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Audio Log Sheets

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: American Folklore Society Centennial / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5603c05dc-94c1-46e0-9b6d-2ef2cafc6f3a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1988-ref2018
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Festival Recordings: AFS Centennial Stage: Festivals: Their Folklore and Their Influence (Fox, Kurin, McKenney, Green)

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. American Folklore Society Centennial Program 1988 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Fox, Phil, 1949-2015  Search this
Kurin, Richard, 1950-  Search this
McKenney, Al, 1944-2015  Search this
Wiggins, Phil  Search this
Green, Rayna  Search this
Lloyd, Timothy, 1951-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
sound-tape reel (analog, 7 in.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1988 June 24
Contents:
Festivals: Their Folklore And Their Influence; Phil Fox, Richard Kurin, Al Mckenny, Phil Wiggins, Rayna Green; Tim Lloyd Reel 3 0f 9
Local Numbers:
FP-1988-7RR-0090
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 24, 1988.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Folklore -- Study and teaching  Search this
Function:
Festivals
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1988, Item FP-1988-7RR-0090
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: American Folklore Society Centennial / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5eca387ce-b856-4dfd-924e-4ca19577a62a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1988-ref572

Festival Recordings: AFS Centennial Stage: Festivals: Their Folklore and Their Influence (Phil Fox, Wilson, Al McKenney, Mike Herter)

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. American Folklore Society Centennial Program 1988 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Artist:
Lloyd, Timothy, 1951-  Search this
Wallace, Andy  Search this
Fox, Phil, 1949-2015  Search this
Performer:
Wilson, Joe, 1938-2015  Search this
Wallace, Andy  Search this
McKenney, Al, 1944-2015  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
sound-tape reel (analog, 7 in.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
New York
Saratoga Springs (N.Y.)
Date:
1988 June 27
Local Numbers:
FP-1988-7RR-0118
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 27, 1988.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Folklore -- Study and teaching  Search this
Agriculture  Search this
Function:
Festivals
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1988, Item FP-1988-7RR-0118
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: American Folklore Society Centennial / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5e4d65042-465b-4b9b-93eb-f804bc6613ad
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1988-ref600

Animal Tales Told in the Gullah Dialect by Albert H. Stoddard of Savannah, Georgia

Performer:
Stoddard, Albert Henry, 1872-1954  Search this
Collection Creator:
Asch, Moses  Search this
Distler, Marian, 1919-1964  Search this
Folkways Records  Search this
Extent:
1 Phonograph record (analog, 33 1/3 rpm, 12 in.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Phonograph records
Place:
United States
Georgia
South Carolina
Track Information:
101 Man Git E Adam Apple.

102 Buh Partridge Outhides Buh Rabbit.

103 Buh Black Sneak Git Ketch.

104 Buh Rabbit Berry Lub Peas.

201 Buh Rabbit Wan Mo Acknowledge.

202 Buh Rabbit Eats Buh Fox's Butter.

203 Buh Deer and Buh Rabbit Race.
Local Numbers:
FW-ASCH-LP-3017

Library of Congress.AAFS L45
Publication, Distribution, Etc. (Imprint):
Washington, D.C. Library of Congress
General:
"From the folklore collections." Program notes by the editor, texts and glossaries inserted in each container. Production notes: Recorded at Washington, D.C., 1949 under a special grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. No duplication allowed listening and viewing for research purposes only.
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for additional information.
Topic:
Storytelling  Search this
Collection Citation:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.ASCH, Item FW-ASCH-LP-3017
See more items in:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection
Moses and Frances Asch Collection / Series 9: Audio Recordings / LP
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk500f2dfce-400d-43fd-97ab-eeab45ead262
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-asch-ref17573

MS 1875 Sixteen Fox stories with translations collected by Truman Michelson

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Bullard, Jack  Search this
Kiyana, Alfred, 1877-1918  Search this
Lasley, Lucy  Search this
Sakihtanohkweha, 1875-1957  Search this
Translator:
Poweshiek, Ida  Search this
Extent:
25 Items (0.25 linear feet (approximately 745 pages)
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Place:
Tama (Iowa)
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains stories handwritten in Meskwaki (Fox) syllabary with English translations by Ida Poweshiek. These texts were collected by Truman Michelson in Tama, Iowa. List of titles based on English translations: 1.) The Winter Story of Longhair, by Lucy Lasley and Jack Bullard; text 18 pages, translation 27 pages. 2.) Fasting, by Lucy Lasley; text 7 pages, translation 3 pages. 3.) Fast runner, by Lucy Lasley; text 2 pages, translation 3 pages. 4.) Lost Boy, by Lucy Lasley; text 2 pages, translation 3 pages. 5.) Peace council with Pawnee, by Lucy Lasley; text 2 pages, translation 3 pages. 6.) Hunting, text 2 pages, translation 3 pages. 7.) Wisahkeha, by Sakihtanohkweha (Mrs. Bill Leaf); text 31 pages and translation 30 pages. 8.) The youth who became corn and the Indians of long ago who grew as all different kinds of things, by Alfred Kiyana; text 41 pages, translation 36 pages. 9.) Rooster with feet of money, text 18 pages, translation 20 pages. 10.) Ball-Player, by Jack Bullard and possibly Lucy Lasley; text 51 pages, translation 73 pages. 11.) One who loved her brother, by Alfred Kiyana; text 41 pages, translation 33 pages. 12.) The men who were taken to heaven by a bear, by Alfred Kiyana; text 7 pages, translation 9 pages. 13.) Keshakiwa, by Lucy Lasley and Jack Bullard; text 23 pages, translation 33 pages. 14.) Story about Turtle and Wisahkeha (Race for girl), text 8 pages, translation 11 pages. 15.) "Why men should not go hunting with ther wives" text 13 pages, (English translation only). 16.) Spirit of fire made by gods, by Alfred Kiyana; text 112 pages, translation 80 pages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1875
Local Note:
Title changed from "Texts and Translations Legends" 3/18/2014.
Other Archival Materials:
See Manuscript 1879 for continuation of Wisahkeha story.
Topic:
Fox language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 1875, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1875
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3bcbf19c0-336c-4b7e-abbb-102589e3a3e1
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1875

MS 2764 Nineteen Fox stories by Alfred Kiyana, Bill Leaf, and Sakihtanohkweha

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Leaf, Bill  Search this
Kiyana, Alfred, 1877-1918  Search this
Sakihtanohkweha, 1875-1957  Search this
Extent:
324 Pages
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Nineteen stories handwritten in Meskwaki (Fox) syllabary by Alfred Kiyana, Bill Leaf, and Sakihtanohkweha (Mrs. Bill Leaf). These texts were collected by Truman Michelson in Tama, Iowa. Eight of the stories are by Alfred Kiyana. They are: Red-Leggings; When Bullhead killed two elks; The woman and the toad; The rooster; Turtle; Raccoon, who yelled loud; Kawesakweha and Kochipekwaha; and The man who got lost. Bill Leaf authored 10 of the texts, including: Many men on the warpath, two stories on Fighters, The one who knew how to hunt, This last one is about when Wisahkeha has been seen, Sacred pack, and When I got drunk. Sakihtanohkweha wrote the text on a youth who fasted. No English translations are present.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2764
Local Note:
Title changed from "Legends" 4/28/2014.
Topic:
Fox language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 2764, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2764
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw31fd65e83-0c73-4080-8589-4deaf4ee09fa
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2764

Lakota texts by George Bushotter

Translator:
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Creator:
Bushotter, George, 1864-1892  Search this
Bruyier, John  Search this
Collection Creator:
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Extent:
Pages (ca. 3,500 pages)
Culture:
Lakota (Teton/Western Sioux)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Date:
1887
Scope and Contents:
259 texts; numbers 189 and 253, as well as parts of 223 and 224 are by John Bruyier, 1888. Interlinear translations by Dorsey, aided by Bushotter and Bruyier.

