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Various Folk Artists: Jean Ritchie, Cisco etc

Performer:
Leadbelly, 1885-1949  Search this
Ritchie, Jean  Search this
Houston, Cisco  Search this
Summers, Andrew Rowan  Search this
Dyer-Bennet, Richard  Search this
James, Karen  Search this
Seeger, Pete, 1919-2014  Search this
Seeger, Peggy, 1935-  Search this
Warner, Frank, 1903-1978  Search this
Watson, Doc  Search this
Cotten, Elizabeth  Search this
Collection Creator:
Asch, Moses  Search this
Distler, Marian, 1919-1964  Search this
Folkways Records  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (sound-tape reel, analog, 10 in.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Anglo-American  Search this
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Appalachian Region, Southern -- Songs and music
United States
New York
Kentucky
Delaware
California
Louisiana
North Carolina
Deep Gap (N.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Contents:
Jean Ritchie--Shady grive; Cisco Houston--900 miles--Andrew Rowan Summers--Shenandoah--Lead Belly-Meeting at the building; Richard Dyer-Bennet--I go no more a-roving; Jean Ritchie--Pretty Polly; Wagoner's lad; Karen James--Molly Malone; Pete Seeger--Wayfaring stranger; Peggy Seeger-When I first came to town; Frank Warner--Haul away Joe; Doc Watson--Wabash cannonball--unk--Roll in my sweet baby's arms; Peggy Seeger--unk; Cisco Houston--Drill, you tarriers drill; Richard dyer-Bennet--Four Marys; Jean Ritchie--Barbara Allen; Elizabeth Cotten--Babe it ain't no lie
Track Information:
101 Shady Grove / Jean Ritchie. Appalachian dulcimer.

106 Pretty Polly / Jean Ritchie. Appalachian dulcimer.

119 Barbara Allen (Child No. 84)/ Jean Ritchie. Appalachian dulcimer.

102 900 Miles / Cisco Houston. Guitar.

117 Drill, Ye Tarriers Drill / Cisco Houston. Guitar.

103 Shenandoah / Andrew Rowan Summers. Guitar.

105 I Go No More A-Roving / Richard Dyer-Bennet. Guitar.

118 The Four Marys / Richard Dyer-Bennet. Guitar.

104 Meeting at the Building / Lead Belly. Guitar.

107 Wagoner's Lad / Guitar.

108 Molly Malone / Karen James. Guitar.

110 The Wayfaring Stranger / Pete Seeger. Banjo.

111 When I First Came to Town / Peggy Seeger. Banjo.

112 Haul Away Joe / Frank Warner. Guitar.

113 Wabash Cannonball / Doc Watson. Guitar.

114 Unknown / Doc Watson. Guitar.

115 Roll in My Sweet Baby's Arms / Doc Watson. Guitar.

116 Unknown / Peggy Seeger. Banjo.

120 Babe It Ain't No Lie / Elizabeth Cotten. Guitar.
Local Numbers:
FW-ASCH-10RR-0153
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: New York, United States.
General:
CDR copy
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. No duplication allowed listening and viewing for research purposes only.
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for additional information.
Topic:
Folk songs -- United States  Search this
Folksong revival  Search this
Blues (Music)  Search this
Appalachian dulcimer  Search this
Guitar  Search this
Banjo  Search this
Collection Citation:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.ASCH, Item FW-ASCH-10RR-0153
See more items in:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection
Moses and Frances Asch Collection / Series 9: Audio Recordings / CD / CDR copy
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk55fe5aef2-8789-4c37-9191-6a2e80487c88
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-asch-ref18668

Old Ways in the New World

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
In the 1970s, more than 90 percent of all Americans recognized themselves as heirs to cultural traditions brought to this country from other parts of the world. The 1975 Old Ways program featured six of the many ethnic groups that have enriched the American mosaic of culture. In the Bicentennial celebration in 1976, more than 30 were expected to participate.

The central theme of the 1975 presentations was celebration. Individuals and groups who serve their communities through singing, dancing, playing music, telling stories, or preparing food for these gatherings were brought to the Festival from ethnic communities in the United States and from their parent nations overseas. The 1975 presentations featured German and Lebanese traditions (June 25-29), and Japanese, Mexican, and Italian traditions (July 2-6).

