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Illinois (lunch break during wheat harvest)

Artist:
Sid Grossman, born New York City 1913-died New York City 1955  Search this
Medium:
gelatin silver print
Dimensions:
8 x 10 in.
Type:
Photography
Date:
1940, printed ca. 1940
Topic:
Figure group\male  Search this
Occupation\farm\harvesting  Search this
Landscape\farm  Search this
Animal\horse  Search this
Recreation\leisure\eating and drinking  Search this
Architecture\vehicle\wagon  Search this
Landscape\Illinois  Search this
Credit Line:
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Howard Greenberg
Object number:
2020.67.11
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Smithsonian American Art Museum Collection
Department:
Graphic Arts
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/vk71d3ab6a6-8dea-4dd1-abbc-a13069ffff37
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:saam_2020.67.11

The Rennet Apple of North America

Maker:
Williams, Michael  Search this
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
ink (overall material)
Measurements:
image: 9 in x 10 in; 22.86 cm x 25.4 cm
Object Name:
lithograph
Object Type:
Lithograph
Place made:
United States: New York, New York City
Date made:
ca 1829
Subject:
Eating  Search this
Related Publication:
Peters, Harry T.. America on Stone
Credit Line:
Harry T. Peters "America on Stone" Lithography Collection
ID Number:
DL.60.2657
Catalog number:
60.2657
Accession number:
228146
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Domestic Life
Art
Peters Prints
Domestic Furnishings
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a1-2e8a-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_324965
Online Media:

Dale-Patterson Family collection

Creator:
Dale, Dianne  Search this
Polk, P. H., 1898-1985  Search this
Names:
Barry, Marion, 1936-2014  Search this
Dale, Almore M., 1911-1984  Search this
Dale, Dianne  Search this
Dale, John Henry, Jr., 1888-1973  Search this
Dale, Lucille Emma Patterson, 1889-1973  Search this
Dale, Marie Howard, 1914-2011  Search this
Dale, Norman Edward, 1908-1991  Search this
Garner, Araminta Dale, 1913-1987  Search this
Patterson, Frederick D. (Frederick Douglass), 1901-1988  Search this
Patterson, Wilhelmina Bessie, 1888-1962  Search this
Extent:
6 Linear feet (9 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Programs
Clippings
Correspondence
Ephemera
Postcards
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1866 - 1990.
Summary:
The Dale-Patterson family papers, which date from 1866 to 2010 and measure 6 linear feet, document the personal and professional lives of the Dale-Patterson family who came to live in Hillsdale, Anacostia, area of Washington, D.C., in 1892.
Scope and Contents note:
The Dale-Patterson family papers, which date from 1866 to 1990 and measure 6 linear feet, document the personal and professional lives of the Dale-Patterson family who came to live in Hillsdale, Anacostia, area of Washington, D.C., in 1892. The collection is comprised of correspondence, photographs, clippings, and ephemera.
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged in four series:

Series 1: Dale-Patterson Family papers Series 2: Charles Qualls papers Series 3: Community Organizations Series 4: Subject Files
Biographical/Historical note:
The Dale family came to Washington, DC in 1886 when John Henry Dale, Sr., a gifted self-taught man, obtained a position as clerk in the newly contracted Pension Bureau building at 5th and G Streets, NW. First they lived near 13th Street and Florida Avenue, NW, then moved to Howard Road in Anacostia. Dale built a house at 2619 Nichols Avenue, now Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue, drawing the plans and supervising the construction. The Dales and only one other family lived in this solidly built house for 100 years before it was sold to a church group and demolished.
General Note:
Finding Aid Note: This finding aid is associated with a MARC collection-level record.361883
Provenance:
The Dale-Patterson Family collection was donated to the Anacostia Community Museum on April 07, 2013.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Rights:
The Dale-Patterson Family collection is the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American families  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Programs
Clippings
Correspondence
Ephemera
Postcards
Citation:
Dale-Patterson Family collection, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Dianne Dale.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-074
See more items in:
Dale-Patterson Family collection
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7c29572e9-2bd6-4b2a-8982-b527693b7885
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-074
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Dale-Patterson Family collection digital asset number 1
Online Media:

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Culture:
Afro-Caribbean cults  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Business records
Videotapes
Plans (drawings)
Negatives
Audiotapes
Contracts
Digital images
Audiocassettes
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Notes
Video recordings
Plena
Place:
Caribbean Area
Haiti
Jamaica
Puerto Rico
Trinidad and Tobago
Date:
June 16-September 6, 1976
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1976 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 9 series.

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: African Diaspora

Series 3: Children's Program

Series 4: Family Folklore

Series 5: Festival Stage

Series 6: Native Americans

Series 7: Old Ways in the New World

Series 8: Regional America

Series 9: Working Americans
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1976 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Division of Performing Arts and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The Festival of American Folklife's first decade culminated with the Bicentennial Festival of American Folklife that took place for twelve weeks in the summer of 1976, from June 16 to September 6 (programs typically ran from Wednesday through Sunday each week). More than 5000 participants took part over the course of the summer. The 1976 Festival involved the participation of every region of the United States, 38 foreign governments, scores of American Indian tribes, and many labor organizations. Some 4.5 million people attended the Festival.

The Bicentennial Festival resulted from the collaboration of the Smithsonian with thousands of national and international scholars, community spokespeople, and cultural exemplars involved in the documentation, presentation, transmission, and conservation of cultural traditions. Preceding the Festival were several years of establishing cultural networks, training students, and providing opportunities for diverse peoples to interpret and present their traditions. The Bicentennial also saw the flowering of a touring program, begun in 1973, in which foreign groups at the Festival subsequently toured the United States. Scores of groups from the African Diaspora and Old Ways in the New World programs gave some 200 performances in 50 cities and towns across the U.S.

The 1976 Festival again took place in the western part of the National Mall to the south of the Reflecting Pool, between 17th and 23rd Streets (see site plan). It was co-organized by the Smithsonian Institution, Division of Performing Arts (James R. Morris, Director; Richard Lusher, Deputy Director) and the National Park Service (Gary Everhardt, Director). Ralph Rinzler was Director of the Festival, and Bess Lomax Hawes and Robert Byington were Deputy Directors of the Festival. Tom Vennum served as Ethnomusicologist, and Frank Proschan as Archivist. The Bicentennial Festival was sponsored by American Airlines and General Foods.

The 1976 Festival again featured seven thematic programs, complemented by a Festival Stage. African Diaspora featured different countries every two weeks. The Festival Stage brought together participants from other areas and - for the last four weeks - its own dedicated performers. Native Americans changed focus by region every week; similarly, Old Ways in the New World changed focus by country every week. Regional America (June 16-August 8) changed focus by region every week, and Working Americans changed focus by theme every two weeks, with an expanded program on Transportation the last four weeks (August 11-September 6).

The 1975 Program Book provided information on each of the programs. Biweekly, a Program Supplement provided schedules and participant information.
Shared Stewardship of Collections:
The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage acknowledges and respects the right of artists, performers, Folklife Festival participants, community-based scholars, and knowledge-keepers to collaboratively steward representations of themselves and their intangible cultural heritage in media produced, curated, and distributed by the Center. Making this collection accessible to the public is an ongoing process grounded in the Center's commitment to connecting living people and cultures to the materials this collection represents. To view the Center's full shared stewardship policy, which defines our protocols for addressing collections-related inquiries and concerns, please visit https://folklife.si.edu/archives#shared-stewardship.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Folk music  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
World music  Search this
Folk art  Search this
occupational folklore  Search this
Orisha religion  Search this
Vodou -- Haiti -- Rituals.  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Business records
Videotapes
Plans (drawings)
Negatives
Audiotapes
Contracts
Digital images
Audiocassettes
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Notes
Video recordings
plena
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1976
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5858643e8-749f-494f-b205-eca860d96375
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1976
Online Media:

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1998 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiocassettes
Sound recordings
Contracts
Notes
Video recordings
Memorandums
Audiotapes
Business records
Photographic prints
Videotapes
Plans (drawings)
Slides (photographs)
Correspondence
Digital images
Negatives
Date:
June 24-July 5, 1998
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1998 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 6 series.

