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Ute tales by A. L. Kroeber

Author:
Kroeber, A. L (Alfred Louis),) 1876-1960  Search this
Physical description:
pages 252-286 24 cm
Type:
Folklore
Place:
Southwest, New
Date:
1901
Topic:
Folklore (Indian-American): Ute  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Tales  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Ute Indians  Search this
Call number:
E99.U8 K76 1901
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_992503

George Hubbard Pepper photograph collection

Creator:
Pepper, George H. (George Hubbard), 1873-1924  Search this
Extent:
1292 negatives (photographic)
23 Photographic prints (black & white)
Culture:
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Purepecha (Tarasco)  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Jemez Pueblo  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Nambe Pueblo  Search this
Picuris Pueblo  Search this
Pojoaque Pueblo  Search this
Puye Pueblo  Search this
San Felipe Pueblo  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)  Search this
Sandia Pueblo  Search this
Santa Ana Pueblo  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Tesuque Pueblo  Search this
Zia Pueblo  Search this
Hopi [Hano]  Search this
Pikuni (Piegan) [Blackfeet Nation, Browning, Montana]  Search this
San Carlos Apache  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Mexica (Aztec) (archaeological culture)  Search this
Pueblo (Anasazi) (archaeological)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
New Mexico
Texas
New York
Montana
Arizona
Basin
Illinois
Mexico
Southwest
Guatemala
Ecuador
Utah
Plains
Date:
1895-1918
Summary:
George Hubbard Pepper specialized in the study of cultures of the American Southwest and Ecuador. Tribes which he studied are Acoma, Aztec, Blackfeet, Cochiti, Hopi, Isleta, Jemez, Laguna, Nambe, Navajo, Picuris, Pojuaque, Puye, San Carlos Apache, San Felipe, San Ildefonso, San Juan, Sandia, Santa Ana, Santa Clara, Taos, Tarascan, Tesuque, Ute, Zia, and Zuni. Photographs in the collection are of an excavation in Tottenville, New York, 1895; Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Cañon, New Mexico: Hyde Expedition, 1896-1900; and expeditions to the occupied Pueblos of the Southwest, 1904; Mexico, 1904, 1906; Guatemala; and Ecuador, 1907. There are also photos which complement a study Pepper did of the technique of Navajo weaving, and miscellaneous scenic and personal photos.
Arrangement note:
Collection arranged by item number.
Biographical/Historical note:
George Hubbard Pepper was born on February 2, 1873 in Tottenville, Staten Island, New York. As a young boy he exhibited a strong interest in archaeology and after his graduating from high school followed encouragement from Prof. Fredric W. Putnam to study at the Peabody Museum of Harvard University, where Pepper stayed from 1895-96. In 1896 he was appointed assistant curator of the Department of the Southwest in the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. From 1896 to 1900, Pepper was a member of the Hyde Exploring Expedition, which conducted excavations at Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. In 1904, he conducted an ethnological survey of the occupied pueblos of the Southwest and at the same time continued his study of the weaving techniques of the Navajo. Pepper also participated in excavations in the yacatas of the Tierra Caliente of Michoacan in Mexico sponsored by George Gustav Heye, and in 1907 he went with Marshall Saville on an expedition to the Province of Manabi in Ecuador, also for Heye. In 1909 Pepper was appointed assistant curator in the Department of American Archaeology at the University Museum of Philadelphia, but after only a year there he joined the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation in New York City, where he stayed until his death. In 1914 he excavated a Munsee cemetery of the historic period near Montague, New Jersey and in the following year he went on the exploration of the Nacoochee mound in the old Cherokee region in Georgia. In 1918 he joined the Hawikku explorations of the Hendricks-Hodge Expedition in New Mexico. Pepper died on May 13, 1924, in New York City. George H. Pepper was a co-founder of the American Anthropological Association, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Ethnological Society of New York, a member of the American Folklore Society, and a corresponding member of the Academia Nacional de Historia of Ecuador. A complete bibliography of his works can be found in Indian Notes, v. 1, no. 3, July 1924, pp. 108-110. The George Hubbard Pepper Papers are in the Latin American Library, Tulane University Library, New Orleans, Louisiana.
Provenance:
According to Frederick Dockstader, director of MAI from 1960 to 1975, in a letter dated March 26, 1968, the collection was given to MAI by Pepper. However, the 1965 Annual Report (p. 26) states that the Photographic Department acquired through the donation of Mrs. Jeannette Cameron approximately 500 new negatives pertaining to field work done by her father from 1900-1910; and the 1966 Annual Report (p. 9) states that many papers of Dr. George H. Pepper were acquired through the courtesy of his daughter, Mrs. Jeanette Cameron.
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Photographic prints
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.034
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-034

Ruth Landes papers

Correspondent:
Mead, Margaret, 1901-1978  Search this
Boas, Franz, 1858-1942  Search this
Wallis, Ruth Sawtell, 1895-1978  Search this
Wagley, Charles, 1913-1991  Search this
Lopez, Salvador  Search this
Little, Kenneth  Search this
Wilson, Maggie  Search this
Whitecloud, Thomas St. Germain  Search this
Henry, Jules, 1904-1969  Search this
Hellman, Ellen  Search this
Haugen, Einar  Search this
Gough, Kathleen  Search this
Lewis, Oscar  Search this
Kaberry, Phyllis Mary, 1910-  Search this
Imes, Elmer Samuel, 1883-1941  Search this
Strong, William Duncan, 1899-1962  Search this
Steyn, Anna F.  Search this
Spier, Leslie, 1893-1961  Search this
Stefansson, Vilhjalmur, 1879-1962  Search this
Solecki, Ralph S.  Search this
Sparta, Francisco  Search this
Rubin, Joan  Search this
Rubin, Vera  Search this
Rodnick, David  Search this
Rogers, Edward S.  Search this
Ritzenthaler, Robert E. (Robert Eugene), 1911-1980  Search this
Roberts, Robert W.  Search this
Ramo, Arthur  Search this
Richards, Audrey  Search this
Preston, Richard J.  Search this
Verger, Pierre  Search this
Vennum, Thomas  Search this
Topash, Mary  Search this
Topash, Joe  Search this
Teskey, Lynn  Search this
Taylor, Beryl  Search this
Tanner, Helen Hornbeck  Search this
Densmore, Frances, 1867-1957  Search this
Quain, Buell H. (Buell Halvor), 1912-1939  Search this
Dunning, William  Search this
Douglas, William A.  Search this
Eggan, Fred, 1906-1991  Search this
Edmondson, Munro S.  Search this
Black, Mary B.  Search this
Benedict, Ruth, 1887-1948  Search this
Domengeaux, James  Search this
Feldman, Albert G.  Search this
Feder, Norman  Search this
Gacs, Ute  Search this
Franklin, John Hope  Search this
Ewers, John C. (John Canfield), 1909-1997  Search this
Erickson, Vincent O.  Search this
Falk, Minna R.  Search this
Faitlovitch, V.  Search this
Alberto Torres, Heloisa  Search this
Buck, Pearl  Search this
Bruce, Harold E.  Search this
Borri, Rina  Search this
Boggs, Stephen Taylor  Search this
Arensberg, Conrad M. (Conrad Maynadier), 1910-1997  Search this
Baldus, Herbert  Search this
Barnouw, Victor  Search this
Bateson, Mary Catherine  Search this
Lurie, Nancy Oestreich  Search this
Malherbe, E.G.  Search this
Marks, Eli S.  Search this
Masha, Louise  Search this
Maslow, Will  Search this
Masquat, Joseph M.  Search this
Mayer, Kurt B.  Search this
McWilliams, Carey  Search this
Bunche, Ralph J.  Search this
Carneiro, Edison  Search this
Chilver, E. M.  Search this
Chilver, Richard  Search this
Clifton, James A.  Search this
Colson, Elizabeth F.  Search this
Daveron, Alexander  Search this
Lowenfeld, Margaret, 1890-1973  Search this
Officer, James E.  Search this
Odum, Howard W.  Search this
Park, Alice  Search this
Paredes, Anthony  Search this
Paton, Alan  Search this
Park, George  Search this
Prado, Idabel do  Search this
Peschel, Keewaydinoquay M.  Search this
Merwe, Hendrik W. van der  Search this
Murphy, Robert Francis  Search this
Messing, Simon D.  Search this
Neumann, Anita  Search this
Nef, Evelyn Stefansson  Search this
Nocktonick, Louise  Search this
Neumann, Walter  Search this
Creator:
Landes, Ruth, 1908-1991  Search this
Names:
Columbia University Research in Contemporary Cultures  Search this
Committee on Fair Employment Practices  Search this
Fisk University  Search this
Johnson, Charles S.  Search this
Landes, Ruth, 1908-1991  Search this
Park, Robert E.  Search this
Extent:
26.5 Linear feet ((63 document boxes and 1 oversized box))
Culture:
Ojibwa Indians  Search this
African American  Search this
Santee Indians  Search this
African  Search this
Acadians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Jews -- American  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Latinos -- California  Search this
Brazilians  Search this
Basques  Search this
American Indians  Search this
Dakota -- Santee  Search this
Afro-Brazilians  Search this
Africans  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Quebec -- Bilingualism
United Kingdom -- colored immigration
South Africa
Date:
1928-1992
Summary:
Most of Ruth Landes's papers relate directly or indirectly to Landes's American Indian research, her work in Brazil, and her study of bilingualism. There is also a considerable amount of material that relates to her experiences (sometimes fictionalized) at Fisk University. There is only small amount of material related to her other interests. Her collection also has material of and relating to the Brazilian folklorist and journalist Edison Carneiro. There is also noteworthy material concerning Herbert Baldus, Ruth Benedict, Elmer C. Imes, Charles S. Johnson, and Robert E. Park. There is a large amount of printed and processed materials in the collection, mainly in the form of newspaper clippings and a collection of scholarly papers.
Scope and Contents:
This collection is mainly comprised of the professional papers of Ruth Schlossberg Landes. Included are correspondence, journals, published and unpublished manuscripts of writings, research materials including field notes and reading notes, photographs, drawings, scholarly papers and publications by other scholars, and clippings from newspapers and periodicals.

