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Andean Storytelling with Julia Garcia (Quechua)

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2012-08-07T16:14:25.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_9dbDDXu-RcY

MS 3941 Materials assembled by Hewitt for preparation of articles in Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 30 and for replies to inquires from the public

Collector:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Correspondent:
Bogaskie, F.  Search this
Skinner, Alanson, 1886-1925  Search this
Creator:
MacKinley, W. E. W., Captain  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology -- Bulletin 30  Search this
Society of American Indians  Search this
Brant, Joseph, 1742-1807  Search this
Old Smoke  Search this
Sayenqueraghta  Search this
Scott, Hugh Lenox, 1853-1934  Search this
Williams, Eleazer  Search this
Culture:
Eskimos  Search this
Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox)  Search this
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Adirondack  Search this
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Black Mincqua  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Pekwanoket  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Wendat (Huron)  Search this
Mohawk  Search this
Maya  Search this
Algonquin (Algonkin)  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Sauk  Search this
Onondaga  Search this
Tuscarora  Search this
Erie (archaeological)  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Susquehannock (archaeological)  Search this
Wyandot  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Kainai Blackfoot (Kainah/Blood)  Search this
Sihasapa Lakota (Blackfoot Sioux)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Calendars
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Contents: Adirondack tribe (St Lawrence River) Old Manuscript Number 3553. Adoption Old Manuscript Number 4007. Refers to Algonquian method of counting -only; see Haas note 2/18/72; Old Manuscript Number 3864. "Alligewi"; Animism Old Manuscript Number 3867 and 2842-c, box 6. Blood Indians, origin of name; Brant, Joseph Old Manuscript Number 3874. Chippewa, origin of name Old Manuscript Number 3646. Chiefs, function and significance of Old Manuscript Number 2842-c, box 6. Delaware tribe, New Jersey area claimed by Old Manuscript Number 3866. Detroit River, tribes near; Ekaentoton Island-- see Ste. Marie Island Environment (Bulletin 30 draft by O. T. Mason) Old Manuscript Number 4007. Erie, origin of name Old Manuscript Number 3646. Erie and Black Mincqua tribes Old Manuscript Number 3586. [Eskimo] Arctic tribes, leaving elderly and sick people to die Old Manuscript Number 3668. Family, Bulletin 30 draft and notes Old Manuscript Number 4011 and 2842-c, box 6. Grand River (Tinaatoua), name of; Hebrew calendar; Hewitt, list of Bulletin 30 articles by Old Manuscript Number 4066. Hoboken, origin of name; Iroquois, "On the Northern and Eastern Territorial Limits of the Iroquoian people, in the 16th Century," and Algonquian tribes, at Chaleur Bay. Iroquois at Gulf of St Lawrence and Bay of Gaspe Old Manuscript Number 3625.
Iroquois, location of Six Nations tribes reservations Old Manuscript Number 3763. Iroquois false face; Iroquois preparation of corn ("as food") Old Manuscript Number 4009. Iroquoian early dress Old Manuscript Number 3660. Iroquoian "Gachoi" tribe, identity of (Correspondence with F. Bogaskie.) Old Manuscript Number 3816. Iroquoian moon names and concept of time; Iroquoian social organization, and place name-name origins; "Man," Iroquoian term for Old Manuscript Number 3781. Iroquoian towns Old Manuscript Number 4006. Kentucky, meaning of the word; Kentucky, origin of name Old Manuscript Number 3840. Lenni Lenape, meaning of the word; Logstown-- see Shenango Old Manuscript Number 3773. Lost Ten Tribes as American Indians Old Manuscript Number 3670. Mayan linguistic family and other Mayan linguistic notes including Quiche and Tepehuanan notes Old Manuscript Number 3473. Mexico: idols, sacrifices, etc. Old Manuscript Number 3807. Mexico: Indian languages. Letter from Captain W.E.W. MacKinley Old Manuscript Number 3778. Missouri, Indian village, location of Old Manuscript Number 3944. Mohawk land near Lake Champlain; Mohawk grammar; Montour family, notes for Bulletin 30 Old Manuscript Number 3812. Muskhogean social organization. Letter from J. J. Harrison. Old Manuscript Number 3891. New England tribes Old Manuscript Number 3513.
Niagara, origin of name; "Old Smoke"-- see Sayenqueraghta Old Manuscript Number 3949. Onondaga tribe, text of memorial inscription to, and correspondence Old Manuscript 4391 and 4271- box 1 (part.) Ontwaganha or Toaganha, origin and meaning of name Old Manuscript Number 3864. Owego, meaning of town's name; Pekwanoket tribe (Cape Cod); Pemaquid, Abnaki word and its origin Old Manuscript Number 89. Piasa bird- pictograph formerly near present Alton, Illinois. Article is similar to that by Cyrus Thomas, Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 30. Old Manuscript Number 3981. Potawatomi, notes on the name Old Manuscript Number 4034. Potawatomi Green Corn Dance; Roanoke, origin of name Old Manuscript Number 3998. Sacagawea, spelling of; St Ignace, 3 settlements (Michigan); St Marie Island or Ekaentoton Island; Sauk, Bulletin 30 article and galley proof, notes Old Manuscript Number 3764. Sayenqueraghta or "Old Smoke" (correspondence with Alanson Skinner) Old Manuscript Number 3949. Scalping Old Manuscript Number 4025. Shenango and Logstown Old Manuscript Number 3773. Sioux, origin of name Old Manuscript Number 3624. Society of American Indians, resolutions by thanking General Hugh L. Scott, Fr. Anselm Webber and others Old Manuscript Number 3868. Susquehanna, origin of name Old Manuscript Number 3707. Tacoma, origin of name Old Manuscript Number 3470.
Thunderbird, notes on Old Manuscript Number 3552. Tinaatoa-- see Grand River; Toronto, origin of name; Tuscarora villages Old Manuscript Number 3998. Wampum Old Manuscript Number 3998. War club with inscription; West Virginia panhandle tribes Old Manuscript Number 3945. Williams, Eleazer Old Manuscript Number 3998. Women, status of Old Manuscript Number 3566. Wyandots (Huron) List of tribes of which Wyandots of today are constituted. Old Manuscript Number 3774.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3941
Topic:
American Indian  Search this
Inheritance -- Adoption  Search this
Religion -- animism  Search this
Names, tribal -- Blood  Search this
Names, tribal -- Chippewa  Search this
Government and politics -- chiefs  Search this
Land tenure and claims -- Delaware  Search this
Names, tribal -- Erie  Search this
Death and mortuary customs -- abandoning elderly and sick  Search this
Marriage and family  Search this
Names, place -- Grand River  Search this
Jews  Search this
Iroquois Indians  Search this
Land tenure and claims  Search this
Masks -- False Face  Search this
Clothing and dress  Search this
Food preparation -- Corn  Search this
Time -- concepts  Search this
Social structure  Search this
Names, place  Search this
Towns, villages and other settlements  Search this
Names, place -- Kentucky  Search this
Names, tribal -- Leni Lenape  Search this
Muskogean Indians  Search this
Names, place -- Niagara  Search this
Names, place -- Owego  Search this
Abenaki Indians  Search this
Names, tribal -- Pemaquid  Search this
Pictographs -- Piasa bird  Search this
Potawatomi Indians  Search this
Dance -- Green Corn  Search this
Names, tribal -- Potawatomi  Search this
Names, place -- Roanoke  Search this
Towns, villages and other settlements -- St Ignace  Search this
Religion -- Mexico  Search this
Sacrifices -- Mexico  Search this
War -- Scalping  Search this
Indian interest groups -- Society of American Indians  Search this
Names, tribal -- Susquehanna  Search this
Names, tribal -- Tacoma  Search this
Folklore -- Thunderbird  Search this
Names, place -- Toronto  Search this
Tuscarora Indians  Search this
Trade, gifts and other exchanges -- Wampum  Search this
Weapons -- war club  Search this
Marriage and family -- women, status of  Search this
Names, place -- Hoboken  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Algonquin  Search this
Honniasant  Search this
Lenape  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Susquehannock  Search this
Mexico  Search this
Genre/Form:
Calendars
Citation:
Manuscript 3941, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3941
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw34e5d46f4-47a1-44d7-8e6d-d282280cd7f8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3941

Festival Recordings: Narrative Stage: Social/Cultural History; Relationship with First Families; Teamwork

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. White House Program 1992 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Miller, Mark K., 1953- (recorder)  Search this
Kamalidiin, Sais (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Fields, Alonzo  Search this
Allen, Eugene, 1919-2010  Search this
Parks, Lillian Rogers  Search this
Ficklin, Samuel, 1923-2000  Search this
Haller, Henry  Search this
Armentrout, Russell, 1929-  Search this
Fox, Sanford, 1919-1996  Search this
Arrington, Howard, 1927-2007  Search this
Burke, Kenneth, 1908-2000  Search this
Names:
United States. Department of Agriculture  Search this
Truman, Harry S., 1884-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Massachusetts
Medford (Mass.)
Virginia
Maryland
Florida
Date:
1992 June 26
Track Information:
101 Social and Cultural History: Changing Working Conditions / Alonzo Fields.

102 Relationships with First Families / Eugene Allen, Lillian Rogers Parks, Samuel Ficklin.

103 Teamwork- A State Dinner / Henry Haller, Russell Armentrout, Sanford Fox.

104 Greatest Challenges- Creative Solutions- Devising Systems / Alonzo Fields, Howard Arrington, Kenneth Burke.
Local Numbers:
FP-1992-CT-0247
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 26, 1992.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
occupational folklore  Search this
Christmas  Search this
Presidents  Search this
Presidents' spouses -- United States  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Flowers  Search this
Secret service -- United States  Search this
Plumbing  Search this
Dinners and dining  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1992, Item FP-1992-CT-0247
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife / Series 5: Workers at the White House / 5.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5c7b93adb-cd20-41ad-b3ff-d48886c83764
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1992-ref885

James Henri Howard Papers

Creator:
Howard, James H., 1925-1982 (James Henri)  Search this
Correspondent:
Woolworth, Alan R.  Search this
Weslager, C.A.  Search this
Witthoft, John, 1921-1993  Search this
Swauger, James Lee  Search this
Turnbull, Colin  Search this
Horn, Frances L.  Search this
Garcia, Louis  Search this
Fogelson, Raymond D.  Search this
Hodge, William  Search this
Hayink, J.  Search this
Feder, Norman  Search this
Ervin, Sam J. Jr  Search this
Feraca, Stephen E., 1934-  Search this
Feest, Christian F.  Search this
Cree, Charlie  Search this
Davis, Edward Mott  Search this
De Busk, Charles R.  Search this
Iadarola, Angelo  Search this
Brasser, Ted J.  Search this
Bunge, Gene  Search this
Cavendish, Richard  Search this
Clifton, James A.  Search this
DeMallie, Raymond  Search this
Blake, Leonard W.  Search this
Dean, Nora Thompson  Search this
Spier, Leslie, 1893-1961  Search this
Smith, John L.  Search this
Swanton, John Robert  Search this
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Peterson, John H.  Search this
Paredes, J. Anthony, 1939- (James Anthony)  Search this
Schleisser, Karl H.  Search this
Reed, Nelson A.  Search this
Medford, Claude W.  Search this
Lurie, Nancy Oestreich  Search this
Opler, Morris Edward  Search this
Nettl, Bruno, 1930-  Search this
Kraft, Herbert C.  Search this
Johnson, Michael G.  Search this
Lindsey-Levine, Victoria  Search this
Kurath, Gertrude  Search this
Adams, Richard N. (Richard Newbold), 1924-  Search this
Allen, James H.  Search this
Barksdale, Mary Lee  Search this
Battise, Jack  Search this
Names:
Lone Star Steel Company  Search this
Extent:
10.25 Linear feet
Culture:
Seminole  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Shawnee  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Chickasaw  Search this
Choctaw  Search this
Yanktonnai Nakota (Yankton Sioux)  Search this
Seneca  Search this
Euchee (Yuchi)  Search this
Omaha  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Chaticks Si Chaticks (Pawnee)  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Mi'kmaq (Micmac)  Search this
Kickapoo  Search this
Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox)  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Oto  Search this
Tonkawa  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Oklahoma -- Archeology
Date:
1824-1992
bulk 1950-1982
Summary:
To a considerable degree, the James H. Howard papers consist of manuscript copies of articles, book, speeches, and reviews that document his professional work in anthropology, ethnology, ethnohistory, archeology, linguistics, musicology, and folklore between 1950 and 1982. Among these are a few unpublished items. Notes are relatively scant, there being somewhat appreciable materials for the Chippewa, Choctaw, Creek, Dakota, Omaha, Ponca, Seminole, and Shawnee. The chief field materials represented in the collection are sound recordings and photographs, but many of the latter are yet to be unidentified. A series of color photographs of Indian artifacts in folders are mostly identified and represent the extensive American Indian Cultural collection of costumes and artifacts that Howard acquired and created. Other documents include copies of papers and other research materials of colleagues. There is very little original material related to archeological work in the collection and that which is present concerns contract work for the Lone State Steel Company.
Scope and Contents:
The James Henri Howard papers document his research and professional activities from 1949-1982 and primarily deal with his work as an anthropologist, archeologist, and ethnologist, studying Native American languages & cultures. The collection consists of Series 1 correspondence; Series 2 writings and research, which consists of subject files (language and culture research materials), manuscripts, research proposals, Indian claim case materials, Howard's publications, publications of others, and bibliographical materials; Series 3 sound recordings of Native American music and dance; Series 4 photographs; and Series 5 drawings and artwork.