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: The Baltic Nations: Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania

Series 3: Pahiyas: A Philippine Harvest

Series 4: The Río Grande/Río Bravo Basin

Series 5: Special Events

Series 6: Wisconsin
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1998 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
On January 25, 1998, the Smithsonian Board of Regents voted to change the name of the Festival of American Folklife to the Smithsonian Folklife Festival. The Folklife and Folkways Archives and Collection of the Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies were also renamed to become the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections.

In presenting community cultural life, the Smithsonian Folklife Festival always engages those communities. The 1998 Festival was a good case in point. All of the nearly 75 researchers who documented, analyzed, and recommended traditions and people for the Festival came from the represented communities. Festival curators and senior staff met with researchers, shared experiences from previous Festivals, challenged assumptions, listened, learned, argued, and negotiated the character of the programs. Although not an easy way to craft a cultural representation, this approach nevertheless allowed for an honest, intellectual engagement, with mutual respect and discovery as ther result.

The 1998 Festival hosted programs on Wisconsin, the Río Grande/Río Bravo Basin, the Philippines, and the Baltic nations of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. Wisconsin celebrated its sesquicentennial in 1998, and sought through the Festival to demonstrate to the nation the vitality of its people and their traditions. The Río Grande/Río Bravo region was redefined 150 years ago with the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which established a new boundary between Mexico and the United States. The river has a variety of meanings for local communities that were explored on the National Mall. The Philippines first tasted independence 100 years ago, and marked its centennial with activities that gave voice to Filipino peoples, both in the island nation and in the United States. The Baltic nations each demonstrated the richness of their cultural life, and its importance in sustaining the struggle to regain their freedom and independence less than a decade before. Special events celebrated the Festival's founder, Ralph Rinzler, and the 50th anniversary of Folkways Records.

The Festival's million visitors could dance to polkas from Milwaukee, learn borderlands ballads, participate in a Philippine pageant, and marvel at the amber work, flax weaving, and choral songs of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. The unexpected also met their eye - a Tibetan sand mandala maker from Wisconsin, a Filipino artisan who fashions musical gongs from bullet casings, a New Mexican pueblo potter who incorporates modern flood stories into her craft, and a Baltic-style St. John's Day ceremony.

The 1998 Festival took place during two five-day weeks (June 24-28 and July 1-5) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 9th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). It featured four programs, with special events that included the Ralph Rinzler Memorial Concert.

The 1998 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; essays provided background on the Festival and on each of the programs.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife Programs & Cultural Studies.

Center for Folklife Programs & Cultural Studies

Richard Kurin, Director; Richard Kennedy, Deputy Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Anthony Seeger, Director, Smithsonian Folkways Recordngs; James Early, Director, Cultural Studies & Communications; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist; Olivia Cadaval, Chair, Research & Education; Betty J. Belanus, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Peter Seitel, Curators, Folklorists, Education and Cultural Specialists; Carla M. Borden, Program/Publications Manager; John W. Franklin, Program Manager; Cynthia Vidaurri, Coordinator, Latino Cultural Resource Network; Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Stephanie Smith, Assistant Archivist; Arlene L. Reiniger, Program Specialist; Charlie Weber, Media Specialist; Roland Freeman, Dan Goodwin, Ivan Karp, Corinne Kratz, Alan Lomax, Worth Long, René López, Kate Rinzler, Fellows & Research Associates

Folklife Advisory Council and Folkways Advisory Council

Roger Abrahams, Jacinto Arias, Michael Asch, Jane Beck, Don DeVito, Pat Jasper, Ella Jenkins, Jon Kertzer, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, John Nixdorf, Bernice Johnson Reagon, John Roberts, Carol Robertson, Gilbert Sprauve, Jack Tchen, Ricardo Trimillos, Carlos Vélez-Ibáñez

National Park Service

Robert Stantion, Director; Terry Carlstrom, Director, National Capital Region
Shared Stewardship of Collections:
The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage acknowledges and respects the right of artists, performers, Folklife Festival participants, community-based scholars, and knowledge-keepers to collaboratively steward representations of themselves and their intangible cultural heritage in media produced, curated, and distributed by the Center. Making this collection accessible to the public is an ongoing process grounded in the Center's commitment to connecting living people and cultures to the materials this collection represents. To view the Center's full shared stewardship policy, which defines our protocols for addressing collections-related inquiries and concerns, please visit https://folklife.si.edu/archives#shared-stewardship.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1998 Smithsonian Folklife Festival forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
arts and crafts  Search this
Folklore  Search this
World music  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiocassettes
Sound recordings
Contracts
Notes
Video recordings
Memorandums
Audiotapes
Business records
Photographic prints
Videotapes
Plans (drawings)
Slides (photographs)
Correspondence
Digital images
Negatives
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1998 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1998
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1998 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5c96ded82-f8f8-4800-8804-a7535f001b13
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1998

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2000 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives
Correspondence
Business records
Audiocassettes
Slides (photographs)
Memorandums
Videotapes
Contracts
Notes
Plans (drawings)
Photographic prints
Audiotapes
Digital images
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Date:
June 23-July 4, 2000
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 2000 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: El Río

Series 3: Special Events

Series 4: Tibetan Culture Beyond the Land of Snows

Series 5: Washington, D.C.: It's Our Home
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 2000 Smithsonian Folklife Festival was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The goal of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival is to present diverse, community-based traditions in an understandable and respectful way. The great strength of the Festival is to connect the public, directly and compellingly, with practitioners of cultural traditions. In 2000, the Festival featured programs on the cultural ecology of the Río Grande/Río Bravo Basin, on Tibetan refugee culture, and on the local traditions of Washington, D.C. Visitors could learn how a cowboy or vaquero from South Texas works cattle, or speak with a Tibetan American immigrant about the meaning underlying her continued practice of sacred traditions. As an artist's hand guided the eyes of Festival viewers, they could imagine how an urban mural reflects life in Washington, D.C.

The Festival program on the cultures of Washington, D.C., showed the vibrancy of local communities that live in the shadow of national institutions. El Río demonstrated the tenacity of regional culture at the borders, even margins, of Mexico and the United States. The program on Tibetan refugees provided a cultural in-gathering of a diaspora community facing issues of continuity and survival - climaxed by a huge ceremony on the National Mall presided over by His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama, who also offered a public address on the occasion. Overall, the Festival this year demonstrated that, while people may be subject to modern forms of colonization, to unequal power and economic arrangements, and to marginalization, exile, and strife in many forms, they use their cultural traditions as sources of strength, resistance, and creativity to cope with and overcome their travail. Culture, after all, is a means of human adaptation. Just because people may be economically poor or politically powerless does not necessarily mean that their cultures are brittle or bereft of value.

The Festival has long had an especially significant impact on those artists, musicians, cooks, and ritual specialists who participate directly in it. The attention they receive usually fortifies their intent to pass on their traditions to children, apprentices, and students, just as it sometimes encourages cultural exemplars to extend their creativity by connecting it to broader civic and economic issues. The Festival's rich cultural dialogue on the National Mall was considered to be particularly significant for American civic life at the dawn of the 21st century, as we enter an era in which no single racial or ethnic group will be a majority. The Festival allows a broad array of visitors to understand cultural differences in a civil, respectful, and educational way. Little wonder it has become a model for public cultural presentation, adopted by organizations elsewhere in the United States and in other democratic nations.

The 2000 Festival took place during two five-day weeks (June 23-27 and June 30-July 4) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 9th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). It featured three programs, with several special events including the Ralph Rinzler Memorial Concert.