The German presentation focused on the music, dance and foodways associated with weddings - a celebration that involves whole communities in customs that have been practiced for hundreds of years. German American musicians played traditional wedding music on a combination of instruments: a hammered dulcimer, accordion, trombone, and bass guitar. Other wedding music was performed by a German American brass band from Wisconsin and another from Texas. From Schleswig-Holstein a six-piece band performed wedding dance music, and Bavarian wedding music was played by three musicians from Munich. A brass band and dancers from Baden-Wurtemburg performed wedding music from their region, and wedding foods were demonstrated.

The Lebanese program reflected the diversity of traditional music and dance, urban and village, sacred and secular. An urban cabaret orchestra from Beirut was joined by another from the United States. Each day's activities portrayed a haflah, or Lebanese party with music, song, food, and dance. Dancers from Marjayoun and Mtein, Lebanon, and Springfield, Massachusetts taught Festival visitors the dabke and other village group dances, and the sacred dimension of Lebanese music was shown by vocalists singing choral songs sacred to Lebanese Christians.

A Natsu Matsuri, or summer festival, provided the frame within which Japanese music, dance, crafts and foods were presented. Japanese Americans from communities in Seabrook, New Jersey, New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, and Washington, D.C., together with folk artists from Tokyo and Mihara, a small seacoast city in Hiroshima Prefecture, created festive celebrations daily, culminating in a major Bon Odori in the Plaza on July 5. Crafts related to festivities such as flower arranging and origami were demonstrated, as were calligraphy, kimono-making, cushion-making and kite-making.

In the Italian area, Italian Americans from neighborhoods in the New York metropolitan area joined counterpart participants from Italy in activities traditionally associated with saint's day celebrations, scampagnate, carnivale and other special occasions. Music was of special importance in these presentations, as it has been in the immigration experience. Visitors also heard the cries of street vendors and the sounds of tambourines, bagpipes, scrapers and accordions, instruments native to many regions of Italy. They enjoyed a Sicilian American marionette show and watched and played Italian games.

Mexicans and Mexican Americans shared the stage the second week of the Festival in a program that attempted to trace the roots of those music traditions most popular among Mexican Americans in the United States. Visitors could compare the styles of the mariachi music that now thrives in Mexico and in the United States. The norteño style, a lively, rustic sound that flourished in Texas and spread through parts of the Southwest, was performed by Mexican American musicians and dancers. An ensemble of five performers from southern Veracruz played the harp-dominated jarocho music and executed the complex footwork of the dances.

Program Coordinator for the Old Ways in the New World was Shirley Cherkasky, assisted by Sandra Tussing and Suzanne Cox. Thomas Vennum was ethnomusicologist. An advisory group included Conrad Arensberg, Svatava Pirkova Jakobson, Alan Lomax, and David McAIIester.

The 1975 program was made possible by the American Revolution Bicentennial Administration, Government of Germany, Government of Japan, Japan Foundation, Government of Lebanon, and Government of Mexico.
Fieldworkers:
Anna Lomax, Anthony Shay, Miiko Toelken, Roger Welsch, Ernestine Perrie, Elizabeth Mathias, Ronald Smith, Philip Sonnichsen
Participants:
German

Gretel Gross Trio:

Hans Eibl, 1941-, zither player

Margarete Gross, 1932-, hackbrett player

Gottfried Keck, 1929-, guitar player

Die Holsteiner -- Die HolsteinerGregor Otto, 1928-, leaderKarl-Heinz Kler, 1937-, musicianHans-Joachim Knoof, 1957-, musicianRüdiger König, 1943-, musicianWalter Siwek, 1919-, musicianPaul Gottfried Zulauf, 1943-, musician

Langenschiltach Blaskapelle -- Langenschiltach BlaskapelleG. F. Weber-Benzing, band leaderGudrun Epting, 1957-, dancerHans Epting, dancerMargot Epting, 1956-, dancerWalter Epting, 1933-, dancerMathias Hildbrandt, 1933-, bass tuba playerMathias Kieninger, 1909-, horn playerAndreas Muller, 1948-, dancerBernd Muller, 1958-, dancerDoris Muller, 1956-, dancerAlfred Weisser, 1930-, tenor horn playerGerd Weisser, 1943-, clarinet playerWalter Weisser, 1935-, trumpet playerMrs. Waltraud Weisser, 1957-, dancer