Howard was also a linguist, musicologist, and folklorist, as well as an informed and able practitioner in the fields of dance and handicrafts. His notable books include Choctaw Music and Dance; Oklahoma Seminoles: Medicines, Magic, and Religion; and Shawnee! The Ceremonialism of a Native American Tribe and its Cultural Background.

Some materials are oversize, specifically these three Winter Count items: 1. a Dakota Winter Count made of cloth in 1953 at the request of James H. Howard, 2. a drawing of British Museum Winter Count on 4 sheets of paper, and 3. Photographs of a Winter Count.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 5 series: Series 1. Correspondence, 1960-1982, undated; Series 2. Writings and Research, 1824-1992; Series 3. Sound Recordings, 1960-1979; Series 4. Photographs, 1879-1985; Series 5. Drawings and Artwork, 1928-1982.
Chronology:
1925 -- James Henri Howard was born on September 10 in Redfield, South Dakota.

1949 -- Received his Bachelor of Arts from the University of Nebraska.

1950 -- Received his Master of Arts from the University of Nebraska and began a prolific record of publishing.

1950-1953 -- Began his first professional employment as an archaeologist and preparator at the North Dakota State Historical Museum in Bismarck.

1955-1957 -- Was a museum lecturer at the Kansas City (Missouri) Museum.

1957 -- James H. Howard received his Ph.D. at the University of Michigan. Joined the staff of the Smithsonian's River Basin Surveys in the summer.

1957-1963 -- Taught anthropology at the University of North Dakota.

1962 -- Chief archeologist at the Fortress of Louisberg Archeological Project in Nova Scotia.

1963-1968 -- Taught anthropology at the University of South Dakota; State Archeologist of South Dakota; Director of the W. H. Over Dakota Museum.

1963-1966 -- Director of the Institute of Indian Studies, University of South Dakota.

1968-1982 -- Associate professor of anthropology at Oklahoma State University at Stillwater (became a full professor in 1971).

1979 -- Consulted for exhibitions at the Western Heritage Museum in Omaha, Nebraska.

1982 -- Died October 1 after a brief illness.
Biographical/Historical note:
James H. Howard was trained in anthropology at the University of Nebraska (B.A., 1949; M.A., 1950) and the University of Michigan (Ph.D., 1957). In 1950-1953, he served as archeologist and preparator at the North Dakota State Historical Museum; and, in 1955-1957, he was on the staff of the Kansas City (Missouri) Museum. During the summer of 1957, he joined the staff of the Smithsonian's River Basin Surveys. Between 1957 and 1963, he taught anthropology at the Universtity of North Dakota. Between 1963 and 1968, he served in several capacities with the University of South Dakota including assistant and associate professor, director of the Institute of Indian Studies (1963-1966), and Director of the W.H. Over Museum (1963-1968). In 1968, he joined the Department of Sociology at Oklahoma State University, where he achieved the rank of professor in 1970. In 1979, he was a consultant for exhibitions at the Western Heritage Museum in Omaha, Nebraska.

Howard's abiding interest were the people of North America, whom he studied both as an ethnologist and archeologist. Between 1949 and 1982, he worked with the Ponca, Omaha, Yankton and Yaktonai Dakota, Yamasee, Plains Ojibwa (or Bungi), Delaware, Seneca-Cayuga, Prairie Potatwatomi of Kansas, Mississipi and Oklahoma Choctaw, Oklahoma Seminole, and Pawnee. His interest in these people varied from group to group. With some he carried out general culture studies; with other, special studies of such phenomena as ceremonies, art, dance, and music. For some, he was interest in environmental adaptation and land use, the latter particularly for the Pawnee, Yankton Dakota, Plains Ojibwa, Turtle Mountain Chippewa, and Ponca, for which he served as consultant and expert witness in suits brought before the United Stated Indian Claims Commisssion. A long-time museum man, Howard was also interested in items of Indian dress, articles associated with ceremonies, and other artifacts. He was "a thoroughgoing participant-observer and was a member of the Ponca Hethuska Society, a sharer in ceremonial activities of many Plains tribes, and a first-rate 'powwow man'." (American Anthropologist 1986, 88:692).

As an archeologist, Howard worked at Like-a-Fishhook Village in North Dakota, Spawn Mound and other sites in South Dakota, Gavin Point in Nebraska and South Dakota, Weston and Hogshooter sites in Oklahoma, and the Fortess of Louisbourg in Nova Scotia. He also conducted surveys for the Lone Star Steel Company in Haskall, Latimer, Le Flore and Pittsburg counties in Oklahoma.
Related Materials:
Howard's American Indian Cultural Collection of Costumes and Artifacts, that he acquired and created during his lifetime, is currently located at the Milwaukee Public Museum. In Boxes 19-21 of the James Henri Howard Papers, there are photographs with accompanying captions and descriptions in binders of his American Indian Cultural Collection of Costumes and Artifacts that his widow, Elfriede Heinze Howard, created in order to sell the collection to a museum.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by James Henri Howard's wife, Elfriede Heinz Howard, in 1988-1990, 1992, & 1994.
Restrictions:
The James Henri Howard papers are open for research. Access to the James Henri Howard papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ethnology -- United States  Search this
Ethnomusicology  Search this
Folklore -- American Indian  Search this
Powwows  Search this
Citation:
James Henri Howard Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1994-30
See more items in:
James Henri Howard Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw30379c657-37d6-4c9e-99c4-eb8f7be76c10
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1994-30
Online Media:

Andean Storytelling with Julia Garcia (Quechua)

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2012-08-05T18:42:24.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_ls3LFLVNc-c

New York City at the Smithsonian

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
At first, it might seem like an oxymoron to talk about the "folklore" or "folklife" of one of the world's most modern cities, but daily life in New York would be impossible without this body of shared urban traditions, of collective community knowledge, customs, historical memories, and cultural understandings that constitutes the folklife of the city. lt provides the basic ground rules that shape how New Yorkers interact with their families, their colleagues, and their fellow New Yorkers. From subway etiquette to local street food to stickball games, these traditions give New York City its unique sense of place.

ln addition to a shared urban culture, most New Yorkers also have one or more reservoirs of specialized traditional knowledge, which they have acquired from their ethnic and/or religious upbringing, working in a particular occupation, or living in a specific area of the city. The innumerable, multifaceted ways in which these factors interact are what make New York and New Yorkers so fascinating. Of course, it was impossible to cover all aspects of New York's culture in a single event, but by approaching city culture thematically, and by carefully selecting examples that highlight different aspects of work, life, and leisure in New York, New York City at the Smithsonian sought to acquaint Festival visitors with both the ordinary and extraordinary aspects of life in Gotham.

What gives New York a sense of being different is not merely tbe myriad ethnic and interest groups that are found in the city, but the complex ways in which they overlap and interact. The physical landscape of New York - the lack of space, the reliance on mass transit by people of vastly differing backgrounds, neighborhoods which are home to both the very rich and the extremely poor - makes it impossible for New Yorkers to ignore the influence of "others." From kosher Chinese restaurants to lrish hip-hop groups to Mexican pizzas, cultures from all corners of the globe have influenced one another in New York, in part because of their physical proximity.

The 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival celebrated just a few of the innumerable manifestations of traditional culture in New York City. More importantly, fieldwork leading up to the Festival allowed the Smithsonian, working in close collaboration with city-based cultural organizations and ethnic and occupational communities, to document daily life in New York City at the turn of the millennium. Material collected during the course of this research, as well as information recorded during and after the Festival, will significantly enrich the Smithsonian's archival holdings about New York City. A century from now, when scholars and writers want to know what it was like to live in New York in 2001, to work on Broadway, to drive a taxi, to trade stocks on Wall Street, or teach English in a school filled with recent immigrants, they can turn to the documentation collected by this project. That body of documentation - and the recordings and photographs made during the Festival itself - took on increased importance with the events of September 11, 2001, barely three months after the Festival had closed, which emphasized to all observers how the cultural values of New Yorkers, vividly on display to Festival visitors, also provided them a reservoir of resiliency to surmount those tragic events.

Nancy Groce was Senior Curator for the program, supported by several Area Curators: Ray Allen, music; Marion Jacobson, urban fashion; Annie Hauck-Lawson, foodways; Cathy Ragland, music; Ethel Raim, music; Henry Sapoznik, media; Brian Thompson, Wall Street; Kay Turner, Wall Street; and Steve Zeitlin, neighborhood. Arlene Reiniger was Program Coordinator.

An Advisory Committee included: Ruth Abram, Director, Lower East Side Tenement Museum; Gladys Pena Acosta, Director, RAICES; Ray Allen, Director, American Studies Program, Brooklyn College/CUNY; Gage Averill, Chair, Music Department, New York University; Fatima Bercht, Chief Curator, El Museo del Barrio; Melody Capote, Executive Director, Caribbean Culture Center/African Diaspora Institute; Barbara Cohen-Stratyner, Curator, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts; Cara De Silva, Food Historian; Miriam De Uriarte, Director of Education, El Museo del Barrio; Howard Dodson, Director, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture/NYPL; Sharon E. Dunn, Senior Assistant for the Arts, New York City Board of Education; Juan Flores, Professor, Black and Puerto Rican Studies, Hunter College/CUNY; Laura Hansen, Director, Place Matters, Municipal Art Society; John Haworth, Assistant Director, National Museum of the American Indian; Ellie Hisama, Director, Institute for Studies in American Music, Brooklyn College/CUNY; Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Professor, Performance Studies Department, NYU; Leah Krauss, Program Officer, The New York Community Trust; Susana Torruella Leva!, Executive Director, El Museo del Barrio; Robert MacDonald, Executive Director, Museum of the City of New York; Fay Chew Matsuda, Executive Director, Museum of Chinese in the Americas; Ethel Raim, Executive Director, Center for Traditional Music and Dance; Jan Seidler Ramirez, Vice President of Public Affairs, New York Historical Society; Frances A. Resheske, Vice President of Public Affairs, Consolidated Edison Company; Joseph Sciarra, Academic Programs, Calandra Italian American Institute, Queens College; Gabrielle Shubert, Director, New York Transit Museum; Pravina Shukla, Assistant Professor, Folklore Department, Indiana University; John Kuo Wei Tchen, Director, Asian/Pacific/American Studies Program & Institute, NYU; Brian Thompson, Director, Museum of American Financial History; Michael Wallace, Historian and Author, CUNY; Steve Wheeler, Archivist, New York Stock Exchange; Theodora Yoshikami, Multicultural Program, American Museum of Natural History; Steven Zeitlin, Executive Director, City Lore: The Center for Urban Culture.