The 2000 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; essays provided background on the Festival and on each of the programs.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

Richard Kurin, Director; Richard Kennedy, Deputy Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Anthony Seeger, Director, Smithsonian Folkways Recordngs; James Early, Director, Cultural Heritage Policy; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist; Olivia Cadaval, Chair, Research & Education; D.A. Sonneborn, Assistant Director, Smithsonian Folkways Recordings; Betty J. Belanus, Nancy Groce, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Peter Seitel, Cynthia Vidaurri, Curators, Folklorists, Education and Cultural Specialists; Carla M. Borden, Program/Publications Manager; John W. Franklin, Program Manager; Cynthia Vidaurri, Coordinator, Latino Cultural Resource Network; Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Stephanie Smith, Assistant Archivist; Arlene L. Reiniger, Program Specialist; Charlie Weber, Media Specialist; Zain Abdullah, Stanford Carpenter, Susan T. Chen, Roland Freeman, Dan Goodwin, Todd Harvey, Amy Horowitz, Ivan Karp, Guy Logsdon, Alan Lomax, Worth Long, René López, Kate Rinzler, Katherine Skinner, Saul Tobias, Bob White, Fellows & Research Associates

Folklife Advisory Council and Folkways Advisory Council

Michael Asch, Phyllis Barney, Jane Beck, Don DeVito, Pat Jasper, Ella Jenkins, Jon Kertzer, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, John Nixdorf, Bernice Johnson Reagon, Gilbert Sprauve, Jack Tchen, Ricardo Trimillos

National Park Service

Robert Stantion, Director; Terry Carlstrom, Director, National Capital Region
Shared Stewardship of Collections:
The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage acknowledges and respects the right of artists, performers, Folklife Festival participants, community-based scholars, and knowledge-keepers to collaboratively steward representations of themselves and their intangible cultural heritage in media produced, curated, and distributed by the Center. Making this collection accessible to the public is an ongoing process grounded in the Center's commitment to connecting living people and cultures to the materials this collection represents. To view the Center's full shared stewardship policy, which defines our protocols for addressing collections-related inquiries and concerns, please visit https://folklife.si.edu/archives#shared-stewardship.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2000 Smithsonian Folklife Festival forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Food habits  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
World music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Correspondence
Business records
Audiocassettes
Slides (photographs)
Memorandums
Videotapes
Contracts
Notes
Plans (drawings)
Photographic prints
Audiotapes
Digital images
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2000 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2000
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2000 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk50f87ef4e-d41a-46d0-8bd1-701b0e61df33
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-2000

Decoration

Artist:
Florence Standish Whiting, born Philadelphia, PA 1888-died Philadelphia, PA 1947  Search this
Medium:
oil on canvas
Dimensions:
30 1/8 x 47 1/4 in. (76.6 x 119.9 cm.)
Type:
Painting
Date:
ca. 1933-1934
Topic:
Figure group  Search this
Occupation\farm\harvesting  Search this
Recreation\leisure\eating and drinking  Search this
New Deal\Public Works of Art Project\Pennsylvania  Search this
Credit Line:
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Transfer from the U.S. Department of Labor
Object number:
1964.1.101
Restrictions & Rights:
CC0
See more items in:
Smithsonian American Art Museum Collection
Department:
Painting and Sculpture
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/vk71a1b7a7f-6135-44e7-93a4-b8a9f9a9e956
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:saam_1964.1.101

The Second Great Match Game for the Championship

Maker:
Magee, John L.  Search this
Physical Description:
ink (overall material)
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
image: 19 in x 27 1/4 in; 48.26 cm x 69.215 cm
Object Name:
lithograph
Object Type:
Lithograph
Place made:
United States: Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
Date made:
1867
Date of event depicted:
1866-10-22
Subject:
Carriages  Search this
Architecture, Commercial Buildings  Search this
Eating  Search this
Chronology: 1860-1869  Search this
Drinking  Search this
Uniforms, fraternal  Search this
Baseball  Search this
Related Publication:
Peters, Harry T.. America on Stone
Garvan, Anthony N. B. and Peter C. Welsh. Victorian American
Credit Line:
Harry T. Peters "America on Stone" Lithography Collection
ID Number:
DL.60.2809
Catalog number:
60.2809
Accession number:
228146
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Domestic Life
Art
Peters Prints
Domestic Furnishings
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a3-ca11-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_325103
Online Media:

Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Food

Creator:
Warshaw, Isadore, 1900-1969  Search this
Extent:
14.46 Cubic feet (consisting of 30.5 boxes, 1 folder, 11 oversize folders, 1 map case folder, 1 flat box (partial).)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Business ephemera
Ephemera
Recipes
Date:
circa 1795-1970
Summary:
A New York bookseller, Warshaw assembled this collection over nearly fifty years. The Warshaw Collection of Business Americana: Food forms part of the Warshaw Collection of Business Americana, Subseries 1.1: Subject Categories. The Subject Categories subseries is divided into 470 subject categories based on those created by Mr. Warshaw. These subject categories include topical subjects, types or forms of material, people, organizations, historical events, and other categories. An overview to the entire Warshaw collection is available here: Warshaw Collection of Business Americana
Scope and Contents:
This material consists primarily of advertising cards, bills/receipts, printed advertisements, catalogues, price lists, business cards, circulars, scattered correspondence on letterhead stationery, import/export documents, fruit crate and other types of labels, publications of various types and pamphlets and books from companies involved in the food industry. These businesses include manufacturers, distributors and wholesalers of food and food products, growers, commission merchants, importers and stores selling food either exclusively, as in grocery stores or food emporiums, or together with other products in general stores. The bulk of the material consists of bills and receipts and trade cards.

The large collection of fruit crate labels consists of three boxes, primarily from growers of apples and pears in the Pacific Northwest. The images on these labels range from caricatures, primarily of Indians, to lush images of the fruits being sold. There are numerous pictures depicting or related to the names of the growers or the brand name being used, such as Mountain Brand, Pyramid Brand, Eskimo Brand, a wren for F.O. Renn or a strongman for E.C. Sampson. Some of the more common images in addition to the Indians and fruit include cowboys, children, flowers, birds and river and mountain views. Several of the images and/or brand names appear on the labels of more than one company.

There are a number of publications included in the materials. There are magazines and journals, both for the trade and for the general public. There are books published about a particular type of food, often by a manufacturer or distributor of that food. There are also histories of some of the companies, usually written by or for the company. Also, in this category, are catalogs of large metropolitan food stores such as S.S. Pierce of Boston, the Joseph R. Peebles' Sons Co. of Cincinnati, Ohio, and Park & Tilford and Francis H. Leggett, both of New York.

Materials in boxes one through eighteen are organized alphabetically by name of company. All materials relating to a particular company, with the exception of import/export documents, publications (if that is the only material) and fruit crate labels, are included with the company related materials.

Boxes eighteen through twenty-one contain the fruit crate labels. These are arranged alphabetically by company. The first folder of each letter contains labels of companies for which there is only one label. The last folder contains labels with no company name. Box twenty-two contains other food labels which are primarily from cans and jars. They are arranged alphabetically, first by type of product such as corn and corn products, ketchup, pasta and peaches, then alphabetically by company for companies with a large number of labels and lastly a folder containing labels with no company name. The labels in the product folders are arranged within the folder first alphabetically by company followed by labels with no company name.

Boxes twenty-three through twenty-seven contain import/export documents. These are also arranged alphabetically by company in the same manner as the fruit crate labels. The import/export documents are primarily from the Port of Philadelphia. The documents cover goods coming into the port on sailing ships and, starting in the 1870's, steam ships and leaving the port on rail and river conveyances. The products were imported from such places as Cuba, Antigua, Trinidad, England, Italy, Germany and Singapore and included cocoanuts, pineapples, dried fruit and nuts, macaroni, cheese, sausages, cooked meats, pickled fish, spices and coffee and tea.

Box twenty-eight contains magazines and periodicals. Some of the publications include What to Eat from 1896 and 1899, The Dietetic Gazette from 1889, Culinary Review from 1943 and Wholesale Grocer. This box also contains correspondence and order forms relating to magazines and periodicals.