Konrad Kostin, folklorist

Ulrich Tolksdorf, 1938-, folklorist

German American

Alte Kameraden Band, Freistadt, Wisconsin -- Alte Kameraden Band, Freistadt, WisconsinDavid Baumann, baritone, trumpet playerDonald Boehlke, drummerNorman Boehlke, trombone playerRoland Braun, 1924-, clarinet, zither playerMervin Browne, clarinet playerKarl Ebenhoch, dancerElroy Ernst, trombone playerFranklin Evens, drummerEarl Hilgendorf, 1934-, baritone, trumpet, fluegelhorn playerFranklin Klug, bass tuba playerDavid Balsiger, trumpet playerHarold Pipkorn, 1927-, baritone hornLouis W. Rittschof, 1935-1996, clarinet playerHarold Schoessow, 1907-1992, trombone playerElmer Schreiber, 1925-1998, trombone player, singerDonald Silldorff, trumpet playerWilmer Wetzel, trumpet player

Pehl's Oompah Band, Fredericksburg Texas -- Pehl's Oompah Band, Fredericksburg TexasHenry Frantzen, 1907-1994, saxophone playerR.L. Frantzen, trumpet playerAnthony Hartmann, 1915-2001, drummerSidney Henke, 1913-1984, saxophone playerHugo Klaerner, 1908-1982, alto horn playerArthur Klein, 1906-1990, accordion playerAlbert Meier, 1914-1992, bass horn playerFelix Pehl, 1895-1982, trumpet player

Bob Schmer's Polka Play Boys -- Bob Schmer's Polka Play BoysAlbert Fahlbusch, 1925-2005, hammered dulcimer playerRoger Fahlbusch, 1958-, bass guitar playerAndrew M. Gentry, trombone playerRobert H. Schmer, accordion player

Lebanese American

Antoinette Arida, 1951-1997, dancer

Radie Bonemery, dancer

Edward Denny, 1910-1984, dancer

Ali Elhage, 1943-2001, dancer

Ethyl Anna Habib, dancer

Joseph George Habib, dancer

Baha lssa, dancer

Hugo Klaerner

Edmond Lahage, 1936-, dancer

S. Kweilin Nassar (Ms.), dancer

Laurice Peters, singer

Jihad Racy, 1943-, oud, -- buzuk -- , nay & rebab player

Ray Rashid, -- darbukkah -- player

Louis Shelby, 1925-2001, violinist

James Soffan, dancer

Khazma Soffan, dancer

Mr. & Mrs. Mohammed Soffan, dancers

Samira Hadad Tamer, dancer

Ahmad Zebian, dancer

Samir Zebian, dancer

Nazih Zebian, dancer

Japanese American

Minyo Dance Group -- Minyo Dance GroupSusan Matsumoto Brown, minyo dancerDonna Endo, minyo dancerDoris Endo, minyo dancerToshiko Hieshima, minyo dancerElaine Ichikawa, minyo dancerMichi Ichikawa, minyo dancerGrace Kono, 1920-2003, minyo dancerKiyo Kunisada, 1918-2004, minyo dancerSharon Miyata, minyo dancerViolet Mizuki, minyo dancerShizuko Ogawa, minyo dancerPhyllis Taketa, minyo dancer

Tachibana Dance Group -- Tachibana Dance GroupSahomi Tachibana, minzoku-buyo dancerToyo Kikuchi, minzoku-buyo dancerEllen Kubo, minzoku-buyo dancerTaeko Okada, minzoku-buyo dancer

