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MS 3941 Materials assembled by Hewitt for preparation of articles in Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 30 and for replies to inquires from the public

Collector:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Correspondent:
Bogaskie, F.  Search this
Skinner, Alanson, 1886-1925  Search this
Creator:
MacKinley, W. E. W., Captain  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology -- Bulletin 30  Search this
Society of American Indians  Search this
Brant, Joseph, 1742-1807  Search this
Old Smoke  Search this
Sayenqueraghta  Search this
Scott, Hugh Lenox, 1853-1934  Search this
Williams, Eleazer  Search this
Culture:
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Adirondack  Search this
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Black Mincqua  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Pekwanoket  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Wendat (Huron)  Search this
Mohawk  Search this
Maya  Search this
Algonquin (Algonkin)  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Sauk  Search this
Onondaga  Search this
Tuscarora  Search this
Erie (archaeological)  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Susquehannock (archaeological)  Search this
Wyandot  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Kainai Blackfoot (Kainah/Blood)  Search this
Sihasapa Lakota (Blackfoot Sioux)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Calendars
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Contents: Adirondack tribe (St Lawrence River) Old Manuscript Number 3553. Adoption Old Manuscript Number 4007. Refers to Algonquian method of counting -only; see Haas note 2/18/72; Old Manuscript Number 3864. "Alligewi"; Animism Old Manuscript Number 3867 and 2842-c, box 6. Blood Indians, origin of name; Brant, Joseph Old Manuscript Number 3874. Chippewa, origin of name Old Manuscript Number 3646. Chiefs, function and significance of Old Manuscript Number 2842-c, box 6. Delaware tribe, New Jersey area claimed by Old Manuscript Number 3866. Detroit River, tribes near; Ekaentoton Island-- see Ste. Marie Island Environment (Bulletin 30 draft by O. T. Mason) Old Manuscript Number 4007. Erie, origin of name Old Manuscript Number 3646. Erie and Black Mincqua tribes Old Manuscript Number 3586. [Eskimo] Arctic tribes, leaving elderly and sick people to die Old Manuscript Number 3668. Family, Bulletin 30 draft and notes Old Manuscript Number 4011 and 2842-c, box 6. Grand River (Tinaatoua), name of; Hebrew calendar; Hewitt, list of Bulletin 30 articles by Old Manuscript Number 4066. Hoboken, origin of name; Iroquois, "On the Northern and Eastern Territorial Limits of the Iroquoian people, in the 16th Century," and Algonquian tribes, at Chaleur Bay. Iroquois at Gulf of St Lawrence and Bay of Gaspe Old Manuscript Number 3625.
Iroquois, location of Six Nations tribes reservations Old Manuscript Number 3763. Iroquois false face; Iroquois preparation of corn ("as food") Old Manuscript Number 4009. Iroquoian early dress Old Manuscript Number 3660. Iroquoian "Gachoi" tribe, identity of (Correspondence with F. Bogaskie.) Old Manuscript Number 3816. Iroquoian moon names and concept of time; Iroquoian social organization, and place name-name origins; "Man," Iroquoian term for Old Manuscript Number 3781. Iroquoian towns Old Manuscript Number 4006. Kentucky, meaning of the word; Kentucky, origin of name Old Manuscript Number 3840. Lenni Lenape, meaning of the word; Logstown-- see Shenango Old Manuscript Number 3773. Lost Ten Tribes as American Indians Old Manuscript Number 3670. Mayan linguistic family and other Mayan linguistic notes including Quiche and Tepehuanan notes Old Manuscript Number 3473. Mexico: idols, sacrifices, etc. Old Manuscript Number 3807. Mexico: Indian languages. Letter from Captain W.E.W. MacKinley Old Manuscript Number 3778. Missouri, Indian village, location of Old Manuscript Number 3944. Mohawk land near Lake Champlain; Mohawk grammar; Montour family, notes for Bulletin 30 Old Manuscript Number 3812. Muskhogean social organization. Letter from J. J. Harrison. Old Manuscript Number 3891. New England tribes Old Manuscript Number 3513.
Niagara, origin of name; "Old Smoke"-- see Sayenqueraghta Old Manuscript Number 3949. Onondaga tribe, text of memorial inscription to, and correspondence Old Manuscript 4391 and 4271- box 1 (part.) Ontwaganha or Toaganha, origin and meaning of name Old Manuscript Number 3864. Owego, meaning of town's name; Pekwanoket tribe (Cape Cod); Pemaquid, Abnaki word and its origin Old Manuscript Number 89. Piasa bird- pictograph formerly near present Alton, Illinois. Article is similar to that by Cyrus Thomas, Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 30. Old Manuscript Number 3981. Potawatomi, notes on the name Old Manuscript Number 4034. Potawatomi Green Corn Dance; Roanoke, origin of name Old Manuscript Number 3998. Sacagawea, spelling of; St Ignace, 3 settlements (Michigan); St Marie Island or Ekaentoton Island; Sauk, Bulletin 30 article and galley proof, notes Old Manuscript Number 3764. Sayenqueraghta or "Old Smoke" (correspondence with Alanson Skinner) Old Manuscript Number 3949. Scalping Old Manuscript Number 4025. Shenango and Logstown Old Manuscript Number 3773. Sioux, origin of name Old Manuscript Number 3624. Society of American Indians, resolutions by thanking General Hugh L. Scott, Fr. Anselm Webber and others Old Manuscript Number 3868. Susquehanna, origin of name Old Manuscript Number 3707. Tacoma, origin of name Old Manuscript Number 3470.
Thunderbird, notes on Old Manuscript Number 3552. Tinaatoa-- see Grand River; Toronto, origin of name; Tuscarora villages Old Manuscript Number 3998. Wampum Old Manuscript Number 3998. War club with inscription; West Virginia panhandle tribes Old Manuscript Number 3945. Williams, Eleazer Old Manuscript Number 3998. Women, status of Old Manuscript Number 3566. Wyandots (Huron) List of tribes of which Wyandots of today are constituted. Old Manuscript Number 3774.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3941
Topic:
American Indian  Search this
Inheritance -- Adoption  Search this
Religion -- animism  Search this
Names, tribal -- Blood  Search this
Names, tribal -- Chippewa  Search this
Government and politics -- chiefs  Search this
Land tenure and claims -- Delaware  Search this
Names, tribal -- Erie  Search this
Eskimos  Search this
Death and mortuary customs -- abandoning elderly and sick  Search this
Marriage and family  Search this
Names, place -- Grand River  Search this
Jews  Search this
Iroquois Indians  Search this
Land tenure and claims  Search this
Masks -- False Face  Search this
Clothing and dress  Search this
Food preparation -- Corn  Search this
Time -- concepts  Search this
Social structure  Search this
Names, place  Search this
Towns, villages and other settlements  Search this
Names, place -- Kentucky  Search this
Names, tribal -- Leni Lenape  Search this
Muskogean Indians  Search this
Names, place -- Niagara  Search this
Names, place -- Owego  Search this
Abenaki Indians  Search this
Names, tribal -- Pemaquid  Search this
Pictographs -- Piasa bird  Search this
Potawatomi Indians  Search this
Dance -- Green Corn  Search this
Names, tribal -- Potawatomi  Search this
Names, place -- Roanoke  Search this
Towns, villages and other settlements -- St Ignace  Search this
Religion -- Mexico  Search this
Sacrifices -- Mexico  Search this
War -- Scalping  Search this
Indian interest groups -- Society of American Indians  Search this
Names, tribal -- Susquehanna  Search this
Names, tribal -- Tacoma  Search this
Folklore -- Thunderbird  Search this
Names, place -- Toronto  Search this
Tuscarora Indians  Search this
Trade, gifts and other exchanges -- Wampum  Search this
Weapons -- war club  Search this
Marriage and family -- women, status of  Search this
Names, place -- Hoboken  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Algonquin  Search this
Honniasant  Search this
Lenape  Search this
Sauk & Fox  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Susquehannock  Search this
Mexico  Search this
Genre/Form:
Calendars
Citation:
Manuscript 3941, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3941
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3941