Lakota text contents: 1. Sword Keeper and his brother. The latter meets Two Faces, a mythic giant. 8 pages and 3 pages (notes) and 1 page partial translation. 2. The Mythic Buffalo. 10 pages. 3. Two Faces. Explains the origin of arrows, pipes, axes, knife-sharpeners, beads, etc. 14 pages. 4. Three brothers who had a witch sister. 17 pages. (incomplete) 5. Children, a bad old woman cannibal, and Spider (the Mythic Trickster). 12 pages. 6. Spider, animals, and women. 15 pages and 6 pages. 7. A man and his ghost wife. 9 and 5 pages. 8. Two against one: a ghost story with a song. 10 pages. 9. A man, a female ghost, and a male ghost who wrestled with the man. 15 pages. 10. Ghost on the hill, who could not be hit by arrows. 8 pages. 11. Treatment of the sick, burial customs. 22 pages and 4 pages (notes) and 2 pages and 1 sketch. 12. The man who came to life again. 14 and 2 (translation) pages. Note by Bruyier at end. 13. The man and woman in the moon. 6 pages. 14. Man, two in the lodge, female ghost, and the friendly wolf. 8 pages. 15. The man who spared the wolf cubs. 11 pages. 16. The Thunder Being and the Unkcegila (a mastadon ?) 12 pages. 17. Waziya, the northern giant who brings snow. 4 pages. 18. Buffalo people who attacked the Indian people. 10 pages. 19. Spider and the land turtle. 29 pages. 20. The man and his two sons. 18 pages and 2 pages (notes). 21. The turtle who wished to fly. 10 pages. 22. The man who could become a grizzly bear. 6 pages. 23. How the Indians cured the sun. 3 pages. 24. Spider and the horned water monster. 7 pages. 25. The strange lake with large subaquatic animals. 6 pages. 26. The warrior surrounded by a serpent. 4 pages. 27. The one-eyed serpent with short legs and large body. 3 pages. 28. Why they pray to stones, the sun, etc. 9 pages.

29. The mountain in which was a large serpent.. 6 pages. 30. Adventures of a man and his wife.. 8 pages. 31. Spider and the Prairie Chicken. 6 pages. 32. Adventure of RAbbit Carrier. 6 pages. 33. The woman who turned to a fish from her waist down. 22 pages. 34. Spider and the Rabbit; how the latter made snow. 5 pages. 35. The male ghost and his living wife. 8 pages. 36. The man with the magic sword, and the one with the powerful breath. 6 pages. 37. Swift Runner (he who tied stones to his legs). 10 pages. 38. The man who was rescued by eaglets. 10 pages. 39. The Double-woman. 5 pages. 40. Spider and the mice. 14 pages. 41. Spider and the ducks--how they got red eyes. 13 pages and 1 sketch. 42. Spider and the Rabbit; how the latter lost his long tail. 11 pages. 43. The man who ressembled the man in the moon. 11 pages. 44. The young lover who was rescued by the girl. 12 pages. 45. The warriors who met Heyoka (Sunflower) who was singing and dancing. 2 pages. 46. The flying Santee (a ghoul). 8 pages. 47. How the Santees first saw buffalo. 8 pages. 48. How the Lakotas went against the Rees. 5 pages. 49. Adventures of the Short Man. 8 pages. 50. Smoke Maker's adventures: a war story. 7 pages. 51. Fight between the Lakota and the Blackfeet. 4 pages (incomplete) 52. Fight between two unarmed men and a grizzly bear. 8 pages. 53. Treatment of an Omaha spy caught by the Lakotas. 6 pages. 54. The wild man, a nude cannibal. 4 pages. 55. He who uses the earth as an ear. 7 pages. 56. Why horses are called, in Lakota, "mysterious dogs." 7 ages. 57. The man who could understand ravens. 5 pages. 58. Of the two small stones that were servants of the people. 6 pages. (Brief note at the end appears to be in Swanton's hand.) 59. The Wahanksica, a strange animal. 3 pages. 60. The animal in the Missouri River which breaks up the ice in the spring of the year. 4 pages.

61. How thw wind brought sickness to Medicine Butte Creek. 6 pages. 62. Beliefs about day and night. 6 pages. 63. The man in the forest and his contest with ghosts. 8 pages. 64. The feast in honor of the Anti-Natural God. 18 pages. 65. Of the Heyoka man who dreamed of his death by lightening. 13 pages. 66. Fight between the Lakota and the Blackfeet. 6 pages. 67. Of the mysteriousman who knew about the distant war party, 5 pages. 68. Of the wise man who caught his eloping wife. 8 pages. 69. How the Rees or Blackfeet came against the Lakotas. 5 pages. 70. Origin of the buffalo. 5 pages. 71. The Sun Dance. A. 98 pages and 3 figures. B. 9 pages. C. 4 pages. D. 7 pages and 1 diagram. E. 6 pages. F. 4 pages. G. 14 pages. H. 3 pages and 2 diagrams. I. 3 pages. 72. The man who could lengthen his arm at will. 7 pages. 73. What a young man must do before he can marry. 11 pages. 74. How the Crows surrounded some Lakotas. 12 pages. 75. A raid on a Lakota camp. 4 pages. 76. Story of a warrior who was not wounded. 9 pages. 77. Fight between the Lakota and white soldiers. 20 pages. 78. Of the Santees, and their fondness for certain foods. 4 pages. 79. What the Lakota thought of the first white people whom they saw. 13 pages. 80. Belief respecting lakes. 6 pages. 81. Belief about this world. 7 pages. 82. The calumet dance. 39 pages and 2 diagrams. 83. How they honor the dead (the Ghost Feast). 15 and 2 and 18 pages. 84. Men who are arrow and bullet proof. 8 pages. 85. Of love potions, etc. 5 pages. 86. The acts of a wounded warrior. 7 pages. 87. Actors clothed in buffalo robes with the hair out detect wrongdoers. 11 pages. 88. Those who imitate the elk. 14 pages. 89. Why a man may not speak to his mother in law. 11 pages. 90. Rules for feasting, smoking, and visiting. 11 pages. 91. Of certain boyish customs. 8 pages. 92. A ghost story. 7 pages. 93. Origin of the white people. 10 pages. 94. Games and their seasons. 10 pages. 95. Education of a boy. 10 pages. 96. Of youth killed in battle, and of his faithful horse. 12 pages. 97. The people who lived in the north. 7 pages and 2 sketches. 98. The ghost woman and the robin. 9 pages. Note at end by Bruyier. 99. The Flying serpent whose touch was fatal. 5 pages. 100. Origin of twins. 5 pages. 101. George Bushotter's autobiography. 117 pages. 102. Belief concerning a loved one who has been called by a ghost. 7 pages. 103. Fight between two gamblers near Chamberlain, Dakota. 7 pages.