The program was produced in collaboration with New York's Center for Traditional Music and Dance and City Lore, with major funding from the New York City Council, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, Howard P. Milstein, and the New York Stock Exchange. The Leadership Committee was co-chaired by The Honorable Daniel Patrick Moynihan and Elizabeth Moynihan and corporate chairman Howard P. Milstein. Major support was provided by Amtrak, Con Edison, the Recording Industries Music Performance Trust Funds, Arthur Pacheco, and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Major contributors included The New York Community Trust, The Coca-Cola Company, The Durst Foundation, the May & Samuel Rudin Family Foundation, Leonard Litwin, Bernard Mendik, and Stephen and Judy Gluckstern. Additional donors included Emigrant Savings Bank, Jeffrey Gural, Lester Morse, Richard Schwartz, Michael Bloomberg, Keyspan Energy, Martin Segal, and Earle Mack.
Researchers:
Jerald Albarelli, Ray Allen, Emily Botein, Lori Branston, Kathleen Condon, Martha Cooper, Amanda Dargan, Andrew Davis, Tony DeNonno, Sonia Estreich, Makale Faber, Kwali Farbes, Michael Greene, Laura Hansen, Annie Hauck-Lawson, Marion Jacobson, Denise Lynn, Elena Martinez, Cathy Ragland, Ethel Raim, Henry Sapoznik, Roberta Singer, Les Slater, Scott Spencer, Brian Thompson, Kay Turner, Tom Van Buren, Li Wangsheng, Bill Westerman, Lois Wilken, Steven Zeitlin
Presenters:
Judy Adamson, Ray Allen, Dwight Blocker Bowers, Kathleen Condon, Andrew Davis, James Early, Makale Faber, Juan Flores, Annie Hauck-Lawson, Marion Jacobson, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Wangsheng Li, Elena Martinez, Cathy Ragland, Ethel Raim, Kristin Richard, Henry Sapoznik, Les Slater, Brian Thompson, Kay Turner, Tom Van Buren, Meg Ventrudo, Cynthia Vidaurri, George Zavala, Steve Zeitlin
Participants:
Arts & Artists

Wilfreda "Bio" Feliciano, muralist, Tats Cru

Hector "Nicer" Nazario, muralist, Tats Cru

Sotero "BG 183" Ortiz, muralist, Tats Cru

Gaspar Ingui, neon sign maker

Robbie Ingui, neon sign maker

Theresa Ingui, neon sign maker

Backstage Broadway

Judy Adamson, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Jarred Aswegan, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Gary Brouwer, theatrical milliner

Kimberly Cea, actress

Edie Cowan, director, choreographer

Brian Healy, prop maker, armorer, Costume Armour

Bob Kelly, wig maker, make-up artist

Polly Kinney, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Janice Lorraine, actress

Terry Marone, Gypsy Robe, Actors' Equity

Barbara Matera, costume maker

Nino Novel lino, prop maker, Costume Armour

Peter Ray, prop maker, Costume Armour

Woody Regan, rehearsal pianist

Linda Rice, wig maker, Bob Kelly

Tom Rocco, actor

Tom Schneider, theatrical milliner

Scott Sliger, make-up artist, Bob Kelly

Josephine Spano, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Patricia Sullivan, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Brian Wolfe, prop maker, Costume Armour

Leslie Wolfe, prop maker, Costume Armour

Building Trades

George Andrucki, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Stan Bernstein, sheet metal worker, Local 28

William Bush, water tank builder

Adonis Cegisman, water tank builder

Ryszard Danielewski, water tank builder

John DeGeorge, water tank builder

Robin Delk, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Nicholas Maldarelli, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Leah Rambo, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Andrew Rosenwach, water tank builder

Thomas Schlitz, sheet metal worker, Local 28

George Treanor, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Arthur Tyburski, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Urban Fashion & Garment Industry

Britt Bowers, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Vanessa Burgos, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Lidia Carrera, needle trade worker, UNITE! Local 23-25

Esther Cheung, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Mary Costantini, mannequin sculptor

Linda Dworak, director, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Shiniji Horimura, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Elizabeth Jacobsen, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Anne Kong, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Anne Liu, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Nicole Mata, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Adrienne Muken, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Ana Perez, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Ramon Roman, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Isabel Toledo, fashion designer

Ruben Toledo, fashion designer

Monica Williamson, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

May Xian, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Foodways

Salvator Bartolomeo, Italian cook

Kam-Chung Chan, Chinese cook

Cara De Silva, food researcher, writer

Makale Faber, West African cook

Mark Federman, Jewish appetizing

Trevor Fraser, West Indian, Caribbean cook

Theresa lngui, Polish, German cook

Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, food historian

Alana Grace Lawson, Polish cook

Vertamae Grosvenor, African-American cook

Molly O'Neill, food writer and chef

Ming Hua Qian, Chinese cook

Donald Ross, bagel and bialy maker

Esta Ross, bagel and bialy maker

Steve Ross, bagel and bialy maker

Community Media

Clay Berry, producer, African-American radio

Kathleen Biggins, host, Irish-American radio

Joe Franklin, host, entertainment community

Debi Jackson, producer, African-American radio

Hal Jackson, host, African-American radio

Bill Jaker, 1939-, radio historian

René Lopez, host, Latino radio

Henry Sapoznik, host, Yiddish radio

Music, Dance & Performance

Wrickford Dalgetty, Caribbean song

Julio Diaz, Latin dancer

Tony DeMarco, Irish fiddle

Linda Hickman, Irish flute

D.J. Angola, turntablist

D.J. Rehka, turntablist

ABDOULAYE DIABATE & SUPER MANDEN -- ABDOULAYE DIABATE & SUPER MANDENAbdoulaye Diabate, director, vocals, guitarChiek Barry, bassMoussa Cissoko, n'goni, guitarAboubakar Diabate, djembeMamadou Diabate, 1975-, koraTapani Sissoko, vocalsAbou Sylla, bala

APOLLO THEATRE, AMATEUR NIGHT AT THE APOLLO -- APOLLO THEATRE, AMATEUR NIGHT AT THE APOLLOVanessa Brown, Amateur Night assistantJoseph Gray, lead vocalsJane Harley, Kemet ProductionsMonteria Ivey, hostSteve Jones, production managerC.P. Lacey, The ExecutionerShirley Matthews, coordinating producerMoni-J, hostessDavid Rodriguez, executive director

RAY CHEW & THE CREW -- RAY CHEW & THE CREWRay Chew, musical directorMike Ciro, guitarBobby Douglas, keyboardArtie Reynolds, bassRalph Rolle, drums

CHERISH THE LADIES -- CHERISH THE LADIESSean Conner, step dancerDeirdre Connolly, tin whistle, vocalsMary Coogan, guitar, banjo, mandolinKatie Fox, step dancerDonna Long, piano, fiddleJoanie Madden, director, tin whistle, flute, vocalsPaul McKeown, sound engineerMary Rafferty, accordion, tin whistleMarie Reilly, fiddle

CHERES UKRAINIAN FOLK ENSEMBLE -- CHERES UKRAINIAN FOLK ENSEMBLEAndriy Milavsky, leader, woodwindsVictor Cebotari, accordionGeorge Cheremush, violinAlexander Fedoriouk, cymbaly (hammered dulcimer)Oleh Ivanyschuk, contrabass

DAVID DAVID -- DAVID DAVIDLauterio Polanco, director, lead vocals, accordionAdriel Espaillat, guieraAdelso Fernandez, bajoKenny Fernandez, tamboraMenecio Martinez, pianoHector Mota, saxophoneFernando Rodreguez, conga

FRISNER AUGUSTIN AND LA TROUPE MAKANDAL -- FRISNER AUGUSTIN AND LA TROUPE MAKANDALFrisner Augustin, 1948-2012, lead drums, vocalsRaymond Charles, third drumSteve Deats, second drumSmith Destin, dancerKethelyne Jean-Louis, dancerKesler Pierre, percussionSandy St. Cyr, dancer

HANGUK: SOUNDS OF KOREA (KOREAN TRADITIONAL PERFORMING ARTS ASSOCIATION) -- HANGUK: SOUNDS OF KOREA (KOREAN TRADITIONAL PERFORMING ARTS ASSOCIATION)Gee Soak Back, percussionHyung Joan Kim, percussionChii-Seung Kwon, percussionJi-Young Park, dancer, percussionSue Yeon Park, dancer, percussionKathy Soh, dancer, percussionMaggie Soh, percussion

LOS AFORTUNADOS -- LOS AFORTUNADOSFelix Sanabria, director, congas, bata, percussionFrancisco Cotto, bassPedro Domeich, dancer, vocalsAlbert Lusink, trumpetAbraham Rodriguez, vocals, percussionMichael Rodriguez, percussionBrandon Rosser, percussionSusan Richardson Sanabria, dancerAdam Tully, tres guitar

LOS MACONDOS -- LOS MACONDOSJorge L. Marquez, bajoEugenio R. Ortega, accordion, lead vocalsJuan A. Ortega, caja vallenata, vocalsDavid Pacheco, timbalesGuillermo E. Penate, guieroMario A. Rodriguez, congas

LOS PLENEROS DE LA 21 -- LOS PLENEROS DE LA 21Juan J. Gutierrez, leader, tamboreroAlberto Cepeda, güiro, tamboreroRoberto Cepeda, vocals, bailador de bomba, güiro, maraca, tamboreroJose Lantigua, keyboardHector Matos, vocals, tamboreroEdgardo Miranda, cuatroDonald Nicks, bassJose Rivera, vocals, tamboreroDomingo Tanco, vocalsNellie Tanco, vocals, bailadora de bomba, tamboreraVictor Velez, vocals, tamborero

MERITA HALILI & THE RAIF HYSENI ORCHESTRA -- MERITA HALILI & THE RAIF HYSENI ORCHESTRAGezim Halili, clarinet, saxophoneMerita Halili, vocalsRaif Hyseni, accordionArtan Kushi, dajreTome Lleshaj, bass guitarEdmond Xhani, laouta

MESAOUDA JUDEO-ARABIC ENSEMBLE -- MESAOUDA JUDEO-ARABIC ENSEMBLEMarc Hazan, vocalsJoshua Levitt, naiHaig Manoukian, oudTomer Tzur, percussion

MUKTHAMBAR FINE ARTS, INC. -- MUKTHAMBAR FINE ARTS, INC.A. Balaskandan, violinBala Ganesh, mrudangist (Asian Indian drum)Aarati Ramanand, dancerSaavitri Ramanand, vocals

MUSIC FROM CHINA -- MUSIC FROM CHINASusan Cheng, director, daruanChung Bun Chiu, percussionWai Wah Law, vocalsGao Renyang, dizi, xiaoGuowei Wang, erhu, zhong hu, daohuTienjou Wang, gou hu, zhong huHerman Wong, concert managerMin Xiaofen, pipaHelen Yee, yang qinYing Ying Zhu, vocals

SAU FAMILY ORCHESTRA -- SAU FAMILY ORCHESTRAZoran Muncan, keyboardErnie Sau, button accordionMichael Sau, button accordionVinnie Sau, violin