Box twenty-nine contains miscellaneous food publications. These are such things as account books, articles from other publications, publications on diet and infants and children and newsletters. Box thirty contains food related publications that are published by or about specific companies for which there is no other material. Box thirty also contains material relating to food equipment and manufacturing. This is arranged initially by company and then contains folders on canning and preserving and patents. The equipment manufactured includes such things as evaporators, sorters and washers.

Box thirty-one consists of publications about specific types of food and general works. The food types include publications about such foods as asparagus, milk and rice. These folders are arranged alphabetically by food type. General works consists of material which is not, or cannot be, related to a specific company or do not fit into one of the major categories set forth above. These are: general images which are not labels, advertising cards, correspondence, food instructions, legislation, miscellaneous price lists, railroad receipts and claims, recipes, shipping and tax stamps.
Arrangement:
Food is arranged in nine subseries:

Manufacturers and Distributors of Food and Food Products

Labels

Import/Export Documents

Magazines and Periodicals

Menus

Publications

Law & Legislation

Food Types

General Works and Miscellaneous
Partial List of Company and Proprietor Names, General Materials:
American Fruit Growers Incorporated Ana-Co

Apple Growers Association

Associated Fruit Company Barnhill Fruit Company Bear Creek

Blue Mountain Fruit Exchange

Boehmer Incorporated Bolinger Orchards

Brewster Distribution Unit

Brewster-Bridgeport Growers Incorporated

Butler Trading Company Incorporated Buck Fruit Company

Casca Growers

Cascadian Fruit Shippers Incorporated

Cashmere Fruit Exchange Cashmere Fruit Growers Union Chelan Falls Orchards

Clark-Baker Company Columbia Basin Orchards Connell Brothers, Company D

Dahn, Floyd Fruits Incorporated

Davidson Fruit Company Del Rio Orchards

Denison, H.S. and Company

Denney and Company Dow Fruit Company

Duddy-Robinson Incorporated/ Thompson-Duddy-Robinson Company

Duthie and Company Earl Fruit Company

East Wenatchee Fruit Growers

Entiat Fruit Growers League

Fairview Ranch Company

Foster's, Myron Hesperian Orchards Fruitland Fruit Association

Fruit Sales Company Incorporated

Gellatly Fruit Company

Greig, W.M.-Bonanza Orchard

Growers Service Company

Hafener Fruit Company

Haskell Packing Company

Hood River Fruit Company

Hood River Produce Exchange

Independent Fruit Shippers

Jennings Fruit Company

Kelly Brothers Company Incorporated

Koon Tai and Company

Koop, The C.M. Company

Lake Chelan Fruit Growers

Lake Chelan Fruit Growers Union

Lake Entiat Growers, Incorporated

Lippmann, J & G

Lockwood, C.M.

Mad River Orchard

Malott Growers Union

Manson, A. Fruit Growers

Marsh, A.E. Company

Methow-Pateros Growers Incorporated

Mojonner & Sons

Monitor Federated Growers

Mutual Sales Agency

Nellis, F.E. & Company

North Pacific Sales Company

Northern Fruit Company

Northwest Wholesale

Northwestern Fruit Exchange

Nuchief Sales, Incorporated

Okanogan Growers Union

Olive Apple Company

Omak Sookum Growers

Oneonta Trading Corporation

Onnail Fruit Growers

Orando Community Packing

Pacific Fruit & Produce company

Paddock, C.R. & Company

Palmer Corporation

Paxton Rivers Company Incorporated

Perhann Fruit Growers

Peshastin Fruit Growers Association

Plummer & Edwins

Renn, F.O. Fruit Company

Richey & Gilbert Company

Rivers, Burnand & Rivers

Robertson, D.O.

Rock Island Unit

Ryan Fruit Company

Sampson, E.G.

Segerstrom, H.N.

Sellers, Ben F. /Spinner Fruit Corporation/Sellers & Spinner

Sgobel & Day

Sisler, J.A.

Smith & Holden

Spokane Fruit Growers Company

Stadelman Fruit Incorporated

Standfield Fruit Growers Union

Steinhardt & Kelly Incorporated

Sterlin-Slater Fruit Growers

Stratford Orchards Company

Stubbs Fruit & Storage Company

Sunnyslope Fruit Exchange

Tedford, R.A. & Company

Tonasket Federated Growers

Trunkey-Wolfe Company, Incorporated

Vernon Orchards

Wade, J.M. Fruit Company

Wagner, E. & Son

Washington Fruit & Produce Company

Weaver, C.H. & Company

Wells & Wade Company

Wenatchee Apple Land Company

Wenatchee District Co-Op Association

Wenatchee Fruit & Storage Company

Wenatchee Fruit & Warehouse Company

Wenatchee North Central Fruit Distributers

Wenatchee Produce Company

Wenatchee Valley Fruit Exchange

Wenatchee-Beebe Orchard Company

Wenatchee-Northern Warehouse and Marketing Company

Wenatchee-Okanogan Warehouse Company

Wenatchee-Skookum Growers

Western Fruit & Produce Company, Incorporated

White Brothers & Crum

Wright Fruit Company

Yakima County Horticultural Union

Yakima Fruit Growers Association

Yakima Fruit Growers Exchange
Partial List of Company and Proprietor Names, Oversize Materials:
An & Company, Shredded Coconut, Location unknown

Armour Packing Company, White Label Soups, Kansas City, MO

Atlantic Macaroni Company, Long Island City, NY

Bajata, P. and Company, Palermo, Italy

Baker-Langdon Orchard Company, Walla Walla, WA

Beamsville Preserving Company, Peerless Brand Apples, Beamsville, Ontario

Bell, William G. Company, Bell's Spiced Seasoning

Beutel, Robert Company, West Bay City, MI

Bloomfield Packaging Company, Ltd., Quaker Hand Packed Tomatoes, Standard Lombard Plums, Bloomfield, Ontario

Brandts, William Sons and Company, London, England

British Canadian Canners Limited, Britannia Brand Choice Standard Apples, Hamilton, Ontario

Burnett's Vanilla, Location unknown

Burnham & Morrill, Portland, ME

California Associated Raisin Company, Sun-Maid Raisins, Fresno, CA

California Fruit Growers Exchange, Sunkist Oranges, Chicago, IL

Campbell , Joseph Company, Campbell's Soup, Camden, NJ

Carle, John and Sons, Imperial Granum "The Great Medicinal Food", New York, NY

Cerere Macaroni, Location unknown

Clark, William, Commission Merchant, New York, NY

Colburn, A. Company, Mustard, Philadelphia, PA

Connor, John T. Company, Wholesale Grocers, Boston, MA

Cowan and Staley, Anaheim, CA

Davis, Frank E.Fish Company, Gloucester, MA

Del Monte Brand, Raisins and Dried Fruits, Location unknown

Dewey Brand, Fancy Stem-Cut Louisiana Oranges

Ferris & Caywood, "The Walter Grape", Poughkeepsie, NY

General Foods Corporation, Jell-0, La Roy, NY

Genesee Pure Food Company, La Roy, NY

Gorton-Pew Fisheries Company, Gloucester, MA

Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company, New York, NY

Griffin and Skelley Company, California Raisin Packers

Gurley, R., New Milford, OH

Harriman, Charles, Curer and Wholesaler in Dry and Pickled Fish, Gloucester, MA

Hazard, E.C. and Company, Shrewsbury Brand White Cherries, Shrewsbury, NJ

Heinz, H.J. Company, Spaghetti, Tomato Ketchup, Pittsburgh, PA

Hershey Packing Company, Pioneer Brand Quick Frozen Green Peas, Seattle, WA

Illinois Canning Company, Joan of Arc Brand French Red Kidney Beans, Hoopeston, IL