104. The singing elk. 7 pages. 105. Belief about Spider. 9 pages. 106. War of the Lakota against the Omaha. 7 pages. 107. Narrow escape of Bark Bird's Tail (a Lakota). 5 pages. 108. Busnotter's cousin's war adventure. 11 pages. 109. How certain men (doctors, priests, etc.) have become mysterious. 16 pages. 110. How the Lakota fought the Cheyennes and Black Men (Commanches ?). 22 pages. 111. Rules of etiquette for brothers, sisters, cousins. 21 pages. 112. Ghost story. 5 pages. 113. The habits of beavers. 8 pages. 114. Spider and the old woman who fed all the animals. 24 pages. 115. The handsome man who was rescued from a pit by a wolf. 32 pages. 116. Trick of a myth-teller. 9 pages. 117. Of thistles. 4 pages. 118. How Indians regard the past and their ancestors. 22 pages. 119. The grass dance. 12 pages. 120. The Big Belly Society. 6 pages. 121. The Mandan Society. 10 pages. 122. "Following one another," a Lakota game. 7 pages. 123. "They make it run by pushing," a Lakota game. 46 pages and 2 (colored) diagrams. 124. Horse racing. 5 pages. 125. Hitting the moccasin, a game. 9 pages. 126. Shooting at the cactus, a gane. 5 pages. 127. Hitting the bow, a game. 5 pages. 128. Shooting at bunches of grass, a game. 5 pages. 129. Shooting at the lights of an animal, a game. 6 pages. 130. Taking captives from one another, a game. 9 pages. 131. Trampling on the beaver, a game. 6 pages. 132. "Howi ! Howi !" a ring game for boys or youths. 12 pages. 133. "They touch not one another," a game. 6 pages. 134. Game with a long grass which has a long, sharp beard. 6 pages. 135. The old woman accuses them," a game. 8 pages. 136. A game with slings. 5 pages. 137. "Goose and her children," a game. 10 pages. 138. Buffalo horn game. 7 and 1 page. 139. A stick which is hurled. 5 and 1 page and 2 figures. 140. "Making the wood dance by hitting it," a game. 8 pages. 41. "Making the wood jump by hitting it," a game. 8 pages. 142. "Making the bow glide by throwing," a game. 6 pages. 143. Coasting. 8 pages. 144. Game of ball. 12 pages. 145. "Shotting at an arrow set up," a game. 7 pages. 146. Grizzly bear game. 12 pages. 147. Deer game. 10 pages. 148. "Running towards one another," a game. 9 pages. 149. "They cause one another to carry packs on their backs," a game. 10 pages. 150. "They hit one another with mud," a game. 10 pages. 151. Hitting the ball, a game. 11 pages. 152. A game with a rawhide hoop. 43 pages and 2 figures. 153. Game of earthen horses. 8 pages. 154. "They slide by pushing," a game. 14 pages. 155. "They kick at one another," a game. 14 pages.

156. "The hoop is made to roll in the wind," a game. 9 pages. 157. [Popgun game.] Missing July, 1966. (not on microfilm made 1958) 1 page illustration found July, 1968. 158. Wrestling. 8 pages. 159. Courting the girls. 9 pages. 160. Game with bow and small wood-pointed arrows. 10 pages. 161. Swinging. 10 pages. 162. "Taking Places from one another," a game. 9 pages. 163. "Playing with small things," a game. 18 pages. 164. Pinching the backs of hands, a game. 11 pages. 165. "Scattering them," a game. 9 pages. 166. "Who shall get threr first," a game. 10 pages. 167. Hopping. 9 pages. 168. Throwing arrows by hand, at a target. 6 pages. 169. Ghost game. 21 pages. 170. Hide and seek. 13 pages. 171. Jumping down from a high object. 12 pages. 172. Plumstone game. 18 pages. 173. Odd or even ? A game with sticks. 12 pages. 174. Throwing chewed leaves into the eyes, a game. 7 pages. 175. Game with the ankle-bones of a deer. 12 pages. 176. Native wooden harminicon, played by boys. 14 pages and 5 figures. 177. Mysterious game. 17 pages. 178. Playing doctor. 10 pages. 179. Pretending to be dead, a game. 10 pages. 180. Hunting young birds in summer. 12 pages. 181. Hunting eggs in spring. 10 pages. 182. Going to make a grass lodge. 11 pages. 183. Scrambling for presents. 11 pages. 184. Sitting on wooden horses, a game. 8 pages. 185. Making a bone turn and hum by twisting a cord. 15 pages and 2 figures. 186. "String twisted in and out among the fingers." 8 pages. 187. Tumbling and somersault. 7 pages. 188. "Game with large things." 17 pages. 189. About two young men who were friends. 51 pages. By Bruyier. 190. A bird that foretells cold weather. 14 pages. 191. Cause of scrofulous sore on the neck. 10 pages. 192. Meaning of ringing sounds in the ears. 10 pages. 193. The Brave and Fox societies. 18 pages and 4 sketches. 194. Dog Society. 31 pages and 2 sketches and 1 page drawing.

195. "Killing by Hitting," or "Taking the Buffalo paunch," a society of women. 12 pages. 196. Scalpdance society. 16 pages and 1 sketch. 197. Night dance. 18 pages. 198. Mysterious society. 16 pages. 199. Grizzly Bear dance. 19 pages. 200. Belief about the Kildeer. 13 pages. 201. The acts of a leader. 17 pages. 202. Return of the night hawk in the spring. 7 pages. 203. Belief concerning the Ski-bi-bi-la, a small grey bird which says Gli Hunwo ?" ("Coming home ?). 16 pages. Also earlier version of the same, with mistakes. 10 pages. 204. About hanging the "tablo" ("shoulder blade") at the door of the lodge. 7 pages. 205. Trying to excell others. 12 pages. 206. Scolding or whipping a woman. 12 pages. 207. How Indian paints are made. 18 pagrs. 208. Acting like the buffalo bull. 9 pages and 1 page drawing. 209. Law about bowls. 9 pages. 210. Meaning of a rooster's crowing. 8 pages. 211. The taking apart of fetishes. 24 pages. 212. How one man drowned another. 21 pages. 213. Concerning warts. 8 pages. 214. Of a woman who qas killed by mosquitoes. 32 pages. 215. Concerning hermaphrodites. 22 pages. 216. Belief concerning the grebe or dabchick. 10 pages. 217. Rules for eating dogs. 8 pages. 218. Bushotter's recollections of a certain famine. 219. Why Lakota men should not wear women's moccasins. 16 pages. 220. Customs relating to bowls. 10 pages. 221. Meanings of various kinds of twitchings. 10 pages. 222. "Kicking out his elder brother's teeth." 10 pages. 223. How a boy wounded his grandfather in the scrotum. 13 pages. Bruyier's revision of the same. 13 pages. 224. Legend of the nude Spider woman. 12 pages. About the woman who was deceived by the grizzly bear, with an account of the prairie hen. 20 pages. By Bruyier. 225. "Punishment of the prairie." 19 pages.

226. Part of the punishment of a murderer. 12 pages. 227. About a foolish wife. 42 pages. 228. How a ghost stunned Bushotter's father. 21 pages. 229. Occasions for scolding wives. 12 pages. Half-page corrected sentence at end by Buyier. 230. Setting out food, etc. for ghosts. 16 pages. 231. Concerning widows and widowers. 30 pages. 232. About a newborn child. 9 pages. 233. Tatala, a humorist. 6 pages. 234. Vegetal lore. 16 pages. 235. About the year when the stars fell (1833). 18 pages. 236. Concerning shells used as necklaces. 8 pages and 2 sketches. 237. Game with a ball of mud. 8 pages. 238. "Throwing fire at one another." 11 pages. 239. Punishment of a liar. 8 pages. 240. Invocation of the Thunder. 13 pages. 241. About spiders. 15 pages. 242. The mysterious imitation of ghosts. 14 pages. 243. What they carry when they migrate. 20 pages. 244. What happened when the Lower Brules went to a mountain. 24 pages. 245. Concerning guardian spirits. 16 pages. 246. About the Thunderers (People dwelling in the clouds.) 25 pages. 247. About lizards, frogs, etc. rained from the sky. 11 pages. 248. Deer Women. 28 pages. 249. Bird societies. 31 pages. 250. Ways od dancing. 26 pages. 251. About gashing the limbs when mourning. 7 pages. 252. On Fellowhood. 16 pages. 253. Ceremonies at birth. 8 pages. Bruyier's revision. 5 pages. 254. Bushotter's stepfather's prophetic gifts. 15 pages. 255. The recovery of Bushotter's younger brother. 14 pages. 256. Why a son or daughter acts in a childish manner. 9 pages. 257. Giving birth to one child while still nursing another. 13 pages. 258. Courting. 48 pages and 3 page color folding drawing and 1 page drawing. 259. Heyoka woman. 8 pages.
Biographical / Historical:
Historical data on the Bushotter texts. 1927: May 24. Stories 102-189 sent to Franz Boas, at Columbia. 1928: March 15. Stories 137-189 returned. April 17. 16 miscellaneous sheets sent to Boas. May 14. All the remaining Bushotter material returned. 1936: June 26. All the Bushotter texts sent to Boas. 1939: July 11. Stories 102-259 returned. 1942: April 16. Stories 1-101 returned. 1966: Survey by R. J. DeMallie showed all stories present with the exception of last part of Number 4, last part of Number 51, and all of Number 157. A few illustrations are also missing.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS.4800: (3.1.1.3) [103]
Local Note:
Old number 2632 (Parts 1-3)
autograph document signed
Collection Restrictions:
The James O. Dorsey Papers are open for research. Access to the James O. Dorsey Papers requires an appointment
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Lakota dialect  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 4800 James O. Dorsey papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers / Series 1: Siouan-Catawban / 1.2: Dakota
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a9ec836e-eaf4-41da-8dc1-8cc89ae21490
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms4800-ref1779