SHASHMAQAM BUKHARAN JEWISH CULTURAL GROUP -- SHASHMAQAM BUKHARAN JEWISH CULTURAL GROUPAbokhay Aminov, vocals, doyra (drum)Tavriz Aronova, ensemble memberDavid Davidov, tarFiruza Junatan, dancerShumiel Kuyenov, doyra (drum)Boris Kuknariyev, accordionIzro Malakov, vocals

SIMON SHAHEEN & QANTARA -- SIMON SHAHEEN & QANTARASimon Shaheen, director, oud, violinOlga Chirino, keyboardsBilly Drewes, soprano saxJamie Haddad, world percussionFrancois Moutin, contrabassAdam Rogers, acoustic and electric guitarBassam Saba, flute, naiLuis Santiago, Latin percussionNajib Shaheen, oudSteve Sheehan, world percussionSoraya, vocalsMartin Zarzar, world percussion

SON MUNDANO -- SON MUNDANOBobby Allende, bongosJimmy Bosch, 1962-, tromboneNelson Gonzalez, Cuban tresNelson Gonzalez, Jr., lead vocalsOscar Hernandez, electric pianoRene Lopez, Jr., congasLuis Rosa, vocalsJoe Santiago, upright bass

VISION BAND

X-ECUTIONERS -- X-ECUTIONERSD.J. AngolaTotal EclipsePeter KangRoc RaiderMista SinistaRob Swift

YURI YUNAKOV ENSEMBLE -- YURI YUNAKOV ENSEMBLELauren Brody, keyboard, vocalsCatherine Foster, clarinetIvan Milev, accordionGeorge Petrov, drumsCarol Silverman, vocalsYuri Yunakov, 1958-, saxophone

Neighborhood & Community Life -- Neighborhood & Community LifeLori Brandston, urban sports and gamesSam Chwat, speech therapist, dialect coachMichael E. Clark, Citizens Committee for New York CitySonia Estreich, Citizens Committee for New York CityMichael Greene, urban sports and gamesLaura Hansen, Place Matters, Municipal Art SocietyRoberta Jones, storytellerJessica Katz, Citizens Committee for New York CityAnnie Lanzilloto, storyteller, performance artistMoe Maloney, community activist, "Mayor of Windsor Terrace"Rosalyn Perry, storytellerLiz Sevcenko, Memory Map, Lower East Side Tenement Museum

Street Life, Festival, Celebration

Mikey Enoch, steel pan tuner

Richie Richardson, Caribbean carnival costume maker

Les Slater, Caribbean carnival culture

Transit

Carissa Amash, New York Transit Museum

Bruce Alexander, subway engineer, MTA

Chris Creed, subway engineer, MTA

Sandra Lane, subway operator, MTA

Anthony Palombella, bus operator, MTA

Luz Montano, New York Transit Museum

Tarin Reid, subway operator, MTA

Charles Sachs, Sr., curator, New York Transit Museum

Gabrielle Shubert, director, New York Transit Museum

Mark Watson, New York Transit Museum

Wall Street

Richard Anderson, Jr., stock market investor, speaker

Richard Anderson, Sr., stock market investor, analyst

Richard Baratz, caricaturist, stock certificate engraver, American Bank Note Company

Madeline Boyd, trader, New York Stock Exchange

Victoria Chukwuka, New York Metro Coordinator, Stock Market Game

Joseph Cicchetti, trader, New York Mercantile Exchange

Anthony DeMarco, trader, New York Board of Trade

Joe Gabriel, engineer, plant manager, New York Stock Exchange

Michael Geoghan, clerk, New York Mercantile Exchange

John E. Herzog, founder, Museum of American Financial History

Scott Hess, trader, New York Mercantile Exchange

Myron Kandel, senior financial editor, CNN

Michael LaBranche, specialist, New York Stock Exchange

Gary Lapayover, trader, New York Mercantile Exchange

Michel Mark, New York Mercantile Exchange

Mark Tomasko, financial printer, engraving historian

Nancy Norton Tomasko, financial printer

Steve Wheeler, archivist, New York Stock Exchange

Jason Zweig, columnist, -- Money -- Magazine

Generations: a centennial tribute to Margaret Mead

THE FLOWERS FAMILY SINGERS -- THE FLOWERS FAMILY SINGERSRev. James N. Flowers, Jr., director, vocals, Ft. Washington, MarylandAnthony Flowers, vocals, keyboard, Seat Pleasant, MarylandYolanda Flowers, vocals, Capital Heights, MarylandMarie Hickson, vocals, Capital Heights, MarylandDorothy McDowell, vocals, Upper Marlboro, MarylandMargie Pickett, vocals, Landover, MarylandErma Reed, vocals, Landover, MarylandMildred Scruggs, vocals, Capital Heights, Maryland

WALKER CALHOUN AND THE RAVEN ROCK DANCERS -- WALKER CALHOUN AND THE RAVEN ROCK DANCERSWalker Calhoun, director, vocals, drum, rattle, Cherokee, North CarolinaAndrew Calhoun, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaJennifer Calhoun, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaChris Mahan, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaVelma Mahan, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaDelana Smith, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaPatrick Smith, dancer, vocals, Cherokee, North Carolina

THE SAU FAMILY ORCHESTRA, RIDGEWOOD, QUEENS, NEW YORK -- THE SAU FAMILY ORCHESTRA, RIDGEWOOD, QUEENS, NEW YORKZoran Muncan, keyboard, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkAksenti Sau, piano accordion, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkErnie Sau, button accordion, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkMichael Sau, button accordion, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkNikica Sau, keyboard, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkVinnie Sau, violin, Ridgewood, Queens, New York
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2001, Series 4
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5fa8116c3-ad1f-4df7-ae92-1bfaad7778fa
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2001-ref34

Festival Recordings: Narrative Stage: Social Ceremony & Protocol

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. White House Program 1992 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Spinks, Vondale (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Armentrout, Russell, 1929-  Search this
Fox, Sanford, 1919-1996  Search this
Names:
United States. Department of Agriculture  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Virginia
Maryland
Date:
1992 June 28
Local Numbers:
FP-1992-CT-0259
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 28, 1992.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
occupational folklore  Search this
Calligraphy  Search this
Government etiquette  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1992, Item FP-1992-CT-0259
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife / Series 5: Workers at the White House / 5.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5d6b2e9a0-5042-489b-9f33-669af1c41648
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1992-ref897

Festival Recordings: Narrative Stage: Traditions of Social Ceremony/Relationships w/ Guests: Foodways at the White House

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. White House Program 1992 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Walker, Tracy (recorder)  Search this
Keydel, Stefan (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Bruce, Preston, 1908-1995  Search this
Armentrout, Russell, 1929-  Search this
Fox, Sanford, 1919-1996  Search this
Allen, Eugene, 1919-2010  Search this
Haller, Henry  Search this
Johnson, John H., 1924-2004  Search this
Names:
United States. Department of Agriculture  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Virginia
Maryland
Date:
1992 July 2
Track Information:
101 Traditions of Social Ceremony: Relationships with Guests / Preston Bruce, Russell Armentrout, Sanford Fox.

102 Foodways at the White House: Adapting to Different First Families / Eugene Allen, Henry Haller, John H. Johnson.
Local Numbers:
FP-1992-CT-0267
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 2, 1992.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
occupational folklore  Search this
Doorkeepers  Search this
Calligraphy  Search this
Government etiquette  Search this
Dinners and dining  Search this
Butlers  Search this
Cooks  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1992, Item FP-1992-CT-0267
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife / Series 5: Workers at the White House / 5.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk59bea61f5-f44d-4477-8eb7-2706e61a0898
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1992-ref905

Festival Recordings: Narrative Stage: Restoring the White House; Teamwork: A State Dinner

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. White House Program 1992 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Keydel, Stefan (recorder)  Search this
Irby, Laurus (recorder)  Search this
Artist:
Cleland, Raymond, 1967-  Search this
Roberts, David, 1960-  Search this
Plunkett, Patrick, 1947-  Search this
Bruce, Preston, 1908-1995  Search this
Armentrout, Russell, 1929-  Search this
Fox, Sanford, 1919-1996  Search this
Performer:
Cleland, Raymond, 1967-  Search this
Roberts, David, 1960-  Search this
Plunkett, Patrick, 1947-  Search this
Bruce, Preston, 1908-1995  Search this
Armentrout, Russell, 1929-  Search this
Fox, Sanford, 1919-1996  Search this
Names:
United States. Department of Agriculture  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Anglo-American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Maryland
Virginia
Date:
1992 July 5
Track Information:
101 Restoring the White House: Stone Cutters and Carvers / David Roberts, Patrick Plunkett, Raymond Cleland.

102 Teamwork: A State Dinner / Preston Bruce, Russell Armentrout, Sanford Fox.
Local Numbers:
FP-1992-CT-0280
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 5, 1992.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
occupational folklore  Search this
Stonecarving  Search this
State Dinners  Search this
Florists  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1992, Item FP-1992-CT-0280
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife / Series 5: Workers at the White House / 5.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5daa5b063-4034-4f6e-a2e5-cd168c249f27
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1992-ref918

Audio Log Sheets

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: American Folklore Society Centennial / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5603c05dc-94c1-46e0-9b6d-2ef2cafc6f3a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1988-ref2018
3 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Audio Log Sheets digital asset number 1
  • View Audio Log Sheets digital asset number 2
  • View Audio Log Sheets digital asset number 3

Festival Recordings: AFS Centennial Stage: Festivals: Their Folklore and Their Influence (Fox, Kurin, McKenney, Green)

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. American Folklore Society Centennial Program 1988 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Fox, Phil, 1949-2015  Search this
Kurin, Richard, 1950-  Search this
McKenney, Al, 1944-2015  Search this
Wiggins, Phil  Search this
Green, Rayna  Search this
Lloyd, Timothy, 1951-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
sound-tape reel (analog, 7 in.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1988 June 24
Contents:
Festivals: Their Folklore And Their Influence; Phil Fox, Richard Kurin, Al Mckenny, Phil Wiggins, Rayna Green; Tim Lloyd Reel 3 0f 9
Local Numbers:
FP-1988-7RR-0090
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 24, 1988.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Folklore -- Study and teaching  Search this
Function:
Festivals
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1988, Item FP-1988-7RR-0090
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: American Folklore Society Centennial / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5eca387ce-b856-4dfd-924e-4ca19577a62a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1988-ref572

Festival Recordings: AFS Centennial Stage: Festivals: Their Folklore and Their Influence (Phil Fox, Wilson, Al McKenney, Mike Herter)

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. American Folklore Society Centennial Program 1988 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Artist:
Lloyd, Timothy, 1951-  Search this
Wallace, Andy  Search this
Fox, Phil, 1949-2015  Search this
Performer:
Wilson, Joe, 1938-2015  Search this
Wallace, Andy  Search this
McKenney, Al, 1944-2015  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
sound-tape reel (analog, 7 in.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
New York
Saratoga Springs (N.Y.)
Date:
1988 June 27
Local Numbers:
FP-1988-7RR-0118
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 27, 1988.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Folklore -- Study and teaching  Search this
Agriculture  Search this
Function:
Festivals
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1988, Item FP-1988-7RR-0118
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: American Folklore Society Centennial / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5e4d65042-465b-4b9b-93eb-f804bc6613ad
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1988-ref600

Michigan

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
From the State of Michigan, ninety of its residents came to the 1987 Festival to speak about and demonstrate some of the rich traditional culture from that region. To help create a festival setting in which performers of valued traditions could speak about their experiences and heritages with performed music, active demonstrations, and spoken words seemed a most appropriate way to celebrate the sesquicentennial of that geographically endowed, historically important and culturally rich state.