MS 1449 A.S. Gatschet Vocabularies and Other Linguistic Notes

Creator:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Petroff, Ivan  Search this
Latham, R. G. (Robert Gordon), 1812-1888  Search this
Brown, J. Ross  Search this
McDonald, Furman  Search this
Smith, Nimrod Tom  Search this
Hoffman, Walter James, 1846-1899  Search this
W., H. D.  Search this
Dalrymple, Edwin A., 1818-1881  Search this
Shea, John Gilmary, 1824-1892  Search this
Smith, Buckingham, 1810-1871  Search this
Marban, M. P. P. Pedro  Search this
Rohde  Search this
Bruhl  Search this
Pinart, A. L. (Alphonse Louis), 1852-1911  Search this
Pike, Albert, 1809-1891  Search this
Informant:
Tomazin, Ignatius  Search this
Porter, Pleasant  Search this
Naumoff  Search this
Kamilkoishin ?, Nicolai  Search this
Robertson, A. E. W. (Ann Eliza Worcester), 1826-1905  Search this
Correspondent:
Eells, Myron, 1843-1907  Search this
Denison, James D.  Search this
McCain, Frank  Search this
Extent:
253 Pages
Culture:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
American Indian -- California  Search this
Hoh  Search this
Eskimos  Search this
Chugach  Search this
Kuskwogmiut Yup'ik (Kuskokwim Eskimo)  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Yokuts  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Quechua  Search this
Coushatta (Koasati)  Search this
Chitimacha  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Euchee (Yuchi)  Search this
Apalachee (archaeological)  Search this
Beothuk Indians  Search this
Natchez  Search this
Quileute  Search this
Klamath  Search this
Hitchiti Seminole  Search this
Chimakum  Search this
Woccon  Search this
Pamunkey  Search this
Moxo (Mojo)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Newsclippings
Place:
Alaska -- Names, place
Alaska -- Names, tribal
California
South America
Bolivia
Peru
Date:
ca. 1881-1886
Scope and Contents:
Contains vocabularies and other linguistic notes on a variety of American Indian languages. Mainly transcripts by Gatschet from other sources; includes some material recorded by Gatschet, and a few original manuscripts sent to him by others.
Contents: Alaska: Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 49-52. Petroff, Ivan. "Aliaskan Names, Ivan Petroff." 2 pages, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. List of Alaskan place and tribal names with notes on each. Apalachee: Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 103-104. [Gatschet, A. S.] Apalachee [vocabulary], with Pl[easant] Porter [Creek inft.]." 2 pages, in Gatschet's handwriting. Comparison of Apalachee words with Creek. Gatschet indicates: "(Copied in Apal. book, July 1889)." Beothuk: Ms. Vocabulary 1449, pages 27-41. [Gatschet, A. S.] Beothuk vocabularies, notes, and bibliographic references. 14 1/2 pages, mostly in Gatschet's handwriting. (pages 27-28 and 35-36 are in R. G. Latham's hand.) Working notes for Gatschet's published article on Beothuk -- comment by M. R. Haas, 11/58. California (Yuman ?): Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 122-123; 124 (?) Brown, J. Ross Extract from "J. Ross Brown. Sketch of the exploration of lower Cal. San Franc[isco ?], 1869. H. H. Bancroft & Co., 177 pp." 2 pages, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Miscellaneous notes on lower California tribes and languages, with list of some of the tribes in the area and their approximate locations. California: Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 148. [Gatschet, A. S.] Bibliographic references relating to California. 1 page, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Furman, McDonald Ms Vocabulary 1449 file: Catawba. Page 159 "An Indian's Petition." No date. Newsclipping. 1 slip. Ms Vocabulary 1449 Woccon and Catawba comparative vocabulary No date. Autograph document. 6 pages. Pages 87-89 and 93-94. Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 186a and ff. Eells, M. Comparison of numerals in Chemakum, Quileute, and Hoh, 1 page and accompanying letter to A. S. Gatschet, August 24, 1883, from M. Eells, Skokomish, Mason Co., Wash., 2 pages, handwritten. Ms Vocabulary pages 108-110. [Gatschet, A. S.] "Mtn. Cherokee's names (topographical). Nimrod Tom Smith [inft ?], 1/2 breed, in Swain Co., North Car., P. O. Quallatown...April 18, '82." 3 pages, in Gatschet's handwriting. List of Cherokee place names and locations. Chippewa: Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 178-80. [Gatschet, A. S.] "Odjibwe - Local and tribal names. Ign. Tomazin [inft.], Jan. 31, '83." 3 pages, in Gatschet's handwriting. Also (page 180) short extract from Dorman, Primitive Superstitions, page 148, on Ojibwa cannibalism, in Gatschet's handwriting.
Chitimacha: Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 85 (top). [Gatschet, A. S.] "Shetimasha" vocabulary of 8 words, translated into French. 1/2 page, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Eskimo: Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 45. Hoffman, Dr W. J. "Eskimo text obtained by Dr W. J. Hoffman, at San Francisco, Cal., from Naumoff, an Eskimo from Kadiak..." No date. 1 page in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Includes text and inter-linear translation, plus translation of same story from sign language. Note by Gatschet indicates that text is not in Kodiak dialect. Eskimo (Chugach) Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 53-66. Petroff, Ivan "Vocabulary of Tchugatch-Inuit. Taken by Ivan Petroff, in June, 1881, at various places, chiefly at Nu'tchik or Port Etches, abt. 60 1/2 N. Lat. From full bloods. 14 pages, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Also contains comparison with "Tchiglit" (Kopagmiut), in Gatschet's handwriting. "Partly entered in Mscr. vocab. Vol. 3." Eskimo (Kuskwogmiut): Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 76-84; 85-86; 95-96. [Petroff, Ivan ?] "Kuskokvog-miut (Inuit) [vocabulary], from Nicolai Kamilkoishin [?] native of the tribe educated at the Russian Mission, Yukon R., at Ikomiut." 13 pages, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Partly entered in Mscr. vocabulary, Volume IIId (note in Gatschet's handwriting.) Eskimo: Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 249. W--, H. D. "A curious race. The Mutes of northern Alaska. Their manner of living. Peculiar family relations - superstitions and queer customs." From the San Francisco Chronicle, Sunday November 14, 1886. 1 page, newsclipping. Hitchiti: Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 203 (bottom), 204 (bottom), 205. Robertson, Mrs A. E. "Acts. VIV, ii in Hitchiti" (page 203); "Hitchiti words from Mrs Robertson" (204); "Hitchiti verbs, by Mrs Robertson" (205). 3 pages, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Kiowa: Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 26. Gatschet, A. S. "Phonetics of the Kayowe Language, by Albert S. Gatschet. Read before the A.A.A.S., Cincinnati, 1881." 1 page, clipping from published article. Note in margin in Gatschet's handwriting reads: "Science of Sept. 17, 1881. By John Michels, New York."
Klamath: Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 133-136; 143-147. [Gatschet, A. S.] Queries relating to the Klamath language by Gatschet, with answers written in by various Indians from the Klamath Agency, Oregon (cf. letter of J. G. Dennison, page 142 of this manuscript). 9 pages, partially in Gatschet's handwriting. Klamath: Ms 1449, pages 137-142. Denison, James D. "Story of the birth of Aisis," a Klamath legend, and accompanying letter from J. G. Dennison to A. S. Gatschet, August 29, 1880, Klamath Agency, Oregon. 6 pages, handwritten. Klamath: Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 149-152. McCain, Frank Letter to A. S. Gatschet, January 30, 1880, from Frank McCain, Klamath Indian Agency, Lake Co., Oregon, containing 22 word Klamath vocabulary. 4 pages, handwritten. Koasati: Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 102; 204. Robertson, Mrs A. E. [and A. S. Gatschet] "Koassadi. Supplement to words by Mrs A. E. Robertson, copied in Vocab. No. 2, obtained from [---illeg.]"; short vocabulary of verbs "from vocab. Vol 2, Koassati of Mrs Robertson"; and passage from "Actorum XIV, 11, in Koasata." 2 pages, in A S. Gatschet's handwriting. Page 102 contains a short list of Koasati words (probably from Mrs Robertson) with corresponding Choctaw equivalents (supplied by Gatschet [?] from the "Ch. grammar"; passage from Acts XIV, ii in Koasati with inter-linear translation, presumably by Gatschet; and list of Koasati verbs, no source mentioned. Page 204 contains the same bible passage in Koasati, with slightly different English translation, and list of same verbs, identified as being from "vocab. Vol 2...of Mrs Robertson." Pamunkey: Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 46. Dalrymple, Rev Mr 17 word Pamunkey vocabulary collected by Rev Dalrymple in 1844 at King William County, Virginia. (Hist Mag., N. Y. II, page 182) and short note from J. G. Shea. 1 page, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. See National Anthropological Archives Manuscript 4069, referring to the original of the Dalrymple Manuscript in Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore.
Seminole: Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 182. [Buckingham-Smith, etc. ?] "Seminole Local Names. Buck. Smith, Beach, p. 125 (with Stidham)." 1 page, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. South America (Mojo): Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 187. Marban, M. P. P. Pedro "Moxo 6 Mojo. M.P.P. Pedro Marban, de la Compania de Jesus, Superior [ ]. Arte de la Lengua Moxa, con su vacabulario y cathecismo. Colegio de San Pablo (Lima), 1701. pages 664, etc." 1 page, in Gatschet's handwriting. Notes on Mojo language. South America (Miscellaneous): Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 128. Rohde, [ ] "Rohde on Sudamerika"...(1883-84)." 1 page, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Miscellaneous extracts relating to South American Indian tribes. South America (Miscellaneous): Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 97-101. Miscellaneous notes on South America copied by Gatschet from various published sources. 5 pages, in Gatschet's handwriting. South America Peru: (Quechua): Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 239. Bruhl, -- "Inquiries by Bruhl on Kechua. Oct. 1885." 1 page, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. 9 word Quechua vocabulary. Yokuts (Cholovone): Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 231-236. Pinart, Alph. L. "Yatchikumne [Cholovone, in Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 30], near Stockton, Cal. Alp. L. Pinart, 1880." 6 pages, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Notes (written in French) on the various Cholovone dialects, and vocabulary with some words translated into English and some into Spanish. Yuchi and Natchez: Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 106 Pike, Gen Albert "Elements of Inflection [of the verb to have]. Yuchi (Pike, p.--) & Naktche." 1 page, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Yuchi and Natchez: Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 107 Pike, Gen. Albert "Albert Pike's Vocabularies, 18.... Yuchi & Naktche." 1 page, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Comparison of 33 words in Yuchi and Natchez. Yuchi: Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 201-203. Robertson, Mrs A. E. "Yutchi [vocabulary] transliterated from mscr. of Mrs. Robertson, 1873 ?." 3 pages, in Gatschet's handwriting. Also contains passage from bible (Acts XIV, ii) apparently in Yuchi, with interlinear translation.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1449
Topic:
Names, place -- Chippewa  Search this
Names, tribal -- Chippewa  Search this
Names, place -- Alaska  Search this
Names, tribal -- Alaska  Search this
Chemakum Indians  Search this
Numbers  Search this
Quileute Indians  Search this
Hoh  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Cannibalism  Search this
Cherokee Indians  Search this
Names, place  Search this
Klamath Indians  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Seminole Indians  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Creek  Search this
Catawba Indians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Newsclippings
Citation:
Manuscript 1449, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1449
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1449
Online Media:

Ruth Landes papers

Correspondent:
Mead, Margaret, 1901-1978  Search this
Boas, Franz, 1858-1942  Search this
Wallis, Ruth Sawtell, 1895-1978  Search this
Wagley, Charles, 1913-1991  Search this
Lopez, Salvador  Search this
Little, Kenneth  Search this
Wilson, Maggie  Search this
Whitecloud, Thomas St. Germain  Search this
Henry, Jules, 1904-1969  Search this
Hellman, Ellen  Search this
Haugen, Einar  Search this
Gough, Kathleen  Search this
Lewis, Oscar  Search this
Kaberry, Phyllis Mary, 1910-  Search this
Imes, Elmer Samuel, 1883-1941  Search this
Strong, William Duncan, 1899-1962  Search this
Steyn, Anna F.  Search this
Spier, Leslie, 1893-1961  Search this
Stefansson, Vilhjalmur, 1879-1962  Search this
Solecki, Ralph S.  Search this
Sparta, Francisco  Search this
Rubin, Joan  Search this
Rubin, Vera  Search this
Rodnick, David  Search this
Rogers, Edward S.  Search this
Ritzenthaler, Robert E. (Robert Eugene), 1911-1980  Search this
Roberts, Robert W.  Search this
Ramo, Arthur  Search this
Richards, Audrey  Search this
Preston, Richard J.  Search this
Verger, Pierre  Search this
Vennum, Thomas  Search this
Topash, Mary  Search this
Topash, Joe  Search this
Teskey, Lynn  Search this
Taylor, Beryl  Search this
Tanner, Helen Hornbeck  Search this
Densmore, Frances, 1867-1957  Search this
Quain, Buell H. (Buell Halvor), 1912-1939  Search this
Dunning, William  Search this
Douglas, William A.  Search this
Eggan, Fred, 1906-1991  Search this
Edmondson, Munro S.  Search this
Black, Mary B.  Search this
Benedict, Ruth, 1887-1948  Search this
Domengeaux, James  Search this
Feldman, Albert G.  Search this
Feder, Norman  Search this
Gacs, Ute  Search this
Franklin, John Hope  Search this
Ewers, John C. (John Canfield), 1909-1997  Search this
Erickson, Vincent O.  Search this
Falk, Minna R.  Search this
Faitlovitch, V.  Search this
Alberto Torres, Heloisa  Search this
Buck, Pearl  Search this
Bruce, Harold E.  Search this
Borri, Rina  Search this
Boggs, Stephen Taylor  Search this
Arensberg, Conrad M. (Conrad Maynadier), 1910-1997  Search this
Baldus, Herbert  Search this
Barnouw, Victor  Search this
Bateson, Mary Catherine  Search this
Lurie, Nancy Oestreich  Search this
Malherbe, E.G.  Search this
Marks, Eli S.  Search this
Masha, Louise  Search this
Maslow, Will  Search this
Masquat, Joseph M.  Search this
Mayer, Kurt B.  Search this
McWilliams, Carey  Search this
Bunche, Ralph J.  Search this
Carneiro, Edison  Search this
Chilver, E. M.  Search this
Chilver, Richard  Search this
Clifton, James A.  Search this
Colson, Elizabeth F.  Search this
Daveron, Alexander  Search this
Lowenfeld, Margaret, 1890-1973  Search this
Officer, James E.  Search this
Odum, Howard W.  Search this
Park, Alice  Search this
Paredes, Anthony  Search this
Paton, Alan, 1903-1988  Search this
Park, George  Search this
Prado, Idabel do  Search this
Peschel, Keewaydinoquay M.  Search this
Merwe, Hendrik W. van der  Search this
Murphy, Robert Francis  Search this
Messing, Simon D.  Search this
Neumann, Anita  Search this
Nef, Evelyn Stefansson  Search this
Nocktonick, Louise  Search this
Neumann, Walter  Search this
Creator:
Landes, Ruth, 1908-1991  Search this
Names:
Columbia University Research in Contemporary Cultures  Search this
Committee on Fair Employment Practices  Search this
Fisk University  Search this
Johnson, Charles S.  Search this
Landes, Ruth, 1908-1991  Search this
Park, Robert E.  Search this
Extent:
26.5 Linear feet ((63 document boxes and 1 oversized box))
Culture:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
African American  Search this
Dakota (Eastern Sioux)  Search this
African  Search this
Acadians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Jews -- American  Search this
Latinos -- California  Search this
Brazilians  Search this
Basques  Search this
American Indians  Search this
Afro-Brazilians  Search this
Africans  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Quebec -- Bilingualism
United Kingdom -- colored immigration
South Africa
Date:
1928-1992
Summary:
Most of Ruth Landes's papers relate directly or indirectly to Landes's American Indian research, her work in Brazil, and her study of bilingualism. There is also a considerable amount of material that relates to her experiences (sometimes fictionalized) at Fisk University. There is only small amount of material related to her other interests. Her collection also has material of and relating to the Brazilian folklorist and journalist Edison Carneiro. There is also noteworthy material concerning Herbert Baldus, Ruth Benedict, Elmer C. Imes, Charles S. Johnson, and Robert E. Park. There is a large amount of printed and processed materials in the collection, mainly in the form of newspaper clippings and a collection of scholarly papers.
Scope and Contents:
This collection is mainly comprised of the professional papers of Ruth Schlossberg Landes. Included are correspondence, journals, published and unpublished manuscripts of writings, research materials including field notes and reading notes, photographs, drawings, scholarly papers and publications by other scholars, and clippings from newspapers and periodicals.

Landes's field research on Candomblé in Brazil is well-represented in this collection, consisting of her field journals, writings, and photographs. Also present are Maggie Wilson's stories that were the basis for Landes's The Ojibwa Woman. Unfortunately, Landes was unable to locate her journals for her early research with the Ojibwa/Chippewa, Potawatomi, and Dakota. There are, however, field photographs of the Ojibwa/Chippewa and Potawatomi in the collection. There is also a great deal of her research on groups, especially minorities, in multilingual states with particular focus on the French of Quebec, Basques of Spain and the United States, Boers and Blacks of South Africa, the several socio-linguistic groups of Switzerland, and Acadians (Cajuns) of Louisiana. In the collection are several drafts of her unpublished manuscript on bilingualism, "Tongues that Defy the State." There is also a small amount of material about Black Jews of New York and considerable material about Landes's experience among African Americans when she taught briefly at Fisk University, including her unpublished manuscript "Now, at Athens," containing fictional and autobiographical accounts of her time at Fisk.

Reflections of other facets of Landes's professional activities are also included. Some materials concern her teaching activities, and there is also documentation of her work with the Fair Employment Practices Commission (a federal government agency during the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt) and a similar private organization which immediately succeeded the FEPA; Gunnar Myrdal's research into the plight of African Americans ("The Negro in America"); the Research in Contemporary Cultures project at Columbia University; and the American Jewish Congress.

Among Landes's correspondents are Ruth Benedict, Franz Boas, Margaret Mead, Ralph Bunche, Herbert Baldus, Edison Carneiro, Sally Chilver, Frances Densmore, Sol Tax, Elmer S. Imes, Charles S. Johnson, Robert E. Park, and Hendrik W. van der Merwe.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into 6 series: (1) Correspondence, 1931-1991; (2) Research Materials, circa 1930s-1990; (3) Writings, circa 1930s-1990; (4) Teaching Materials, 1935-1975, undated; (5) Biographical and Personal Files, 1928-1988; (6) Graphic Materials, 1933-1978, undated
Biographical Note:
Ruth Schlossberg Landes was born on October 8, 1908 in New York City. Her father was Joseph Schlossberg, an activist in the Yiddish labor socialist community and one of the founders of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America. She studied sociology at New York University (B.A. 1928) and social work at the New York School of Social Work, Columbia University (M.S.W. 1929). While in graduate school, Landes studied Black Jews in Harlem for her master's thesis, a topic that developed her interests in anthropology.

After graduating in 1929, she worked as a social worker in Harlem and married Victor Landes, a medical student and son of family friends. Their marriage ended after two years when she enrolled in the doctoral program in anthropology at Columbia against her husband's wishes. She kept his surname due to the stigma of being a divorced woman.

At Columbia, Landes studied under Franz Boas and Ruth Benedict, her main advisor. Under the guidance of Benedict, Landes moved away from further study of African Americans to focus on Native American communities. Upon Benedict's suggestion, Landes studied the social organization of the Ojibwa in Manitou Rapids in Ontario from 1932 to 1936 for her Ph.D. fieldwork. Her dissertation, Ojibwa Sociology, was published in 1937. Landes also contributed "The Ojibwa of Canada" in Cooperation and Competition among Primitive Peoples (1937), a volume edited by Margaret Mead. In 1938, Landes published Ojibwa Women (1938), a book written in collaboration with Maggie Wilson, an Ojibwa interpreter and informant.

In addition to studying the Ojibwa in Ontario, Landes also conducted fieldwork with the Chippewa of Red Lake, Minnesota in 1933, working closely with shaman or midé Will Rogers. Her book, Ojibwa Religion and the Midéwiwin (1968) was based largely on her research with Rogers and Maggie Wilson. In 1935 and 1936, she undertook fieldwork with the Santee Dakota in Minnesota and the Potawatomi in Kansas. Like Ojibwa Religion and the Midéwiwin, her books on the Santee Dakota and Potawatomi were not published until several years later—The Mystic Lake Sioux: Sociology of the Mdewakantonwan Sioux was published in 1968 while The Prairie Potawatomi was published in 1970. In between her field research in the 1930s and the publication of The Prairie Potawatomi, Landes returned to Kansas to study the Potawatomi in the 1950s and 1960s.

Landes's plan to continue her studies with the Potawatomi in 1937 changed when Benedict invited her to join a team of researchers from Columbia University in Brazil. Landes was to conduct research on Afro-Brazilians in Bahia, Brazil, while Walter Lipkind, Buell Quain, and Charles Wagley studied indigenous people in the Amazons. To prepare for her research, Landes was at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee in 1937 and 1938 to consult with Robert Park and Donald Pierson and to use the university's library collections of African and African American materials. During that time, Landes also held a teaching position at Fisk and lived in the non-segregated women's residence on campus. Landes later wrote "Now, at Athens," an unpublished memoir containing fictional and true accounts of her experiences at Fisk.

From 1938 to 1939, Landes conducted fieldwork on the role of Afro-Brazilian women and homosexuals in the Candomblé religion in Bahia, Brazil. Unable to move freely by herself in Brazil as a single woman, Landes was accompanied by Edison Carneiro, a Bahian journalist and folklorist. With Carneiro as her companion, Landes was allowed access to rituals and people that would have been closed off to her otherwise. Due to her association with Carneiro, a member of the Brazilian Communist Party, Landes was suspected of being a communist and was forced to leave Bahia early. Publications from her research in Brazil include "A Cult Matriarchate and Male Homosexuality" (1940) and City of Women (1947). She returned to Brazil in 1966 to study the effects of urban development in Rio de Janeiro. In 1967, a Portuguese translation of City of Women was published, a project that Carneiro had commissioned as the first director of the Ministry of Education and Culture's Special National Agency for the Protection of Folklore.

Landes returned to New York in 1939, working briefly as a researcher for Gunnar Myrdal's study of African Americans. Unable to obtain a permanent position at a university, she worked in several other short term positions throughout most of her career. During World War II, Landes was a research director for the Office of the Coordinator for Inter-American Affairs (1941) and consultant for President Franklin D. Roosevelt's Fair Employment Practices Committee on African American and Mexican American cases (1941-44). In 1945, Landes directed a program created by Pearl S. Buck and a group of interdenominational clergy to analyze pending New York anti-discrimination legislation. She moved to California the following year to work for the Los Angeles Metropolitan Welfare Council on a study of race and youth gangs. After her contract ended, she moved back to New York and was hired as a contract researcher for the American Jewish Congress (1948-50). She also participated in Columbia University's Research in Contemporary Cultures (1949-51), studying Jewish families. She coauthored with Mark Zborowski, "Hypothesis concerning the Eastern European Jewish Family." From 1951 to 1952, Landes spent a year in London, funded by a Fulbright fellowship to study colored colonial immigrants and race relations in Great Britain.

After her fellowship ended, Landes returned to the United States and held short term appointments at several universities. She taught at the William Alanson White Psychiatric Institution in New York (1953-54), the New School for Social Research in New York (1953-55), University of Kansas (1957, 1964), University of Southern California (1957-62), Columbia University (1963), Los Angeles State College (1963), and Tulane University (1964). At Claremont Graduate School, Landes helped to develop and direct the Claremont Anthropology and Education Program (1959-62).

It was not until 1965 that Landes obtained a permanent faculty position at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario; she was recruited for the position by Richard Slobodin. Due to Ontario's age retirement law, Landes was forced to retire in 1973 at the age of 65. She continued to teach part-time until 1977, when she became professor emerita.

Landes passed away at the age of 82 on February 11, 1991.