Lakota texts by George Bushotter, Stories 190-240

Creator:
Bushotter, George, 1864-1892  Search this
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Collection Creator:
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Extent:
798 Pages ((10 folders))
Culture:
Lakota (Teton/Western Sioux)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Manuscripts
Date:
1887
Scope and Contents:
These 51 stories form a portion of Lakota texts by George Bushotter collected by James Dorsey in Manuscript 4800: (3.1.1.3) [103]. Interlinear translations are by Dorsey, aided by Bushotter and Bruyier. Each story is numbered. 190.) A bird that foretells cold weather. 191.) Cause of scrofulous sore on the neck. 192.) Meaning of ringing sounds in the ears. 193.) The Brave and Fox societies. Includes 4 sketches. 194.) Dog Society. Includes 2 sketches and 1 page drawing. 195.) "Killing by Hitting," or "Taking the Buffalo paunch," a society of women. 196.) Scalpdance society. Includes 1 sketch. 197.) Night dance. 198.) Mysterious society. 199.) Grizzly Bear dance. 200.) Belief about the Kildeer. 201.) The acts of a leader. 202.) Return of the night hawk in the spring. 203.) Belief concerning the Ski-bi-bi-la, a small grey bird which says Gli Hunwo ?" ("Coming home ?). Also earlier version of the same, with mistakes. 204.) About hanging the "tablo" ("shoulder blade") at the door of the lodge. 205.) Trying to excell others. 206.) Scolding or whipping a woman. 207.) How Indian paints are made. 208.) Acting like the buffalo bull. Includes 1 drawing. 209.) Law about bowls. 210.) Meaning of a rooster's crowing. 211.) The taking apart of fetishes. 212.) How one man drowned another. 213.) Concerning warts. 214.) Of a woman who was killed by mosquitoes. 215.) Concerning hermaphrodites. 216.) Belief concerning the grebe or dabchick. 217.) Rules for eating dogs. 218.) Bushotter's recollections of a certain famine. 219.) Why Lakota men should not wear women's moccasins. 220.) Customs relating to bowls. 221.) Meanings of various kinds of twitchings. 222.) "Kicking out his elder brother's teeth." 223.) How a boy wounded his grandfather in the scrotum. Bruyier's revision of the same. 224.) Legend of the nude Spider woman. 12 pages. About the woman who was deceived by the grizzly bear, with an account of the prairie hen. 20 pages. By Bruyier. 225.) "Punishment of the prairie." 226.) Part of the punishment of a murderer. 227.) About a foolish wife. 228.) How a ghost stunned Bushotter's father. 229.) Occasions for scolding wives. Half-page corrected sentence at end by Buyier. 230.) Setting out food, etc. for ghosts. 231.) Concerning widows and widowers. 232.) About a newborn child. 233.) Tatala, a humorist. 234.) Vegetal lore. 235.) About the year when the stars fell (1833). 236.) Concerning shells used as necklaces. Includes 2 sketches. 237.) Game with a ball of mud. 238.) "Throwing fire at one another." 239.) Punishment of a liar. 240.) Invocation of the Thunder.
Arrangement:
The stories are organized in folders in the following manner: 190-194; 195-199; 200-205; 206-211; 212-215; 216-222; 223-225; 226-229; 230-235; 236-240.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS.4800: (3.1.1.3) [130, 190-240]
Local Note:
MS 4800: (3.1.1.3) [103, 190-240] was arbitrarily broken up into multiple records to facilitate accessibility of digital slideshows.
Collection Restrictions:
The James O. Dorsey Papers are open for research. Access to the James O. Dorsey Papers requires an appointment
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Lakota dialect  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 4800 James O. Dorsey papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers / Series 1: Siouan-Catawban / 1.2: Dakota / Lakota texts by George Bushotter
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b055c1b3-92e5-4194-a8a5-8098b23398d3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms4800-ref2267

MS 2655 Seven Fox stories by Alfred Kiyana, Sakihtanohkweha, and Jack Bullard

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Kiyana, Alfred, 1877-1918  Search this
Bullard, Jack  Search this
Sakihtanohkweha, 1875-1957  Search this
Translator:
Poweshiek, Horace  Search this
Extent:
63 Items (0.63 linear feet (638 pages)
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Seven stories handwritten in Meskwaki (Fox) syllabic text by Alfred Kiyana, Sakihtanohkweha (Mrs. Bill Leaf), and Jack Bullard, with English translations by Horace Poweshiek. These were collected by Truman Michelson in Tama, Iowa. The texts by Alfred Kiyana are "The man who married a giant woman," (text 23 pages, translation 18 pages); "When the ghosts cheated the Frenchmen," (text 7 pages, translation 5 pages); "Ten men," (text 13 pages, translation 10 pages); "Ghost, A man who had been a ghost and was a manitou," (text 49 pages, translation 40 pages); and "Wisahkeha dance," (text 197 pages, translation 94 pages). Sakihtanohkweha authored "Turkey-owner" (text 23 pages, translation 22 pages) and Jack Bullard authored "[The one who owned a wooden witch image]" (text 48 pages, translation 48 pages).
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2655
Local Note:
Title updated from "Texts" 3/28/2014.
Topic:
Fox language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 2655, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2655
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw35a34301a-2909-4fec-a685-49113a65b7ae
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2655

MS 1879 Nine Fox legends collected by Truman Michelson

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Leaf, Bill  Search this
Lincoln, Harry  Search this
Kiyana, Alfred, 1877-1918  Search this
Sakihtanohkweha, 1875-1957  Search this
Translator:
Poweshiek, Ida  Search this
Extent:
25 Items (0.25 linear feet (425 pages)
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Nine stories in Meskwaki (Fox) syllabary by various authors with English translations by Ida Poweshiek. Contents: 1) Wapasaya by Bill Leaf; text 29 pages, translation 34 pages. 2.) When Wisahkeha fed bees to the wolves, by Alfred Kiyana; text 17 pages, translation 14 pages. 3.) Wisake, by Sakihtanohkweha (Mrs. Bill Leaf); text 40 pages, translation 30 pages. 4) Feather, by Harry Lincoln; text 25 pages, translation 34 pages. 5.) The man who made a sacred bundle, by Alfred Kiyana; text 27 pages, translation 18 pages. 6.) Something about Rabbit and Bear, by Harry Lincoln; text 6 pages, translation 9 pages. 7.) The Indian lead miners who mined lead long ago, by Alfred Kiyana; text 32 pages, translation 36 pages. 8.) The Indian who was blessed a an owl long ago, by Alfred Kiyana; text 31 pages, translation 28 pages. 9) When Wisake was almost captured by the manitous by Alfred Kiyana; text 8 pages, translation 13 pages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1879
Local Note:
Title changed from "8 Legends" 3/19/2014.
Topic:
Fox language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Wapasaiya  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 1879, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1879
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c8526d16-b9d0-4b75-a18c-6a76792fe94f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1879

MS 2153 Seven Fox stories by Alfred Kiyana with translations and grammatical notes

