorsey working on Arapaho, continued until 1906

1902 -- Fieldwork on heraldry with Kiowa and Apache communities all year except for two brief visits to Washington, D.C. in September and November

July 1903 -- Mooney and Dorsey study Sun Dance on Cheyenne reservation in Oklahoma Territory, brought staff photographer Charles Carpenter. Spent a week attending the Sun Dance and made the first photographs of the skull-dragging ceremony

October 1903 -- Photographed Arapaho Tomahawk Dance

Winter 1903 -- At the Cheyenne-Arapaho agency in Darlington; winter spent with Cheyenne, and finishing Kiowa tipi models for the Bureau's exhibit at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition

March 1904 -- At Mount Scott with Kiowa

June 1904 -- St. Louis Exposition opens

April 1906 -- Last visit to Cheyenne

Summers, 1911-1916 -- Visits to Cherokee

1918 -- Assisted with charting the Native American Church of Oklahoma (the Secretary of the Interior issued a ban on his research)

June 28, 1918 -- Requested by Fewkes to study peyote cult and Kiowa Heraldry (see Mooney Papers, Box 1, Letters, statement dated 1921)

December 22, 1921 -- Died
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 74, James Mooney photographs, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.74
See more items in:
James Mooney photographs
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw35162d7ce-2ae2-4302-963d-b416aa1eca3b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-74
Online Media:

Sketch of two gaming lances with explanatory text

Collector:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Collection Creator:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Collection Artist:
Big Horse, Hubble.  Search this
Silver Horn, 1860-1940  Search this
Murphy, Charles (Cheyenne)  Search this
Bianki  Search this
Lame Dog.  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (leaf )
Culture:
American Indian  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents:
Drawings by Native artists to illustrate James Mooney's notes on Kiowa "heraldry" as he termed shield and tipi designs.
Local Numbers:
NAA INV MS2538P1H13

NAA MS 2538: Box 1

OPPS NEG 92-11176
Local Note:
drawing
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 2538, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 2538 James Mooney notes and drawings on Cheyenne and Kiowa heraldry
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw300937a76-699f-49e7-9c08-291d12e842bb
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms2538-ref334

George Bird and Elizabeth Curtis Grinnell photograph collection

Creator:
Tuell, Julia E.  Search this
Grinnell, George Bird, 1849-1938  Search this
Extent:
119 Negatives (photographic) (119 glass plate negatives, black and white, 7 x 9 in.)
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Glass plate negatives
Place:
Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana
Rosebud County (Mont.)
Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma
Glacier National Park (Mont.)
Lame Deer (Mont.)
Washita County (Okla.)
Date:
1902-1910
Summary:
The core of this photographic collection (1902-1904) was taken during Grinnell's visits among the Northern (Montana, Rosebud County and Rosebud River, Lame Deer) and Southern (Washita County, Oklahoma) Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne). The photographs document domestic and daily life on the reservation (especially activies involving women), religious ceremonies, camps and dwellings, and important officials. The attributions of the photographs in this collection are far from certain. While many of these images appear to have been taken by Grinnell himself, a substantial portion were also taken by his wife Elizabeth Curtis Grinnell (b. 1876) and their friend Julia E. Tuell. A very small subset of these images (3) also depicts mountains and vistas in Glacier National Park (Flathead County, Glacier County) Montana.
Arrangement note:
negatives: organized in 6 boxes; arranged numerically by image number
Biographical/Historical note:
George Bird Grinnell, naturalist, conservationist and Indian rights activist, was born into a prominent family in Brooklyn, New York. He attended Yale University, receiving his B.A. in 1870 and a Ph.D. in paleontology in 1880. While at Yale, Grinnell participated in a paleontological expedition to the central Plains, Wyoming and Utah. In 1874 he served as naturalist and paleontologist in Lt. Colonel George Armstrong Custer's Black Hills expedition and, in 1875, was a member of William Ludlow's expedition surveying the Yellowstone. In 1899 Grinnell was a naturalist on Edward H. Harriman Expedition to Alaska. Grinnell's lifelong interest in the west was well established long before he left Yale. In 1876, four years before he earned his Ph.D., Grinnell became the editor-in-chief and soon-to-be owner of Forest and Stream magazine. Under his leadership, it became the country's foremost natural history magazine. Grinnell was the magazine's editor from 1876 until 1911, and he used its pages to help promote the creation of national parks. Grinnell played a pivotal role in the creation of Glacier National Park in 1910.