Sources Consulted

Cole, Sally. 2003. Ruth Landes: A Life in Anthropology. Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press.

Chronology

1908 October 8 -- Born Ruth Schlossberg in New York City

1928 -- B.A. in sociology, New York University

1929 -- M.S.W., New York School of Social Work, Columbia University

1929-1931 -- Social worker in Harlem Married to Victor Landes

1929-1934 -- Studied Black Jews in Harlem

1931 -- Began graduate work in anthropology at Columbia University

1932-1936 -- Studied the Ojibwa in Ontario and Minnesota (in field periodically)

1933-1940 -- Research Fellow, Columbia University

1935 Summer-Fall -- Studied the Santee Sioux (Dakota) in Minnesota

1935-1936 -- Studied the Potawatomi in Kansas

1935 -- Ph.D., Columbia University

1937 -- Instructor, Brooklyn College

1937-1938 -- Instructor, Fisk University

1938-1939 -- Studied Afro-Brazilians and Candomblé in Brazil, especially at Bahia

1939 -- Researcher on Gunnar Myrdal's study, "The Negro in America"

1941 -- Research Director, Office of Inter American Affairs, Washington, D.C.

1941-1945 -- Representative for Negro and Mexican American Affairs, Fair Employment Practices Committee (FEPC), President Franklin D. Roosevelt Administration

1944 -- Interim Director, Committee Against Racial Discrimination, New York

1946-1947 -- Researcher, study of Mexican American youth, gangs, and families, Los Angeles Metropolitan Council

1948-1951 -- Researcher, American Jewish Congress, New York

1949-1951 -- Research consultant, study on Jewish families in New York for Research in Contemporary Cultures Project, Columbia University

1951-1952 -- Fulbright Scholar, to study colored colonial immigration into Great Britain

1953-1954 -- Lecturer, William Alanson White Psychiatric Institution, New York

1953-1955 -- Lecturer, New School for Social Research, New York

1956-1957 -- Married to Ignacio Lutero Lopez

1957 Summer -- Visiting Professor, University of Kansas

1957-1958 -- Visiting Professor, University of Southern California

1957-1965 -- Consultant, California agencies (Department of Social Work, Bureau of Mental Hygiene, Department of Education, Public Health Department) and San Francisco Police Department

1958-1959 -- Director, Geriatrics Program, Los Angeles City Health Department

1959-1962 -- Visiting Professor and Director of Anthropology and Education Program, Claremont Graduate School

1962 -- Extension Lecturer, University of California, Los Angeles and University of California, Berkeley

1963 -- Extension Lecturer, Columbia University Extension Lecturer, Los Angeles State College

1963-1965 -- Consultant, International Business Machines (IBM)

1964 January-June -- Visiting Professor, Tulane University

1964 Summer -- Field work with Potawatomi in Kansas Professor, University of Kansas

1965-1975 -- Professor at McMaster University

1966 -- Studied urban development in Rio de Janeiro

1968-1975 -- Studied bilingualism and biculturalism in Spain, Switzerland, South Africa, United States, and Canada (in Spain and the United States concentrated on Basques)

1975 -- Became part-time faculty member at McMaster University

1977 -- Professor Emerita, McMaster University

1978 -- Award of Merit from the University of Wisconsin, Green Bay

1991 February 11 -- Died in Hamilton, Ontario

1991 -- Establishment of the Ruth Landes Memorial Research Fund at Research Institute for the Study of Man (RISM)
Related Materials:
Correspondence from Ruth Landes can be found in the William Duncan Strong Papers, the Leonard Bloomfield Papers, and MS 7369. The Ruth Bunzel Papers contains a copy of a grant application by Landes.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Ruth Landes in 1991.
Restrictions:
The Ruth Landes papers are open for research. The nitrate negatives in this collection have been separated from the collection and stored offsite. Access to nitrate negatives is restricted due to preservation concerns.

Access to the Ruth Landes papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Midéwiwin  Search this
Bilingualism  Search this
Aging  Search this
Candomblé (Religion)  Search this
Citation:
Ruth Landes papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1991-04
See more items in:
Ruth Landes papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1991-04
Online Media:

Festival Recordings: Narrative Stage: Good Time Music; Ways of our Grandmothers; Fest. Encounters: Mothers and Daughters

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Heartbeat Program 1995 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Fries, Colin (recorder)  Search this
Artist:
Torres, Bernice  Search this
DeLaune, Dorothy Whitehorse  Search this
Charles, Elena, 1918-2007  Search this
Porubova, Eva  Search this
Stiková, Eva  Search this
Stachelrodt, Mary  Search this
Burch, Sharon  Search this
Ashley, Lillian  Search this
Performer:
Torres, Bernice  Search this
DeLaune, Dorothy Whitehorse  Search this
Charles, Elena, 1918-2007  Search this
Porubova, Eva  Search this
Stiková, Eva  Search this
Stachelrodt, Mary  Search this
Burch, Sharon  Search this
Ashley, Lillian  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Americans  Search this
Pomo Indians  Search this
Navajo Indians  Search this
Kiowa Indians  Search this
Yupik Eskimos  Search this
Czech-Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Oklahoma
Arizona
California
Sebastopol (Calif.)
Chinle (Ariz.)
Anadarko (Okla.)
Alaska
Bethel (Alaska)
Fairfield (Calif.)
Roznov p.r. (Czech Republic)
Czech Republic
Date:
1995 June 23
Track Information:
101 Good Time Music / Bernice Torres, Dorothy Whitehorse DeLaune, Lillian Ashley. Drum.

102 Ways of Our Grandmothers / Bernice Torres, Elena Charles, Sharon Burch. Hand drums.

103 Festival Encounters: Mothers and Daughters: Transmission of Music / Eva Porubova, Eva Stiková, Mary Stachelrodt. Hand drums.
Local Numbers:
FP-1995-CT-0480
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 23, 1995.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
American Indian  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Lullabies  Search this
Drum  Search this
Hand drums  Search this
Identity (Philosophical concept)  Search this
Gender  Search this
Navajo Indians  Search this
Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Generations  Search this
Family  Search this
Herbs -- Theraputic use  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1995, Item FP-1995-CT-0480
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Heartbeat: The Voices of First Nations Women / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1995-ref835

Festival Recordings: Narrative Stage: Festival Encounters: Mothers and Daughters: Transmission of Music

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Heartbeat Program 1995 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Fries, Colin (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Charles, Elena, 1918-2007  Search this
Stiková, Eva  Search this
Porubova, Pavla  Search this
Artist:
Stiková, Eva  Search this
Porubova, Eva  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Yupik Eskimos  Search this
Czech-Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Alaska
Roznov p.r. (Czech Republic)
Bethel (Alaska)
Czech Republic
Date:
1995 June 23
Local Numbers:
FP-1995-CT-0481
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 23, 1995.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
American Indian  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Lullabies  Search this
Hand drums  Search this
Family  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Generations  Search this
Gender  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1995, Item FP-1995-CT-0481
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Heartbeat: The Voices of First Nations Women / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1995-ref836

Festival Recordings: Narrative Stage: Ways of our Grandmothers; Transforming Traditions

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Heartbeat Program 1995 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Mullen, Mary (recorder)  Search this
Walters, Wendy (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
DeLaune, Dorothy Whitehorse  Search this
Charles, Elena, 1918-2007  Search this
Stachelrodt, Mary  Search this
Chandler, Cora  Search this
Smith, Ramona  Search this
Sweethearts of Navajoland  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Americans  Search this
Kiowa Indians  Search this
Yupik Eskimos  Search this
Navajo Indians  Search this
Atsina Indians  Search this
Cree Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Oklahoma
Alaska
Anadarko (Okla.)
Bethel (Alaska)
Arizona
Montana
Chinle (Ariz.)
Fort Belknap Indian Reservation (Mont.)
Date:
1995 June 25
Track Information:
101 Ways of Our Grandmothers / Dorothy Whitehorse DeLaune, Elena Charles, Mary Stachelrodt. Hand drums.

102 Transforming Traditions / Sweethearts of Navajoland, Cora Chandler, Ramona Smith. Drum,Water-drum.
Local Numbers:
FP-1995-CT-0488
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 25, 1995.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
American Indian  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Hand drums  Search this
Drum  Search this
Water-drum  Search this
Gender  Search this
Family  Search this
language  Search this
Generations  Search this
Names  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Rites and ceremonies  Search this
puberty  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1995, Item FP-1995-CT-0488
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Heartbeat: The Voices of First Nations Women / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1995-ref843

Festival Recordings: Narrative Stage: Contemporary Singer/Songwriters; Ceremonial Crafts

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Heartbeat Program 1995 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Miller, Mark K., 1953- (recorder)  Search this
Mullen, Mary (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Hill, Elizabeth  Search this
Barney, Geraldine  Search this
Charles, Elena, 1918-2007  Search this
Stachelrodt, Mary  Search this
Peterson, Melissa  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Americans  Search this
Mohawk Indians  Search this
Navajo Indians  Search this
Apache Indians  Search this
Makah Indians  Search this
Yupik Eskimos  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Ontario
Canada
New Mexico
Tohatchi (N.M.)
Ohsweken (Ont.)
Alaska
Washington
Neah Bay (Wash.)
Bethel (Alaska)
Date:
1995 June 26
Track Information:
101 Contemporary Singer/Songwriters / Elizabeth Hill, Geraldine Barney. Guitar,Flute.

102 Ceremonial Crafts / Elena Charles, Mary Stachelrodt, Melissa Peterson.
Local Numbers:
FP-1995-CT-0492
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 26, 1995.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
American Indian  Search this
Folksong revival  Search this
Singer-Songwriters  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Guitar  Search this
Flute  Search this
Gender  Search this
Iroquois Indians  Search this
Jewelry  Search this
Basket making  Search this
Beads  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1995, Item FP-1995-CT-0492
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Heartbeat: The Voices of First Nations Women / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1995-ref847

Joyce Davis; Marvin Salo - ski and snowshoe making

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Finnish-American Program 1980 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Artist:
Salo, Marvin, 1927-2003  Search this
Davis, Joyce E., 1945-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording
1 Sound recording (sound-tape reel, analog, 7 in.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Finnish Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Finland
Minnesota
Date:
1980 October 9
Local Numbers:
FP-1980-7RR-0111
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, October 9, 1980.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Skis and skiing  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1980 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1980, Item FP-1980-7RR-0111
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1980 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1980 Festival of American Folklife / Series 5: Finnish Americans / 5.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1980-ref360
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History of Smithsonian Folklife Oral History Interviews

Extent:
0.5 cu. ft. (2 half document boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Date:
2005-2009
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives (SIA) began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also reminiscences and interviews recorded by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Smithsonian Institution predoctoral fellow, William S. Walker, of Brandeis University, conducted a series of oral history interviews on the history of folklife presentation at the Smithsonian, as part of his dissertation research.
Descriptive Entry:
The History of Folklife at the Smithsonian Oral History Interviews consist of 13.2 hours of analog and digital audio interviews and 369 pages of transcript.
Historical Note:
Folklife studies are carried on in several organizational units of the Smithsonian Institution: the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), the Festival of American Folklife (FAF), and the National Museum of American History (NMAH), and the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI). Dr. Walker began his project on the study and exhibition of folklife at the Smithsonian, focusing on the Folklife Festival and then expanded his interview scope to include other Smithsonian cultural scholars and solicit their views on the FAF and cultural studies, exhibition and public programming at the Smithsonian.