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Kiyana, Alfred, 1877-1918  Search this
Translator:
Leaf, Bill  Search this
Brown, Thomas, circa 1891-  Search this
Walker, Leo  Search this
Extent:
154 Pages
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Seven stories in Meskwaki (Fox) syllabic text by Alfred Kiyana with English translations and Truman Michelson's grammatical notes. Collected in Tama, Iowa, the following is a list of the stories: 1.) "Owl" text 8 pages, translation from Bill Leaf 3 pages; 2) "The married couple: the man whose wife was wooed by a bear" text 29 pages, translation 18 pages, grammatical questions 6 pages; 3) "When Possum married Woodchuck" text 8 pages, 2 translations from Leo Walker (one incorrectly labelled "When Raccoon married Badger") 6 pages; 4) "When Raccoon was friends with Badger" text 16 pages, translation 13 pages; 5) "When the Fox chiefs were all killed by the Menominee" text 4 pages, translation from Leo Walker 3 pages; 6) "Me so swa" text 22 pages, translation by Michelson and Thomas Brown 18 pages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2153
Topic:
Fox language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 2153, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2153
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw350ad675f-c01a-495e-9283-75341c3c2544
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2153

Nahuatl

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
14 Boxes
Culture:
Nahua  Search this
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Folklore
Narratives
Date:
1951
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Mexico/Central America/South America series contains Harrington's Nahuatl research. The materials consist of linguistic notes, grammar, texts, and miscellaneous notes.

His linguistic notes form the largest section of this subseries. A semantically arranged vocabulary was elicited from Alfonso Hernandez Catarina. The categories of lexical items include phenomena, directions, seasons, astronomy, time, plant parts, plants, animal parts, animals, age-sex, rank, relationship, material culture, religion, tribenames, and placenames. A "Flood Story" in English is also included. In addition, there are some phrases, information on phonetics and grammar, and a little ethnographic data. There are references to secondary sources such as Simeon, Carochi ("Car."), and "Gar."

Arcadio Sagahon was also a major contributor. Harrington recorded eighteen pages of basic vocabulary with him. There is also a section of randomly arranged vocabulary based on an examination of rock and plant specimens, with occasional references to "Arc's book" (not further identified). Some equivalent terms were provided by Tiburcio Jaimez.

A compilation of several sets of word lists on numbered pages resulted from a number of linguistic sessions with Tiburcio Jaimez. These include commentary on a book by Cardenas (abbreviated "Card.") which is not further identified. Harrington also elicited Jaimez's aid in rehearing the source referred to as "Gar." They developed fairly extensive annotations to pages 40 to 51 of that work, and the section on verbs. In addition, Jaimez provided commentary on the book Raices etimologicas del idioma nahuatl by Pedro Barra y Valenzuela.

Additional linguistic data were furnished by Tomas Perez Escobar and Jose Farias Galindo. A general, unsorted vocabulary which Harrington recorded from Escobar, with a few comments from Arcadio Sagahon, is supplemented by a sizable section of notes in his own hand. Sentences in Nahuatl are each followed by a Spanish translation. Farias provided vocabulary during a number of sessions in which he was accompanied by Captain Santos Acevedo Lopez. There is also a small file of miscellaneous vocabulary given together by Farias and Arcadio Sagahon.

Many of the data from the preceding groups of field notes were brought together in a comprehensive semantic arrangement. In addition, Harrington compiled lists of words in English and Spanish as a questionnaire for eliciting Maya words. (In fact, this section is headed by a sheet with the label "Questionnaire for Az[tec].")

A final section of linguistic notes includes miscellaneous shorter vocabularies, a four-page word list, and Harrington's questionnaire. A "Coyotepec Vocabulary" of nineteen pages was recorded from Francisco Pinera Martinez. It includes Xochimilco equivalences, commentary by Jose Farias Galindo, and a reference to Mr. Sanchez. Notes from a "Cuautla Trip" include a short vocabulary (seven pages) from an unidentified informant and miscellaneous notes on people and places. A twenty-three page basic vocabulary and a few phrases were recorded from Jose Fortino. Harrington later obtained a few Xochimilco glosses and a little commentary by Arcadio Sagahon. The sixteen pages of notes, resulting from a trip Harrington took to Tepotzotlan with Farias and "Arc," contain miscellaneous data and references to an unnamed informant. A basic vocabulary and some short sentences were elicited from Jose Barreraon May 2, 1951, under the heading "Tete. Voc." It is unclear whether the language referred to is Tetelcingo or Tetela but it was presumably related to the language of Tezcoco. The seventy pages of data, which include some Xochimilco terms and information on the country, are supplemented by two pages obtained from "Juan while waiting for the bus." The material was reheard with Farias, Perez, and Sagahon at a later date. There are nine pages of data from an interview with Albino (Alvino) Cortes. There is a mention of Frederico Hernandez, and Miguel Romero was also present during the recording of the "Aztec vocabulary." Lexical items were recorded from Munoz (alternate spelling Munos), Romero, and Juan Ramos of Puebla, near Vera Cruz City. There are also four pages of notes in an unidentified hand and a questionnaire used by Harrington in his linguistic work. It includes a little data from "Alf." and "Arc."

Notes on Nahuatl grammar include excerpts from a number of published sources, primarily Whorf, Simeon, and Carochi. The topics covered include phonetics (one section is labeled "Phonetics Tibd"), syntax, verb, noun, pronoun, numeral, adjective, adverb, postposition, conjunction, and interjection. The principal informants cited are Arcadio Sagahon and Tomas Perez Escobar. Additional information was provided by Alfonso Hernandez Catarina, Tiburcio Jaimez, Tomas Perez Escobar, Jose Farias Galindo, and Captain Acevedo. One page of the grammar is in Farias' handwriting. Several pages are marked "Tete."

The major sets of Nahuatl texts which Harrington recorded were assigned by him to one of two categories: "Finished" or "Not yet gone over." The first designation indicates that the Nahuatl phonetic transcription of a given text was refined with the original speaker--and sometimes reheard by others--and that it was accompanied by a complete Spanish translation and possibly notes. There are references to Matlapa and Jalpilla forms. The predominant contributor was Arcadio Sagahon. Alternate versions of each text were also given by Tiburcio Jaimez and Alfonso Hernandez. All of the stories have to do with animals and many appear to be translations of fables rather than native texts: "The Sky Is Falling" (Chicken Little), "La Zorra y el Queso" (The Fox and the Cheese). The texts labeled "Not gone over" appear to have been recorded from Hernandez and Jaimez but not reviewed with Sagahon. The stories include "The Girl and the Head of the Birds," "The Queen Bee and the Drone," and the lengthy "La Vida de un Indigena." A miscellaneous set of texts at the end of the series represents an attempt at a translation of the Lord's Prayer by Hernandez and Sagahon and a poem evidently written by the latter.

Harrington also compiled several miscellaneous files of data on Nahuatl. The first, consisting of notes from the period 1922 to 1927, includes bibliographic references, a list of "Aztek" words from Ben Elson in Vera Cruz, and a partial English translation of Carochi's grammar by Paul Vogenitz. Other files -which contain some typed and handwritten notes prepared by others-include background notes on the geography, history, and language of the Nahuatl; bibliographic references; maps; and a list of "persons and addresses." The latter contains some biographical data on Harrington's informants. There are also reports from Carlos Morales and copies of letters which reflect Harrington's efforts to contact Nahuatl speakers.
Biographical / Historical:
Harrington conducted fieldwork on Nahuatl--also referred to as Aztec--during a six-month period in 1951. In March he left Washington, D.C., arriving at the Hotel Fornos in Mexico City on March 25. He remained there until early September. Most of his informants were found locally, although he did make a number of side trips into the surrounding regions.