Landes's field research on Candomblé in Brazil is well-represented in this collection, consisting of her field journals, writings, and photographs. Also present are Maggie Wilson's stories that were the basis for Landes's The Ojibwa Woman. Unfortunately, Landes was unable to locate her journals for her early research with the Ojibwa/Chippewa, Potawatomi, and Dakota. There are, however, field photographs of the Ojibwa/Chippewa and Potawatomi in the collection. There is also a great deal of her research on groups, especially minorities, in multilingual states with particular focus on the French of Quebec, Basques of Spain and the United States, Boers and Blacks of South Africa, the several socio-linguistic groups of Switzerland, and Acadians (Cajuns) of Louisiana. In the collection are several drafts of her unpublished manuscript on bilingualism, "Tongues that Defy the State." There is also a small amount of material about Black Jews of New York and considerable material about Landes's experience among African Americans when she taught briefly at Fisk University, including her unpublished manuscript "Now, at Athens," containing fictional and autobiographical accounts of her time at Fisk.

Reflections of other facets of Landes's professional activities are also included. Some materials concern her teaching activities, and there is also documentation of her work with the Fair Employment Practices Commission (a federal government agency during the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt) and a similar private organization which immediately succeeded the FEPA; Gunnar Myrdal's research into the plight of African Americans ("The Negro in America"); the Research in Contemporary Cultures project at Columbia University; and the American Jewish Congress.

Among Landes's correspondents are Ruth Benedict, Franz Boas, Margaret Mead, Ralph Bunche, Herbert Baldus, Edison Carneiro, Sally Chilver, Frances Densmore, Sol Tax, Elmer S. Imes, Charles S. Johnson, Robert E. Park, and Hendrik W. van der Merwe.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into 6 series: (1) Correspondence, 1931-1991; (2) Research Materials, circa 1930s-1990; (3) Writings, circa 1930s-1990; (4) Teaching Materials, 1935-1975, undated; (5) Biographical and Personal Files, 1928-1988; (6) Graphic Materials, 1933-1978, undated
Biographical Note:
Ruth Schlossberg Landes was born on October 8, 1908 in New York City. Her father was Joseph Schlossberg, an activist in the Yiddish labor socialist community and one of the founders of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America. She studied sociology at New York University (B.A. 1928) and social work at the New York School of Social Work, Columbia University (M.S.W. 1929). While in graduate school, Landes studied Black Jews in Harlem for her master's thesis, a topic that developed her interests in anthropology.

After graduating in 1929, she worked as a social worker in Harlem and married Victor Landes, a medical student and son of family friends. Their marriage ended after two years when she enrolled in the doctoral program in anthropology at Columbia against her husband's wishes. She kept his surname due to the stigma of being a divorced woman.

At Columbia, Landes studied under Franz Boas and Ruth Benedict, her main advisor. Under the guidance of Benedict, Landes moved away from further study of African Americans to focus on Native American communities. Upon Benedict's suggestion, Landes studied the social organization of the Ojibwa in Manitou Rapids in Ontario from 1932 to 1936 for her Ph.D. fieldwork. Her dissertation, Ojibwa Sociology, was published in 1937. Landes also contributed "The Ojibwa of Canada" in Cooperation and Competition among Primitive Peoples (1937), a volume edited by Margaret Mead. In 1938, Landes published Ojibwa Women (1938), a book written in collaboration with Maggie Wilson, an Ojibwa interpreter and informant.

In addition to studying the Ojibwa in Ontario, Landes also conducted fieldwork with the Chippewa of Red Lake, Minnesota in 1933, working closely with shaman or midé Will Rogers. Her book, Ojibwa Religion and the Midéwiwin (1968) was based largely on her research with Rogers and Maggie Wilson. In 1935 and 1936, she undertook fieldwork with the Santee Dakota in Minnesota and the Potawatomi in Kansas. Like Ojibwa Religion and the Midéwiwin, her books on the Santee Dakota and Potawatomi were not published until several years later—The Mystic Lake Sioux: Sociology of the Mdewakantonwan Sioux was published in 1968 while The Prairie Potawatomi was published in 1970. In between her field research in the 1930s and the publication of The Prairie Potawatomi, Landes returned to Kansas to study the Potawatomi in the 1950s and 1960s.

Landes's plan to continue her studies with the Potawatomi in 1937 changed when Benedict invited her to join a team of researchers from Columbia University in Brazil. Landes was to conduct research on Afro-Brazilians in Bahia, Brazil, while Walter Lipkind, Buell Quain, and Charles Wagley studied indigenous people in the Amazons. To prepare for her research, Landes was at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee in 1937 and 1938 to consult with Robert Park and Donald Pierson and to use the university's library collections of African and African American materials. During that time, Landes also held a teaching position at Fisk and lived in the non-segregated women's residence on campus. Landes later wrote "Now, at Athens," an unpublished memoir containing fictional and true accounts of her experiences at Fisk.

From 1938 to 1939, Landes conducted fieldwork on the role of Afro-Brazilian women and homosexuals in the Candomblé religion in Bahia, Brazil. Unable to move freely by herself in Brazil as a single woman, Landes was accompanied by Edison Carneiro, a Bahian journalist and folklorist. With Carneiro as her companion, Landes was allowed access to rituals and people that would have been closed off to her otherwise. Due to her association with Carneiro, a member of the Brazilian Communist Party, Landes was suspected of being a communist and was forced to leave Bahia early. Publications from her research in Brazil include "A Cult Matriarchate and Male Homosexuality" (1940) and City of Women (1947). She returned to Brazil in 1966 to study the effects of urban development in Rio de Janeiro. In 1967, a Portuguese translation of City of Women was published, a project that Carneiro had commissioned as the first director of the Ministry of Education and Culture's Special National Agency for the Protection of Folklore.

Landes returned to New York in 1939, working briefly as a researcher for Gunnar Myrdal's study of African Americans. Unable to obtain a permanent position at a university, she worked in several other short term positions throughout most of her career. During World War II, Landes was a research director for the Office of the Coordinator for Inter-American Affairs (1941) and consultant for President Franklin D. Roosevelt's Fair Employment Practices Committee on African American and Mexican American cases (1941-44). In 1945, Landes directed a program created by Pearl S. Buck and a group of interdenominational clergy to analyze pending New York anti-discrimination legislation. She moved to California the following year to work for the Los Angeles Metropolitan Welfare Council on a study of race and youth gangs. After her contract ended, she moved back to New York and was hired as a contract researcher for the American Jewish Congress (1948-50). She also participated in Columbia University's Research in Contemporary Cultures (1949-51), studying Jewish families. She coauthored with Mark Zborowski, "Hypothesis concerning the Eastern European Jewish Family." From 1951 to 1952, Landes spent a year in London, funded by a Fulbright fellowship to study colored colonial immigrants and race relations in Great Britain.

After her fellowship ended, Landes returned to the United States and held short term appointments at several universities. She taught at the William Alanson White Psychiatric Institution in New York (1953-54), the New School for Social Research in New York (1953-55), University of Kansas (1957, 1964), University of Southern California (1957-62), Columbia University (1963), Los Angeles State College (1963), and Tulane University (1964). At Claremont Graduate School, Landes helped to develop and direct the Claremont Anthropology and Education Program (1959-62).

It was not until 1965 that Landes obtained a permanent faculty position at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario; she was recruited for the position by Richard Slobodin. Due to Ontario's age retirement law, Landes was forced to retire in 1973 at the age of 65. She continued to teach part-time until 1977, when she became professor emerita.

Landes passed away at the age of 82 on February 11, 1991.

Sources Consulted

Cole, Sally. 2003. Ruth Landes: A Life in Anthropology. Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press.

Chronology

1908 October 8 -- Born Ruth Schlossberg in New York City

1928 -- B.A. in sociology, New York University

1929 -- M.S.W., New York School of Social Work, Columbia University

1929-1931 -- Social worker in Harlem Married to Victor Landes

1929-1934 -- Studied Black Jews in Harlem

1931 -- Began graduate work in anthropology at Columbia University

1932-1936 -- Studied the Ojibwa in Ontario and Minnesota (in field periodically)

1933-1940 -- Research Fellow, Columbia University

1935 Summer-Fall -- Studied the Santee Sioux (Dakota) in Minnesota

1935-1936 -- Studied the Potawatomi in Kansas

1935 -- Ph.D., Columbia University

1937 -- Instructor, Brooklyn College

1937-1938 -- Instructor, Fisk University

1938-1939 -- Studied Afro-Brazilians and Candomblé in Brazil, especially at Bahia

1939 -- Researcher on Gunnar Myrdal's study, "The Negro in America"

1941 -- Research Director, Office of Inter American Affairs, Washington, D.C.

1941-1945 -- Representative for Negro and Mexican American Affairs, Fair Employment Practices Committee (FEPC), President Franklin D. Roosevelt Administration

1944 -- Interim Director, Committee Against Racial Discrimination, New York

1946-1947 -- Researcher, study of Mexican American youth, gangs, and families, Los Angeles Metropolitan Council

1948-1951 -- Researcher, American Jewish Congress, New York

1949-1951 -- Research consultant, study on Jewish families in New York for Research in Contemporary Cultures Project, Columbia University

1951-1952 -- Fulbright Scholar, to study colored colonial immigration into Great Britain

1953-1954 -- Lecturer, William Alanson White Psychiatric Institution, New York

1953-1955 -- Lecturer, New School for Social Research, New York

1956-1957 -- Married to Ignacio Lutero Lopez

1957 Summer -- Visiting Professor, University of Kansas

1957-1958 -- Visiting Professor, University of Southern California

1957-1965 -- Consultant, California agencies (Department of Social Work, Bureau of Mental Hygiene, Department of Education, Public Health Department) and San Francisco Police Department

1958-1959 -- Director, Geriatrics Program, Los Angeles City Health Department

1959-1962 -- Visiting Professor and Director of Anthropology and Education Program, Claremont Graduate School

1962 -- Extension Lecturer, University of California, Los Angeles and University of California, Berkeley

1963 -- Extension Lecturer, Columbia University Extension Lecturer, Los Angeles State College

1963-1965 -- Consultant, International Business Machines (IBM)

1964 January-June -- Visiting Professor, Tulane University

1964 Summer -- Field work with Potawatomi in Kansas Professor, University of Kansas

1965-1975 -- Professor at McMaster University

1966 -- Studied urban development in Rio de Janeiro

1968-1975 -- Studied bilingualism and biculturalism in Spain, Switzerland, South Africa, United States, and Canada (in Spain and the United States concentrated on Basques)

1975 -- Became part-time faculty member at McMaster University

1977 -- Professor Emerita, McMaster University

1978 -- Award of Merit from the University of Wisconsin, Green Bay

1991 February 11 -- Died in Hamilton, Ontario

1991 -- Establishment of the Ruth Landes Memorial Research Fund at Research Institute for the Study of Man (RISM)
Related Materials:
Correspondence from Ruth Landes can be found in the William Duncan Strong Papers, the Leonard Bloomfield Papers, and MS 7369. The Ruth Bunzel Papers contains a copy of a grant application by Landes.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Ruth Landes in 1991.
Restrictions:
The Ruth Landes papers are open for research. The nitrate negatives in this collection have been separated from the collection and stored offsite. Access to nitrate negatives is restricted due to preservation concerns.