JoAllyn Archambault (1942- ), Director of the American Indian Program at the National Museum of Natural History, is an enrolled member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe. She earned her doctorate at the University of California in Berkeley in 1984. She was a faculty member of the Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukie, Wisconsin (1983-86), and the Director of Ethnic Studies, California College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland, California (1978-83). As curator of Anthropology at the NMNH since 1986, she organized various exhibitions, including Plains Indian Arts: Change and Continuity, 100 Years of Plains Indian Painting, Indian Baskets and Their Makers, and Seminole Interpretations.

Spencer Crew (1949- ) received the A.B. in history from Brown University in 1972 and holds a master's degree (1973) and a doctorate from Rutgers University (1979). He was assistant professor of African-American and American History at the University of Maryland-Baltimore County, 1978-1981; historian, 1981-1987, curator 1987-1989, Department of Social and Cultural History, chair, 1989-1991, deputy director, 1991-1992, acting director, 1992-1994, director, 1994-2001 of NMAH. He then served as historical consultant to the National Civil Rights Museum, in Memphis, Tennessee, from 1987-1991; consultant to the Civil Rights Institute, in Birmingham, Alabama, 1991-1994; and executive director and chief executive officer for the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center from 2001-2008; and was appointed Clarence Robinson Professor at George Mason University in 2008. At the Smithsonian, Crew curated several exhibitions, most notably Field to Factory: Afro-American Migration, 1915-1940

William W. Fitzhugh (1943- ), an anthropologist, specialized in circumpolar archaeology, ethnology and environmental studies. He received his B.A. from Dartmouth College in 1964. After two years in the U.S. Navy, he attended Harvard University where he received his PhD in anthropology in 1970. He joined the Anthropology Department at NMNH in 1970. As director of the Arctic Studies Center and Curator in the Department of Anthropology, NMNH, he has spent more than thirty years studying and publishing on arctic peoples and cultures in northern Canada, Alaska, Siberia and Scandinavia. His archaeological and environmental research has focused upon the prehistory and paleoecology of northeastern North America, and broader aspects of his research feature the evolution of northern maritime adaptations, circumpolar culture contacts, cross-cultural studies and acculturation processes in the North, especially concerning Native-European contacts. He curated four international exhibitions, Inua: Spirit World of the Bering Sea Eskimos; Crossroads of Continents: Native Cultures of Siberia and Alaska; Ainu: Spirit of a Northern People; and Vikings: The North Atlantic Saga.

Rayna D. Green (1942- ) curator and Director of the American Indian Program at the NMAH, received the B.A. in 1963 and M.A. in 1966 from Southern Methodist University, served in the Peace Corps as a history instructor and library director for the Teacher Training School in Harar, Ethiopia, and the Ph. D. in Folklore and American Studies from Indiana University in 1973. A member of the Cherokee tribe, she administered National Native American Science Resource Center, Dartmouth College, before joining the staff of the Smithsonian in 1984. She has written extensively of Native American culture and foodways. Her research and exhibit projects include a documentary narrative with Julia Child, In the Kitchen with Julia, following on her co-curation of the long-running popular exhibition Bon App tit: Julia Child's Kitchen at the Smithsonian.

Thomas W. Kavanagh (1949- ), an anthropologist, received the B.A. from the University of New Mexico in 1971, the M.A. from The George Washington University in 1980, and the Ph.D. from University of New Mexico in 1986. He began his career at Indiana University and then joined the staff of the Smithsonian Institution. A scholar of Comanche Indians of Oklahoma, he has published extensively on the Comanches and was appointed Consulting Anthropologist for the Comanche Nation. In the 2000s, he served as director of the Seton Hall University Museum. His publications include Comanche Ethnography (2008), Comanche Political History (1996), North American Indian Portraits: Photographs from the Wanamaker Expeditions (1996), and "Comanche" in the Handbook of North American Indians, Volume 13 (Plains), Smithsonian Institution (2001).

Roger G. Kennedy (1926-2011) graduated from Yale University in 1949 and the University of Minnesota Law School in 1952, and pursued a diverse career in banking, television production, historical writing, foundation management, and museum administration. He was appointed Director of the National Museum of History and Technology (NMHT) in 1979, renamed it the National Museum of American History, and left in 1992 to become Director of the National Park Service. He focused on social and cultural history, and oversaw controversial exhibits including A More Perfect Union: Japanese Americans & the American Constitution and Field to Factory: Afro-American Migration, 1915-1940.

Keith E. Melder (1932- ) studied American history at Williams College (B.A. 1954) and Yale University (M.A. 1957; PhD, 1964). He was an intern at the NMHT in 1958 and returned in 1961 as Curator of Political History until his retirement in 1996. His research focused on America political movements, especially the Women's Movement and the Civil Rights era. Melder was also interviewed for two other Smithsonian Institution Archives projects, Record Unit 9603, African American Exhibits at the Smithsonian, and Record Unit 9620, the American Association of Museums Centennial Honorees Oral History Project, as well as for the Ruth Ann Overbeck Capitol Hill History Project of the Capitol Hill Historical Society.

Clydia Dotson Nahwooksy (1933-2009), a Cherokee, and her husband Reaves, a Comanche Nation member, worked most of their lives to preserve American Indian tribal culture. Originally from Oklahoma, they spent 20 years in Washington, D.C., as cultural activists. In the 1970s, Clydia was director of the Indian Awareness Program for the Smithsonian Institution's Festival of American Folklife. In 1986 both Nahwooskys entered the seminary, and the Rev. Clydia Nahwooksy was an active pastor and a member of the Board of National Ministries and the American Baptist Churches USA General Board.

Ethel Raim (1936- ), Artistic Director of New York's Center for Traditional Music and Dance (CTMD), researched ethnic music and worked closely with community-based traditional for almost five decades. Raim also had a distinguished career as a performer, recording artist, music editor, and singing teacher. In 1963 she co-founded and was musical director of the Pennywhistlers, who were among the first to bring traditional Balkan and Russian Jewish singing traditions to the folk music world. Raim served as music editor of Sing Out! magazine from 1965 to 1975. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, she developed ethnic programs for the Newport Folklife Festival and the Smithsonian's Festival of American Folklife. In 1975 Raim joined Martin Koenig as Co-Director of the Balkan Folk Arts Center, which developed into the CTMD in New York City.

Joanna Cohan Scherer (1942- ) received the B.A. from Syracuse University in 1963 and the M.A. from Hunter College, City University of New York in 1968. A specialist in visual anthropology especially of Native Americans, historical photography, women and photography, North American Indian photography, and cultural anthropology. She joined the staff of the Anthropology Archives of the National Museum of Natural History in 1966 and in 1975 advanced to served as anthropologist and illustrations editor for the Smithsonian's multivolume series Handbook of North American Indians.

Robert D. Sullivan (1949- ) was educated at St. John Fisher College with a B.S. in anthropology in 1970, the M.A. in education management from the University of Rochester in 1979, and pursued the Ph.D. in human studies (ABD) at The George Washington University until 2006. He served as Chief of Museum Education at Rochester Museum and Science Center from 1970 to 1980, Director at the New York State Museum from 1980 to 1990, and Associate Director for exhibitions at National Museum of Natural History from 1990 to 2007.

Peter Corbett Welsh (1926-2010) was a curator and historian at the Museum of History and Technology, now known as the National Museum of American History. He was born on August 28, 1926, in Washington, D.C. He received his B.A. from Mount Union College in Alliance, Ohio, in 1950 and completed a post-graduate year of study at the University of Virginia. He received his M.A. from the University of Delaware where he was the first recipient of the Hagley Fellowship in 1956. Welsh served in the United States Army, 1951-1954. Prior to coming to the Smithsonian Institution, he was Research Assistant and Fellowship Coordinator at the Eleutherian-Mills Hagley Foundation, 1956-1959. Welsh was Associate Curator in the Smithsonian's Department of Civil History, 1959-1969, and served as editor of the Smithsonian's Journal of History in 1968. As Curator he played a major role in the development of the Growth of the United States hall for the opening of the Museum of History and Technology which depicted American civilization from the time of discovery through the mid-twentieth century. Welsh was Assistant Director General of Museums, 1969-1970, and assisted with the implementation of the National Museum Act through seminars on improving exhibit effectiveness. He also served as Director of the Office of Museum Programs, 1970-1971. After Welsh's tenure at the Smithsonian, he became the Director of both the New York State Historical Association and the Cooperstown Graduate Program, 1971-1974. He then served as Director of Special Projects at the New York State Museum in Albany, 1975-1976; Director of the Bureau of Museums for the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission; President of The Welsh Group, 1984-1986; and Curator (1986-1988) and Senior Historian (1988-1989) of the Adirondack Museum in Blue Mountain Lake, New York. In 1989, he became a full-time, independent museum consultant and lecturer, and was a visiting professor of the State University of New York (SUNY) in 1992. Welsh was a contributor to numerous scholarly journals. He authored Tanning in the United States to 1850 (1964), American Folk Art: The Art of the People (1967), Track and Road: The American Trotting Horse, 1820-1900 (1968), The Art of the Enterprise: A Pennsylvania Tradition (1983), and Jacks, Jobbers and Kings: Logging the Adirondacks (1994).
Rights:
Restricted. Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission.
Topic:
Interviews  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Folklife studies  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9619, History of Smithsonian Folklife Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9619
See more items in:
History of Smithsonian Folklife Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9619

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1967 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Contracts
Photographic prints
Audiocassettes
Negatives
Video recordings
Notes
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Business records
Slides (photographs)
Memorandums
Correspondence
Videotapes
Digital images
Date:
July 1-4, 1967
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1967 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Fieldwork

Series 3: Photographs

Series 4: Audio

Series 5: Video
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1967 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Division of Performing Arts.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
In 1966, Smithsonian Secretary S. Dillon Ripley engaged James R. Morris to serve as Director of Museum Services, soon to become a new Division of Performing Arts. Ripley charged Morris to develop a full program of performances on the National Mall - sound and light show, readings and concerts, films, live demonstrations, and special exhibitions. Morris, who had previously organized the American Folk Festival in Asheville, North Carolina, in 1963, proposed that the Smithsonian host a folk festival as the centerpiece of the outdoors activities. Through the Asheville festival, Morris had come into contact with key people involved in the Newport Folk Festival, among them Alan Lomax. It was Lomax who suggested that the Smithsonian hire Newport's then-director of field programs, Ralph C. Rinzler, to help plan a Smithsonian festival. The term "folklife", drawn from Scandinavian usage, was chosen over "folk" as the name of the new Festival.