Grinnell's interest in the west extended to its native inhabitants. He was deeply interested in Plains Indians and, year after year, spent his summers visiting different reservations. He had befriended Frank North and his Pawnee scouts, and accompanied them on buffalo and elk hunts. Grinnell witnessed the destruction of game animals, brought about by commercial hunters, and was cognizant of its impact on Plains Indians' way of life. Grinnell, a prolific writer, authored several books and many articles on Cheyenne, Blackfoot, and Pawnee Indians, the most well-know of which was the two volume work entitled "The Cheyenne Indians: Their History and Way of Life," first published in 1923. Until his death, he remained a staunch supporter of Cheyenne rights.

Grinnell was a founding member of both the Audubon Society and Boone and Crockett Club (with Theodore Roosevelt). He chaired the Council on National Parks, Forests and Wildlife, and was president of the National Parks Association. He was a trustee of the New York Zoological Society. Grinnell was also a prominent member of many other associations, such as the American Association of the Advancement of Science and New York Academy of Science. Grinnell was 89 years old when he died in New York City.
Location of Other Archival Materials Note:
See manuscript items in the Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records at the NMAI Archive Center. See also the George Bird Grinnell photograph collection at the Braun Research Library, Southwest Museum, Autry National Center in Los Angeles.
Restrictions:
Researchers must contact the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
Rights:
Some items restricted: Cultural Sensitivity
Genre/Form:
Glass plate negatives
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.140
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4ffe48cba-9571-4489-96d8-36f5f16ab469
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-140

Joseph C. Farber photographs of Native American life

Creator:
Farber, Joseph C., 1903-  Search this
Names:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.) -- Exhibitions.  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Gorman, R. C. (Rudolph Carl), 1932-  Search this
Extent:
6,000 Contact prints (circa 6000 contact prints (proof sheets))
6,000 Acetate negatives (circa)
8 Color transparencies
1,000 Items (circa 1000 enlarged prints: silver gelatin (some mounted for exhibition))
Culture:
Arctic peoples  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Onondaga  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Quinault  Search this
Tlingit  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Eskimos  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Lummi  Search this
Haida  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Kootenai (Kutenai)  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Miccosukee Seminole (Mikasuki)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)  Search this
Chehalis  Search this
Apache  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Cocopa  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Pueblo  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Contact prints
Acetate negatives
Color transparencies
Photographs
Place:
North Carolina
New York
New Mexico
Montana
South Dakota
Oklahoma
Arizona
California
Florida
Minnesota
Alaska
Alberta
Washington (State)
Barrow, Point (Alaska)
Yuma County (Ariz.)
Taos (N.M.)
Date:
circa 1970-1975
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs made as part of Joseph C. Farber's project to document modern NAtive American everyday life. Represented tribes include the Acoma, Apache, Blackfoot, Chehalis, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chippewa, Cocopa, Dakota, Eskimo, Haida, Kiowa, Kutenai, Lummi, Mohave, Mohawk, Navaho, Northern Athabascan, Onandaga, Pima, Pueblo, Quinalt, Seminole, Taos, Tlingit, and Zuni. Subject coverage is broad and varies from tribe to tribe. Included are portraits, as well as totem poles, carving, weaving, pottery, painitng, landscapes, boats and canoes, ceremonial regalia, camps, classes and vocational training, homes and traditional dwellings, construction projects, rodeos and powwows, dances, industries (including lumber), herding and ranching, agriculture, stores and storefronts, cliff dwellings, parades, crab cleaning, fishing, games, health care, legal processes, music, office work, sewing, vending, and a funeral. There are also photographs of R. C. Gorman (and a letter from Gorman to Farber) and Fritz Shoulder (some in color).