Throughout Michigan's history those who migrated to the state have been drawn by - or have themselves introduced - fishing, trapping, mining, lumbering, farming, and automobile manufacturing. The lore of such occupations, combined with the rich ethnic heritage of those who built Michigan, form the essence of the state's traditional culture. Michigan today is home to more than one hundred different nationalities, including the country's largest population of Finns, Belgians, Maltese, and Chaldeans; the second largest numbers of Dutch, Lebanese, and French Canadians; and perhaps the largest concentration of Muslim Arabs (in southeast Dearborn) outside the Middle East. Detroit alone is one of the most ethnically diverse cities in the country. The heritage of these diverse groups - along with those of Native, Euro Americans, and Afro Americans who migrated to Michigan throughout the state's history - give Michigan folklife its distinctive characteristics.

Complementing a full performance schedule that highlighted Michigan's diverse musical heritage, ongoing demonstrations included lure making, fly tying, boat building, Native American quillwork, black ash basketry, finger weaving and beadwork, Dutch wooden shoe making, furniture carving, Afro American quilt making, Palestinian needlework, Ukrainian textiles and egg decorating, ski and sleigh making, decoy carving, rag rug weaving, cherry harvesting & pruning, evergreen nursery techniques, net making, and ice fishing.

Betty Belanus, Laurie Sommers, and Thomas Vennum, Jr. served as Curators for the Michigan program, with Laurie Sommers also serving as Program Coordinator and Barbara Lau, as Assistant Program Coordinator.

The Michigan Program was made possible by the Michigan Sesquicentennial Commission and the Michigan Department of State.
Fieldworkers and consultants:
Fieldworkers

Dennis Au, Michael Bell, Horace Boyer, John Alan Cicala, Timothy Cochrane, Gregory Cooper, C. Kurt Dewhurst, Stev'e Frangos, Roland Freeman, Janet Gilmore, Alicia María González, James Leary, Yvonne Lockwood, Marsha MacDowell, Phyllis M. May-Machunda, Mario Montaño, Earl Nyholm, Marsha Penti, Roger Pilon, Peter Seitel, Eliot Singer, Laurie Sommers, Nicholas R. Spitzer, Thomas Vennum, Jr.

Consultants

George Cornell, LuAnne Kozma, Robert McCarl, Oscar Paskal, Barry Lee Pearson, Joseph Spielberg
Presenters:
Dennis Au, Horace Boyer, C. Kurt Dewhurst, Paul Gifford, Janet Gilmore, James Leary, William Lockwood, Yvonne Lockwood, Marsha MacDowell, Earl Nyholm, Mario Montaño, Roger Pilon, Joseph Spielberg, Nicholas R. Spitzer, Benjamin Wilson
Participants:
Crafts

Samiha Abusalah, Palestinian needle worker, Dearborn, Michigan

James Baker, wooden shoe maker, Holland, Michigan

Catherine Baldwin, 1935-2001, Ottawa quill worker, Suttons Bay, Michigan

Amnah Baraka, Palestinian needle worker, Dearborn, Michigan

Chou Chang, Hmong textile artist, Detroit, Michigan

Rita L. Corbiere, Ojibwa quill worker, storyteller, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan

Alice Fox, 1916-1995, Ojibwa quill worker, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan

Russell Johnson, 1918-, blacksmith, Strongs, Michigan

Arnold Klein, Jr., Ukrainian embroiderer, egg decorator, Hamtramck, Michigan

George McGeshick, Ojibwa birch bark canoe builder, Iron River, Michigan

Mary McGeshick, Ojibwa cradle board decorator, Iron River, Michigan

Yer Yang Mua, Hmong textile artist, Detroit, Michigan

Julia Nyholm, 1913-2005, Ojibwa finger weaver, bead worker, Crystal Falls, Michigan

Gust Pietilla, 1906-1999, ski, sleigh and tool maker, Bruce Crossing, Michigan

Agnes Rapp, 1920-2003, Ottawa-Potawatomi black ash basket maker, Berrien Springs, Michigan

Glen Van Antwerp, cedar fan carver, Lansing, Michigan

Lloyd Van Doornik, mas¬ter carver, furniture maker, Holland, Michigan

Julia Wesaw, 1908-1992, Potawatomi black ash basket maker, Hartford, Michigan

Rosie Wilkins, 1905-1994, quilt maker, Muskegon, Michigan

Foodways

Helen Mohammed Atwell, 1934-2003, Lebanese cook, Dearborn, Michigan

Marguerite L. Berry-Jackson, storyteller, cook, herbalist, Lansing, Michigan

Lucille Brown, 1917-1996, pasty maker, Wakefield, Michigan

Marie L. Cross, storyteller, cook, herbalist, Mecosta, Michigan

Eustacio Y. Flores, Jr., Mexican-American cook, Grand Rapids, Michigan

Anna E. Lassila, 1909-2001, pasty maker, rag rug weaver, Mohawk, Michigan

Elda Peltier, 1915-2005, muskrat cook, Monroe, Michigan

Hudson "Huddy" Peltier, 1912-2003, muskrat cook, Monroe, Michigan

Music

The Hammon Family, bluegrass, country, gospel music -- The Hammon Family, bluegrass, country, gospel musicGeorge "Dub" Hammon, bass player, vocalist¬, Davison, MichiganMarge Hammon, mandolin player, vocalist, Davison, MichiganMel Hammon, fiddle player, vocalist, Davison, MichiganRon Hammon, guitar player, vocalist, Davison, Michigan

Judy & Her Suchey Brothers, polka band -- Judy & Her Suchey Brothers, polka bandMike Kindt, bass player, Alpena, MichiganBill Suchey, Jr., trumpet player, Alpena, MichiganBob Suchey, saxophone player, Alpena, MichiganJim Suchey, accordion player, Alpena, MichiganJudy Suchey, drummer, Alpena, MichiganMike Suchey, trumpet player, Alpena, Michigan

Rev. Andre Woods & The Chosen, gospel music -- Rev. Andre Woods & The Chosen, gospel musicSederia Butler, soprano, Detroit, MichiganDawn Byers, alto, Detroit, MichiganStephanie Colfield, drummer, Westland, MichiganEarl Fisher, tenor, Detroit, MichiganCraig Harris, bass guitar player, Cleveland, Ohio, MichiganGrenee Hunter, alto, Detroit, MichiganWillie Lucas, tenor, Detroit, MichiganRenee Thomas, soprano, Detroit, MichiganDana Wilcox, soprano, Detroit, MichiganRev. Andre Woods, arranger, director, Detroit, Michigan

Sensational Gospel Tones -- Sensational Gospel TonesAlfred Charleston, Grand Rapids, MichiganDonald Charleston, lead guitar and bass player, Grand Rapids, MichiganJuanita Charleston, Grand Rapids, MichiganRev. Leon Charleston, Grand Rapids, MichiganHenrietta Fields, Grand Rapids, MichiganTanya Johnson, vocalist, drummer, Grand Rapids, MichiganNathaniel Smith, Grand Rapids, Michigan

Sugar Island Boys, Anglo-French string band -- Sugar Island Boys, Anglo-French string bandRené Coté, fiddle player, Ontario, CanadaHoney McCoy, 1904-1988, piano player, vocalist, Sault Ste. Marie, MichiganJoe Menard, 1935-, guitar player, vocalist, Sault Ste. Marie, MichiganTom Stevens, Dobro player, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan

Bill Stimac & Sons, music from the Keweenaw Peninsula -- Bill Stimac & Sons, music from the Keweenaw PeninsulaBill Stimac, 1923-, accordion player, Houghton, MichiganMark Stimac, 1956-, banjo and guitar player, Houghton, MichiganRandy Stimac, 1958-, accordion player, Houghton, Michigan

Thimbleberry, Finnish music -- Thimbleberry, Finnish musicEd Lauluma, 1921-2005, fiddle player, Chassell, MichiganAl Reko, 1933-, accordion player, vocalist, St. Paul, Minnesota, MichiganOren Tikkanen, mandolin and guitar player, Calumet, Michigan

Tomicic Brothers Orchestra, tamburitza music -- Tomicic Brothers Orchestra, tamburitza musicMike Cani, cello player, Detroit, MichiganJoel Novosel, bass player, Detroit, MichiganGeorge Patrash, pugaria player, Detroit, MichiganMike Tomicić, first brac player, Windsor, Ontario, CanadaPeter Tomicić, second brac player, Windsor, Ontario, Canada

Yemeni Folkloric Dance Group, Arab village music -- Yemeni Folkloric Dance Group, Arab village musicSaleh Alward, dancer, Dearborn, MichiganMohsin Elgabri, dramatist, dancer, Oud player, Dearborn, MichiganAlsanabani Faris, dancer, Dearborn, MichiganSaeed Masjahri, dancer, Dearborn, MichiganM. Aideroos Mohsen, dancer, Dearborn, MichiganAbdo Ali Saeed, dancer, Dearborn, MichiganOmar A. Wahashi, oud and tabla player, Dearborn, Michigan

Rose Mae Menard, 1901-1988, come¬dienne, storyteller, herbalist, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan

Art Moilanen, 1916-1995, vocalist, accordion player, Mass City, Michigan

Les Raber, fiddle player, Hastings, Michigan

Isaiah "Dr." Ross, 1925-1993, blues musician, Flint, Michigan

Occupations

Esperanza Alcala, ever¬green nursery worker, Grand Haven, Michigan

Steven B. Fouch, 1952-, cherry grower, extension agent, Grawn, Michigan

Elias Lopez, 1935-2004, evergreen nursery worker, Grand Haven, Michigan

Damien Lunning, trapper, Mio, Michigan

Judith Lunning, trapper, game cook, Mio, Michigan

Pedro Rodriguez, ever¬green nursery worker, Grand Haven, Michigan

Personal Experience Narrative, Flint Sit-Down Strike

Fred Ahearn, 1910-1991, Flint, Michigan

Burt Christenson, Flint, Michigan

Shirley Foster, Flint, Michigan

Berdene "Bud" Simons, Newport Richey, Florida

Nellie Simons, Newport Richey, Florida

Waterways

Josephine F. Sedlecky-Borsum, sports shop owner, fly tier, Baldwin, Michigan

Ray Davison, Great Lakes fisherman, Menominee, Michigan

Dick Grabowski, 1931-2006, Great Lakes fisherman, Menominee, Michigan

Charlie Nylund, 1933-, Great Lakes fisherman, Menominee, Michigan

Jay Stephan, river guide, boat builder, Grayling, Michigan

Elman G. "Bud" Stewart, 1913-1999, lure maker, Alpena, Michigan

Jim Wicks, ice fisherman, decoy carver, McMillan, Michigan

Ralph Wilcox, Great Lakes fisherman, fish smoker, Brimley, Michigan

David Wyss, river guide, boat builder, fly tier, Grayling, Michigan
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1987, Series 4
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk558f67840-21f3-484a-b448-14772c6b5dcc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1987-ref34

Family Folklore Interviews: Sanow, Fox, Bretholz, Stronberg

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Office of Folklife Programs. Family Folklore Project  Search this
Field worker:
Burack-Novick, Lynda  Search this
Performer:
Bretholz, Myron  Search this
Stromberg, Marvin  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound cassette (analog., compact audio cassette)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
German  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1976 June 27
1976
General note:
Other number FP-1976-CT-0160
Local Numbers:
FP-1976-CT-0160

FLP.114057
Publication, Distribution, Etc. (Imprint):
United States 1976
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 27, 1976.
General:
109-1/3-76
Participants:
Sanow, Fox, Arnold, Gail
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Migration  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Fiction  Search this
Work  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Travel  Search this
Children  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1976, Item FP-1976-CT-3160
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Family Folklore / FP-1974-CT-0758: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk52a3c7b20-eed7-4957-91f7-a31965a82a75
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1976-ref11327

Family Folklore Interviews: Johnson, Jacobson, Rosenfield, Fox, Preshey

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Office of Folklife Programs. Family Folklore Project  Search this
Zeitlin, Steven J. (field worker)  Search this
Artist:
Johnson, Farnum  Search this
Performer:
Johnson, Farnum  Search this
Preshey, Mary E.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
analog.
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1976 July 17
1976
General note:
Other number FP-1976-CT-0489
Local Numbers:
FP-1976-CT-0489
Publication, Distribution, Etc. (Imprint):
United States 1976
General:
474-1-76
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 17, 1976.
Participants:
Jacobson, Rosenfield, Fox, Amy, Fran, Debbie
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Courtship  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1976, Item FP-1976-CT-3491
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Family Folklore / FP-1974-CT-0758: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5dee620f7-0631-4342-bedf-15c0dd7d0aa1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1976-ref11987

Children's Program

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The Children's Area was a magnet to young visitors during the Bicentennial Festival. The Hill and Sand area provided the three essential elements of earth, sand, and water, inviting children to transform the landscape with castles and forts, quarries and caves, as dreams emerged from the blank sand canvas. In the dirt-floored Marble Ring, parents could teach their children, and children could bring their parents up to date on the ways of aggies, steelies, puries, and cats' eyes. The Game Ring had a tree club-house and materials for building on additions; games of all sorts were also played here: tug of war, jump rope, squirt gun fights, four square, hop scotch, football.