Access to the Ruth Landes papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Midéwiwin  Search this
Bilingualism  Search this
Aging  Search this
Candomblé (Religion)  Search this
Citation:
Ruth Landes papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1991-04
See more items in:
Ruth Landes papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1991-04
Online Media:

Guide to the Beatrice Medicine papers

Creator:
Medicine, Beatrice  Search this
Extent:
28 Linear feet (65 document boxes, 1 box of oversize materials, 1 box of ephemera, 1 shoebox of index cards, 1 map drawer)
Culture:
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Native American  Search this
American Indian -- Education  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Place:
Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North & South Dakota
Date:
1914, 1932-1949, 1952-2003 (bulk dates, 1945-2003).
Summary:
The Beatrice Medicine papers, 1913-2003 (bulk 1945-2003), document the professional life of Dr. Beatrice "Bea" Medicine (1923-2005), a member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, anthropologist, scholar, educator, and Native rights activist. The collection also contains material collected by or given to Medicine to further her research and activism interests. Medicine, whose Lakota name was Hinsha Waste Agli Win, or "Returns Victorious with a Red Horse Woman," focused her research on a variety of topics affecting the Native American community: 1) mental health, 2) women's issues, 3) bilingual education, 4) alcohol and drug use, 5) ethno-methodologies and research needs of Native Americans, and 6) Children and identity issues. The collection represents Medicine's work as an educator for universities and colleges in the United States and in Canada, for which she taught Native American Studies courses. Additionally, because of the large amount of research material and Medicine's correspondence with elected U.S. officials and Native American leaders, and records from Medicine's involvement in Native American organizations, the collection serves to represent issues affecting Native Americans during the second half of the 20th century, and reflects what Native American leaders and organizations did to navigate and mitigate those issues. Collection materials include correspondence; committee, conference, and teaching material; ephemera; manuscripts and poetry; maps; notes; periodicals; photographs; training material; and transcripts.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Beatrice Medicine reflect Medicine's interests as an academic and an activist, and contain correspondence, committee, conference, and teaching material, ephemera, manuscripts and poetry, maps, notes, periodicals, photographs, and training material (see series scope notes for further details on contents). The majority of the material is printed matter that Medicine collected, with less of her own work included. Taken together, the collection reflects issues affecting Native Americans during the second half of the 20th century, as well as the network of Native American leaders and organizations that navigated these issues. Student papers, letters of recommendation, evaluations, and documents containing personally identifiable information are restricted.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into 24 series:

Series 1: Native American Culture and History, 1954-1962, 1967-1975, 1978-1989, 1991-1997, 1999-2002

Series 2: Appropriations, Economics, and Labor, 1955, circa 1970-1980, 1988, 1993, circa 1995-2000

Series 3: Archaeology, 1935-1950, 1952-1973, 1987-1995

Series 4: Native American Artists, Authors, Crafts, Film, and Poets, 1951-1969, 1972-2002

Series 5: Census, Demographic, and Poll Data, 1974, 1984-1986

Series 6: Civil Rights, 1972, 1980, 1983-1997

Series 7: Committee Material: Correspondence, Meeting Minutes, and Memos, 1985-1995

Series 8: Conference Material, 1955-1962, 1965, 1968-1974, 1976-2002

Series 9: Correspondence, 1952, 1959, 1962, 1966-2000

Series 10: Education: Native American Institutions and Teaching Material, 1948-2002

Series 11: Ephemera: Campaign, Pow-Wow, and Other Event Buttons, and Calendars, 1973, 1976, circa 1980-2000

Series 12: Health: Alcohol and Drug Addiction and Recovery, Disabilities, Healthcare, Mental Health, Nutrition, and Wellness, 1955, 1965, 1969-1999, 2004

Series 13: Historic Preservation, 1942, 1956, 1960-1969, 1979, circa 1985-1998

Series 14: Invitations, 1966-1979, 1982, 1991-2002

Series 15: Linguistics: Native American Languages, 1961, 1963, 1975, 1978-1981, 1987-1995

Series 16: Manuscripts, 1964-2003

Series 17: Maps, 1982-1991

Series 18: Museum Material: Native American Museums, Exhibit Preparation, and the National Museum of the American Indian, 1949, 1962, circa 1976-1998

Series 19: Oversized Material, 1962, circa 1965-1996, 1999

Series 20: Published material: Journals, Magazines, Monographs, and Newsletters, 1914, 1932, 1944, 1946-1947, 1952-2003

Series 21: Reports, 1947-1949, 1956-1998

Series 22: Training Material, 1968, 1988-2000

Series 23: Women and Gender, 1962, 1965, circa 1970-1997

Series 24: Restricted Material, 1972, 1978, 1987-1999
Biographical / Historical:
A member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, Beatrice "Bea" Medicine—also known by her Lakota name Hinsha Waste Agli Win, or "Returns Victorious with a Red Horse Woman"—was born on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in Wakpala, South Dakota on August 1, 1923.

As a young adult, she studied at the South Dakota State University on the Laverne Noyes Scholarship, where she attained her B.A. in Anthropology in 1945. Between 1945 and 1951, Medicine worked a variety of teaching positions, including for three American Indian institutions (see Chronology for Medicine's complete work history). In 1951, Medicine went back to school and worked as a research assistant until she earned her master's degree in Sociology and Anthropology from Michigan State University in 1954. For the remainder of her life, Medicine served as faculty, visiting professor, and scholar-in-residence at thirty-one universities and colleges in the United States and Canada, teaching cultural and educational anthropology courses, as well as Native American Studies. As an educator, Medicine carried out her research on a variety of issues affecting Native American and First Nation communities, including: 1) mental health issues, 2) women's issues—professionalization, sterilization, socialization, and aging, 3) bilingual education, 4) alcohol and drug use and abuse, 5) ethno-methodologies and research needs, and 6) socialization of children and identity needs. Medicine's research in American Indian women's and children's issues, as well as her research in gender identity among the LGBT community was among the first to document the narratives of the members of these groups.

In 1974, Medicine testified alongside her cousin, Vine Deloria, Jr., as an expert witness in the Wounded Knee trial (United States v. Banks and Means). Following this, Medicine returned to school to pursue her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology, which she completed in 1983 at the University of Wisconsin. With her experience as a researcher, educator, activist, and Lakota woman, medicine sought to create more opportunities for multicultural and bilingual education for minority students, especially those of Native American descent. Such education, she believed, provided students a means to preserve and legitimize their own cultural identity, debase negative stereotyes, and be recognized as individuals who are capable of academic and economic achievement.

Medicine was an active member of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) and pursued her educational agenda further through the establishment of the Committee of Anthropologists in Primarily Minority Institutions (CAPMI) (1987-1995), which brought anthropologists out of retirement to teach at minority institutions. (See Chronology for a complete list of organizations and committees in which Medicine was involved.) The program was short-lived but provided a space for minority students to confront a field that historically misrepresented them, reclaim their narratives and languages, and instigate positive change as potential future anthropologists.

Medicine officially retired on August 1, 1989, but continued to be active in AAA and was honored many times for her contributions to the field of anthropology. Some of her recognitions include the Distinguished Service Award from AAA (1991) and the Bronislaw Malinowski Award from the Society for Applied Anthropology (1996). One of Medicine's highest honors, however, was serving as the Sacred Pipe Woman at the 1977 Sun Dance. Medicine continued her research into retirement, and went on to publish her first book in 2001, Learning to Be an Anthropologist and Remaining "Native": Selected Writings. Medicine died in Bismarck, North Dakota on December 19, 2005. Medicine's final work, Drinking and Sobriety Among the Lakota Sioux was published posthumously in 2006. In honor of her life's work and dedication to education, the Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) created the Bea Medicine Award, a scholarship travel grant for students to attend the Annual Meeting of the SfAA.

Chronology: Beatrice Medicine

1923 August 1 -- Beatrice Medicine (also known by her Lakota name, Hinsha Waste Agli Win, or "Returns Victorious with a Red Horse Woman") is born on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in Wakpala, South Dakota.

1941-1945 -- Receives scholarship: Laverne Noyes Scholarship, South Dakota State University

1945 -- Receives Bachelor of Arts, Anthropology, South Dakota State University.

1945-1946 -- Teacher, Home Economics, Haskell Indian Institute (B.I.A.)

1947-1948 -- Health Education Lecturer, Michigan Tuberculosis Association

1948-1949 -- Teacher, Santo Domingo Pueblo, United Pueblos Agency, Albuquerque, New Mexico

1949-1950 -- Teacher, Navajo Adult Beginner's Program, Albuquerque Indian School

1950-1951 -- Teacher, Home Economics, Flandreau Indian School

1950-1954 -- Fellowship: Illinois Federation of Women's Clubs Fellowships

1951-1954 -- Research Assistant, Sociology and Anthropology, Michigan State University

1953-1954 -- Fellowship: John Hay Whitney Foundation Fellowship

1954 -- Receives Master of Arts, Sociology and Anthropology, Michigan State University. Fellowship: American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship

1954- -- Charter Member, American Indian Women's Service League

1955-1958 -- Teaching and Research Assistant, University of Washington

1956 -- Honor: Outstanding Alumna, South Dakota State University

1960 -- Mentioned as "Who's Who Among American Indians"

circa 1960 -- Alpha Kappa Delta, Sociology Hononary Phi Upsilon Omicron, Home Economic Honorary

1960-1963 -- Lecturer, Anthropology, University of British Columbia

1960-1964 -- Board of Directors, Native Urban Indian Centers in Vancouver, British Columbia and Calgary, Alberta

1963-1964 -- Lecturer/Sociology and Teacher/Counselor, Mount Royal College, Indian Affairs Branch Receives grant: American Council of Learned Societies Research Grant

1965 -- Lecturer, Social Science, Michigan State University

1966 -- Psychiatric Social Worker, Provincial Guidance Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

1966-1967 -- Receives grant: Career Development Grant, National Institute of Mental Health

1966- -- Member, National Congress of American Indians (Education Issues)

1967 -- Receives grant: Ethnological Research Grant, National Museum of Canada

1967-1968 -- Lecturer, Sociology and Anthropology, University of Montana

1968 -- Teacher, "Cultural Enrichment Program," Standing Rock Indian Reservation, South Dakota Cited in "The Role of Racial Minorities in the United States," Seattle, Washington