Farber's travels included Alaska (Point Barrow, Dead Horse, Glacier Bay, Haines, Hoona, Hydaberg, Ketchikan, Mount McKinley, Prudhoe Bay, Saxman, and Sitka); Alberta (Blackfeet Reservation); Arizona (Canyon de Chelly, Cocopa Reservation, Flagstaff, Kayenta, Monument Valley, Pima Reservation, Quechan Reservation, Mojave Reservation, and Yuma); California (Alcatraz, Oakland, and San Francisco); Florida (Big Cypress Reservation; Miccosukee Reservation); Minnesota (Minneapolis and Nett Lake); Montana (Northern Cheyenne Reservation); New Mexico (Acoma, Gallup, Navajo Forest, Picuris, Puye, San Ildefonso, Santa Clara, Santa Fe, Taos, San Ildefonso, Santa Clara, and Tesuque); New York (New York City and Onandaga Reservation); North Carolina (Cherokee Reservation); Oklahoma (Anadarko, Apache, Lawton, Stilwell, and Tahlequah); South Dakota (Rosebud and Wounded Knee); and Washington (Lummi Reservation, Nisqually River, Puyallup River, and Quinalt Reservation).
Biographical/Historical note:
Joseph C. Farber (1903-1994) was a successful New York businessman and professional photographer. He studied with Edward Steichen at the New York Camera Club in the 1920s. The prints in this collection resulted from a five-year project that involved travelling to Native communities throughout the United States to document modern Native American life. The project resulted in a book, Native Americans: 500 Years After (1975), as well as exhibits, including one in the National Museum of Natural History in 1976-1977.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 78-1, NAA ACC 95-3
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Farber's photographs, previously located in Photo Lot 95-3 have been relocated and merged with Photo Lot 78-1. These photographs were also made by Joseph C. Farber and form part of this collection.
The National Museum of American History Archives Center holds the Joseph Farber Papers and Photographs, circa 1962-1990.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Photographs published in Farber's books still under copyright. Reproduction permission from artist's estate.
Topic:
Dwellings  Search this
Vocational education  Search this
Canoes and canoeing  Search this
Boats and boating  Search this
Dance  Search this
Powwows  Search this
Rodeos  Search this
Building  Search this
handicrafts  Search this
Totem poles  Search this
Agriculture  Search this
Livestock  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 78-1, Joseph C. Farber photographs of Native American life, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.78-1
See more items in:
Joseph C. Farber photographs of Native American life
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw381bc3276-6acf-4c9a-ac8c-9b59ad173f56
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-78-1

MS 2531 James Mooney notebooks principally regarding Kiowa, Cheyenne, and Arapaho shield and tipi designs

Creator:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Artist:
Murphy, Charles (Cheyenne)  Search this
Sweezy, Carl, 1881-1953  Search this
Names:
Wolf Face (Cheyenne)  Search this
Extent:
15 Volumes (autograph documents, photographs, and graphite, ink, colored pencil, crayon, and watercolor drawings.)
Culture:
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Volumes
Ledger drawings
Date:
bulk ca. 1903-1904
Scope and Contents:
Notes and drawings by Native artists relating to heraldry, as Mooney termed tipi and shield designs. Also some myths and linguistic data from these and other Plains tribes. The manuscript is a compilation of materials created over a period of years, assembled under the current number by the BAE archivist. Bound volumes (since disbound for lamination) were placed under this manuscript number; loose notes and drawings on the same topics were primarily assembled under manuscript number 2538.
Biographical / Historical:
James Mooney (1861-1921) was a self-taught ethnologist. He was employed by the Bureau of American Ethnology from 1885 until his death. In this capacity, he worked extensively among the Cherokee and Kiowa. Among the Kiowa his studies focused on pictorial calendars, the peyote religion, and heraldry, the term he used to refer to the designs on shields and painted tipis. In the course of his study of Kiowa and Cheyenne heraldry, he commissioned illustrations of shield and tipi designs, as well as miniature shields and tipis. For additional biographic information on James Mooney see: Christopher Winters, General Editor, International Dictionary of Anthropologists, Garland Publishing, 1991. Neil M. Judd, The Bureau of American Ethnology - A Partial History, University of Oklahoma Press, 1967. L.G. Moses, The Indian Man - A Biography of James Mooney, University of Nebraska Press, 1984.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2531