The first Festival of American Folklife was held July 1-4, 1967 in two tents - one for crafts and one for sales - a music stage, and a performance area on the terrace of the Museum of History and Technology (later, the National Museum of American History). Fifty-eight traditional craftspeople and thirty-two musical and dance groups from throughout the United States demonstrated and performed at the first open-air event. Mountain banjo-pickers and ballad singers, Chinese lion dancers, Indian sand painters, basket and rug weavers, New Orleans jazz bands and a Bohemian hammer dulcimer band from east Texas combined with the host of participants from many rural and urban areas of the U.S. The entire event was free to the public, the expense of the production having been borne by the Smithsonian aided by numerous civic and cultural organizations, business enterprises and State Arts Councils.

The 1967 Festival drew a huge crowd - estimated at more than 400,000 - and strong interest from the press, Members of Congress, and Smithsonian leadership. In the Smithsonian's annual report for 1967, Ripley reflected on the success of the Festival:

Within - in the Museum - the tools, the products of craft work, the musical instruments hang suspended in cases, caught in beautifully petrified isolation. Without, for the space of a few hours they came alive in the hands of specialists from all over America.... It was a moving spectacle and one that underscored the principle that a museum, to be a museum in the best sense of the word, must live and breathe both within and without.

The 1967 Festival marked the inception of a fresh attempt at the evaluation, documentation and celebration of a hitherto unrecognized area of vigorous American expression. Concurrent with the first Festival, an American Folklife Conference was organized (with assistance from Henry Glassie) to address topics of American and international folklife studies, the relationship between folklife and history, applied folklife, and folklife in schools, museums, communities, and government agencies.

The Festival was organized by the Division of Performing Arts, under the direction of James R. Morris. Ralph Rinzler was the Applied Folklore Consultant and Festival Artistic Director, and Marian A. Hope was Project Assistant. No program book or schedule was published, but news articles, congressional remarks, letters from the public, and a list of participants were later compiled in lieu of a program book. That document can be viewed in Series 1.
Participants:
Crafts

Harry Belone, 1912-1986, Navajo sand painter, Arizona

Herman Benton, 1914-1994, scoop maker, New York

Mary Bowers, 1922-2002, Seminole patchwork, needlework, Florida

Marie Z. Chino, 1907-1982, Acoma pottery, New Mexico

Mildred Cleghorn, 1910-1997, Indian cloth dolls, Oklahoma

Maisy Coburn, apple face and corncob dolls, Arkansas

Margaret Coochwytewa, 1923-1995, Hopi, coil and yucca leaves basket maker, Arizona

Victor Coochwytewa, 1922-2011, Hopi silversmith, Arizona

Freedom Quilting Bee, Alabama

Taft Greer, 1908-1986, weaver, Tennessee

Joseph Grismayer, 1888-1970, willow basket maker, Pennsylvania

Dewey Harmon, 1900-1972, whittler, North Carolina

Bea Hensley, 1919-2013, blacksmith, North Carolina

Louise Jones, 1910-1973, coil basket making, South Carolina

Robert Keith, chair maker, North Carolina

Mrs. Robert Keith, chair maker, North Carolina

Norman Kennedy, 1934-, carder, spinner, weaver, Massachusetts

Clifford Lucas, Indian dolls, New Mexico

Lila Suzanne Marshall, 1908-1994, corn shuck dolls, North Carolina

Charles Mayac, 1906-1971, ivory carver, Alaska

Leo J. Meyer, scrimshaw carver, Maryland

Alice Merryman, 1906-2007, corn shuck dolls, Arkansas

Norman Miller, 1905-1972, southern pottery, Alabama

Mrs. Norman Miller, southern pottery, Alabama

Hazel Miracle, 1915-2001, apple face, corn shuck dolls, Kentucky

Homer Miracle, 1910-1980, hand-hewn bowls, carver, Kentucky

Ann Mitchell, corn shuck dolls, Maryland

Golda Porter, spinner, North Carolina

Edd Presnell, 1916-1994, dulcimer maker, North Carolina

Ambrose Roanhorse, 1904-1982, Navajo silversmith, Arizona

Garnet Claw Roanhorse, 1911-1999, Navajo rug weaver, Arizona

Georgianne Robinson, 1917-1985, Osage ribbon work, needlework, Oklahoma

Lou Sesher, 1915-1989, model boat builder, Pennsylvania

Genevieve Tomey, Osage ribbon work, needlework, Oklahoma

Elisia Trivett, rug hooker, North Carolina

Ora Watson, 1909-2004, quilting, North Carolina

Willard Watson, 1905-1994, toy maker, North Carolina

Music

The Baca Family Band, Czech-American polka music, Texas

Libba Cotten, Country guitarist, North Carolina, Washington, D.C.

Dejan's Olympia Brass Brand, New Orleans marching band, Louisiana

Jimmie Driftwood, Ozark ballad singer, Arkansas

First Maryland Regiment Fife and Drum Corps, martial music, Maryland

John Jackson, Songster and blues singer, Virginia

Bessie Jones (1902-1984) and the Georgia Sea Island Singers, shouts, jubilees, spirituals, and ring games, Georgia

Norman Kennedy, Scots ballad singer, Massachusetts

Clark Kessinger, 1896-1975, mountain fiddler, West Virginia

Vinice Lejeune (1919-1993) Group, Cajun band, Louisiana

The McGee Brothers with Sid Harkreader, String band, Tennessee

Sam McGee, 1894-1975

Kirk McGee, 1899-1983

Gene Meade, West Virginia

The Moving Star Hall Singers, shouts, jubilees, spirituals, and ring games, South Carolina

Glenn Ohrlin, cowboy singer, Arkansas

Grace Papakee, 1907-1982, Mesquakie Indian music, Iowa

John Papakee, 1895-1981, Mesquakie Indian music, Iowa

Billie Pierce (1907-1974) and De De Pierce (1904-1973) and the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, New Orleans jazz, Louisiana

Almeda Riddle, Ozark ballad singer, Arkansas

Scottish Pipe Band, highland marching music, Washington, D.C.

Wade Ward (1892-1971) and the Buck Mountain Band, mountain string band, Virginia

Yomo Toro Band, Puerto Rican music, New York

Ed Young (1910-1972), G.D. Young and Lonnie Young (1903-1976), African American fife and drum group, Mississippi

Young People's Chorus from the Scripture of Church of Christ, gospel, Virginia

Dance

Blue Ridge Mountain Dancers, cloggers, North Carolina

Chinese Lion Group, Washington, D.C.

Maurice Flowers, square dance caller, Maryland

Los Gallegos d'Espana, Galician dance, New York

Glinka Dancers, Russian dance group, New Jersey

Jochim Koyuk, King Island Eskimo dancer, Alaska

Mrs. Jochim Koyuk, King Island Eskimo dancer, Alaska

McNeff Dancers, Irish dancing with Ceilidh band, New York

Henry Paterick, square dance caller, Virginia

St. Andrews Society Group, Scottish dancing, Washington, D.C.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1967 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Folklore  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Food habits  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk music  Search this
World music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Contracts
Photographic prints
Audiocassettes
Negatives
Video recordings
Notes
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Business records
Slides (photographs)
Memorandums
Correspondence
Videotapes
Digital images
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1967 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections , Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1967
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1967 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1967

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1971 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Culture:
Areyto  Search this
Moko Jumbie Dance  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Videotapes
Audiotapes
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Memorandums
Correspondence
Business records
Notes
Plans (drawings)
Digital images
Video recordings
Slides (photographs)
Negatives
Photographic prints
Sound recordings
Place:
Caribbean Area
Puerto Rico
Virgin Islands
Date:
July 1-5, 1971
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1971 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Northwest Coast Indians

Series 3: Ohio

Series 4: Performances

Series 5: Union Workers
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1971 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Division of Performing Arts.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The Festival of American Folklife, since its initiation in 1967, sought to present varied folk traditions representing a broad spectrum of our nation's cultural groups. It was the Smithsonian's hope and belief that the 1971 Festival would deepen and advance public appreciation of the richness and viability of American grass-roots creativity.

The 1971 Festival featured the State of Ohio, Pacific Northwest Coast Indians and Alaskan Eskimos, and the American worker as a part of organized labor. It took place for five days on the National Mall, between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of History and Technology and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan).

Evening programs took place in two locations: Indian Pow Wows were held in the Indian Area at 13th Street opposite the National Museum of History and Technology nightly except July 4th when a powwow was held on the Washington Monument Grounds. Evening concerts took place on the Main Stage located in front of the National Museum of Natural History. The Main Stage also hosted its own performers and others drawn from one of the Festival's three other programs; the resulting recordings constitute a separate subseries below.

The 1971 Festival was once again produced by the Division of Performing Arts, where James R. Morris was Director and Richard Lusher was Deputy Director. Ralph Rinzler continued as Festival Director, with Gerald L. Davis as Assistant Director and Kenneth S. Goldstein as Special Assistant to the Secretary on Folklore and Folklife.

The 1971 Program Book included information on all of the programs, a participant list, and schedule.
Festival speakers and consultants:
Roger Abrahams, Daniel Barnes, Mike Cooney, Hazel Dickens, Josh Dunson, Kenneth S. Goldstein, Archie Green, Richard Hulan, Martin Koenig, George Mitchell, Patrick Mullen, Hoyle Osborne, Ethel Raim, Alice Foster Seeger, Bob Siggins, Frances Utley, Arthur Walker
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1971 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Folk music  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folklore  Search this
World music  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Taino Indians  Search this
limbo (dance)  Search this
Steel bands (Music)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Videotapes
Audiotapes
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Memorandums
Correspondence
Business records
Notes
Plans (drawings)
Digital images
Video recordings
Slides (photographs)
Negatives
Photographic prints
Sound recordings
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1971 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1971
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1971 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1971

Native Americans

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Beginning with the first Festival in 1967, Native American presentations demonstrated the vitality of craft traditions, culinary arts, song and dance, and folklore. The 1974 Native American program marked the fifth year in a series of regional programs, to culminate in the Bicentennial Festival in 1976 with a comprehensive national program. More than 90 participants joined the Festival, primarily from the Western States of California, Utah, Nevada, Idaho, and Colorado; special programs on sports and games brought tribal members from elsewhere in the country.