1968 March -- Speaker: "The Pow-Wow as a Social Factor in the Northern Plains Ceremonialism," Montana Academy of Sciences

1968 May -- Speaker: "Patterns and Periphery of Plains Indian Pow-Wows," Central States Anthropological Society

1968 June -- Speaker: "Magic Among the Stoney Indians," Canadian Sociology and Anthropological Association, Calgary, Alberta

1968 August -- Speaker: "Magic Among the Stoney Indians," International Congress of Americanists, Stuttgart, German Speaker: "The Dynamics of a Dakota Indian Giveaway," International Congress of Americanists, Stuttgart, German

1968-1969 -- Director, American Indian Research, Oral History Project and Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of South Dakota

1968-1970 -- Consultant, Text Book Evaluation Committee, American Indians United

1969 -- Assistant Professor, Teacher Corps, University of Nebraska

1969 September -- Speaker: "The Red Man Yesterday," Governor's Interstate Indian Council, Wichita, Kansas

1969 December -- Speaker: "The Native American in Modern Society," Northwestern State College

1969-1970 -- Assistant Professor, San Francisco State University Speaker: "The Indian in Institutions of Higher Learning," Annual Conference, National Indian Education Association

1969-1975 -- Member, Editorial Board, American Indian Historical Society

1970 -- Mentioned for second time as "Who's Who Among American Indians" Steering Committee Member, Indian Ecumenical Convocation of North America Member, Planning Committee Indian Alcoholism and Drug Use

1970 August -- Speaker: "The Role of the White Indian Expert," 2nd Annual Conference, National Indian Education Association

1970 October -- Speaker: "The Ethnographic Study of Indian Women," Annual Convention, American Ethnohistorical Soceity

1970 November -- Speaker: "The Anthropologists as the Indian's Image Maker," Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association Speaker: "The Anthropologist and Ethnic Studies Programs," Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association

1970-1971 -- Associate Professor, Anthropology, San Francisco State University Member, Mayor's Committee on the Status of Women, San Francisco, California

1971 -- Member, Native American Scholars Board, Steering and Selection, American Indian Historical Society

1971 May -- Speaker: "Ethnic Studies and Native Americans," National Education Association

1971-1973 -- Pre-Doctoral Lecturer, Anthropology, University of Washington Consultant, American Indian Heritage Program

1972 -- Honored in "Potlatch" ceremony by Makah Tribal people at the National Indian Education Conference for contributions to Indian education Receives grant: American Council of Learned Societies Travel Grant, Americanist Annual Meeting, Rome, Italy Curriculum Advisor, Lakota Higher Education Center, Prine Ridge, South Dakota

1972 March -- Speaker: "Warrior Women Societies," Northwest Anthropological Conference

1972 April -- Chairperson and Speaker: "Racism and Ethnic Relations," Society for Applied Anthropology

1972 June -- Chairperson, Native American Studies Symposium, International Congress of Americanists, Mexico

1972 August -- Speaker: "Warrior Women of the Plains," International Congress of Americanists, Rome, Italy

1972 November -- Speaker: "Native Americans in the Modern World," Southwest Minnesota State College

1973 -- Expert Witness, Yvonne Wanro Trial, Spokane, Washington Member, Organization of American States, First Congress of Indigenous Women, Chiapas, Mexico Speaker: "Self-Direction in Sioux Education," American Anthropological Association Speaker: "North American Native Women: The Aspirations and Their Associations," presented as a Delegate to the Inter-American Commission on Indigenous Women, Chiapas, Mexico

1973-1974 -- Visiting Professor, Anthropology, Native American Studies Program, Dartmouth College

1973-1976 -- Member, Committee on Minorities in Anthropology, American Anthropological Association

1973- -- Consultant, Human Services Department, Sinte Gleska Community College

1974 -- Expert Witness, Wounded Knee Trial, Lincoln, Nebraska Speaker: "Indian Women's Roles: Traditional and Contemporary," Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association

1974-1975 -- Visiting Professor, Anthropology, Colorado College

1975-1976 -- Visiting Associate Professor, Anthropology, Stanford University

1975-1977 -- Member, Steering Committee, Council of Anthropology and Education, American Anthropological Association

1976 -- Visiting Professor, Educational Anthropology, University of New Brunswick Expert Witness, Topsky Eagle Feathers Trial, Pocatello, Idaho Panelist, White House Conference on Ethnic Studies, Washington, D.C.

1977 -- Expert Witness, Greybull Grandchildren Custody Case, Portland, Oregon American Indian representative to the World Conference on Indigenous People, Geneva, Switzerland Honor: Outstanding Alumna, South Dakota State University

1977 August 18 -- Medicine serves as Sacred Pipe Woman at the Sun Dance, Green Grass, South Dakota

1977-1980 -- Education Consultant, National Congress of American Indians, Washington, D.C.

1978 -- Cited in the Directory of Significant 20th Century American Minority Women, Gaylord Professional Publications Biographical Sketch in "Moving Forward" of the Bookmark Reading Program, Third Edition

1978 August -- Speaker: "Issues in the Professionalization of Native American Women," Annual Meeting, American Psychological Association

1978-1982 -- Advanced Opportunity Fellow, Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

1979 -- Visiting Professor, Department of Education Policy Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison

1979 August -- Honorary Doctorate of Human Letters, Northern Michigan University Speaker: "The Dakota Indian Memorial Feast: Reservation and Urban Manifestations," International Congress of Americanists, Lima, Peru

1980 -- Member, Nominations Committee, American Anthropological Association Biographical Sketch in "Native American Indian Personalities, Historical and Contemporary," Dansville, New York: The Instructor Publications, Inc.

1981 -- Visiting Professor, Graduate School of Public Affairs, University of Washington-Seattle Speaker: "Linguistically Marginated: The Transformation of Dominated Speech Varieties," American Anthropological Association

1982 -- School of Social and Behavioral Science Academic Planning, California State University Speaker: "Policy Decisions: Federal Regulations and American Indian Identity Issues," Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association

1982-1983 -- Anthropology Department Curriculum Committee, California State University

1982-1985 -- Associate Professor of Anthropology, Coordinator, Interdisciplinary Program in American Indian Studies, California State University Coordinator, Interdisciplinary Program in American Studies Program, California State University

1982- -- President, Assembly of California Indian Women

1983 -- Receives Ph.D., Cultural Anthropology, University of Wisconsin Expert Witness, Fortunate Eagle Trial, Reno, Nevada Award: Outstanding Woman of Color, National Institute of Women of Color, Washingtonton, D.C. (for anthropological contributions) Award: Outstanding Minority Researcher, American Educational Research Association Publishes book with Patricia Albers: The Hidden Half: Indian Women of the Northern Plains Honor: Significant Academic Book (The Hidden Half), Choice, Association of Colleges and Research Libraries, American Library Association

1983-1984 -- Student Affirmative Action Coordinating Council, California State University

1983-1986 -- Member, Executive Board, Southwest Anthropological Association Member, Governing Board, Common Cause

1984 -- Member, Advisory Board of National Research for Handicapped Native Americans, North Arizona University Scholarly Publications Award Selection Committee, California State University Award: Faculty Award for Meritorious Service, California State University Speaker: Field Work Methods: "Ties That Bond," Committee on the Status of Women in Anthropology," Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association Speaker: "Career Patterns of American Indian Women," Council of Education and Anthropology, Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association

1984 November -- Faculty Award for Meritorious Service, California State University

1984-1985 -- Participant, Chancellor's Office Grant to "Cross-Cultural Perspectives in the Social Sciences," California State University

1985 November -- Speaker: Conference on "The Native American: His Arts, His Culture, and His History," West Virginia State College

1985-1986 -- Board of Directors, Naechi Institute on Alcohol and Drug Education

1985-1988 -- Professor, Department of Anthropology and Director, Native Centre, University of Calgary

1985-1989 -- Member, Malinowski Awards Committee, Society for Applied Anthropology

1987 -- Honor: Outstanding Minority Professorship Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks Visiting Professor, University of Michigan

1987-1995 -- Member, Committee of Anthropologists in Primarily Minority Institutions, American Anthropological Association

1988 August 1 -- Medicine officially retires.

1989 -- Volunteer (Committee of Anthropologists in Primarily Minority Institutions, American Anthropological Association), Standing Rock College Honor (twice): Outstanding Minority Professorship Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks Visiting Professor, Wayne State University.

1990 -- Honor: "Outstanding Contributions for the promotion of sex equity in Education," Illinois State Board of Education Honor: Outstanding Lakota Woman, Standing Rock College

1991 -- Honor: Distinguished Service Award, American Anthropological Association. Medicine was the first American Indian to receive this award.

1991 -- Visiting Professor, Saskatchewan Indian Federal College Visiting Professor, Colorado College Visiting Professor, Anthropology, Humboldt State University

1992 -- Visiting Distinguished Professor, Women's Studies, University of Toronto

1993 -- Visiting Professor, Rural Sociology, South Dakota State University Award: Distinguished Native American Alumna Award, South Dakota State University

1993-1994 December -- Research Co-ordinator, Women's Perspectives, Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples

1994- -- Adjunct Professor, University of Alberta

1995 -- Scholar in Residence, Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul Visiting Scholar, Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia Award: Ohana Award, Multi-Cultural Counseling Excellence, American Association of Counselors

1996 -- Award: Bronislaw Malinowski Award, Society for Applied Anthropology. Buckman Professor, Department of Human Ecology, University of Minnesota

circa 1997- -- Associate Professor of Anthropology Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, California State University

2001 -- Publishes book: Learning to Be an Anthropologist and Remaining "Native": Selected Writings.

2005 -- Award: George and Louise Spindler Award, Council on Anthropology and Education, American Anthropological Association.

2005 December 19 -- Medicine dies during emergency surgery in Bismarck, North Dakota.

2006 -- Book: Drinking and Sobriety Among the Lakota Sioux is published posthumously.