Importers and Dealers in Fine Groceries Philadelphia, PA

Jersey Biscuit Company, Newark, NJ

Johnson, C.J. and Company, General Commission Merchants, Location unknown

Kensett, Thomas and Company, Oysters, Baltimore, MD

King, William, Grocer, Philadelphia, PA

Larkin Company, Grocers, Buffalo, NY

Lester, Frank, New York, NY

Libby, McNeil and Libby, Luncheon Meats, Chicago, IL

Little Gem Cream Com, Company and Location unknown

McCormick and Company, Bee and Banquet Brand Products, Importers, Exporters, and Packers, Baltimore, MD

McQuestin, G.B., Nashua , NH

Mellins Food, For Infants and Invalids, Boston, MA

Meloripe Fruit Company Boston, MA

Minnesota Valley Canning Company

Mitchell, Fletcher and Company

Montgomery Ward and Company, Chicago, IL

Natural Food Company Triscuit, Niagara Falls, NY

Niblets Brand Mexicorn and Whole Kernel Com La Sueur, MN

Northwestern Fruit Exchange Skookum Apples, Seattle, WA Peebles and White

Penguin Brand Quick Frozen French Style Green Beans Seattle, WA

People's Tea, Spice, & Baking Powder Company, Cincinnati, OH

Pomeroy English Walnut Farm Lockport, NY

Price, Joseph J., Dealer in Family Groceries, Wines, Liquors, and Imported Cigars, Albany, NY

Procter & Gamble Company Crisco, Cincinnati, OH

Rowland, James and Company Fancy Groceries, Teas, and Coffees Location unknown

Royal Cocoanut Company, New York, NY

Schepp, L. and Company Schepp's Cocoanut, New York, NY

Snow, F.H. Canning Company

Stickney & Poor's, Premium Spices and Mustards Location unknown

Stone, Arthur and Company Wholesale Grocers, New Orleans, LA

Thurber, H.K. & F.B. and Company Grocer, New York, NY

United Fruit Company Bananas, Boston, MA

Washington Dehydrated Food Company Washington Brand Dehydrated Apples Yakima, WA

Washington Frosted Foods, Inc.

Wells, Miller & Provost Wholesaler Warehouse New York, NY

Wendell, Jacob L. Pickling and Preserving Philadelphia, PA

Wholesale Grocers and Commission Merchants Petersburg, VA

Worth, William E. and Company Wilmington , NC

Young & Lyon, Providence, RI
Materials in the Archives Center:
Archives Center Collection of Business Americana (AC0404)
Forms Part Of:
Forms part of the Warshaw Collection of Business Americana.

Series 1: Business Ephemera

Series 2: Other Collection Divisions

Series 3: Isadore Warshaw Personal Papers

Series 4: Photographic Reference Material
Provenance:
Food is a portion of the Business Ephemera Series of the Warshaw Collection of Business Americana, Accession AC0060 purchased from Isadore Warshaw in 1967. Warshaw continued to accumulate similar material until his death, which was donated in 1971 by his widow, Augusta. For a period after acquisition, related materials from other sources (of mixed provenance) were added to the collection so there may be content produced or published after Warshaw's death in 1969. This practice has since ceased.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Some items may be restricted due to fragile condition.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
advertising -- Confectionery  Search this
Agriculture  Search this
Baking  Search this
Bakers and bakeries  Search this
Beverages  Search this
Chocolate  Search this
Coffee  Search this
Corn  Search this
Food  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Food -- United States  Search this
Meat industry  Search this
Poultry industry  Search this
Refrigeration and refrigerating machinery  Search this
Salt  Search this
Seafood  Search this
Tea  Search this
Genre/Form:
Business ephemera
Ephemera
Recipes
Citation:
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Food, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0060.S01.01.Food
See more items in:
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Food
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep85e832c01-d882-4b07-9429-55ea5da89013
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0060-s01-01-food
Online Media:

Festival Recordings: Learning Center/Camp Fire: Czech American Community in New Mexico: W&V Dorn; Gospel Traditions

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. New Mexico Program 1992 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Place, Janet L. (recorder)  Search this
Recorder:
Bergeson, Kevin (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Kretek, Edward, 1927-1997  Search this
Kretek, Gertrude  Search this
Kretek, Geraldine, 1929-  Search this
Jones, Rodney  Search this
Dorn, Vodra, 1957-  Search this
Dorn, William, 1952-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Czech-Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
New Mexico
Deming (N.M.)
Albuquerque (N.M.)
Date:
1992 June 26
Track Information:
101 Czech American Community in New Mexico / Edward Kretek, Gertrude Kretek, Geraldine Kretek.

102 Gospel Traditions / Rodney Jones, Vodra Dorn, William Dorn. Piano.
Local Numbers:
FP-1992-CT-0131
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 26, 1992.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Gospel music  Search this
Piano  Search this
Emigration & immigration  Search this
Discrimination  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Agriculture  Search this
Gardens  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1992, Item FP-1992-CT-0131
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: New Mexico / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk59d6174cd-631e-4253-bd95-82360f95e794
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1992-ref679

Festival Recordings: Learning Center/Camp Fire: William & Vondra Dorn; Gospel Traditions

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. New Mexico Program 1992 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Davis, Mariel Smith (recorder)  Search this
Recorder:
Barge, Michelle (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Jones, Rodney  Search this
Dorn, Vodra, 1957-  Search this
Dorn, William, 1952-  Search this
Garcia, Banjo  Search this
Winters, Emily  Search this
Whelan, Johnny, 1946-  Search this
Whelan, Luther, 1975-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Hispanic Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
New Mexico
Albuquerque (N.M.)
Las Cruces (N.M.)
Continental Divide Wilderness (N.M.)
Date:
1992 June 27
Track Information:
101 Gospel Traditions / Rodney Jones, Vodra Dorn, William Dorn. Guitar.

102 Camp Fire / Banjo Garcia, Emily Winters, Johnny Whelan, Luther Whelan. Guitar,Harmonica.
Local Numbers:
FP-1992-CT-0138
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 27, 1992.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Cowboys Poetry -- Sound recordings  Search this
Folk songs -- United States  Search this
Cowboys -- Songs and music  Search this
Guitar  Search this
Harmonica  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Ranch life  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1992, Item FP-1992-CT-0138
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: New Mexico / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5389f7a00-23f5-4437-83e1-4cb0b470d2d3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1992-ref686

Festival Recordings: Narrative Stage: Social/Cultural History; Relationship with First Families; Teamwork

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. White House Program 1992 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Miller, Mark K., 1953- (recorder)  Search this
Kamalidiin, Sais (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Fields, Alonzo  Search this
Allen, Eugene, 1919-2010  Search this
Parks, Lillian Rogers  Search this
Ficklin, Samuel, 1923-2000  Search this
Haller, Henry  Search this
Armentrout, Russell, 1929-  Search this
Fox, Sanford, 1919-1996  Search this
Arrington, Howard, 1927-2007  Search this
Burke, Kenneth, 1908-2000  Search this
Names:
United States. Department of Agriculture  Search this
Truman, Harry S., 1884-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Massachusetts
Medford (Mass.)
Virginia
Maryland
Florida
Date:
1992 June 26
Track Information:
101 Social and Cultural History: Changing Working Conditions / Alonzo Fields.

102 Relationships with First Families / Eugene Allen, Lillian Rogers Parks, Samuel Ficklin.

103 Teamwork- A State Dinner / Henry Haller, Russell Armentrout, Sanford Fox.

104 Greatest Challenges- Creative Solutions- Devising Systems / Alonzo Fields, Howard Arrington, Kenneth Burke.
Local Numbers:
FP-1992-CT-0247
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 26, 1992.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
occupational folklore  Search this
Christmas  Search this
Presidents  Search this
Presidents' spouses -- United States  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Flowers  Search this
Secret service -- United States  Search this
Plumbing  Search this
Dinners and dining  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1992, Item FP-1992-CT-0247
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife / Series 5: Workers at the White House / 5.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5c7b93adb-cd20-41ad-b3ff-d48886c83764
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1992-ref885

Festival Recordings: Narrative Stage: Early Background and Training; Serving First Families; Relationships w/ Guests

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. White House Program 1992 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Keydel, Stefan (recorder)  Search this
Irby, Laurus (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Fields, Alonzo  Search this
Bruce, Preston, 1908-1995  Search this
Allen, Eugene, 1919-2010  Search this
Haller, Henry  Search this
Arrington, Howard, 1927-2007  Search this
Parks, Lillian Rogers  Search this
Names:
United States. Department of Agriculture  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Massachusetts
Maryland
Virginia
Date:
1992 July 5
Track Information:
101 Early Background and Training / Alonzo Fields, Preston Bruce.