During the course of his study he worked with speakers of a number of dialects. He distinguished between the various forms he recorded by the use of abbreviations: "Az." or "Cl. Az." referred to Classical Aztec and "Naw." to Nahuatl. "Fed. Dist." was used for Federal District, "Xoch." for Xochimilco, "MA" for Milpa Alta, "V.C." for Vera Cruz, and "Mat(l)." for Matlapa. Terms from the Valley of Mexico were noted variously by the markers "Valle de Mex.," "V de M.," or "V of M." Some comparisons were occasionally made with Cahuilla (Cah.) words.

Harrington made use of a number of secondary sources throughout his study. The primary works which he consulted included the Dictionnaire de La langue nahuatl ou mexicaine by Remi Simeon, Arte de La lengua mexicana by Horacio Carochi, and a source referred to as "Gar."--possibly by Angel Maria Garibay Kintana or Jose I. Davila Garibi. He evidently had plans to prepare an annotated version of Simeon's Nahuatl-French dictionary. An assistant aided him in photostatting and pasting each entry on a separate card. Preliminary steps were taken to provide English glosses but no new Nahuatl data were appended to them.

The first informant whom Harrington contacted was Miguel Romero. They worked together on March 26 and 27 and April 1. He spoke with Salome Perez on March 27 and interviewed Tomas Perez Escobar on an almost daily basis from March 28 through April 28. The latter, referred to variously as "Professor Perez," "Perez," and "Tomas," was from the Valley of Mexico. Sessions were conducted intermittently with Frederico Hernandez Mota and Professor Jose Farias Galindo in April and May. Farias (Far.) was a Nahuatl speaker teaching elementary school in Mexico City and Xochimilco. Harrington also noted that he was the translator of the Mexican national anthem into Nahuatl and that he published poetry. In several sessions he was accompanied by Santos Acevedo Lopez, a captain in the Mexican army, who also typed a number of sheets for Harrington.

Harrington's financial records for May 22 mention receipts for payment signed by Tiburcio Jaimez and Arcadio Sagahon, indicating that he probably worked with them at least during the latter part of May. Jaimez, usually referred to by the abbreviation "Tib.," was born and raised in the pueblo of San Francisco Calixtlahuacan.

The field notes indicate that Harrington worked with another major informant, Professor Alfonso Hernandez Catarina, beginning in July. Born at Coxcatlan, "Alf." had been living for some nine years at Ciudad Santos, San Luis Potosi.

Among secondary informants with whom Harrington consulted were Professor Gregorio Cruz (Cruz, Ruz), of the Colegio Administrativo at Toluco, who was teaching school in Tenango;Jose Fortino, a resident of Teskitote Ranch; and Professor Camarena of Toluca. Others mentioned were Francisco Pinera Martinez (middle name alternately spelled Pireda), E[fraim] Sanchez, Pablo Yadieis, and Juan Baloria.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Nahuatl language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Zoology -- nomenclature  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Folklore
Narratives
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 7.2
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 7: Mexico/Central America/South America
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw31da33128-08f5-4876-b6e0-b2b194ae05c9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15100
Online Media:

Family Folklore Interviews: Sanow, Fox, Bretholz, Stronberg

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Office of Folklife Programs. Family Folklore Project  Search this
Field worker:
Burack-Novick, Lynda  Search this
Performer:
Bretholz, Myron  Search this
Sanow,Fox, Arnold,Gail  Search this
Stromberg, Marvin  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
German  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1976 June 27
1976
General note:
Other number FP-1976-CT-0160
Local Numbers:
FP-1976-CT-0160

FLP.114057
Publication, Distribution, Etc. (Imprint):
United States 1976
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 27, 1976.
General:
109-1/3-76
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Migration  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Fiction  Search this
Work  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Travel  Search this
Children  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1976, Item FP-1976-CT-3160
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Family Folklore / FP-1974-CT-0758: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk52a3c7b20-eed7-4957-91f7-a31965a82a75
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1976-ref11327

Family Folklore Interviews: Johnson, Jacobson, Rosenfield, Fox, Preshey

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Office of Folklife Programs. Family Folklore Project  Search this
Zeitlin, Steven J. (field worker)  Search this
Artist:
Jacobson, Rosenfield, Fox, Amy, Fran, Debbie  Search this
Johnson, Farnum  Search this
Performer:
Jacobson, Rosenfield, Fox, Amy, Fran, Debbie  Search this
Johnson, Farnum  Search this
Preshey, Mary E.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
analog.
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1976 July 17
1976
General note:
Other number FP-1976-CT-0489
Local Numbers:
FP-1976-CT-0489
Publication, Distribution, Etc. (Imprint):
United States 1976
General:
474-1-76
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 17, 1976.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Courtship  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1976, Item FP-1976-CT-3491
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Family Folklore / FP-1974-CT-0758: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5dee620f7-0631-4342-bedf-15c0dd7d0aa1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1976-ref11987

Children's Program

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The Children's Area was a magnet to young visitors during the Bicentennial Festival. The Hill and Sand area provided the three essential elements of earth, sand, and water, inviting children to transform the landscape with castles and forts, quarries and caves, as dreams emerged from the blank sand canvas. In the dirt-floored Marble Ring, parents could teach their children, and children could bring their parents up to date on the ways of aggies, steelies, puries, and cats' eyes. The Game Ring had a tree club-house and materials for building on additions; games of all sorts were also played here: tug of war, jump rope, squirt gun fights, four square, hop scotch, football.

In the Crafts Tents, the articles useful in play were constructed; children and adults made doll houses and dolls, folded paper cootie catchers, soap box derby cars, wooden sailboats. The Folk Swap Tent was for the exchange of secret languages and riddles, counting out rhymes and ghost stories. Here, costumes and puppets were also fashioned for the Stage, where children from local schools and clubs shared their performance traditions - clapping games, circuses, stunts, and parades. Sometimes adults taught the traditional games and playparties that they remembered so lovingly from their own childhoods.

The program was coordinated by Kate Rinzler, assisted by Saucie Melnicove.
Presenters and area supervisors:
Jean Alexander, Jeffrey Byrd, Jacqueline Cook, Peter Crowley, Jean Kaplan, Betsy Nadas, Marcella Nichols, Rosa Scott, Suzy Seriff, Kim Storey, Willie Demps
Participants:
Stu Jamieson, folklorist

Bessie Jones, 1902-1984, folklorist, Brunswick, Georgia

Vanessa Jones, folklorist

Mei Jiun Mai, Chinese folklore

Andrea Meditch, folklorist

Ann Mitchell, quilter

Tinson Mortensen, woodworker

Tom Murphy, woodworker

Paul Ofori-Ansah, folklorist

Mary Scherbatskoy, folklorist

Dorothy Stroman, folklorist

Lu Yu, Chinese folklore

Yung Ching-Yeh, Chinese folklore

Schools

Bancroft Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Brent Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Brightwood Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Burrville Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Capitol Hill Day School, Washington, D.C.

Dale Wilson Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Edmonds-Peabody Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Lamont Elementary, New Carrolton, Maryland

Long Branch Elementary, Arlington, Virginia

Mott Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Parkland Jr. High, Rockville, Maryland

Piney Branch Middle School, Takoma Park, Maryland

Simmons Elementary, Washington, D.C.

St. Rita Parochial School, Alexandria, Virginia

Stevens Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Takoma Park Elementary, Takoma Park, Maryland

Thomas Stone Elementary, Mt. Rainier, Maryland

Thomson Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Washington International School, Washington, D.C.