2008 -- The Society for Applied Anthropology creates the Bea Medicine Award.
Provenance:
The papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Beatrice Medicine between 1997 and 2003, and by Ted Garner in 2006.
Restrictions:
Materials relating to student grades, letters of recommendation, and evaluations have been restricted.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Alcohol  Search this
Gender imagery  Search this
Discrimination  Search this
Linguistics -- Research -- United States  Search this
Photographs  Search this
Lakota Indians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Citation:
Beatrice Medicine papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.1997-05
See more items in:
Guide to the Beatrice Medicine papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1997-05

John L. Fischer and Ann K. Fischer papers

Creator:
Fischer, Ann K.  Search this
Fischer, John Lyle, 1923-1985  Search this
Extent:
31.71 Linear feet ((65 boxes, 1 manuscript folder, and 128 sound recordings) )
Note:
Original sound recordings are in cold storage.
Culture:
Caroline Islanders  Search this
Caroline Islands  Search this
Chuukese (Micronesian people)  Search this
New England -- Child rearing  Search this
Japan -- Child rearing  Search this
Ponape  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Sound recordings
Date:
ca. 1942-1985
Summary:
This collection contains John and Ann Fischer's correspondence, field notes, manuscripts, microfilm, sound recordings, and photographs relating to their work in Micronesia, Japan, and New England. Most of the materials in this collection were produced or collected by John. Although some materials have been identified as Ann's work, not all folders containing her notes have been so identified. Since John and Ann often collaborated, some of their notes are also intermixed. Materials relating to Truk and Ponape make up the bulk of the series. They not only include John and Ann's field notes but also administrative materials relating to John's position as District Anthropologist and District Island Affairs Officer. Because they returned at various times to visit and update data, there are documents on Ponape from 1949 as well as from the 1970s and in between. The Fischers' work in Japan is also well-represented in the collection along with their research for John and Beatrice Whiting's Six Cultures Project. The collection also contains a number of psychological tests administered by John and Ann during their research in Ponape and Japan. The sound recordings are mostly related to Ponape, with additional recordings from Japan. Several of the photographs are from Micronesia, some of which were taken by Harry Clifford Fassett. There are also some photos from Japan as well as personal photographs. Additional items in the collection include John's correspondence and papers he wrote as a student.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains John and Ann Fischer's correspondence, field notes, manuscripts, microfilm, sound recordings, and photographs relating to their work in Micronesia, Japan, and New England. Most of the materials in this collection were produced or collected by John. Although some materials have been identified as Ann's work, not all folders containing her notes have been so identified. Since John and Ann often collaborated, some of their notes are also intermixed.

Materials relating to Truk and Ponape make up the bulk of the series. They not only include John and Ann's field notes but also administrative materials relating to John's position as District Anthropologist and District Island Affairs Officer. Because they returned at various times to visit and update data, there are documents on Ponape from 1949 as well as from the 1970s and in between. The Fischers' work in Japan is also well-represented in the collection along with their research for John and Beatrice Whiting's Six Cultures Project.

The sound recordings are also mostly related to Ponape, with additional recordings from Japan. Several of the photographs are from Micronesia, some of which were taken by Harry Clifford Fassett. There are also some photos from Japan as well as personal photographs. Additional items in the collection include John's correspondence and papers he wrote as a student. Psychological tests administered by John and Ann during their research in Ponape and Japan are also in the collection.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 9 series: (1) Records and correspondence, 1948-1985; (2) Truk, 1949-1984 [Bulk 1949-1953]; (3) Ponape, 1839-1984 [Bulk 1947-1984]; (4) New England, 1954-1968 [Bulk 1955-1968]; (5) Japan, 1940-1985 [Bulk 1961-1964]; (6) Academic Work, 1946-1974; (7) Photographs, 1899-1974 [Bulk 1942-1974]; (8) Microfilm, undated; (9) Sound Recordings, 1947-1976 [Bulk 1959-1976]
Biographical Note:
Ann Kindrick Fischer was born on May 22, 1919 in Kansas City. She completed her undergraduate work at the University of Kansas with a B.A. in Sociology in 1941. During World War II she lived in Washington, D.C. working as registrar at the School of Advanced International Studies. At the time she was briefly married to her first husband, James Meredith.

In 1946 Ann entered Radcliffe College's graduate program in the Department of Anthropology. As a student at Radcliffe, she met John Fischer, who was a student at Harvard. In 1949 she traveled to the Caroline Islands to study Trukese mother and child training and to marry John, who had obtained a position as District Anthropologist of the U.S. Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands. During their time in Micronesia, the two lived a year in Truk and three years in Ponape. While in Ponape, Ann taught English in a middle school as part of her anthropological research. She completed her dissertation, "The Role of the Trukese Mother and Its Effect on Child Training," and was awarded her Ph.D. in Anthropology in 1957.

Her interest in childrearing continued when she returned to Massachusetts from Micronesia. From 1954 to 1957, she worked as a research assistant on the Ford Foundation Six Cultures Project under the direction of John and Beatrice Whiting. Ann and her husband collaborated in a study of children in a New England town, which resulted in their 1963 article "The New Englanders of Orchard Town, USA." In 1961 and 1962, Ann and John worked together again to study childrearing in Japan, focusing on psychology and family life. When they returned from Japan, they did a follow-up study of a Japanese community in San Mateo, California.

In 1959, Ann became the first anthropologist to hold a training fellowship in biostatistics and epidemiology at Tulane University's School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. She joined their faculty and also taught at the Tulane School of Social Work (1960-1966) and the Anthropology Department of Newcomb College (1968-1971). In addition, Ann served as consultant to the Peace Corps on Micronesia.

Although she continued to write extensively on families and children throughout her career, her interests also included medicine, the role of women, and minority rights. She particularly became interested in the Houma Indians, publishing her article "History and Current Status of the Houma Indians" in 1965. An active supporter of the Houma Indians, she played an integral role in eliminating segregation in the school system in their area.

On April 22, 1971 Ann died of cancer at the age of 51.

Selected Bibliography

Edmonson, Munro S. "Ann Kindrick Fischer." -- Women Anthropologists: Selected Biographies -- . Ed. Ute Gacs, -- et al. -- Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1989.

Halpern, Katherine Spencer. "Ann Fischer 1919-1971." -- American Anthropologist -- , New Series, Vol. 75, No. 1. (Feb., 1973), pp. 292-294.

Marshall, M. and M. Ward. "John (Jack) Fischer (1923-1985)." -- American Anthropologist -- , New Series, Vol.89, No.1 (Mar., 1987) 134-136.

John Lyle Fischer was born in Kewanee, Illinois on July 9, 1923. His undergraduate work began at Harvard in 1940 but was interrupted by his military service during World War II. During the war he studied Japanese and served as both an interpreter and translator in the Marines. Following the war he returned to Harvard to complete his B.A. in 1946. His undergraduate honors thesis was entitled "Japanese Linguistic Morphology in Relation to Basic Cultural Traits."

John continued on at Harvard for his graduate studies in the Department of Social Relations, earning his Masters degree in Anthropology in 1949. That same year he married Ann Kindrick Meredith on his birthday. The two were stationed in Micronesia where John served as District Anthropologist (1949-1951) for the Naval Administration and later as the District Island Affairs Officer (1951-1953) under the Interior Department Administration.

When he and his family moved back to Massachusetts, he returned to his academic studies at Harvard. Drawing upon his fieldwork in Micronesia, he completed his dissertation, "Language and Folktale in Truk and Ponape: A Study in Cultural Integration," in 1954 and received his PhD from Harvard the following year. Work on the dissertation led to a lifelong interest in folklore and lingistics as well as Truk and Ponape. He revisited Ponape several times in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

From 1954 to 1955 John collaborated with his wife to study comparative child-rearing in New England. In the early 1960s, they once again conducted fieldwork together, this time in Japan, studying the psychological dynamics of family life. They later did a follow-up study of a Japanese community in San Mateo, California. Just before his death, John was planning another research trip to Japan.

In 1958, John obtained a faculty position at Tulane University teaching social anthropology. He served as chair of the Department of Anthropology from 1969 to 1971 and taught at the university until his death. By 1979 Fischer had learned Russian and taught for a year at the University of Leningrad. Fischer was also a Visiting Professor at the University of Pittsburgh in 1975 to 1976. In addition, he was active in various professional societies and consulted with several national organizations. He was co-author of 8 books as well as author of many articles and book chapters.

Following Ann's death from cancer, Fischer married Simonne Cholin Sanzenbach, who was also a professor at Tulane, in 1973. They shared many interests and published an article together in Japanese, "The Nature of Speech According to French Proverbs," in 1983.

At the age of 61, John passed away on May 16, 1985.
Related Materials:
More materials relating to John and Ann Fischer can be found in other collections at the National Anthropological Archives. MS 7516 "Documents relating to scientific investigations in Micronesia" contains the Fischers' 1954 East Caroline Handbook. More of John's correspondence can be found in the Southern Anthropological Society Records and in Saul Herbert Riesenberg's Correspondence series under the Records of the Department of Anthropology. The American Indian Chicago Conference Records contains Ann's correspondence.

Harvard University's Tozzer Library and the Bishop Museum also hold some of John's original Ponapean field notes.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Richard A. Marksbury in 2013.
Restrictions:
Access to psychological tests administered by John and Ann Fischer during their research in Ponape and Japan is restricted. Access to the John L. Fischer and Ann K. Fischer Papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Polynesian languages  Search this
Truk language  Search this
Japanese language  Search this
Child rearing -- New England  Search this
Folklore -- Caroline Islands  Search this
Music -- Caroline Islands  Search this
Nurses -- anthropological study  Search this
Child rearing -- Japan  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sound recordings
Citation:
The John L. Fischer and Ann K. Fischer papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.2013-16
See more items in:
John L. Fischer and Ann K. Fischer papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2013-16
Online Media:

MS 830 The Life and Culture of the Ute

Creator:
Powell, John Wesley, 1834-1902  Search this
Informant:
Naches  Search this
Extent:
160 Pages
Culture:
Ute -- Games  Search this
Ute -- Migration  Search this
Ute -- Habitations  Search this
Ute -- Government  Search this
Ute -- Subsistence  Search this
Ute -- Religion  Search this
Ute -- Pine nuts  Search this
Ute -- folkore  Search this
Ute -- Kinship  Search this
Ute -- Food  Search this
Ute -- mental disease  Search this
Ute -- Disease  Search this
Ute -- Geriatrics  Search this
Ute -- Death  Search this
Ute -- Marriage  Search this
Mental illness -- Ute  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Title supplied by J. N. B. Hewitt, and sections numbered and arranged by him. Unnumbered sections added later.
Sections entitled: (1) Games and amusements, 3 pages;

(2,3) [Paiute; transferred in 1959 to file Number 831-c, -d];

(4) Means of Subsistence, 52 pages;

(5) Migration, 8 pages;

(6) Home, 5 pages;

(7) Government, 10 pages;

(8) Fear of the insane, 2 pages;

(9) treatment of the sick, 27 pages;

(10) Treatment of the aged, 4 pages;

(11) Killing the doctor (told by Naches, Salt Lake City, May, 1873), 3 pages;

(12) The boundaries of the earth, 5 pages;

(13) Na-gun'-tu-wip, the home of the departed spirits, 8 pages;