In the Crafts Tents, the articles useful in play were constructed; children and adults made doll houses and dolls, folded paper cootie catchers, soap box derby cars, wooden sailboats. The Folk Swap Tent was for the exchange of secret languages and riddles, counting out rhymes and ghost stories. Here, costumes and puppets were also fashioned for the Stage, where children from local schools and clubs shared their performance traditions - clapping games, circuses, stunts, and parades. Sometimes adults taught the traditional games and playparties that they remembered so lovingly from their own childhoods.

The program was coordinated by Kate Rinzler, assisted by Saucie Melnicove.
Presenters and area supervisors:
Jean Alexander, Jeffrey Byrd, Jacqueline Cook, Peter Crowley, Jean Kaplan, Betsy Nadas, Marcella Nichols, Rosa Scott, Suzy Seriff, Kim Storey, Willie Demps
Participants:
Stu Jamieson, folklorist

Bessie Jones, 1902-1984, folklorist, Brunswick, Georgia

Vanessa Jones, folklorist

Mei Jiun Mai, Chinese folklore

Andrea Meditch, folklorist

Ann Mitchell, quilter

Tinson Mortensen, woodworker

Tom Murphy, woodworker

Paul Ofori-Ansah, folklorist

Mary Scherbatskoy, folklorist

Dorothy Stroman, folklorist

Lu Yu, Chinese folklore

Yung Ching-Yeh, Chinese folklore

Schools

Bancroft Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Brent Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Brightwood Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Burrville Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Capitol Hill Day School, Washington, D.C.

Dale Wilson Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Edmonds-Peabody Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Lamont Elementary, New Carrolton, Maryland

Long Branch Elementary, Arlington, Virginia

Mott Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Parkland Jr. High, Rockville, Maryland

Piney Branch Middle School, Takoma Park, Maryland

Simmons Elementary, Washington, D.C.

St. Rita Parochial School, Alexandria, Virginia

Stevens Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Takoma Park Elementary, Takoma Park, Maryland

Thomas Stone Elementary, Mt. Rainier, Maryland

Thomson Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Washington International School, Washington, D.C.

Watkins Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Wheatley Elementary, Washington, D.C.

Woodmore Elementary, Mitchellville, Maryland

Girl Scout Troops

Brownies Troop 645, Brownies Troop 2188, Brownies Troop 2467, Cadettes Troop 741, Cadettes Troop 801, Cadettes Troop 1149, Juniors Troop 512, Juniors Troop 968, Juniors Troop 1363, Juniors Troop 1524, Girl Scout Troop 11, Girl Scout Troop 401, Girl Scout Troop 1129, Girl Scout Troop 1466, Girl Scout Troop 1745, Girl Scout Troop 1821, Girl Scout Troop 2344, Vero Beach, Florida Girl Scout Troop Juniors 1980, Geneva, Ohio Girl Scout Troop 496, Mt. Vernon, N.Y. Girl Scout Troop 46J, Senior Scouts of '76

Campfire Girls Troop 439

Boy Scout Troops

Cub Pack 87, Cub Pack 114, Cub Pack 166, Cub Pack 200, Cub Pack 248, Cub Pack 389, Cub Pack 445, Cub Pack 621, Cub Pack 640, Cub Pack 662, Cub Pack 691, Cub Pack 725, Cub Pack 781, Cub Pack 937, Cub Pack 1039, Cub Pack 1048, Cub Pack 1282, Cub Pack 1414, Cub Pack 1441, Cub Pack 1584

Arlington County, Virginia Recreation Centers

Anne Murphy, Anne Suter, Dawson Terrace, Drew, Germantown, Jackson, Jefferson, Kenmore, Lee, Lubber Run, Madison, Stratford, Swanson, Walter Reed, Yorktown

Washington, D.C. Recreation Centers

Amidon, Anacostia, Arboretum, Bald Eagle, Banneker, Barry Farms, Benning Park, Benning Terrace, Bertie Bachus, Brent, Brentwood, Bruce Park, Bundy, Congress Heights, Douglass, East Capitol, Eliot, Evans, Fairfax, Fort Greble, Francis, Frazier, Friendship House, Greenleaf, Hardy, Hart, Hearst, Hillcrest, Hine, Jefferson, K. C. Lewis, Keane, Kelly Miller, Kenilworth, King, Lafayette, Logan, Ludlow, Malcolm X, Maury, Mayfair, Mitchell Park, Montana, New York Avenue, North Michigan Park, Orr, Parkside, Payne, Peabody, Powell-Lincoln, Randall, Ridge, River Terrace, Roper, Rosedale, Savoy, Seaton, Sherwood, Slowe, Sousa, Stoddert, Taft, Terrell, Thompson, Trinidad, Tyler, Virginia Avenue, Watkins, Woodland, Woodson

Fairfax County, Virginia Recreation Centers

Cameron, D.R. Tinn, Garfield, Greenbriar, Hayfield, Hunt Valley, Hunters, Little Run, Parklawn, Spring Hill, Woodlawn, Woods

Montgomery County, Maryland Recreation Centers

Area 1, Area 2, Area 3, Area 4, Area 5, Camp Breezy Hollow, Camp Meadowbrook, Cannon Road, Cashell, Fox Chapel, Mill Creek Towne, Page, Pinecrest, Watkins Mill

Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission Recreation Centers

Adelphi, Area 2, Area 4, Area 6, Arts Program, Beltsville, Bowie, Camp Dawana, Morningside, New Carrolton, Seabrook, South Laurel, Valley View

Camps

Arlington YMCA, Barrie Day Camp, Becky Mark's group, Camp Dawana, Camp Green Acres, Camp Greenway, Camp Pinto, Campfire Ga-Ro-Da, Ebenezer Methodist Church, Pin Oak 4 H Club, Safari Day Camp, Town and Country
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1976, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk59b5d6ae1-5722-4592-a894-2c331bfa9ed9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1976-ref24

Working Americans

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Since 1971, under the rubric of "Union Workers" and, later, "Working Americans", the Festival of American Folklife broadened the scope of traditional folklore by including exhibits featuring the American working man and woman. The premise was that folklore is a continuing process and that occupations generate individual styles, superstitions, language, initiations that unite those workers within one occupation across the country and around the world.

In 1974, the skills of workers from a large number of contemporary occupations centered on communication were exhibited in the Working Americans area of the Festival. In addition, this program focused on the folklore of these occupations: occupational jokes, rituals, beliefs, customs, language, and stories that express workers' true attitudes toward themselves, their jobs and co-workers, their working conditions and unions, their industries, and local communities. The Festival's concern was to present the worker not only as a skilled practitioner of his or her trade, but even more importantly, as a person whose entire expressive culture is heavily influenced by the work he or she does. Presentations in 1974 were organized around several domains of communication: graphic communications, radio broadcasting, telecommunications, ham radio (amateur radio), theater work, and music.

Festival presentations were the result of extensive planning and cooperation among the AFL-CIO, the U.S. Department of Labor, the Smithsonian and its folklife scholars, and the National Park Service. The program coordinator was Shirley Askew, assisted by Susan Donahue; consultants included Kenneth Goldstein, Archie Green, and Jill Shuman.

Presentations in 1974 laid the groundwork for the major Bicentennial Festival of American Folklife, including as many as 90 occupational groups.
Fieldworkers:
Robert Baron, Saul Broudy, Bruce Nickerson, Robert E. Porter, Richard Skrinjar
Participants:
Communications Workers of America

Joseph A. Beirne, 1911-, President

Jeffrey Shaw, exhibit coordinator

Participants: -- Participants:Albert GreenwoodCalvin FosterEdward O'ConnorJames SpicknallChris DreslinMax LindseyElmer PilgrimRichard LincolnDon FoxGroff (Sarge) YeckJohn ClaggettFrancis J. Kriege, Jr.Roger CullerC. W. SmithHarold NewtonJohn RumseyAlice WilliamsVicki WhiteBlondell WareWila HallDavid MooreBernice LaCourHazell Rouse

Graphic Arts International Union

Kenneth J. Brown, President

John A. Stagg, exhibit coordinator

Walter Lypka, exhibit coordinator

Participants: -- Participants:Carolyn ForsterHarvey LovinArnold GrummerOther members of the Graphic Arts International Union also participated in this exhibit.

Foundation for Amateur Radio

Hugh Turnbull, W3ABC, President

Edmund B. Redington, W4ZM, exhibit coordinator

The Foundation acknowledges the support and co-operation of the national organization of radio amateurs, The American Radio Relay League, Inc. (Newington, Conn.), and the participation of the following League officials: Victor Clark, W4KFC (Vice President), and Harry McConaghy, W3SW (Director, Atlantic Division).

Department of State Amateur Radio Club -- Department of State Amateur Radio ClubBryan Cordray, WA5SPIJohn Swafford, W4HUWilliam R. Jochimsen, W3UVFred Vogel, WA3QBKHersh Miller, W3SWDMac Shimp, WA3PPPJim Brown, W5DRPJames Bullington, K4LSDGale Conard, K3VTAPauline Conard, WA3VHHTom Masingill, WB4KNWGlen Starkey, K4PUISam Staton, K41TBDexter Anderson, K3KWJWill DeCierq, WA4DIBEarle Sherman, K4HQP

National Capital DX Association -- National Capital DX AssociationDon Search, W3AZDJim Douglas, W3ZNHLynn Lamb, W3BWZPete Huber, WA3KSQJoe Mikuckis, K3CHPBurt Cohen, W3CREDick Price, W3DBTGeorge Grant, WA3MBQDick Propst, W3NLBill May, W3RXMort Cohen, K3SXQBill Shepherd, W3ZSRSteve Jarrett, K4CFBRay Johnson, K4DXOPete Raymond, K4EKJJinny Beyer, W41DGRay Porter, K40MRRay Spence, W4QAWTed Cohen, W4UMFJohn Kanode, W4WSFJohn Boyd, W4WWG

The American Federation of Television and Radio Artists

Northern Virginia FM Association, Inc. -- Northern Virginia FM Association, Inc.George Miller, K4EJYCharles Raybuck, W4YEBJ. William Miller, K3MMWalter Lockhart, W3PWBDonald Dunlap, WB4QAXRobert Payton, W4GPD

Amateur Radio Public Service Corps -- Amateur Radio Public Service CorpsKarl Medrow, W3FAJohn Munholland, K3LFDBob Slagle, K4GRBud Cone, WA4PBGSherm Winings, WB4RDVJohn Manning, WB4MAECharles Stay, W4HECraig Church, K4GORPhilip Sager, WB4FDTSteve Floyd, WB4YHDMarc Pressman, WB4DRBKen Johnson, WN4GHY

Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT) -- Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT)Perry I. Klein, K3JTEJan A. King, W3GEYWm. A. Hook, W3QBCCharles Dorian, W3JPTWilliam A. Tynan, W3KMVJoseph Kasser, G3ZCZ/W3Richard Daniels, WA4DGUThomas H. Mitchell, WA3TBDEdward Ramos, W3HQHR. Alfred Whiting, K3BRS

Metrovision, Inc. (Amateur television club) -- Metrovision, Inc. (Amateur television club)Terry Fox, WB4JFIMike Bray, WB4DVDBruce Brown, WB4YTUTom Lucas, WA4RBEPaul Lain, W4WHODon Miller, W9NTPJohn Oehlenschlager, WA4EMOStu Mitchell, WAODYJJohn Hart, K3KWOPhil Poole, WB4FQRFrank Lamm, WB4FUJ

Washington Area Young Ladies Radio Club (WAYLARC) -- Washington Area Young Ladies Radio Club (WAYLARC)Irene Akers, W3RXJElizabeth Zandonini, W3CDQEthel Smith, K4LMBMaxine Harris, WA4UWKJanie Mcintyre, K4BNGClaire Bardon, K4TVTMary Seaton, W4HRDPat Morton, LU1BAR/3Meg Cauffield, W3UTRPeg Demueles, WA3SCXSandra Rutiser, K3SOXGinny Pemkerton, K4SHE

Actors Equity Association

National Association of Broadcast Employees and Technicians

Scenic Artists of the International Brotherhood of Painters and Allied Trades

American Federation of Musicians

Hal C. Davis, President

in cooperation with

THE MUSIC PERFORMANCE TRUST FUNDS

Kenneth E. Raine, Trustee Music Performance Trust Funds

The music for this occasion was provided by a grant from the Music Performance Trust Funds, a public service organization, created and financed by the recording industries under agreements with the American Federation of Musicians.

Phyllis Boyens, 1947-2009, singer, guitarist

Philip Cassadore, 1932-1985, Apache singer

Sam Chatmon, 1899-1983, blues singer, guitarist, Hollandale, Mississippi

Hazel Dickens, 1935-2011, singer, guitarist

Jim Garland, 1905-1978, singer, guitarist

Joe Glazer, 1918-2006, singer, guitarist

Sarah Ogan Gunning, 1910-1983, singer, guitarist

Janie Hunter, 1918-1997, singer, ring-games

Bessie Jones, 1902-1984, singer, ring-games

Jesse Mays, spiritual singer, Independence, Mississippi

Mary McCaslin, 1946-, singer, guitarist

Paul Ortega, 1937-, Apache singer

Bruce Phillips, 1935-2008, singer, guitarist

Jim Ringer, 1936-1992, singer, guitarist

Florence Reece, 1900-1986, singer

Houston Stackhouse, 1910-1980, blues singer, Crystal Springs, Mississippi

James "Son" Thomas, 1926-1993, blues singer, Leland, Mississippi

Varney Watson, singer, guitarist

Floyd Westerman, 1936-2007, Sioux singer

Nimrod Workman, 1895-1994, singer, balladeer
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1974 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1974, Series 9
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1974 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5f48dd211-4045-4a57-a2a5-8e2f9b3dfcc7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1974-ref1376

Carey Bell and Harmonica Frank Floyd

Creator:
Union Workers Stage 1972  Search this
Artist:
Bell, Carey, 1936-2007  Search this
Floyd, Frank, 1908-1984  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (7 inch reel, 1/4 inch tape)
sound-tape reel (analog, 7 in.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Illinois
Tennessee
Date:
1972 July 1
Contents:
Hound Dog Taylor fragment; Harmonica Blues Workshop- Carey Bell- O Susannah- interview with Carey Bell- Walkin' by myself; Harmonica Frank-- Fox chase- Mama blues (Married man blues); Floyd and Bell- harmonica-guitar duet; Demonstration of hands-free harmonica
Track Information:
101 null / Harmonica.
General note:
DPA number 72.502.01
Local Numbers:
FP-1972-7RR-0050
General:
CDR copy
72.502.01
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 1, 1972.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Blues (Music)  Search this
Harmonica  Search this
Labor  Search this
occupational folklore  Search this
Country music  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1972 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1972, Item FP-1972-7RR-0050
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1972 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1972 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Union Workers / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk538a4878c-9e0b-4229-96f8-f10932103469
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1972-ref968

Lakota texts by George Bushotter

Translator:
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Creator:
Bushotter, George, 1864-1892  Search this
Bruyier, John  Search this
Collection Creator:
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Extent:
Pages (ca. 3,500 pages)
Culture:
Lakota (Teton/Western Sioux)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Date:
1887
Scope and Contents:
259 texts; numbers 189 and 253, as well as parts of 223 and 224 are by John Bruyier, 1888. Interlinear translations by Dorsey, aided by Bushotter and Bruyier.

Lakota text contents: 1. Sword Keeper and his brother. The latter meets Two Faces, a mythic giant. 8 pages and 3 pages (notes) and 1 page partial translation. 2. The Mythic Buffalo. 10 pages. 3. Two Faces. Explains the origin of arrows, pipes, axes, knife-sharpeners, beads, etc. 14 pages. 4. Three brothers who had a witch sister. 17 pages. (incomplete) 5. Children, a bad old woman cannibal, and Spider (the Mythic Trickster). 12 pages. 6. Spider, animals, and women. 15 pages and 6 pages. 7. A man and his ghost wife. 9 and 5 pages. 8. Two against one: a ghost story with a song. 10 pages. 9. A man, a female ghost, and a male ghost who wrestled with the man. 15 pages. 10. Ghost on the hill, who could not be hit by arrows. 8 pages. 11. Treatment of the sick, burial customs. 22 pages and 4 pages (notes) and 2 pages and 1 sketch. 12. The man who came to life again. 14 and 2 (translation) pages. Note by Bruyier at end. 13. The man and woman in the moon. 6 pages. 14. Man, two in the lodge, female ghost, and the friendly wolf. 8 pages. 15. The man who spared the wolf cubs. 11 pages. 16. The Thunder Being and the Unkcegila (a mastadon ?) 12 pages. 17. Waziya, the northern giant who brings snow. 4 pages. 18. Buffalo people who attacked the Indian people. 10 pages. 19. Spider and the land turtle. 29 pages. 20. The man and his two sons. 18 pages and 2 pages (notes). 21. The turtle who wished to fly. 10 pages. 22. The man who could become a grizzly bear. 6 pages. 23. How the Indians cured the sun. 3 pages. 24. Spider and the horned water monster. 7 pages. 25. The strange lake with large subaquatic animals. 6 pages. 26. The warrior surrounded by a serpent. 4 pages. 27. The one-eyed serpent with short legs and large body. 3 pages. 28. Why they pray to stones, the sun, etc. 9 pages.

29. The mountain in which was a large serpent.. 6 pages. 30. Adventures of a man and his wife.. 8 pages. 31. Spider and the Prairie Chicken. 6 pages. 32. Adventure of RAbbit Carrier. 6 pages. 33. The woman who turned to a fish from her waist down. 22 pages. 34. Spider and the Rabbit; how the latter made snow. 5 pages. 35. The male ghost and his living wife. 8 pages. 36. The man with the magic sword, and the one with the powerful breath. 6 pages. 37. Swift Runner (he who tied stones to his legs). 10 pages. 38. The man who was rescued by eaglets. 10 pages. 39. The Double-woman. 5 pages. 40. Spider and the mice. 14 pages. 41. Spider and the ducks--how they got red eyes. 13 pages and 1 sketch. 42. Spider and the Rabbit; how the latter lost his long tail. 11 pages. 43. The man who ressembled the man in the moon. 11 pages. 44. The young lover who was rescued by the girl. 12 pages. 45. The warriors who met Heyoka (Sunflower) who was singing and dancing. 2 pages. 46. The flying Santee (a ghoul). 8 pages. 47. How the Santees first saw buffalo. 8 pages. 48. How the Lakotas went against the Rees. 5 pages. 49. Adventures of the Short Man. 8 pages. 50. Smoke Maker's adventures: a war story. 7 pages. 51. Fight between the Lakota and the Blackfeet. 4 pages (incomplete) 52. Fight between two unarmed men and a grizzly bear. 8 pages. 53. Treatment of an Omaha spy caught by the Lakotas. 6 pages. 54. The wild man, a nude cannibal. 4 pages. 55. He who uses the earth as an ear. 7 pages. 56. Why horses are called, in Lakota, "mysterious dogs." 7 ages. 57. The man who could understand ravens. 5 pages. 58. Of the two small stones that were servants of the people. 6 pages. (Brief note at the end appears to be in Swanton's hand.) 59. The Wahanksica, a strange animal. 3 pages. 60. The animal in the Missouri River which breaks up the ice in the spring of the year. 4 pages.

61. How thw wind brought sickness to Medicine Butte Creek. 6 pages. 62. Beliefs about day and night. 6 pages. 63. The man in the forest and his contest with ghosts. 8 pages. 64. The feast in honor of the Anti-Natural God. 18 pages. 65. Of the Heyoka man who dreamed of his death by lightening. 13 pages. 66. Fight between the Lakota and the Blackfeet. 6 pages. 67. Of the mysteriousman who knew about the distant war party, 5 pages. 68. Of the wise man who caught his eloping wife. 8 pages. 69. How the Rees or Blackfeet came against the Lakotas. 5 pages. 70. Origin of the buffalo. 5 pages. 71. The Sun Dance. A. 98 pages and 3 figures. B. 9 pages. C. 4 pages. D. 7 pages and 1 diagram. E. 6 pages. F. 4 pages. G. 14 pages. H. 3 pages and 2 diagrams. I. 3 pages. 72. The man who could lengthen his arm at will. 7 pages. 73. What a young man must do before he can marry. 11 pages. 74. How the Crows surrounded some Lakotas. 12 pages. 75. A raid on a Lakota camp. 4 pages. 76. Story of a warrior who was not wounded. 9 pages. 77. Fight between the Lakota and white soldiers. 20 pages. 78. Of the Santees, and their fondness for certain foods. 4 pages. 79. What the Lakota thought of the first white people whom they saw. 13 pages. 80. Belief respecting lakes. 6 pages. 81. Belief about this world. 7 pages. 82. The calumet dance. 39 pages and 2 diagrams. 83. How they honor the dead (the Ghost Feast). 15 and 2 and 18 pages. 84. Men who are arrow and bullet proof. 8 pages. 85. Of love potions, etc. 5 pages. 86. The acts of a wounded warrior. 7 pages. 87. Actors clothed in buffalo robes with the hair out detect wrongdoers. 11 pages. 88. Those who imitate the elk. 14 pages. 89. Why a man may not speak to his mother in law. 11 pages. 90. Rules for feasting, smoking, and visiting. 11 pages. 91. Of certain boyish customs. 8 pages. 92. A ghost story. 7 pages. 93. Origin of the white people. 10 pages. 94. Games and their seasons. 10 pages. 95. Education of a boy. 10 pages. 96. Of youth killed in battle, and of his faithful horse. 12 pages. 97. The people who lived in the north. 7 pages and 2 sketches. 98. The ghost woman and the robin. 9 pages. Note at end by Bruyier. 99. The Flying serpent whose touch was fatal. 5 pages. 100. Origin of twins. 5 pages. 101. George Bushotter's autobiography. 117 pages. 102. Belief concerning a loved one who has been called by a ghost. 7 pages. 103. Fight between two gamblers near Chamberlain, Dakota. 7 pages.