102 Serving First Families of the Nation: What Makes the White House Different / Eugene Allen, Henry Haller, Howard Arrington.

103 Relationships with White House Guests / Alonzo Fields, Lillian Rogers Parks.
Local Numbers:
FP-1992-CT-0281
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 5, 1992.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
occupational folklore  Search this
Migration  Search this
Genealogy  Search this
Butlers  Search this
Plumbing  Search this
Postal service  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Presidents  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1992, Item FP-1992-CT-0281
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife / Series 5: Workers at the White House / 5.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5d3de55e1-79bd-4e8b-8cfa-9bf17b0b0f8d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1992-ref919

Michigan Fieldwork: Marie Cross, Hazel Stirling

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Michigan Program 1987 Washington, D.C.  Search this
May-Machunda, Phyllis (field worker)  Search this
Performer:
Stirling, Hazel  Search this
Cross, Marie L.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Michigan
Mecosta (Mich.)
Date:
1986 October 21
Local Numbers:
FP-1987-CT-0542
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Michigan, United States, October 21, 1986.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Storytelling  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Herbs -- Theraputic use  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1987, Item FP-1987-CT-0542
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Michigan / Fieldwork
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk569e42f62-a307-4258-a8b0-70c29a0f80b6
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1987-ref1319

Festival Recordings: Michigan Narrative Stage: Migration to Michigan; Lore of the Lure; The Flint Sit-Down Strike

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Michigan Program 1987 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Performer:
Berry-Jackson, Marguerite L.  Search this
Wilkins, Rosie, 1905-1994  Search this
Lunning, Damien  Search this
Stewart, Elman, 1913-1999  Search this
Wicks, Jim  Search this
Christensen, Burt  Search this
Ahearn, Fred, 1910-1991  Search this
Foster, Shirley  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Michigan
Lansing (Mich.)
Muskegon (Mich.)
McMillan (Mich.)
Mio (Mich.)
Alpena (Mich.)
Flint (Mich.)
Date:
1987 June 25
Contents:
MARGUERITE BERRY-JACKSON, ROSIE WILKINS; JIM WICKS, DAMIEN LUNNING, ELMAN "BUD" STEWART; FREDDIE AHEARN, SHIRLEY FOSTER, BURT CHRISTENSON, NELL SIMONS, BERDENE "BUD" SIMONS MIGRATION TO MICHIGAN, LORE OF THE LURE; SIT-DOWN STRIKE AND THE FLINT COMMUNITY 1 OF 4
Track Information:
101 Migration to Michigan / Marguerite L. Berry-Jackson, Rosie Wilkins.

102 Lore of the Lure / Damien Lunning, Elman Stewart, Jim Wicks.

103 Sit-Down Strike and the Flint Community / Burt Christensen, Fred Ahearn, Shirley Foster.
Local Numbers:
FP-1987-CT-0259
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 25, 1987.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Quilting  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Migration  Search this
Fishing  Search this
Strikes and lockouts  Search this
Automobile industry workers  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Function:
Labor unions
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1987, Item FP-1987-CT-0259
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Michigan / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk55ba03e6a-f758-4a39-8b87-d295db766518
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1987-ref776

Family Folklore Interviews: Wilson, Van Hoeson, Phiaffinelli

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Office of Folklife Programs. Family Folklore Project  Search this
Greenbaum, Brad (field worker)  Search this
Performer:
Wilson, Beverly  Search this
Phiafinelli, Maria  Search this
Van Hoeson, Robert, Margaret  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1977 October 10
1977
General note:
Other number FP-1976-CT-0702
Local Numbers:
FP-1977-CT-0702
Publication, Distribution, Etc. (Imprint):
United States 1977
General:
64-1/3-77
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, October 10, 1977.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Courtship  Search this
Genealogy  Search this
History  Search this
Racism  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1977 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1977, Item FP-1977-CT-0702
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1977 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1977 Festival of American Folklife / Series 8: Other Programs / 8.5: Family Folklore Interviews
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5c774bedf-d832-4b32-bd5f-07a6773fe46a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1977-ref289

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1967 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Contracts
Photographic prints
Audiocassettes
Negatives
Video recordings
Notes
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Business records
Slides (photographs)
Memorandums
Correspondence
Videotapes
Digital images
Date:
July 1-4, 1967
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1967 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Fieldwork

Series 3: Photographs

Series 4: Audio

Series 5: Video
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1967 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Division of Performing Arts.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
In 1966, Smithsonian Secretary S. Dillon Ripley engaged James R. Morris to serve as Director of Museum Services, soon to become a new Division of Performing Arts. Ripley charged Morris to develop a full program of performances on the National Mall - sound and light show, readings and concerts, films, live demonstrations, and special exhibitions. Morris, who had previously organized the American Folk Festival in Asheville, North Carolina, in 1963, proposed that the Smithsonian host a folk festival as the centerpiece of the outdoors activities. Through the Asheville festival, Morris had come into contact with key people involved in the Newport Folk Festival, among them Alan Lomax. It was Lomax who suggested that the Smithsonian hire Newport's then-director of field programs, Ralph C. Rinzler, to help plan a Smithsonian festival. The term "folklife", drawn from Scandinavian usage, was chosen over "folk" as the name of the new Festival.

The first Festival of American Folklife was held July 1-4, 1967 in two tents - one for crafts and one for sales - a music stage, and a performance area on the terrace of the Museum of History and Technology (later, the National Museum of American History). Fifty-eight traditional craftspeople and thirty-two musical and dance groups from throughout the United States demonstrated and performed at the first open-air event. Mountain banjo-pickers and ballad singers, Chinese lion dancers, Indian sand painters, basket and rug weavers, New Orleans jazz bands and a Bohemian hammer dulcimer band from east Texas combined with the host of participants from many rural and urban areas of the U.S. The entire event was free to the public, the expense of the production having been borne by the Smithsonian aided by numerous civic and cultural organizations, business enterprises and State Arts Councils.

The 1967 Festival drew a huge crowd - estimated at more than 400,000 - and strong interest from the press, Members of Congress, and Smithsonian leadership. In the Smithsonian's annual report for 1967, Ripley reflected on the success of the Festival:

Within - in the Museum - the tools, the products of craft work, the musical instruments hang suspended in cases, caught in beautifully petrified isolation. Without, for the space of a few hours they came alive in the hands of specialists from all over America.... It was a moving spectacle and one that underscored the principle that a museum, to be a museum in the best sense of the word, must live and breathe both within and without.

The 1967 Festival marked the inception of a fresh attempt at the evaluation, documentation and celebration of a hitherto unrecognized area of vigorous American expression. Concurrent with the first Festival, an American Folklife Conference was organized (with assistance from Henry Glassie) to address topics of American and international folklife studies, the relationship between folklife and history, applied folklife, and folklife in schools, museums, communities, and government agencies.