(14) Methods of marrying, 7 pages;

(15) Selection of food (1873), 3 pages;

(16) The morning address, 2 pages;

(17) Some of their faculties;, 4 pages;

(18) Notes on the gentes (in shorthand), 2 pages; Mythology of the Numas, 10 pages; Pine nuts are brought from a distant country (legend, 1873), 4 pages; Burying customs (told by Naches, Salt Lake City, 1873), 1 page; Religion of the Utes (talk given by Powell ?), 29 pages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 830
Topic:
Games -- Ute  Search this
Migration -- Ute  Search this
Habitations -- Ute  Search this
Government -- Ute  Search this
Subsistence -- Ute  Search this
Religion -- Ute  Search this
Pine nuts -- Ute  Search this
Folklore -- Ute  Search this
Kinship -- Ute  Search this
Food -- Ute  Search this
Disease -- Ute  Search this
Geriatrics -- Ute  Search this
geography -- Ute  Search this
Marriage -- Ute  Search this
Death -- Ute  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 830, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS830
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms830

MS 828-a The So-kus Wai-un-ats or One-two Boys

Creator:
Powell, John Wesley, 1834-1902  Search this
Extent:
31 Pages
Culture:
Ute Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
A legend. Original in Powell's hand; 3 other copies, 28, 15, 14 pages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 828-a
Local Note:
See also Manuscript Number 798, "Indian Life," (Paiute ?), in which this legend is included.
Topic:
Folklore -- Ute  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 828-a, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS828A
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms828a

MS 794-a Ute and Paiute legends

Creator:
Powell, John Wesley, 1834-1902  Search this
Extent:
322 Pages
Culture:
Paiute Indians  Search this
Ute Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1873
Scope and Contents:
Contains 46 stories.
Ute and Paiute Stories: Arbitrary reference number: 1. Ta-vu has a fight with the sun 19 pages. 2. Origin of water 2 pages. 3. Pats-ug the Otter is transformed into a Fish, 4 pages. 4. To-gok and his brother, or Snow, Hail, Rain and Thunder, 7 pages. 5. I-tsa marries his Daughter, 5 pages. 6. Pa-vits and Po-nig or the Weasel and Skunk, 9 pages. 7. I-Tsa lets the animals out of the Cave, 10 pages. 8. Origin of the Numas, 4 pages. 9. Origin of the Moon and length of the Year, 6 pages. 10. I-tsa punished by I-sha, 12 pages. 11. Hu-na is chosen Grave-digger, 3 pages. 12. Ko-ip seeks revenge on I-tsa, 10 pages. 13. Good and bad People, 2 pages. 14. Shin-av and the Birds, 4 pages. 15. To-gok procures a Rattle, 3 pages 16. Story of the Sai-du-kas, 3 pages. 17. Pa-o-ha, 5 pages. 18. Wa-na-ta-win-ni and Ni-mi-ap, 2 pages. 19. How Pa-so-wa-vits won his wife, 17 pages.
Ute and Paiute Stories: Arbitrary reference Number: 20. Shin-au-av and To-ko-puts, 5 pages. 21. The first Child born, 8 pages. 22. Pu-ni and Ta-vwats (The Skunk and the Chipmunk), 10 pages. 23. The Son of Shin-au-av Pa-vits loves the wife of Kwi-ats, 6 pages. 24. Shin-au-av and Nu-wa-pa-kuts, 6 pages. 25. How Ai-ai got his wife, 5 pages. 26. The Flood, 5 pages. 27. Shin-au-av Pa-vits and Tum-pwi-nai-ro-gwi-nump, 9 pages. 28. Story of the Eagle, 18 pages. 29. General discussion from Story of the Flood, 3 pages. Ong, Chai-ok and Shinau-av go to a distant mountain to gather pine nuts, 3 pages. 31. The story of the moon, 3 pages. 32. The son of the younger Shin-au-av is punished for disobedience, 4 pages. 33. Story of Hu-pats and Kom, 18 pages. 34. The abandoned Boy, 9 pages. 35. Chu-ar-um-pu-run-kunt and the Yu-kuts, 8 pages. 36. Hu-pats visits the Jay Nation on the Kaibab, 16 pages. 37. The Shin-au-av Brothers discuss matters of importance to the people, 12 pages. 38. Shin-au-av and Yam-puts, 8 pages. 39. The origin of the Canyons of the Colorado, 3 pages. 40. Origin of the Echo (Gosiute), 12 pages. 41. Origin of the Echo (Paiute), 5 pages. 42. Origin of the Mountains, Valleys, Canyons, etc., 5 pages. 43. Corn brought to the earth, 7 pages. 44. Spirits (Numas), 4 pages. 45. General discussion (Pa-vi-ot-si), 1 page. 46. Shu'-ni-am. 2 pages. (Found in file 6/60 but previously unlisted.)
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 794-a
Other Title:
Ta-vu has a fight with the sun
Origin of water
Pats-ug the Otter is transformed into a fish
To-gok and his brother, or Snow, Hail, Rain and Thunder
I-tsa marries his daughter
Pa-vits and Ponig or the Weasel and Skunk
I-tsa lets the animals out of the Cave
Origin of the Numas
Origin of the Moon and length of the Year
I-tsa punished by I-sha
Hu-na is chosen Grave-digger
Ko-ip seeks revenge on I-tsa
Good and bad People
Shin-av and the Birds
To-gok procures a Rattle
Story of the Sai-du-kas
Pa-o-ha
Wa-na-ta-win-ni and Ni-mi-ap
How Pa-so-wa-vits won his wife
Shin-au-av and To-ko-puts
The first Child Born
Pu-ni and Ta-vwats (The Skunk and the Chipmunk)
The son of Shin-au-av Pa-vits loves the wife of Kwi-ats
Shin-au-av and Nu-wa-pa-kuts
How Ai-ai got his Wife
The Flood
Shin-au-av Pa-vits and Tum-pwi-nai-ro-gwi-nump
Story of the Eagle
General discussion from Story of the Flood
Ong, Chai-ok and Shinau-ay go to a distant mountain to gather pine-nuts
The story of the Moon
The son of the younger Shin-au-av is punished for disobedience
Story of Hu-pats and Kom
The abandoned Boy
Chu-ar-um-pu-run-kunt and the Yu-kuts
Hu-pats visits the Jay nation on the Kaibab
The Shin-au-av Brothers discuss matters of importance to the people
Shin-au-av and Yam-puts
The origin of the Canyons of the Colorado
Origin of the Echo
Origin of the Mountains, Valleys, Canyons, etc
Corn brought to the earth
Spirits (Numas)
Shu'-ni-am
Topic:
Folklore -- Ute  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 794-a, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS794A
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms794a
Online Media:

Native American Women's Action Council (NAWAC)/National Indian Women's Action Corps (NIWAC)

Collection Creator:
Thorpe, Grace F.  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print
Container:
Box 1, Folder 21
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Date:
1970-1971
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Grace F. Thorpe Collection, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Grace F. Thorpe Collection
Grace F. Thorpe Collection / Series 4: Working on Behalf of Native Americans and Activism
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-085-ref106
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Working Americans

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The Working Americans program explored and celebrated work-related traditions, looking at Americans not as people from a certain area of the country or from a particular culture, but in terms of how they made their living and what they needed to know to do their jobs. Each occupation has its own traditions and its own body of skills. In the Working Americans section, Festival-goers could meet and talk with members of many unions and organizations while they demonstrated the particular know-how essential to their varied tasks and while they shared, in the workshop areas, the particular tales and jokes that grow out of the nature of the work they do.

The Folklife of Transportation Workers Project celebrated the lore, lifestyles, and occupational skills of the American workers who operate, maintain, and regulate the nation's transport system. The airline pilot's complex take-off procedure, the flight attendant's responsibility for safety in the cabin, the railroader's ability to calculate and make complicated box-car switches could be found here; as well as bus and taxi drivers' tales of ways to handle over-demanding passengers, truck driving songs, and seafarers' yarns. Transportation workers keep the nation's economic lifeblood moving. They also harbor a rich lore, replete with heroes, tall tales, and songs, that was demonstrated within this program.

June 16-27, Workers Who Extract and Shape. Presentations included glass bottle blowing, glass engraving and horseshoe making.

July 1-11, Workers Who Build. This program celebrated the skills and folklore of the building and construction trades. Participants demonstrated building crafts such as carpentry, tile and terrazzo skills, and even the casting of plaster masks of visitors' faces.

July 14-25, Workers Who Clothe Us. Participants celebrated the skills and folklore of workers in the garment trades, with demonstrations of clothes design, bonnaz (machine embroidery), leather work, and industrial loom work.

July 28-August 8, Workers in Communications, Arts & Recreation. This theme celebrated the skills and folklore of the print and broadcast media, telephone communications, and performing arts. Members of the Graphic Arts International Union demonstrated newspaper printing, four-color printing, and book binding. Members of the United Paperworkers International Union demonstrated papermaking, and members of various performing arts groups gave workshops.

August 11-22, Workers in Professional & Technical Skills, Transportation. Presentations celebrated the skills and folklore of professionals who work in health and medical fields, the tobacco industry, and the print and copying industry. Demonstrations included hospital workers demonstrating operating room techniques, cigar rolling, pharmacists making compounds, and body repairmen working on cars. The Transportation area presented the occupational culture of the men and women who work in the various modes of transportation, including the railroads, metropolitan and long-distance buses, taxicabs, trucks, ships, and stations of the Coast Guard. In the Transportation area, the skills of railroad men, airline pilots, truck drivers and seamen were featured.

August 25-September 6, Workers Who Feed Us, Transportation. Participants celebrates the skills and folklore of people involved with various aspects of production, preparation, and distribution of food. Hotel and restaurant workers demonstrated decorative ice carving, specialty table settings, wine stewarding, and cold food decoration. The Transportation area presented the occupational culture of those who work in the various modes of transportation, including skills demonstrations by airline, railroad and metropolitan transit workers, as well as by Coast Guardsmen who showed ornamental rope work and knot tying.

Shirley Askew served as Program Coordinator, with Robert McCarl as Folklorist, Robert Porter as Field Research & Presentation Specialist, and Susan Donahue as Assistant Program Coordinator. Peter Seitel was Project Coordinator for the Transportation program, assisted by Jack Santino.