104. The singing elk. 7 pages. 105. Belief about Spider. 9 pages. 106. War of the Lakota against the Omaha. 7 pages. 107. Narrow escape of Bark Bird's Tail (a Lakota). 5 pages. 108. Busnotter's cousin's war adventure. 11 pages. 109. How certain men (doctors, priests, etc.) have become mysterious. 16 pages. 110. How the Lakota fought the Cheyennes and Black Men (Commanches ?). 22 pages. 111. Rules of etiquette for brothers, sisters, cousins. 21 pages. 112. Ghost story. 5 pages. 113. The habits of beavers. 8 pages. 114. Spider and the old woman who fed all the animals. 24 pages. 115. The handsome man who was rescued from a pit by a wolf. 32 pages. 116. Trick of a myth-teller. 9 pages. 117. Of thistles. 4 pages. 118. How Indians regard the past and their ancestors. 22 pages. 119. The grass dance. 12 pages. 120. The Big Belly Society. 6 pages. 121. The Mandan Society. 10 pages. 122. "Following one another," a Lakota game. 7 pages. 123. "They make it run by pushing," a Lakota game. 46 pages and 2 (colored) diagrams. 124. Horse racing. 5 pages. 125. Hitting the moccasin, a game. 9 pages. 126. Shooting at the cactus, a gane. 5 pages. 127. Hitting the bow, a game. 5 pages. 128. Shooting at bunches of grass, a game. 5 pages. 129. Shooting at the lights of an animal, a game. 6 pages. 130. Taking captives from one another, a game. 9 pages. 131. Trampling on the beaver, a game. 6 pages. 132. "Howi ! Howi !" a ring game for boys or youths. 12 pages. 133. "They touch not one another," a game. 6 pages. 134. Game with a long grass which has a long, sharp beard. 6 pages. 135. The old woman accuses them," a game. 8 pages. 136. A game with slings. 5 pages. 137. "Goose and her children," a game. 10 pages. 138. Buffalo horn game. 7 and 1 page. 139. A stick which is hurled. 5 and 1 page and 2 figures. 140. "Making the wood dance by hitting it," a game. 8 pages. 41. "Making the wood jump by hitting it," a game. 8 pages. 142. "Making the bow glide by throwing," a game. 6 pages. 143. Coasting. 8 pages. 144. Game of ball. 12 pages. 145. "Shotting at an arrow set up," a game. 7 pages. 146. Grizzly bear game. 12 pages. 147. Deer game. 10 pages. 148. "Running towards one another," a game. 9 pages. 149. "They cause one another to carry packs on their backs," a game. 10 pages. 150. "They hit one another with mud," a game. 10 pages. 151. Hitting the ball, a game. 11 pages. 152. A game with a rawhide hoop. 43 pages and 2 figures. 153. Game of earthen horses. 8 pages. 154. "They slide by pushing," a game. 14 pages. 155. "They kick at one another," a game. 14 pages.

156. "The hoop is made to roll in the wind," a game. 9 pages. 157. [Popgun game.] Missing July, 1966. (not on microfilm made 1958) 1 page illustration found July, 1968. 158. Wrestling. 8 pages. 159. Courting the girls. 9 pages. 160. Game with bow and small wood-pointed arrows. 10 pages. 161. Swinging. 10 pages. 162. "Taking Places from one another," a game. 9 pages. 163. "Playing with small things," a game. 18 pages. 164. Pinching the backs of hands, a game. 11 pages. 165. "Scattering them," a game. 9 pages. 166. "Who shall get threr first," a game. 10 pages. 167. Hopping. 9 pages. 168. Throwing arrows by hand, at a target. 6 pages. 169. Ghost game. 21 pages. 170. Hide and seek. 13 pages. 171. Jumping down from a high object. 12 pages. 172. Plumstone game. 18 pages. 173. Odd or even ? A game with sticks. 12 pages. 174. Throwing chewed leaves into the eyes, a game. 7 pages. 175. Game with the ankle-bones of a deer. 12 pages. 176. Native wooden harminicon, played by boys. 14 pages and 5 figures. 177. Mysterious game. 17 pages. 178. Playing doctor. 10 pages. 179. Pretending to be dead, a game. 10 pages. 180. Hunting young birds in summer. 12 pages. 181. Hunting eggs in spring. 10 pages. 182. Going to make a grass lodge. 11 pages. 183. Scrambling for presents. 11 pages. 184. Sitting on wooden horses, a game. 8 pages. 185. Making a bone turn and hum by twisting a cord. 15 pages and 2 figures. 186. "String twisted in and out among the fingers." 8 pages. 187. Tumbling and somersault. 7 pages. 188. "Game with large things." 17 pages. 189. About two young men who were friends. 51 pages. By Bruyier. 190. A bird that foretells cold weather. 14 pages. 191. Cause of scrofulous sore on the neck. 10 pages. 192. Meaning of ringing sounds in the ears. 10 pages. 193. The Brave and Fox societies. 18 pages and 4 sketches. 194. Dog Society. 31 pages and 2 sketches and 1 page drawing.

195. "Killing by Hitting," or "Taking the Buffalo paunch," a society of women. 12 pages. 196. Scalpdance society. 16 pages and 1 sketch. 197. Night dance. 18 pages. 198. Mysterious society. 16 pages. 199. Grizzly Bear dance. 19 pages. 200. Belief about the Kildeer. 13 pages. 201. The acts of a leader. 17 pages. 202. Return of the night hawk in the spring. 7 pages. 203. Belief concerning the Ski-bi-bi-la, a small grey bird which says Gli Hunwo ?" ("Coming home ?). 16 pages. Also earlier version of the same, with mistakes. 10 pages. 204. About hanging the "tablo" ("shoulder blade") at the door of the lodge. 7 pages. 205. Trying to excell others. 12 pages. 206. Scolding or whipping a woman. 12 pages. 207. How Indian paints are made. 18 pagrs. 208. Acting like the buffalo bull. 9 pages and 1 page drawing. 209. Law about bowls. 9 pages. 210. Meaning of a rooster's crowing. 8 pages. 211. The taking apart of fetishes. 24 pages. 212. How one man drowned another. 21 pages. 213. Concerning warts. 8 pages. 214. Of a woman who qas killed by mosquitoes. 32 pages. 215. Concerning hermaphrodites. 22 pages. 216. Belief concerning the grebe or dabchick. 10 pages. 217. Rules for eating dogs. 8 pages. 218. Bushotter's recollections of a certain famine. 219. Why Lakota men should not wear women's moccasins. 16 pages. 220. Customs relating to bowls. 10 pages. 221. Meanings of various kinds of twitchings. 10 pages. 222. "Kicking out his elder brother's teeth." 10 pages. 223. How a boy wounded his grandfather in the scrotum. 13 pages. Bruyier's revision of the same. 13 pages. 224. Legend of the nude Spider woman. 12 pages. About the woman who was deceived by the grizzly bear, with an account of the prairie hen. 20 pages. By Bruyier. 225. "Punishment of the prairie." 19 pages.

226. Part of the punishment of a murderer. 12 pages. 227. About a foolish wife. 42 pages. 228. How a ghost stunned Bushotter's father. 21 pages. 229. Occasions for scolding wives. 12 pages. Half-page corrected sentence at end by Buyier. 230. Setting out food, etc. for ghosts. 16 pages. 231. Concerning widows and widowers. 30 pages. 232. About a newborn child. 9 pages. 233. Tatala, a humorist. 6 pages. 234. Vegetal lore. 16 pages. 235. About the year when the stars fell (1833). 18 pages. 236. Concerning shells used as necklaces. 8 pages and 2 sketches. 237. Game with a ball of mud. 8 pages. 238. "Throwing fire at one another." 11 pages. 239. Punishment of a liar. 8 pages. 240. Invocation of the Thunder. 13 pages. 241. About spiders. 15 pages. 242. The mysterious imitation of ghosts. 14 pages. 243. What they carry when they migrate. 20 pages. 244. What happened when the Lower Brules went to a mountain. 24 pages. 245. Concerning guardian spirits. 16 pages. 246. About the Thunderers (People dwelling in the clouds.) 25 pages. 247. About lizards, frogs, etc. rained from the sky. 11 pages. 248. Deer Women. 28 pages. 249. Bird societies. 31 pages. 250. Ways od dancing. 26 pages. 251. About gashing the limbs when mourning. 7 pages. 252. On Fellowhood. 16 pages. 253. Ceremonies at birth. 8 pages. Bruyier's revision. 5 pages. 254. Bushotter's stepfather's prophetic gifts. 15 pages. 255. The recovery of Bushotter's younger brother. 14 pages. 256. Why a son or daughter acts in a childish manner. 9 pages. 257. Giving birth to one child while still nursing another. 13 pages. 258. Courting. 48 pages and 3 page color folding drawing and 1 page drawing. 259. Heyoka woman. 8 pages.
Biographical / Historical:
George Bushotter (1864-1892), or Oteri, was a Teton Lakota born in Dakota Territory to a Yankton man and his wife Grey Whirlwind, a Minneconjou Lakota. Raised to be a warrior, Bushotter nevertheless left to study at the Hampton Institute in Virginia from 1878-1881. He entered the Theological Seminary of Virginia in 1885 to become a minister, but his inadequate knowledge of English made the study of Latin and Greek incredibly difficult for him. At the advice of the faculty, Bushotter left the seminary in 1887. While at Hampton, he met Rev. James Owen Dorsey and recognized the potential in working with him to complete ethnographic studies, and worked with the BAE for approximately ten months in 1887. His primary contributions were in the comparative linguistics of Teton Lakota, writing myths and other texts in Lakota, and assisting Dorsey in creating the synonomy of Lakota tribal names that formed a major part of what was to become the Handbook of North American Indians North of Mexico. For more information on George Bushotter, see American Indian Intellectuals, ed. Margot Liberty, 1978.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS.4800: (3.1.1.3) [103]
Local Note:
Old number 2632 (Parts 1-3)
autograph document signed
Collection Restrictions:
The James O. Dorsey Papers are open for research. Access to the James O. Dorsey Papers requires an appointment
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Lakota dialect  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 4800 James O. Dorsey papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers / Series 1: Siouan-Catawban / 1.2: Dakota
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a9ec836e-eaf4-41da-8dc1-8cc89ae21490
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms4800-ref1779

Animal Tales Told in the Gullah Dialect by Albert H. Stoddard of Savannah, Georgia

Performer:
Stoddard, Albert Henry, 1872-1954  Search this
Collection Creator:
Asch, Moses  Search this
Distler, Marian, 1919-1964  Search this
Folkways Records  Search this
Extent:
1 Phonograph record (analog, 33 1/3 rpm, 12 in.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Phonograph records
Place:
United States
Georgia
South Carolina
Track Information:
101 Man Git E Adam Apple.

102 Buh Partridge Outhides Buh Rabbit.

103 Buh Black Sneak Git Ketch.

104 Buh Rabbit Berry Lub Peas.

201 Buh Rabbit Wan Mo Acknowledge.

202 Buh Rabbit Eats Buh Fox's Butter.

203 Buh Deer and Buh Rabbit Race.
Local Numbers:
FW-ASCH-LP-3017

Library of Congress.AAFS L45
Publication, Distribution, Etc. (Imprint):
Washington, D.C. Library of Congress
General:
"From the folklore collections." Program notes by the editor, texts and glossaries inserted in each container. Production notes: Recorded at Washington, D.C., 1949 under a special grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. No duplication allowed listening and viewing for research purposes only.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Storytelling  Search this
Collection Citation:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.ASCH, Item FW-ASCH-LP-3017
See more items in:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection
Moses and Frances Asch Collection / Series 9: Audio Recordings / LP
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk500f2dfce-400d-43fd-97ab-eeab45ead262
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-asch-ref17573

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