The Festival was organized by the Division of Performing Arts, under the direction of James R. Morris. Ralph Rinzler was the Applied Folklore Consultant and Festival Artistic Director, and Marian A. Hope was Project Assistant. No program book or schedule was published, but news articles, congressional remarks, letters from the public, and a list of participants were later compiled in lieu of a program book. That document can be viewed in Series 1.
Participants:
Crafts

Harry Belone, 1912-1986, Navajo sand painter, Arizona

Herman Benton, 1914-1994, scoop maker, New York

Mary Bowers, 1922-2002, Seminole patchwork, needlework, Florida

Marie Z. Chino, 1907-1982, Acoma pottery, New Mexico

Mildred Cleghorn, 1910-1997, Indian cloth dolls, Oklahoma

Maisy Coburn, apple face and corncob dolls, Arkansas

Margaret Coochwytewa, 1923-1995, Hopi, coil and yucca leaves basket maker, Arizona

Victor Coochwytewa, 1922-2011, Hopi silversmith, Arizona

Freedom Quilting Bee, Alabama

Taft Greer, 1908-1986, weaver, Tennessee

Joseph Grismayer, 1888-1970, willow basket maker, Pennsylvania

Dewey Harmon, 1900-1972, whittler, North Carolina

Bea Hensley, 1919-2013, blacksmith, North Carolina

Louise Jones, 1910-1973, coil basket making, South Carolina

Robert Keith, chair maker, North Carolina

Mrs. Robert Keith, chair maker, North Carolina

Norman Kennedy, 1934-, carder, spinner, weaver, Massachusetts

Clifford Lucas, Indian dolls, New Mexico

Lila Suzanne Marshall, 1908-1994, corn shuck dolls, North Carolina

Charles Mayac, 1906-1971, ivory carver, Alaska

Leo J. Meyer, scrimshaw carver, Maryland

Alice Merryman, 1906-2007, corn shuck dolls, Arkansas

Norman Miller, 1905-1972, southern pottery, Alabama

Mrs. Norman Miller, southern pottery, Alabama

Hazel Miracle, 1915-2001, apple face, corn shuck dolls, Kentucky

Homer Miracle, 1910-1980, hand-hewn bowls, carver, Kentucky

Ann Mitchell, corn shuck dolls, Maryland

Golda Porter, spinner, North Carolina

Edd Presnell, 1916-1994, dulcimer maker, North Carolina

Ambrose Roanhorse, 1904-1982, Navajo silversmith, Arizona

Garnet Claw Roanhorse, 1911-1999, Navajo rug weaver, Arizona

Georgianne Robinson, 1917-1985, Osage ribbon work, needlework, Oklahoma

Lou Sesher, 1915-1989, model boat builder, Pennsylvania

Genevieve Tomey, Osage ribbon work, needlework, Oklahoma

Elisia Trivett, rug hooker, North Carolina

Ora Watson, 1909-2004, quilting, North Carolina

Willard Watson, 1905-1994, toy maker, North Carolina

Music

The Baca Family Band, Czech-American polka music, Texas

Libba Cotten, Country guitarist, North Carolina, Washington, D.C.

Dejan's Olympia Brass Brand, New Orleans marching band, Louisiana

Jimmie Driftwood, Ozark ballad singer, Arkansas

First Maryland Regiment Fife and Drum Corps, martial music, Maryland

John Jackson, Songster and blues singer, Virginia

Bessie Jones (1902-1984) and the Georgia Sea Island Singers, shouts, jubilees, spirituals, and ring games, Georgia

Norman Kennedy, Scots ballad singer, Massachusetts

Clark Kessinger, 1896-1975, mountain fiddler, West Virginia

Vinice Lejeune (1919-1993) Group, Cajun band, Louisiana

The McGee Brothers with Sid Harkreader, String band, Tennessee

Sam McGee, 1894-1975

Kirk McGee, 1899-1983

Gene Meade, West Virginia

The Moving Star Hall Singers, shouts, jubilees, spirituals, and ring games, South Carolina

Glenn Ohrlin, cowboy singer, Arkansas

Grace Papakee, 1907-1982, Mesquakie Indian music, Iowa

John Papakee, 1895-1981, Mesquakie Indian music, Iowa

Billie Pierce (1907-1974) and De De Pierce (1904-1973) and the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, New Orleans jazz, Louisiana

Almeda Riddle, Ozark ballad singer, Arkansas

Scottish Pipe Band, highland marching music, Washington, D.C.

Wade Ward (1892-1971) and the Buck Mountain Band, mountain string band, Virginia

Yomo Toro Band, Puerto Rican music, New York

Ed Young (1910-1972), G.D. Young and Lonnie Young (1903-1976), African American fife and drum group, Mississippi

Young People's Chorus from the Scripture of Church of Christ, gospel, Virginia

Dance

Blue Ridge Mountain Dancers, cloggers, North Carolina

Chinese Lion Group, Washington, D.C.

Maurice Flowers, square dance caller, Maryland

Los Gallegos d'Espana, Galician dance, New York

Glinka Dancers, Russian dance group, New Jersey

Jochim Koyuk, King Island Eskimo dancer, Alaska

Mrs. Jochim Koyuk, King Island Eskimo dancer, Alaska

McNeff Dancers, Irish dancing with Ceilidh band, New York

Henry Paterick, square dance caller, Virginia

St. Andrews Society Group, Scottish dancing, Washington, D.C.
Shared Stewardship of Collections:
The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage acknowledges and respects the right of artists, performers, Folklife Festival participants, community-based scholars, and knowledge-keepers to collaboratively steward representations of themselves and their intangible cultural heritage in media produced, curated, and distributed by the Center. Making this collection accessible to the public is an ongoing process grounded in the Center's commitment to connecting living people and cultures to the materials this collection represents. To view the Center's full shared stewardship policy, which defines our protocols for addressing collections-related inquiries and concerns, please visit https://folklife.si.edu/archives#shared-stewardship.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1967 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Folklore  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Food habits  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk music  Search this
World music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Contracts
Photographic prints
Audiocassettes
Negatives
Video recordings
Notes
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Business records
Slides (photographs)
Memorandums
Correspondence
Videotapes
Digital images
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1967 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections , Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1967
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1967 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk529e94ea3-000d-4513-b130-8a8ea3e935bd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1967

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1981 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Business records
Plans (drawings)
Correspondence
Digital images
Audiotapes
Audiocassettes
Notes
Contracts
Videotapes
Slides (photographs)
Negatives
Memorandums
Sound recordings
Photographic prints
Date:
June 24-July 5, 1981
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1981 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 10 series.

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Adobe Architecture

Series 3: Arts Endowment Folk Arts Program

Series 4: A Celebration of the American Tent Show

Series 5: Children's Program

Series 6: Folklore of the Deaf

Series 7: Music and Crafts of the Southeastern United States

Series 8: Northeastern Music and Dance

Series 9: Ojibwa Culture

Series 10: South Slavic Americans
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1981 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Office of Folklife Programs and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
In 1981, the fifteenth annual Festival of American Folklife returned to the summer, resuming the schedule of two five-day weeks that had characterized Festivals in the 1973-1975 era. The 1981 Festival would be the last held on a site on the National Mall later to be occupied by the National Museum of African American History and Culture, between 14th and 15th Streets and between Constitution Avenue and Madison Drive (see site plan).

Preparations for the Festival's return to summer involved going back to many old friends in mid-winter and asking them if they would make one or two kiln-loads of pottery in mid-spring for the coming Festival. The Folklife Program asked others, "Can you come to Washington for two weeks around the Fourth of July?" In keeping with the International Year of Disabled Persons, Festival organizers asked still others, 'Will you help us with a special program on the folklore of Deaf people?" The Smithsonian encountered approval at almost every turn. A return to summer was greeted with enthusiasm as was the combination of old themes with some new ones. The lengthened two-week format was appealing, and Fourth of ]uly weekend in the Nation's Capital sounded just fine, too.

The Smithsonian also turned to the Folk Arts Program of the National Endowment for the Arts to help out because the return to summer involved producing two Folklife Festivals in less than one year, and time for fieldwork was limited. The result was a series of daytime programs and evening concerts that drew on five years of intensive work on the part of the Arts Endowment in supporting folk arts performance and documentation.

The 1981 Program Book provided information on each of the programs.

The 1981 Festival was again co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy and Music Performance Trust Funds. It was organized by the Office of Folklife Programs.