Among the tribes participating in the 1974 Festival were (from California) the Tolowa, Pomo, Hoopa, Yurok, Karok, Luiseno, Maidu, Cahuilla, as well as (from the Basin and Plateau States) Paiute, Shoshone, Kaibab, Northern Ute, Ute Mountain, Southern Ute, and Nez Perce. Sports and games were presented by Creek, Cherokee, Eskimo, Acoma, Athabaskan, Jemez, and Laguna participants. Pomo basket makers, Karok netmakers, Yurok canoe carvers, a Tolowa reed boat weaver, and cooks from Yurok, Hoopa, Karok and Cahuilla tribes of California demonstrated crafts and foodways.

Performances took place in a California plank house and a Basin/Plateau tipi, with workshops and discussions in a Learning Center, and sports and games in a dedicated area. The Learning Center was a multimedia venue designed as an introduction to contemporary Indian communities and their traditional backgrounds. Such topics as the Indian Family, Native Community, and Contributions to America were discussed by participants, while Festival visitors could attend language classes, learn Indian songs, and view photographs of contemporary and historic Native Americans.

Carole Parker served as program coordinator, assisted by Thomas Kavanagh; the California program was coordinated by Joy Sundberg (Yurok); the Basin/Plateau program, by Jim Jefferson (Southern Ute); and the sports and games, by Matt Waconda and Ethan Bigpond. The multi-year program was shaped by the Native Americans Advisory Group, including Louis Bruce, Clydia Nahwooksy, Dell Hymes, William Sturtevant, Samuel Stanley, Herman Viola, Carnes Burson, and Robert Byington. Major sponsors for the 1974 program included the Public Information Office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Department of the Army, the Coalition of Eastern Native Americans and the Louisiana Pacific Redwood Corporation.

The following year (1975) saw the last regional Native American program, with the Bicentennial Festival providing a national overview, including some participants who returned from previous years.
Participants:
California

Tolowa

Sheryl Bommelyn, dancer

Loren Bommelyn, dancer

Kara Brundin, dancer

Brenda Green, dancer

John Green, dancer, singer

Carl James, dancer

Samuel Lopez, 1886-1977, singer

Billy Richards, dancer

Mark Richards, dancer

Marvin Richards, dancer, singer

Nicole Richards, dancer, cook

Don Stunrick, dancer

Pomo

Elsie Allen, 1899-1990, basket maker

Dewey Barnes, 1932-2006, fishtrap maker

Rose Barnes, 1929-, dancer

Elvina Brown, dancer

James Brown II, dancer

James Brown III, dancer

Kenneth Fred, 1929-, singer, dancer

Bernadine Hopper, 1918-1999, dancer

Nelson Hopper, Pomo, shell jeweler, Finley, California

Hoopa

Eleanor Abbott, basket maker

Warren Abbott, dancer

Anthony Risling, 1912-2004, fishnet maker

Yurok

George Blake, bow maker, Eureka, California

Ella Johnson, basket maker

Sam Jones, 1913-1996, salmon cook

Walter Lara, Yurok, canoe carver, Eureka, California

Ella Norris, 1892-1982, Wiyot-Yurok, salmon cook, Crescent City, California

Josephine Peters, 1923-2011, jeweler

Pamela Peters, dancer

Mark Sundberg, dancer

Lisa Sundberg, cook, dancer

Tom Williams, canoe carver

Karok

Francis Davis, Sr., 1929-, fishnet maker

Luiseno

Villiana Hyde, 1903-1994, discussant

Maidu

Gladys Mankins, 1912-1985, bead worker, dancer

Seymore Smith, 1891-, singer

Cahuilla

Katherine Saubel, cook

Basin/Plateau

Paiute

Marie Brown, bead worker, cook

Stannard Frank, 1923-1989, discussant

Lily George, 1911-1977, Paiute, tule boat maker, Ely, Nevada

Madaline Kaamasee, doll maker

Lena Murphy, dancer

Marjorie Stark, Paiute, 1911-2001, basket maker, Ely, Nevada

Shoshone

Ella Bear, 1907-1983, hide tanner

Jimmy Dan, dancer, singer

Agnes Gould, 1925-1991, dancer

Audrey Gould, bead worker

Austin Gould, dancer, singer

Vincent Ponzo, buckskin worker

Kaibab

Dan Bullets, 1906-1990, Kaibab, hide tanner, Fredonia, Arizona

Alva Drye, Kaibab, basket maker, Fredonia, Arizona

Lucille Jake, 1920-1997, Kaibab, bead worker, basket maker, Fredonia, Arizona

Lita Sigmiller, Kaibab, basket maker, Fredonia, Arizona

Northern Ute

Irene Coch, bead worker, dancer

Loya Gardner, 1913-2004, dancer

Maxine Natchez, dancer

Ute Mountain

Cliff Duncan, pow wow MC

Bonnie Hatch, Ute Mountain, dancer, Towaoc, Colorado

Sarah Hatch, Ute Mountain, dancer, potter, Towaoc, Colorado

Danny Tallbird, 1926-1996, Cheyenne, dancer, Towaoc, Colorado

Ruby Tallbird, 1934-2004, Ute Mountain, buckskin worker, Towaoc, Colorado

Tony Tallbird, Ute Mountain, dancer, Towaoc, Colorado

Southern Ute

Ramona Eagle, Southern Ute, dancer, Ignacio, Colorado

Dan Jefferson, dancer

Tim Jefferson, dancer

Bonnie Kent, 1918-1989, Southern Ute, dancer, Ignacio, Colorado

Elsie Kent, dancer

Nez Perce

Randall Ellenwood, dancer

Wilfred Halfmoon, dancer

Owen Slickapoo, dancer

Allen Slickpoo, discussant

Sports and Games

Creek

Paul Culley, 1931-1993, Creek, stickball, Wetumka, Oklahoma

Paula Culley, 1963-, Creek-Seminole, stickball, Wetumka, Oklahoma

Jeannie Fixico, 1953-, Creek, stickball, Seminole, Oklahoma

Emma Lowe, 1942-, Creek, stickball, Holdenville, Oklahoma

Larry Soweka, 1945-, Creek, stickball, Henryetta, Oklahoma

Cherokee

George Dixon, 1946-, Cherokee, archer, Muskogee, Oklahoma

Larry Rackliff, 1952-, Cherokee, archer, Tahlequa, Oklahoma

Lyman Vann, 1907-1985, Cherokee, archer, Tulsa, Oklahoma

Pete Vann, 1948-, archer

Eskimo

Laura Bergt, sports

Les Bodfish, sports

Reggie Joule, sports

Roger Kunayak, sports

Acoma

Gordon Joe, 1955-, Acoma, track runner, Paraje, New Mexico

Athabaskan

Fred Titus, sports

Jemez

Steven Gachupin, 1942-, Jemez, track coach, Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico

Laguna

Emmet Hunt, 1948-, Laguna-Acoma, cross country coach, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Bruce Allen Romero, 1959-, track, Paguate, New Mexico

Meldon R. Sanchez, 1959-, runner, San Fidel, New Mexico
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1974 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1974, Series 6
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1974 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1974-ref577

MS 308 Eskimo fables; rough notes

Creator:
Turner, J. Henry  Search this
Edmonds, Harry M. W.  Search this
Extent:
90 Pages
Culture:
Eskimos  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1890-1891
Scope and Contents:
The volume is unsigned. It contains an ink stamp of the U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey Archives, and was probably written by J. H. Turner, an observer for the U. S. C. and G. S. who wintered at Tat-chek village, 1890-91. The name "Edmonds" appears on the 3rd page from the back; the context is not clear, but it may refer to Assistant Astronomer Harry W. Edmonds, Turner's colleague. Other members of the party were H. N. Kieraulff, physician; Gustav Bergmann, foreman; John Meade, assitant foreman; William Rundquist, cook; and W. E. Lindgard, C. P. Harkort, Otto Polte, and E. Engelstad, laborers. --U. S. C. and G. S., Report for 1891, part 1, Washington, 1892, page 89. The volume is ascribed to J. H. Turner on the basis of the above information, first noted by Mrs. Ray in U.S.N.A. At the end of the volume are brief notes in two other handwritings, one headed "Futurity" (beliefs about afterlife), 4 pages, and one giving Eskimo expressions or songs, 1 page.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 308
Local Note:
Letter of J. Henry Turner to Professor T. C. Mendenhall, Supt., U.S.C. and G.S., Washington, September 6, 1890, located in U.S. National Archives by Mrs. Ray (5/67) appears to be in same handwriting as main part of volume. Pages at end of volume seem to be in same hand as letters of Harry M. W. Edmonds to the Supt., U.S.C. and G.S., August 19, 1901 seen by Mrs. Ray in U.S.N.A.
Topic:
Folklore -- Eskimo  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 308, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS308
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms308

MS 3396 Eskimo and Cree notes and texts collected by Truman Michelson at Great Whale River

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Masty, David  Search this
Extent:
2 Notebooks
Culture:
Eskimos  Search this
Inuit  Search this
Cree  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Notebooks
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Field notes
Vocabulary
Place:
Great Whale River (Québec)
Hudson Bay
James Bay (Nunavut)
Date:
1935 summer
Scope and Contents:
Handwritten texts and linguistic and ethnological notes from Truman Michelson's 1935 research among the Cree and Inuit at Great Whale River in Quebec, Canada. Among the people that Michelson worked with were David Masty and Thomas, speakers of Great Whale Cree; Rhoderick, a speaker of Rupert House Cree; and Cookie and Harrold, speakers of Great Whale River Inuit. The texts include stories by Masty in Cree syllabary with English translations by Rhoderick. Also present is an English translation by Harrold of Cookie's Inuit syllabic text in Manuscript 3393. The notes largely focus on the vocabulary and kinship systems of the Cree and Inuit of Great Whale River. There are also Rupert House Cree vocabulary as well as notes on the Cree and Inuit in neighboring areas at Hudson Bay and James Bay.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3396
Local Note:
Title changed from "Eskimo tales and vocabulary; some Indian tales; ethnology; kinship system summer of 1935" 6/3/2014.
Other Archival Materials:
See MS 3393 for the original Inuit text of Cookie's story.
Topic:
Eskimo languages  Search this
Inuit language  Search this
Cree language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnologies  Search this
Kinship  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Field notes
Vocabulary
Citation:
Manuscript 3396, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3396
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3396
Online Media:

MS 2505-b "Unalit" (Unaligmiut) and "Malimyut" (Malemiut) vocabularies, sentences, and linguistic notes, Norton Sound, Alaska