Sponsors included the AFL-CIO and its Affiliates, U.S. Department of Labor, and U.S. Department of Transportation.
Transportation fieldworkers:
John Drake, Elaine Eff, Jan Faul, Archie Green, Alice Lacy, Worth Long, Luis Kemnitzer
Presenters:
Benny Ambush, Karen Byrne, Debbie Dixon, Steve Hagberg, Marta Schley, Barbara Schwartz
Participants:
Workers Who Extract and Shape Products

Members of the following unions:

United Cement, Lime & Gypsum Workers International Union

Thomas F. Miechur, President

Glass Bottle Blowers Association of the United States and Canada

Harry A. Tulley, President

American Flint Glass Workers Union

George M. Parker, President

International Union of Journeymen Horseshoers of the United States and Canada

Duke Bonde, Jr., President

International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers

Floyd E. Smith, President

Molders and Allied Workers Union

Anton J. Trizna, President

American Federation of Musicians

Hal C. Davis, President

The Music Performance Trust Funds

Kenneth E. Raine, Trustee

Saul Broudy

Andy Cohen

Larry Hanks

Fred Holstein

John Kolstad

Lew London

Faith Petrick

Utah Phillips

Mark Ross

Jane Voss

Bodie Wagner

Pop Wagner

Workers Who Build

Members of the following unions:

International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftsmen

Thomas F. Murphy, President

United Brick and Clay Workers of America

Roy L. Brown, President

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America

William Sidell, President

International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers

Charles H. Pillard, President

International Union of Operating Engineers

J.C. Turner, President

International Association of Bridge and Structural Iron Workers

John H. Lyons, President

Laborers' International Union of North America

Angelo Fosco, President

International Union of Wood, Wire and Metal Lathers

Kenneth M. Edwards, President

Operative Plasterers and Cement Masons International Association of the United States and Canada

Joseph T. Power, President

United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipe Fitting Industry of the United States and Canada

Martin J. Ward, President

Sheet Metal Workers International Union

Edward J. Carlough, President

Workers Who Clothe Us

Members of the following unions:

Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union

Murray H. Finley, President

International Ladies' Garment Workers Union

Sol C. Chaikin, President

International Leather Goods, Plastics and Novelty Workers Union

Ben Feldman, President

Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America, Furriers Division

Joseph Belsky, President

Workers in Communications, Arts and Recreation

Members of the following unions:

Actors' Equity Association

Theodore Bikel, President

Communications Workers of America

Glenn E. Watts, President

Graphic Arts International Union

Kenneth J. Brown, President

American Federation of Television and Radio Artists

Kenneth Harvey, President

National Association of Broadcast Employees and Technicians

Edward M. Lynch, President

International Association of Fire Fighters

William H. McClennan, President

American Guild of Musical Artists

Cornell MacNeil, President

American Guild of Variety Artists

Penny Singleton, Executive-President

Hebrew Actors' Union

Herman Yablokoff, President

Workers in Professional and Technical Skills and Services

Members of the following unions and organizations:

Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union

Murray H. Finley, President

The American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

Jerry A. Johnson, Ph.D., President

James J. Garibaldi, Executive Director

Ronald Stone, OTR; President

Virginia Occupational Therapy Association

Silbyl Levine, OTR; President

District of Columbia Occupational Therapy Association

Panelpha Kyler, OTR; President

Maryland Occupational Therapy Association

Retail Clerks International Association

James T. Housewright, President

Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union

Alvin E. Heaps, President

Service Employees International Union, AFL-CIO

George Hardy, President

Amalgamated Transit Union, AFL-CIO, Locals 689, 1551, 1138, 1098

William Deal

Robert Fearington

Ken Grow

William Downey

John Geib

John Palardy

Ron Reier

John Adams

Robert Adams

James Gibson

L. Ray Gossard

Lee Ice

Monte W. Monteith

Bernard O'Mahoney

New York Taxi Drivers Union, AFL-CIO, Local 3036

Mike Rosenthal

Hy Hershkowitz

Tom Caulfield

Ethel Peoples

Air Traffic Control Association

Arthur Pittius

Stewart A. Dawson

John Goon

Donald E. Jicka

L.I. Pearce

Paul Moore

Capt. Peter W. O'Neil

Thelma K. Swofford

Edward J. Gillet

James F. Arthur

Steward A. Dawson

Robert D. Rudich

Joe B. Shirley

Clarence T. Tolpo, Beaumont, Texas

Lt. Charlotte Wood

Flight Engineers International Association

John Minor

I. (Hauk) Turner

Abe Sewalson

J.P. Trottier

International Association of Machinists, AFL-CIO, Local 1650

Bill Hampton

Kenneth Green

Lloyd Mann

Lloyd Crindlebaugh

F.E. Wood

Bill Hoppe

H.L. Norton

G.F. Roady

M.R. McCutchen

L.C. Leeds

Eddie Glaszczak, Platte City, Missouri

Bill Hoffman, Liberty, Missouri

B.J. Wilson

J.J. Kunrod

John McKim

Harry Powell

B.L. Yardley

N.C. Mosley

Gary Mason

S.M. Ballew

Tracy Bales

Wally Hayward

Dick Lincoln

Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers

B.B. Thomas

B.M. Byrd

O.L. Williams

E.B. Dollar

G.L. Bridgeman

Charles McHuges

Ed Irby

Transport Workers Union, Maintenance, Local 514

R.N. Smythe

P.O. Young

H.V. Highberger

C.R. Burke

J.S. Lowe

B.L. Lamb

S.W. Hathcock

P.E. Corn

A.B. Williams

J. Shade

R.H. Stanley

W.D. Myers

A.D. Sorenson

J.L. Locut

W.C. Popejoy

R.J. Barker

B.M. Maris

S.H. Walden

Workers Who Feed Us

Members of the following unions and organizations:

Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America

Joseph Belsky, President

Bakery and Confectionery Workers International Union of America

Daniel E. Conway, President

Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union

Edward T. Hanley, General President

Maryland and Virginia Milk Producers Association

Walter A. Martz, President

James E. Click, General Manager

The Omaha Livestock Exchange

Amalgamated Transit Union, AFL-CIO, Locals 689, 1551, 1138, 1098

William Deal

Robert Fearington

Ken Grow

William Downey

John Geib

John Palardy

Ron Reier

John Adams

Robert Adams

James Gibson

L. Ray Gossard

Lee Ice

Monte W. Monteith

Bernard O'Mahoney

Vince Hobday

Henry Hawkins

Air Traffic Control Association

Arthur Pittius

Stewart A. Dawson

John Goon

Donald E. Jicka

L.I. Pearce

Paul Moore

Capt. Peter W. O'Neil

Thelma K. Swofford

Edward J. Gillet

James F. Arthur

Steward A. Dawson

Robert D. Rudich

Joe B. Shirley

Clarence T. Tolpo, Beaumont, Texas

Lt. Charlotte Wood

Flight Engineers International Association

John Minor

I. (Hauk) Turner

Abe Sewalson

J.P. Trottier

International Association of Machinists, AFL-CIO, Local 1650

Bill Hampton

Kenneth Green

Lloyd Mann

Lloyd Crindlebaugh

F.E. Wood

Bill Hoppe

H.L. Norton

G.F. Roady

M.R. McCutchen

L.C. Leeds

Eddie Glaszczak, Platte City, Missouri

Bill Hoffman, Liberty, Missouri

B.J. Wilson

J.J. Kunrod

John McKim

Harry Powell

B.L. Yardley

N.C. Mosley

Gary Mason

S.M. Ballew

Tracy Bales

Wally Hayward

Dick Lincoln

Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers

B.B. Thomas

B.M. Byrd

O.L. Williams

E.B. Dollar

G.L. Bridgeman

Charles Hughes

Ed Irby

Transport Workers Union, Maintenance, Local 514

R.N. Smythe

P.O. Young

H.V. Highberger

C.R. Burke

J.S. Lowe

B.L. Lamb

S.W. Hathcock

P.E. Corn

A.B. Williams

J. Shade

R.H. Stanley

W.D. Myers

A.D. Sorenson

J.L. Locut

W.C. Popejoy

R.J. Barker

B.M. Maris

S.H. Walden

R.C. Sagar

M.D. Harrell

B.L. Ewing

J.L. Guynn

T.R. Hopper

C.E. Quinn

K.L. Anderson

Truckers

Jim Ringer

Ray Bieri

Jack Hamilton

George Gordon

Edgar Graves

James Marshall

Artie Marshall

William Peoples, III

Margaret Brooks

Bernice McDonald

Doris Miller

Ed Miller

Lee Voorhies

Richard Voorhies

Timmy Voorhies

Dale Setzer

Harry Bavdakian

Sea Chanteys

Louis Killen

Gerret Warner

Jeff Warner

John Benson

Jeff Davis

John Roberts

Maintenance of Way

Simon Shaw

Al Marshall

Bob Dudley

Roy Johnson

Clifton Anderson

Robert Dudley

Henry Hawkins

Brotherhood of Railway Carmen, Locals 1395, 43, 468, 364, 175

C. Lightfoot

G. Butcher

S. Miedzienowski

W. Palmer

J. Palumbo

M. Walston

P. Lawson

W. Hardin

C. Green

S. Siadys

F. Burke

H. Lewin

Coast Guard

BMC C.D. Haywood

QM1 G.H. Hornbeck

BMC D.B. McMichael

ASM T.A. Hallmark

BM1 L.L. Proud

QM2 J.W. White

MK2 B.G. Borato

MK1 S.J. Halloran

Allied Pilots Association

Capt. Jenks

Jim Foringer

Capt. N. Schweitzer

W.J. Rogers

Capt. (Hap) Hazard

Al Voras

Transportation Workers Union Flight Attendants, Local 552

Karen Hill

Marti O'Rourke

Dee Dee Dougherty

Tootie Higgs

Judy Marek

Ed Gold

Ed Pagan

Linda Welker

Gussie Utting

Roy Brayton

Carol Peisinger

Fran Bollero

Carolyn Green

Mary Jo Kerr

Janet Piersan

United Transportation Union
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1976, Series 9
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1976-ref64

Native Americans

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Beginning with the first Festival in 1967, Native American presentations demonstrated the vitality of craft traditions, culinary arts, song and dance, and folklore. The 1974 Native American program marked the fifth year in a series of regional programs, to culminate in the Bicentennial Festival in 1976 with a comprehensive national program. More than 90 participants joined the Festival, primarily from the Western States of California, Utah, Nevada, Idaho, and Colorado; special programs on sports and games brought tribal members from elsewhere in the country.