Folklife Advisory Council

Wilcomb E. Washburn, Chairman, Roger Abrahams, Richard Ahlborn, Richard Dorson, William Fitzhugh, Lloyd Herman, Robert Laughlin, Scott Odell, Ralph Rinzler, Peter Seitel, Richard Sorenson, Thomas Vennum

Office of Folklife Programs

Ralph Rinzler, Director; Richard Derbyshire, Archivist; Susan Kalcik, Folklorist; Jeffrey LaRiche, Program Coordinator; Jack Santino, Folklorist; Peter Seitel, Senior Folklorist; Thomas Vennum, Ethnomusicologist; Steve Zeitlin, Folklorist

National Park Service

Russell E. Dickenson, Director; Manus J. Fish, Jr., Regional Director, National Capital Region
Fieldworkers and presenters:
Erdye Betrand, Peggy Bulger, Simon Carmel, Marda Freeman, Monica Goubaud, Nick Hawes, Glen Hinson, Geraldine Johnson, Walter Mahovlich, Richard March, Brooks McNamara, Peter Nabokov, Alyce Newkirk, Earl Nyholm, Jo Radner, Kate Rinzler, Robert Sayers, Daniel Sheehy, Robert Teske, Margaret Yocom
Shared Stewardship of Collections:
The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage acknowledges and respects the right of artists, performers, Folklife Festival participants, community-based scholars, and knowledge-keepers to collaboratively steward representations of themselves and their intangible cultural heritage in media produced, curated, and distributed by the Center. Making this collection accessible to the public is an ongoing process grounded in the Center's commitment to connecting living people and cultures to the materials this collection represents. To view the Center's full shared stewardship policy, which defines our protocols for addressing collections-related inquiries and concerns, please visit https://folklife.si.edu/archives#shared-stewardship.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1981 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Folk music  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folklore  Search this
World music  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Business records
Plans (drawings)
Correspondence
Digital images
Audiotapes
Audiocassettes
Notes
Contracts
Videotapes
Slides (photographs)
Negatives
Memorandums
Sound recordings
Photographic prints
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1981 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1981
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1981 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk560e40437-4356-4252-92a3-f895fe0a60b6
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1981
Online Media:

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Business records
Sound recordings
Negatives
Video recordings
Correspondence
Plans (drawings)
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Videotapes
Notes
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Slides (photographs)
Audiotapes
Digital images
Date:
June 23-July 4, 1995
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1995 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 6 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: The Cape Verdean Connection

Series 3: The Czech Republic: Tradition and Transformation

Series 4: Heartbeat: The Voices of First Nations Women

Series 5: Russian Roots, American Branches: Music in Two Worlds

Series 6: Special Events
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1995 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The 1995 Festival featured American Indian women's musical traditions, the heritage of the Czech Republic and Czech Americans, music of Russian and Russian American groups, and the cultural life of the Cape Verdean community. These programs testified to the vitality of the human spirit, and to how people, ideas, and forms of cultural expression increasingly cross boundaries of geography, politics, language, race, and gender. Special events included evening concerts devoted to African immigrant communities in the Washington, D.C. area and a memorial concert for Festival founding director, Ralph Rinzler.

Heartbeat: The Voices of First Nations Women presented the musical culture of American Indian women. The program examined how these women express their identity through the use of a variety of musical forms - from traditional songs of home to contemporary songs of Indian life, from the appropriation of men's music to the fusion of root music with country, folk, blues, and gospel.

The Czech Republic: Tradition and Transformation provided a broad survey of the ways national, regional, ethnic, and local traditions have been defined in a complex state located at the crossroads of Central Europe. The "Velvet Revolution" of 1989 and the separation of the Czech and Slovak Republics in 1993 have prompted further examinations of cultural identity, the relationship between the state and popular expression, creativity and tradition. Czech Americans, too, have looked at these changes and the reestablishment of relationships to their ancestral homeland.

A third program, Russian Roots, American Branches: Music in Two Worlds, explored the musical culture of Old Believers and Molokans, Russian religious communities created in the 17th and 18th centuries. The program united immigrant communities long established in the United States with those from Russia, and brought together people who, although separated by generations and different social environments, have nonetheless faced parallel issues with regard to cultural persistence and adaptation.

All these programs involved complex institutional arrangements, local-level research and documentation, and strong commitment to and pride in Festival representation. The Cape Verdean Connection program well demonstrated these processes. Cape Verde is an independent island nation and former Portuguese colony located off the west coast of Africa. Cape Verdean Americans, now numbering about 400,000, most born and raised here, historically settled in New England during the 18th century, playing instrumental roles in the whaling and cranberry industries. Cape Verdeans had an important story to tell about their role in American life, their immigrant and continuing transnational cultural experience, their multiracial heritage, and their enduring sense of community - a story with much to tell others as well. Cape Verdeans provided the impetus for the Festival program, carried out most of the research in concert with Smithsonian scholars, led the effort to raise funds from governments, foundations, corporations, and individuals through benefit dances, auctions, and other community events, and, as is fitting, joined with the Smithsonian to share their experiences with the American public.

The 1995 Festival took place during two five-day weeks (June 23-27 and June 30-July 4) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 13th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). It featured four programs and several special events.

The 1995 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; essays provided background on the Festival and each of the four programs.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife Programs & Cultural Studies.

Center for Folklife Programs & Cultural Studies

Richard Kurin, Director; Richard Kennedy, Deputy Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Anthony Seeger, Director, Smithsonian/Folkways Recordngs; Peter Seitel, Senior Folklorist; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist; Betty Belanus, Olivia Cadaval, Amy Horowitz, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Curators, Folklorists, Educational and Cultural Specialists; Carla M. Borden, John W. Franklin, Charlene James-Duguid, Program Managers; Felicia Erickson, Arlene L. Reiniger, Mary Van Meter, Program Specialists; Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Kenneth M. Bilby, Roland Freeman, Ivan Karp, Corrine Kratz, Alan Lomax, Worth Long, Yook Jung Park, Kate Rinzler, Research Associates & Collaborators

Folklife Advisory Council and Folkways Advisory Council

Roger Abrahams, Jacinto Arias, Michael Asch, Jane Beck, Don DeVito, Pat Jasper, Ella Jenkins, Jon Kertzer, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, John Nixdorf, Bernice Reagon, John Roberts, Carol Robertson, Gilbert Sprauve, Jack Tchen, Ricardo Trimillos, Carlos Vélez-Ibáñez

National Park Service

Roger Kennedy, Director; Robert G. Stanton, Regional Director, National Capital Region
Shared Stewardship of Collections:
The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage acknowledges and respects the right of artists, performers, Folklife Festival participants, community-based scholars, and knowledge-keepers to collaboratively steward representations of themselves and their intangible cultural heritage in media produced, curated, and distributed by the Center. Making this collection accessible to the public is an ongoing process grounded in the Center's commitment to connecting living people and cultures to the materials this collection represents. To view the Center's full shared stewardship policy, which defines our protocols for addressing collections-related inquiries and concerns, please visit https://folklife.si.edu/archives#shared-stewardship.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Folk art  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
World music  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Business records
Sound recordings
Negatives
Video recordings
Correspondence
Plans (drawings)
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Videotapes
Notes
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Slides (photographs)
Audiotapes
Digital images
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1995
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5d0f338f7-ff86-4399-82c5-39d8a73d9b35
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1995

Festival Recordings: Food from the Ozarks with Lucky Grissette; Sea Island Cooking Sara Wilson

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. American South Program 1996 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Laronga, Steve (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Grissette, Lucky  Search this
Wilson, Sara  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Arkansas
Mountain View (Ark.)
South Carolina
Saint Helena Sound (S.C.)
Date:
1996 July 4
Track Information:
101 South- Food from the the Ozarks with Lucky Grissette / Lucky Grissette.

102 South- Sea Island Cooking Sara Wilson / Sara Wilson.
Local Numbers:
FP-1996-CT-0307
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 4, 1996.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Instructional  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Gullah  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1996 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1996, Item FP-1996-CT-0307
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1996 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1996 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: The American South / 2.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5c83ce218-5645-4c0a-9eb6-9fd94a741dd0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1996-ref642

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