Watkins Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Wheatley Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Woodmore Elementary, Mitchellville, Maryland

Girl Scout Troops

Brownies Troop 645, Brownies Troop 2188, Brownies Troop 2467, Cadettes Troop 741, Cadettes Troop 801, Cadettes Troop 1149, Juniors Troop 512, Juniors Troop 968, Juniors Troop 1363, Juniors Troop 1524, Girl Scout Troop 11, Girl Scout Troop 401, Girl Scout Troop 1129, Girl Scout Troop 1466, Girl Scout Troop 1745, Girl Scout Troop 1821, Girl Scout Troop 2344, Vero Beach, Florida Girl Scout Troop Juniors 1980, Geneva, Ohio Girl Scout Troop 496, Mt. Vernon, N.Y. Girl Scout Troop 46J, Senior Scouts of '76

Campfire Girls Troop 439

Boy Scout Troops

Cub Pack 87, Cub Pack 114, Cub Pack 166, Cub Pack 200, Cub Pack 248, Cub Pack 389, Cub Pack 445, Cub Pack 621, Cub Pack 640, Cub Pack 662, Cub Pack 691, Cub Pack 725, Cub Pack 781, Cub Pack 937, Cub Pack 1039, Cub Pack 1048, Cub Pack 1282, Cub Pack 1414, Cub Pack 1441, Cub Pack 1584

Arlington County, Virginia Recreation Centers

Anne Murphy, Anne Suter, Dawson Terrace, Drew, Germantown, Jackson, Jefferson, Kenmore, Lee, Lubber Run, Madison, Stratford, Swanson, Walter Reed, Yorktown

Washington, D.C. Recreation Centers

Amidon, Anacostia, Arboretum, Bald Eagle, Banneker, Barry Farms, Benning Park, Benning Terrace, Bertie Bachus, Brent, Brentwood, Bruce Park, Bundy, Congress Heights, Douglass, East Capitol, Eliot, Evans, Fairfax, Fort Greble, Francis, Frazier, Friendship House, Greenleaf, Hardy, Hart, Hearst, Hillcrest, Hine, Jefferson, K. C. Lewis, Keane, Kelly Miller, Kenilworth, King, Lafayette, Logan, Ludlow, Malcolm X, Maury, Mayfair, Mitchell Park, Montana, New York Avenue, North Michigan Park, Orr, Parkside, Payne, Peabody, Powell-Lincoln, Randall, Ridge, River Terrace, Roper, Rosedale, Savoy, Seaton, Sherwood, Slowe, Sousa, Stoddert, Taft, Terrell, Thompson, Trinidad, Tyler, Virginia Avenue, Watkins, Woodland, Woodson

Fairfax County, Virginia Recreation Centers

Cameron, D.R. Tinn, Garfield, Greenbriar, Hayfield, Hunt Valley, Hunters, Little Run, Parklawn, Spring Hill, Woodlawn, Woods

Montgomery County, Maryland Recreation Centers

Area 1, Area 2, Area 3, Area 4, Area 5, Camp Breezy Hollow, Camp Meadowbrook, Cannon Road, Cashell, Fox Chapel, Mill Creek Towne, Page, Pinecrest, Watkins Mill

Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission Recreation Centers

Adelphi, Area 2, Area 4, Area 6, Arts Program, Beltsville, Bowie, Camp Dawana, Morningside, New Carrolton, Seabrook, South Laurel, Valley View

Camps

Arlington YMCA, Barrie Day Camp, Becky Mark's group, Camp Dawana, Camp Green Acres, Camp Greenway, Camp Pinto, Campfire Ga-Ro-Da, Ebenezer Methodist Church, Pin Oak 4 H Club, Safari Day Camp, Town and Country
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1976, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk59b5d6ae1-5722-4592-a894-2c331bfa9ed9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1976-ref24

MS 2671 Four versions of the Fox story of Apaiyashihagi and an untitled text collected by Truman Michelson

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Kiyana, Alfred, 1877-1918  Search this
Leaf, Bill  Search this
Shapochiwa  Search this
Sakihtanohkweha, 1875-1957  Search this
Extent:
225 Pages
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
1912-1913, undated
Scope and Contents:
Four versions of the story of Apaiyashihagi handwritten in Meskwaki (Fox) syllabic text by Alfred Kiyana, Shapochiwa (Mrs. Harry Lincoln), and Sakihtanohkweha (Mrs. Bill Leaf), with English translations by Truman Michelson. Sakihtanohkweha authored two versions, dated 1912 and 1913; only the 1912 version is translated. A note regarding "clans known to Harry Lincoln" can be found at the end of that translation. On the first page of Sakihtanohkweha's 1913 text Michelson notes, "This is a version of lodge-boy thrown away. The first part is nearly identical with the version written by her in the fall of 1912." On page 42-61 of the same text is a different story by Bill Leaf.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2671
Local Note:
Title changed from "Apaiyashihagi Legend" 4/4/2014.
Topic:
Fox language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 2671, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2671
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3ddd22c1f-da81-4c73-ae14-cdedaa749e03
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2671
Online Media:

MS 2024 Fifteen Fox stories by various authors collected by Truman Michelson

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Peters, Jim, 1866-  Search this
Peters, Sam, 1885-  Search this
Pearl Leaf  Search this
Translator:
Poweshiek, Horace  Search this
Extent:
461 Pages
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Fifteen Meskwaki (Fox) syllabic texts by various authors with English translations by Horace Poweshiek. The authors of the Meskwaki texts include Jim Peters, Sam Peters, and Pearl Leaf; the other writers are unidentified. Among the stories are Red leggins (two versions); Wapasaiya; Turtle brings ruin on himself; and Kottilega.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2024
Topic:
Fox language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 2024, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2024
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3000930f1-9f94-433c-8292-c61ec6305866
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2024
Online Media:

MS 2501 Ten Fox stories by Alfred Kiyana, Bill Leaf, and unidentified writers

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Kiyana, Alfred, 1877-1918  Search this
Leaf, Bill  Search this
Translator:
Lincoln, Harry  Search this
Extent:
199 Pages
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Stories handwritten in Meskwaki (Fox) syllabary by Alfred Kiyana, Bill Leaf, and two unidentified writers, with English translations from Harry Lincoln in Truman Michelson's hand. These were collected by Michelson in Tama, Iowa. One text, titled "The buffalo who lived with an Indian woman," is by Alfred Kiyana. Bill Leaf authored "Two men, one became a fish," "Indian Baseball Wisahkeha and Turtle," and "Indian cowboy Wisahkeha." There is an English translation of a fourth text by Leaf, "Bill Leaf's French," but the original Meskwaki text is not present. The authors of the other 5 stories are unidentified. The titles are "A man who was torn to pieces," "The last time the Meskwakis had a war," "The Indian that came to be a manitou," "The person who was blessed by a hawk(?)," and "The man who was blessed by the Apayashihaki brothers."
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2501
Local Note:
Jack Bullard was originally identified as one of the writers, but his handwriting does not match of any of the texts. Title changed from "Legends" 3/27/2014.
Topic:
Fox language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 2501, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2501
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3df5e86b6-211b-4888-af82-ce35ea0500b1
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2501
Online Media:

Working Americans

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Since 1971, under the rubric of "Union Workers" and, later, "Working Americans", the Festival of American Folklife broadened the scope of traditional folklore by including exhibits featuring the American working man and woman. The premise was that folklore is a continuing process and that occupations generate individual styles, superstitions, language, initiations that unite those workers within one occupation across the country and around the world.

In 1974, the skills of workers from a large number of contemporary occupations centered on communication were exhibited in the Working Americans area of the Festival. In addition, this program focused on the folklore of these occupations: occupational jokes, rituals, beliefs, customs, language, and stories that express workers' true attitudes toward themselves, their jobs and co-workers, their working conditions and unions, their industries, and local communities. The Festival's concern was to present the worker not only as a skilled practitioner of his or her trade, but even more importantly, as a person whose entire expressive culture is heavily influenced by the work he or she does. Presentations in 1974 were organized around several domains of communication: graphic communications, radio broadcasting, telecommunications, ham radio (amateur radio), theater work, and music.

Festival presentations were the result of extensive planning and cooperation among the AFL-CIO, the U.S. Department of Labor, the Smithsonian and its folklife scholars, and the National Park Service. The program coordinator was Shirley Askew, assisted by Susan Donahue; consultants included Kenneth Goldstein, Archie Green, and Jill Shuman.