Among the tribes participating in the 1974 Festival were (from California) the Tolowa, Pomo, Hoopa, Yurok, Karok, Luiseno, Maidu, Cahuilla, as well as (from the Basin and Plateau States) Paiute, Shoshone, Kaibab, Northern Ute, Ute Mountain, Southern Ute, and Nez Perce. Sports and games were presented by Creek, Cherokee, Eskimo, Acoma, Athabaskan, Jemez, and Laguna participants. Pomo basket makers, Karok netmakers, Yurok canoe carvers, a Tolowa reed boat weaver, and cooks from Yurok, Hoopa, Karok and Cahuilla tribes of California demonstrated crafts and foodways.

Performances took place in a California plank house and a Basin/Plateau tipi, with workshops and discussions in a Learning Center, and sports and games in a dedicated area. The Learning Center was a multimedia venue designed as an introduction to contemporary Indian communities and their traditional backgrounds. Such topics as the Indian Family, Native Community, and Contributions to America were discussed by participants, while Festival visitors could attend language classes, learn Indian songs, and view photographs of contemporary and historic Native Americans.

Carole Parker served as program coordinator, assisted by Thomas Kavanagh; the California program was coordinated by Joy Sundberg (Yurok); the Basin/Plateau program, by Jim Jefferson (Southern Ute); and the sports and games, by Matt Waconda and Ethan Bigpond. The multi-year program was shaped by the Native Americans Advisory Group, including Louis Bruce, Clydia Nahwooksy, Dell Hymes, William Sturtevant, Samuel Stanley, Herman Viola, Carnes Burson, and Robert Byington. Major sponsors for the 1974 program included the Public Information Office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Department of the Army, the Coalition of Eastern Native Americans and the Louisiana Pacific Redwood Corporation.

The following year (1975) saw the last regional Native American program, with the Bicentennial Festival providing a national overview, including some participants who returned from previous years.
Participants:
California

Tolowa

Sheryl Bommelyn, dancer

Loren Bommelyn, dancer

Kara Brundin, dancer

Brenda Green, dancer

John Green, dancer, singer

Carl James, dancer

Samuel Lopez, 1886-1977, singer

Billy Richards, dancer

Mark Richards, dancer

Marvin Richards, dancer, singer

Nicole Richards, dancer, cook

Don Stunrick, dancer

Pomo

Elsie Allen, 1899-1990, basket maker

Dewey Barnes, 1932-2006, fishtrap maker

Rose Barnes, 1929-, dancer

Elvina Brown, dancer

James Brown II, dancer

James Brown III, dancer

Kenneth Fred, 1929-, singer, dancer

Bernadine Hopper, 1918-1999, dancer

Nelson Hopper, Pomo, shell jeweler, Finley, California

Hoopa

Eleanor Abbott, basket maker

Warren Abbott, dancer

Anthony Risling, 1912-2004, fishnet maker

Yurok

George Blake, bow maker, Eureka, California

Ella Johnson, basket maker

Sam Jones, 1913-1996, salmon cook

Walter Lara, Yurok, canoe carver, Eureka, California

Ella Norris, 1892-1982, Wiyot-Yurok, salmon cook, Crescent City, California

Josephine Peters, 1923-2011, jeweler

Pamela Peters, dancer

Mark Sundberg, dancer

Lisa Sundberg, cook, dancer

Tom Williams, canoe carver

Karok

Francis Davis, Sr., 1929-, fishnet maker

Luiseno

Villiana Hyde, 1903-1994, discussant

Maidu

Gladys Mankins, 1912-1985, bead worker, dancer

Seymore Smith, 1891-, singer

Cahuilla

Katherine Saubel, cook

Basin/Plateau

Paiute

Marie Brown, bead worker, cook

Stannard Frank, 1923-1989, discussant

Lily George, 1911-1977, Paiute, tule boat maker, Ely, Nevada

Madaline Kaamasee, doll maker

Lena Murphy, dancer

Marjorie Stark, Paiute, 1911-2001, basket maker, Ely, Nevada

Shoshone

Ella Bear, 1907-1983, hide tanner

Jimmy Dan, dancer, singer

Agnes Gould, 1925-1991, dancer

Audrey Gould, bead worker

Austin Gould, dancer, singer

Vincent Ponzo, buckskin worker

Kaibab

Dan Bullets, 1906-1990, Kaibab, hide tanner, Fredonia, Arizona

Alva Drye, Kaibab, basket maker, Fredonia, Arizona

Lucille Jake, 1920-1997, Kaibab, bead worker, basket maker, Fredonia, Arizona

Lita Sigmiller, Kaibab, basket maker, Fredonia, Arizona

Northern Ute

Irene Coch, bead worker, dancer

Loya Gardner, 1913-2004, dancer

Maxine Natchez, dancer

Ute Mountain

Cliff Duncan, pow wow MC

Bonnie Hatch, Ute Mountain, dancer, Towaoc, Colorado

Sarah Hatch, Ute Mountain, dancer, potter, Towaoc, Colorado

Danny Tallbird, 1926-1996, Cheyenne, dancer, Towaoc, Colorado

Ruby Tallbird, 1934-2004, Ute Mountain, buckskin worker, Towaoc, Colorado

Tony Tallbird, Ute Mountain, dancer, Towaoc, Colorado

Southern Ute

Ramona Eagle, Southern Ute, dancer, Ignacio, Colorado

Dan Jefferson, dancer

Tim Jefferson, dancer

Bonnie Kent, 1918-1989, Southern Ute, dancer, Ignacio, Colorado

Elsie Kent, dancer

Nez Perce

Randall Ellenwood, dancer

Wilfred Halfmoon, dancer

Owen Slickapoo, dancer

Allen Slickpoo, discussant

Sports and Games

Creek

Paul Culley, 1931-1993, Creek, stickball, Wetumka, Oklahoma

Paula Culley, 1963-, Creek-Seminole, stickball, Wetumka, Oklahoma

Jeannie Fixico, 1953-, Creek, stickball, Seminole, Oklahoma

Emma Lowe, 1942-, Creek, stickball, Holdenville, Oklahoma

Larry Soweka, 1945-, Creek, stickball, Henryetta, Oklahoma

Cherokee

George Dixon, 1946-, Cherokee, archer, Muskogee, Oklahoma

Larry Rackliff, 1952-, Cherokee, archer, Tahlequa, Oklahoma

Lyman Vann, 1907-1985, Cherokee, archer, Tulsa, Oklahoma

Pete Vann, 1948-, archer

Eskimo

Laura Bergt, sports

Les Bodfish, sports

Reggie Joule, sports

Roger Kunayak, sports

Acoma

Gordon Joe, 1955-, Acoma, track runner, Paraje, New Mexico

Athabaskan

Fred Titus, sports

Jemez

Steven Gachupin, 1942-, Jemez, track coach, Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico

Laguna

Emmet Hunt, 1948-, Laguna-Acoma, cross country coach, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Bruce Allen Romero, 1959-, track, Paguate, New Mexico

Meldon R. Sanchez, 1959-, runner, San Fidel, New Mexico
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1974 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1974, Series 6
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1974 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1974-ref577

MS 4828 Ute tales

Creator:
Cook, Nan  Search this
Extent:
197 Pages
Culture:
Ute Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Includes: White River tales collected from informants at White Rocks, Ft. Duchesne and Myton, Utah, in 1936 and 1937; Uintah tales from informants residing near White Rocks, Utah, 1939; Uncompaghre tales from informants between Ft. Duchesne and Ouray, Utah, 1937. [ca. 1937]. Contains 11 Uintah tales, 81 White River tales and 33 Uncompaghre tales. Names of informants and interpreters are given for each tale.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4828
Local Note:
Carbon typescript
Topic:
Folklore -- Ute  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 4828, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4828
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4828

MS 3832 Extract from letter to S. F. Baird

Creator:
Faris, Lafayette  Search this
Addressee:
Baird, Spencer Fullerton, 1823-1887  Search this
Extent:
3 Pages
Culture:
Paiute Indians -- (identification uncertain)  Search this
Ute Indians -- (identification uncertain)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Pages
Date:
September 3, 1880
Scope and Contents:
Comments on similarity of myth of So-kuswai-un-ants (published by Powell in Report of Exploration of Colorado River) and Egyptian tradition reported by Herodotus.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3832
Local Note:
manuscript copy
Topic:
Folklore -- Paiute ?  Search this
Folklore -- Ute ?  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 3832, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3832
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3832

MS 3759 Origin of the Pai-Ute

Creator:
Powell, John Wesley, 1834-1902  Search this
Extent:
7 Pages
Culture:
Paiute Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Pages
Date:
1871-1872
Scope and Contents:
Myth in English, with several names in the Kaibab Southern Paiute dialect of Ute.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3759
Local Note:
manuscript document
Topic:
Folklore -- Paiute  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 3759, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3759
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3759

MS 3534 Shahaptian Myths Collected by J. Curtin

Creator:
Curtin, Jeremiah, 1835-1906  Search this
Extent:
68 Pages
Culture:
Shahaptian -- Folklore  Search this
Paiute -- Animal names  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Contains one Paiute myth in English, with a list of animal names in a Southern Paiute dialect of Ute.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3534
Local Note:
Typescript document
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 3534, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3534
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3534

Monsters of contact : historical trauma in Caddoan oral traditions / Mark van de Logt

Author:
Van de Logt, Mark 1968-  Search this
Physical description:
xvii, 252 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm
Type:
Folklore
Place:
North America
Date:
2018
Topic:
Caddoan Indians--Folklore  Search this
Monsters  Search this
Oral tradition  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1104887

More earthmaker's tales / retold and illustrated by Gretchen Will Mayo

Author:
Mayo, Gretchen  Search this
Physical description:
49 p. : ill. ; 23 cm
Type:
Folklore
Date:
1990
1989
Topic:
Nature  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_776337

Coyote steals the blanket : a Ute tale / retold and illustrated by Janet Stevens

Author:
Stevens, Janet  Search this
Physical description:
[32] p. : col ill. ; 28 cm
Type:
Folklore
Legends
Date:
1993
C1993
Topic:
Coyote (Legendary character)  Search this
Call number:
E99.U8 S74 1993
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_740984

MS 2247-c Ute myth

Creator:
Powell, John Wesley, 1834-1902  Search this
Extent:
5 pages
Culture:
Ute Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Contents: "Stone Shirt myth."
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2247-c
Local Note:
See File Number 828-a for a longer version of this story.
Topic:
Folklore -- Ute  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2247-c, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2247C
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2247c

Bad medicine & good : tales of the Kiowas / by Wilbur Sturtevant Nye ; with drawings by Nick Eggenhofer

Title:
Bad medicine and good
Tales of the Kiowas
Author:
Nye, Wilbur Sturtevant 1898-1970  Search this
Physical description:
291 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Type:
Folklore
Place:
Texas
Date:
1962
©1962
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_263532

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