Creator:
Turner, Lucien M. (Lucien McShan)  Search this
Extent:
1 Volume
Culture:
Eskimos  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Volumes
Date:
1874-77
Scope and Contents:
Pages 3186-3475: "Unalit-English vocabulary, St Michaels, Norton Sound, Alaska. Over 3000 words, in partial alphabetical order, with sentences, grammatical notes, place names, legends, and verb conjugations interspersed. Pages 2475a-3495: Malemiut-English vocabulary, Norton Sound, Alaska. Approximately 250 words, alphabetical order.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2505-b
Local Note:
This volumes is listed in Pilling, Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 1, 1887, page 94 as part of a Manuscript folio that he calls "[Contributions to the Natural History of North America. Report on observations made in Ungava and Labrador in 1882-1884 by L.M. Turner.]" Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscripts 2505-a and 2505-c also form part of this report, and there is an additional volume, with pages numbered 1842-2127 (listed in Pilling as "Ethnology of the Innuit,") which had not been located in 6/63. Manuscript 2505-b has not been titled by Turner, but the cover is marked in his handwriting with Roman Numerals XXIII and XXIV. These numerals do not seem to be related to the pagination, and possibly refer to the state before binding.
Topic:
Names, place -- Eskimo  Search this
Folklore -- Eskimo  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2505-b, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2505B
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2505b

MS 3393 Eskimo syllabic text collected by Truman Michelson at Great Whale River

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Extent:
7 Pages
Culture:
Inuit  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Place:
Great Whale River (Québec)
Date:
1935 summer
Scope and Contents:
Notebook containing story by Cookie, an Inuit man, handwritten in Inuit syllabary. The story, collected by Truman Michelson at Great Whale River in Quebec, Canada, is of Tunnies, a brother and sister that lived with the Inuit.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3393
Other Archival Materials:
See Manuscript 3396 for an English translation of the story.
Topic:
Eskimo languages  Search this
Inuit language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 3393, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3393
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3393
Online Media:

MS 2925 Report of the Northern Alaska Exploring Expedition

Creator:
Stoney, George Morse, 1852-1905  Search this
Culture:
Eskimo -- birth  Search this
Eskimo -- Boats  Search this
Eskimo -- Dwellings  Search this
Eskimo -- Clothing  Search this
Eskimo -- Hide preparation  Search this
Eskimo -- anthropometry  Search this
Eskimo -- Folklore  Search this
Eskimo -- Trade  Search this
Eskimo -- Medicine  Search this
Eskimo -- Children  Search this
Eskimo -- puberty  Search this
Eskimo -- sledge  Search this
Eskimo -- deer drive  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
April 13, 1884-November 9, 1886
Scope and Contents:
This published account follows the manuscript in the main, with minor editorial changes, especially in the paragraphing and in arrangement of the sections. However, there are some paragraphs and several entire sections in the manuscript which do not appear in the published account. Manuscript page number 160-163. "Boats." Includes drawing of oomiak, kayak, and birchbark canoe, page 161. 163-165. "Houses." Includes drawing of ground plan and cross-section, page 164. 165-167. "Clothing." 167. "Tanning Skins." 167-168. "Thread, Rope, etc." 168-169. Line drawing and description of Malemute sledge. 175-179. "The Second Expedition. ...lists of the provisions, small stores and clothing, outfit, and trade articles of the expedition." 180-199. "Aurora." Observations, August 25, 1885-May 31, 1886. 200-207. "Explorer, Engines and Boiler; Particulars and Dimensions." 208-209. "First Expedition. Stores taken in stem cutter Helena on her survey trip." 210-216; Measurements of Uneluk, Putnam River Malemute, male, aged 32; [217-219] Apaucuk, No-to-ark River, Malemute, male, aged ca. 42; Tatantuk, Norton Sound Malemute, age unknown. [220-238] "Meteorological Observations," including original data sheets.
Manuscript page Number 8. Paragraph concerning native village, N.W. side of Nunivak Island. 10. Paragraph concerning native village, S.W. side of Sledge Island. 60. "Ground plan of hut showing interior." Ink diagram of hut described in published text, page 40. 82. "Section of hut showing interior." Diagram of hut described in published text, page 46. 121-22. "The Chipp or Ik-pik-puk River." 122-122 1/2. "The Colville or Kinyanook River." 127. "Puberty" and "Birth." (Published version lists "Parturation" in contents, but does not treat it in text.) 129. Native population figures. 134-35. Last paragraph of "Doctors" section, describing cure for petty illnesses, using shaman's belt and a stick. (Last 3 paragraphs in published version under "Doctors," pages 90-91, are not in Manuscript.) 139. Diagram of deer drive. 152-157. Legends." (Published version lists in Contents, "Native Legends as Chap. XIII, but this chapter is not in text. Chap. XIV of the Contents, "All Aboard for Home," is not in the published text, nor is it in the Manuscript.) 157-60. "Trade." Gives "articles most in demand," and "price list obtained from the traders" with value of trade goods in terms of number of skins.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2925
Local Note:
See Lt. George M. Stoney, Naval Explorations in Alaska; An Account of Two Naval Expeditions to Northern Alaska, with Official Maps of the Country Explored, U.S. Naval Institute, Annapolis, Maryland, 1900, 105 pages, 3 maps, 7 plates. line drawings.
Topic:
Boats -- Eskimo  Search this
Dwellings -- Eskimo  Search this
Clothing -- Eskimo  Search this
Hide preparation -- Eskimo  Search this
Anthropology, physical -- Eskimo  Search this
Folklore -- Eskimo  Search this
Trade, gifts and exchanges -- Eskimo  Search this
Medicine -- Eskimo  Search this
Children and childbirth -- Eskimo  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2925, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2925
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2925

Native American discourse : poetics and rhetoric / edited by Joel Sherzer and Anthony C. Woodbury

Author:
Sherzer, Joel  Search this
Woodbury, Anthony C  Search this
Physical description:
x, 246 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Type:
Texts
Criticism, interpretation, etc
Place:
Lenguas
Amérique du Nord
Amérique centrale
Date:
1987
Topic:
Indian literature--History and criticism  Search this
Folk literature, Indian--History and criticism  Search this
Languages--Discourse analysis  Search this
Discurso--Análisis literario  Search this
Indios de América del Norte--Discurso--Análisis  Search this
Maya Quiché (Idioma)--Discurso--Análisis  Search this
Littérature indienne--Histoire et critique  Search this
Langues indiennes d'Amérique--Analyse du discours  Search this
Folk literature, Indian  Search this
Indian literature  Search this
Indians of Central America--Languages--Discourse analysis  Search this
Discourse analysis  Search this
Verteltheorie  Search this
Indianentalen  Search this
Littérature indienne d'Amérique--Histoire et critique  Search this
Folklore indien--Histoire et critique  Search this
American Indian literatures - Critical studies  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_326456

Black Europe / by Jeffrey Green, Rainer E. Lotz and Howard Rye

Title:
Sounds and images of Black people in Europe pre-1927
Producer:
Green, Jeffrey P.  Search this
Lotz, Rainer E.  Search this
Rye, Howard  Search this
Author:
Bergmeier, Horst  Search this
Nowakowski, Konrad  Search this
Ziegler, Susanne  Search this
Mahrenholz, Hans-Jürgen  Search this
Stoecker, Holger  Search this
Performer:
Weeks, Seth  Search this
Davis, Belle  Search this
Woolf, Gipsy 1882-1986  Search this
Fields, Arabella 1879-  Search this
Zabriskie, Pete  Search this
Hampton, Pete  Search this
Bowman, Laura 1881-1957  Search this
Carlisle, George Horace 1883-1963  Search this
Wellmon, Harry  Search this
Johnson, Jack 1878-1946  Search this
Roberts, Bob 1885 or 1889-1926  Search this
Boyd, Joseph 1870-  Search this
Garland, Will 1878-1938  Search this
Jenkins, Edmund Thornton 1894-1926  Search this
Parker, Herbert Eugene 1896-  Search this
Mitchell, Louis A. 1885-1957  Search this
Dixon, Rudolph 1896-1944  Search this
Dove, Evelyn 1902-1987  Search this
Jones, Russell 1892-1959  Search this
Payne, John 1872-  Search this
Hayes, Roland 1887-1977  Search this
Stretton, Gordon  Search this
Boucher, James 1902-1973?  Search this
Granstaff, Earl 1893 or 1894-1929  Search this
Sissle, Noble 1889-1975  Search this
Blake, Eubie 1887-1983  Search this
Wooding, Sam 1895-1985  Search this
Briggs, Arthur 1899-1991  Search this
Caillaux, Pierre de  Search this
Pollard, Hughes 1892-1926  Search this
Baker, Josephine 1906-1975  Search this
Hednoff, Harry 1896-1982  Search this
Tessema Eshete 1876-1964  Search this
Ransome-Kuti, J. J (Josaiah Jesse) 1855-1930  Search this
Plaatje, Sol. T (Solomon Tshekisho) 1876-1932  Search this
Cole, M (Singer)  Search this
Martin, E. O.  Search this
Nathaniels, R. C. -1962  Search this
Solanke, Ladipo  Search this
Four Black Diamonds (Musical group)  Search this
Black Troubadours  Search this
Georgia Piccaninnies (Musical group)  Search this
Ciro's Club Coon Orchestra  Search this
Savoy Quartet  Search this
Versatile Four (Musical group)  Search this
Dan & Harvey's Jazz Band  Search this
Famous Broadway Band  Search this
Layton and Johnstone  Search this
Hatch and Carpenter  Search this
Four Harmony Kings  Search this
Author:
Coleridge-Taylor, Samuel 1875-1912 Scenes from The song of Hiawatha Hiawatha's wedding feast Selections  Search this
Coleridge-Taylor, Samuel 1875-1912 Songs op. 37 Elëanor  Search this
Phonothèque nationale (France)  Search this
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Lautarchiv  Search this
Berliner Phonogramm-Archiv  Search this
Exposition universelle internationale de 1900 (Paris, France)  Search this
Physical description:
2 volumes : color illustrations, facsimiles, maps, portraits ; 31 cm + 1 case of 44 sound discs (digital, mono. ; 4 3/4 in.) + 1 CD-ROM (PDF ; 4 3/4 in.)
Type:
Music
Folklore
Field recordings
Place:
Europe
Africa
Date:
2013
C2013, p2013
To 1921
1921-1930
Topic:
Blacks  Search this
African Americans--Influence  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Music  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Popular music  Search this
Ragtime music  Search this
String band music  Search this
Spirituals (Songs)  Search this
Jazz  Search this
Minstrel music  Search this
African languages  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1036702

The Eskimo of Baffin Land and Hudson Bay, from notes collected by Capt. George Comer, Capt. James S. Mutch and Rev. E. J. Peck / by Franz Boas

Author:
Boas, Franz 1858-1942  Search this
Comer, George  Search this
Mutch, James S  Search this
Peck, E. J (Edmund James)  Search this
Physical description:
2 v. (xviii, 570 p.), 10 leaves of plates : ill. ;
Type:
Books
Place:
Northwest Territories
Baffin Island
Keewatin District
Date:
1970
1901
1901-1907
Topic:
Eskimos  Search this
Eskimos--Legends  Search this
Call number:
mfc 1565
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_375129

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