OPPS NEG 57,508-A---521-A

OPPS NEG 71-3046-A

OPPS NEG 71-3046

OPPS NEG 72-1801 CN-1818 CN
Local Note:
The John M. Seger Referred to in Vol VIII (and also in Mooney's peyote files) was a teacher of agricultural methods. Walter Campbell edited his autobiography, "Early Days among the Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians," Univ. of Okla. press. Genevieve Seger, his daughter, lives at Geary, Okla.; she may be a trustee of the Okla. Historical Soc. --Information from Althea Bass, here May 1959.
Mrs. J. H. Bass (Althea Bass) here May 6, 1959, thinks that the "Paul" referred to occasionally in Vols. III, IV, and V may be Paul Boynton, an interpreter who spoke both Cheyenne and Arapaho. His family still lives at El Reno. His father had something to do with the Agency. Paul Boynton is mentioned in one of the letters in Mooney corresponence for 1902-06 (Smithsonian Institution - Bureau of American Ethnology correspondence files.)
Date written on several pages by Mooney; almost certainly drawings done by same artist at same time and place as Ms. 2531, Vol. 10, identified by Mooney as "Drawn by Nakoim' eno = Bear Wings/alias Charles Murphy, Cheyenne Cantonment, Okla."
Album Information:
MS 2531
Topic:
War -- Cheyenne  Search this
Winter counts -- Kiowa  Search this
Cradles -- Kiowa  Search this
Clothing -- Kiowa  Search this
Names, Personal -- Kiowa  Search this
Shields -- Cheyenne  Search this
Camps -- Cheyenne  Search this
Sun Dance -- Cheyenne  Search this
Games -- Cheyenne  Search this
Hide preparation -- Cheyenne  Search this
Folklore -- Kiowa  Search this
Horse trappings -- Cheyenne  Search this
Music -- Kiowa  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Ledger drawings
Citation:
Manuscript 2531, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2531
See more items in:
MS 2531 James Mooney notebooks principally regarding Kiowa, Cheyenne, and Arapaho shield and tipi designs
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw38a7004b3-148e-4a15-a445-5406d8e34621
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2531
Online Media:

Charles Murphy drawing of Cheyenne men, women, and children playing a game

Creator:
Murphy, Charles (Cheyenne)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Collection Artist:
Murphy, Charles (Cheyenne)  Search this
Sweezy, Carl, 1881-1953  Search this
Extent:
1 Drawing (graphite, colored pencil, and ink, 23 x 29 cm.)
Culture:
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Drawings
Ledger drawings
Date:
ca. 1904-1906
Local Numbers:
NAA INV 08901400

NAA MS 2531, Volume 10
Place:
United States Oklahoma Territory Cantonment.
United States Oklahoma Canton.
Album Information:
MS 2531-10 002
Genre/Form:
Ledger drawings
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 2531, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 2531 James Mooney notebooks principally regarding Kiowa, Cheyenne, and Arapaho shield and tipi designs
MS 2531 James Mooney notebooks principally regarding Kiowa, Cheyenne, and Arapaho shield and tipi designs / Charles Murphy drawings of Cheyenne tipi designs and social customs
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3ef1d9b3b-3bfb-477b-9b3c-7393680f73e5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms2531-ref86

Charles Murphy drawing of men and women playing snow-snake game, with tipi camp in background

Creator:
Murphy, Charles (Cheyenne)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Collection Artist:
Murphy, Charles (Cheyenne)  Search this
Sweezy, Carl, 1881-1953  Search this
Extent:
1 Drawing (graphite, colored pencil, and ink, 23 x 29 cm.)
Culture:
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Drawings
Ledger drawings
Date:
ca. 1904-1906
Local Numbers:
NAA INV 08901500

NAA MS 2531, Volume 10
Place:
United States Oklahoma Territory Cantonment.
United States Oklahoma Canton.
Album Information:
MS 2531-10 003
Genre/Form:
Ledger drawings
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 2531, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 2531 James Mooney notebooks principally regarding Kiowa, Cheyenne, and Arapaho shield and tipi designs
MS 2531 James Mooney notebooks principally regarding Kiowa, Cheyenne, and Arapaho shield and tipi designs / Charles Murphy drawings of Cheyenne tipi designs and social customs
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3cdef62f8-ad3b-41fd-9fdd-74db9e405d99
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms2531-ref87

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