Presentations in 1974 laid the groundwork for the major Bicentennial Festival of American Folklife, including as many as 90 occupational groups.
Fieldworkers:
Robert Baron, Saul Broudy, Bruce Nickerson, Robert E. Porter, Richard Skrinjar
Participants:
Communications Workers of America

Joseph A. Beirne, 1911-, President

Jeffrey Shaw, exhibit coordinator

Participants: -- Participants:Albert GreenwoodCalvin FosterEdward O'ConnorJames SpicknallChris DreslinMax LindseyElmer PilgrimRichard LincolnDon FoxGroff (Sarge) YeckJohn ClaggettFrancis J. Kriege, Jr.Roger CullerC. W. SmithHarold NewtonJohn RumseyAlice WilliamsVicki WhiteBlondell WareWila HallDavid MooreBernice LaCourHazell Rouse

Graphic Arts International Union

Kenneth J. Brown, President

John A. Stagg, exhibit coordinator

Walter Lypka, exhibit coordinator

Participants: -- Participants:Carolyn ForsterHarvey LovinArnold GrummerOther members of the Graphic Arts International Union also participated in this exhibit.

Foundation for Amateur Radio

Hugh Turnbull, W3ABC, President

Edmund B. Redington, W4ZM, exhibit coordinator

The Foundation acknowledges the support and co-operation of the national organization of radio amateurs, The American Radio Relay League, Inc. (Newington, Conn.), and the participation of the following League officials: Victor Clark, W4KFC (Vice President), and Harry McConaghy, W3SW (Director, Atlantic Division).

Department of State Amateur Radio Club -- Department of State Amateur Radio ClubBryan Cordray, WA5SPIJohn Swafford, W4HUWilliam R. Jochimsen, W3UVFred Vogel, WA3QBKHersh Miller, W3SWDMac Shimp, WA3PPPJim Brown, W5DRPJames Bullington, K4LSDGale Conard, K3VTAPauline Conard, WA3VHHTom Masingill, WB4KNWGlen Starkey, K4PUISam Staton, K41TBDexter Anderson, K3KWJWill DeCierq, WA4DIBEarle Sherman, K4HQP

National Capital DX Association -- National Capital DX AssociationDon Search, W3AZDJim Douglas, W3ZNHLynn Lamb, W3BWZPete Huber, WA3KSQJoe Mikuckis, K3CHPBurt Cohen, W3CREDick Price, W3DBTGeorge Grant, WA3MBQDick Propst, W3NLBill May, W3RXMort Cohen, K3SXQBill Shepherd, W3ZSRSteve Jarrett, K4CFBRay Johnson, K4DXOPete Raymond, K4EKJJinny Beyer, W41DGRay Porter, K40MRRay Spence, W4QAWTed Cohen, W4UMFJohn Kanode, W4WSFJohn Boyd, W4WWG

The American Federation of Television and Radio Artists

Northern Virginia FM Association, Inc. -- Northern Virginia FM Association, Inc.George Miller, K4EJYCharles Raybuck, W4YEBJ. William Miller, K3MMWalter Lockhart, W3PWBDonald Dunlap, WB4QAXRobert Payton, W4GPD

Amateur Radio Public Service Corps -- Amateur Radio Public Service CorpsKarl Medrow, W3FAJohn Munholland, K3LFDBob Slagle, K4GRBud Cone, WA4PBGSherm Winings, WB4RDVJohn Manning, WB4MAECharles Stay, W4HECraig Church, K4GORPhilip Sager, WB4FDTSteve Floyd, WB4YHDMarc Pressman, WB4DRBKen Johnson, WN4GHY

Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT) -- Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT)Perry I. Klein, K3JTEJan A. King, W3GEYWm. A. Hook, W3QBCCharles Dorian, W3JPTWilliam A. Tynan, W3KMVJoseph Kasser, G3ZCZ/W3Richard Daniels, WA4DGUThomas H. Mitchell, WA3TBDEdward Ramos, W3HQHR. Alfred Whiting, K3BRS

Metrovision, Inc. (Amateur television club) -- Metrovision, Inc. (Amateur television club)Terry Fox, WB4JFIMike Bray, WB4DVDBruce Brown, WB4YTUTom Lucas, WA4RBEPaul Lain, W4WHODon Miller, W9NTPJohn Oehlenschlager, WA4EMOStu Mitchell, WAODYJJohn Hart, K3KWOPhil Poole, WB4FQRFrank Lamm, WB4FUJ

Washington Area Young Ladies Radio Club (WAYLARC) -- Washington Area Young Ladies Radio Club (WAYLARC)Irene Akers, W3RXJElizabeth Zandonini, W3CDQEthel Smith, K4LMBMaxine Harris, WA4UWKJanie Mcintyre, K4BNGClaire Bardon, K4TVTMary Seaton, W4HRDPat Morton, LU1BAR/3Meg Cauffield, W3UTRPeg Demueles, WA3SCXSandra Rutiser, K3SOXGinny Pemkerton, K4SHE

Actors Equity Association

National Association of Broadcast Employees and Technicians

Scenic Artists of the International Brotherhood of Painters and Allied Trades

American Federation of Musicians

Hal C. Davis, President

in cooperation with

THE MUSIC PERFORMANCE TRUST FUNDS

Kenneth E. Raine, Trustee Music Performance Trust Funds

The music for this occasion was provided by a grant from the Music Performance Trust Funds, a public service organization, created and financed by the recording industries under agreements with the American Federation of Musicians.

Phyllis Boyens, 1947-2009, singer, guitarist

Philip Cassadore, 1932-1985, Apache singer

Sam Chatmon, 1899-1983, blues singer, guitarist, Hollandale, Mississippi

Hazel Dickens, 1935-2011, singer, guitarist

Jim Garland, 1905-1978, singer, guitarist

Joe Glazer, 1918-2006, singer, guitarist

Sarah Ogan Gunning, 1910-1983, singer, guitarist

Janie Hunter, 1918-1997, singer, ring-games

Bessie Jones, 1902-1984, singer, ring-games

Jesse Mays, spiritual singer, Independence, Mississippi

Mary McCaslin, 1946-, singer, guitarist

Paul Ortega, 1937-, Apache singer

Bruce Phillips, 1935-2008, singer, guitarist

Jim Ringer, 1936-1992, singer, guitarist

Florence Reece, 1900-1986, singer

Houston Stackhouse, 1910-1980, blues singer, Crystal Springs, Mississippi

James "Son" Thomas, 1926-1993, blues singer, Leland, Mississippi

Varney Watson, singer, guitarist

Floyd Westerman, 1936-2007, Sioux singer

Nimrod Workman, 1895-1994, singer, balladeer
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1974 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1974, Series 9
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1974 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5f48dd211-4045-4a57-a2a5-8e2f9b3dfcc7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1974-ref1376

Carey Bell and Harmonica Frank Floyd

Creator:
Union Workers Stage 1972  Search this
Artist:
Bell, Carey, 1936-2007  Search this
Floyd, Frank, 1908-1984  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (7 inch reel, 1/4 inch tape)
sound-tape reel (analog, 7 in.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Illinois
Tennessee
Date:
1972 July 1
Contents:
Hound Dog Taylor fragment; Harmonica Blues Workshop- Carey Bell- O Susannah- interview with Carey Bell- Walkin' by myself; Harmonica Frank-- Fox chase- Mama blues (Married man blues); Floyd and Bell- harmonica-guitar duet; Demonstration of hands-free harmonica
Track Information:
101 null / Harmonica.
General note:
DPA number 72.502.01
Local Numbers:
FP-1972-7RR-0050
General:
CDR copy
72.502.01
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 1, 1972.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Blues (Music)  Search this
Harmonica  Search this
Labor  Search this
occupational folklore  Search this
Country music  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1972 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1972, Item FP-1972-7RR-0050
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1972 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1972 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Union Workers / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk538a4878c-9e0b-4229-96f8-f10932103469
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1972-ref968

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