Fusako Akahoshi (Ms.), 1906-, zabuton maker

Shingetsu Akahoshi, 1906-2007, calligraphy demonstrator

lddy Asada, mochi-tsuki demonstrator and organizer

Kimie Bond, koto player

Tamae Brockman, koto player

Takeno Dodohara, zabuton maker

Sarah Setsuko Hecht, koto player

Katsuko Lee, ikebana demonstrator

Kyomi Nakamura, mochi-tsuki demonstrator & organizer

Noriko Nakamura, -- cha no yu -- performer

Mitsuko Nakashita, clothing customs demonstrator

Midori Nataka, zabuton maker

Kyoko Okamoto, koto player

Yasuko Sudo, koto player

Kimi Sugiyama, -- cha no yu -- performer

Chizu Takaoka, narrator

Karen Takata, 1955-, origami & ribbon folding demonstrator

James Takemori, judo demonstrator

Harumi Taniguchi, 1902-2001, zabuton demonstrator

Hisano Tazumi, 1898-1999, zabuton demonstrator

Mrs. Sus Uyeda, ikebana demonstrator

Japanese

Yasuto Adachi, dancer

Shiro Chiba, 1936-, dancer

Tsukasa Ezaki, 1929-, dancer

Katsutoshi Hibi, 1944-, dancer

Tadao Kagami, 1939-, dancer

Takaki Kagawa, 1950-, flute, drum player

Setsuko Konishi, 1950-, dancer

Sachio Kuramoto, 1931-, shamisen player

Eiko Kurata, 1949-, dancer

Hideko Mamiya, 1945-, dancer

Kenjiro Maru, 1947-, flutist

Shigeo Mase, 1933-, dancer

Makiko Nakanishi, 1952-, dancer

Miyoko Nozawa, 1919-, dancer

Takae Ohmoto, dancer

Mitsuto Ohshita, dancer

Kinuko Sakakibara, 1935-, dancer

Kimio Sugawara, 1951-, singer, shamisen player

Akio Takahashi, 1933-, dancer

Kozo Yamaji, 1939-, stage director

Hisae Yamamoto, 1945-, dancer

Italian American

Siciliani

Sisto Cominotto, 1904-1982, puppeteer

Angelo Grillo, puppeteer

Ida Grillo, 1905-1994, puppeteer

Joanna Lauria, puppeteer

Vincent Lauria, puppeteer

Ann Manteo, puppeteer

Denise Manteo, puppeteer

Michael Manteo, puppeteer

Miguel Manteo, 1909-1989, puppeteer

Napolitana

Giuseppina D'Andrea, percussionist, singer

Calabrese

Angelo Azzinari, 1916-1983, singer

Annunziata Chimenti, 1917-2006, tambourine player and singer

Annunziato Chimenti, castanet player and singer

Giuseppe DeFranco, 1933-, accordion player

Francesca Feraco, tambourine player and singer

Angelo Gabriele, 1921-2006, accordion player and singer

Angelo Gencarelli, 1920-2004, singer

Vincenzo DeLuca, 1933-1983, bagpipe player

Molisani

Antonio David, drum, castanet player and singer

Vincenzo David, friction drum player

Trentini

Mario Dellao, singer

Guido Endrizzi, 1924-2001, singer

Cornelio Facinelli, singer

Simone Fellin, singer

Louis Flaim, singer

Umberto Flaim, singer

Mexican

Hermanos Fierro -- Hermanos FierroAlejandro Fierro Samuyo, harpistDaniel Ramos Palacio, jarana playerHermo Solis Portela, jarana player

La Danza Azteca -- La Danza AztecaJuan Narranjo González, dancerJulio Narranjo Gonzáles, violinist

Mariachi Udabe -- Mariachi UdabeEzekiel Hernández, violinistRafael Hernández, violinistAntonio Macías, trumpet playerFelix Macías, trumpet playerJosé María Morales, violinistRamiro Morales, guitaristAdana Udave, violinistFilamon Udave, guitarron player

Huicholes -- HuicholesMariano Ríos Díaz, guitaristRufino Ríos Díaz, violinistSantos González Ríos, dancer, craftspersonCrescencio Pérez Robles, dancerCarlos Ríos Rosas, violinistEncarnación Martínez Leguizamo, dancerAngélica Castillo Martínez, dancerJesús Reyes Vargas, harpist
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1975 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1975, Series 7
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1975 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5bd5d41ea-d91e-41f1-b14f-16ca06a40175
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1975-ref648

National Heritage Fellowships Program

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
On July 3, 1982, the Festival hosted a ceremony awarding the first annual National Heritage Fellowships. These honors, organized and funded by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), were awarded to traditional musicians and craftspersons who have made outstanding contributions to the cultural life of our nation. Complementing the award ceremony, the Festival presented a series of daily tribute concerts to demonstrate respect and esteem for the talent, vision, and application of the recipients. In addition, an exhibition of crafts by Fellows was shown in the National Museum of American History through August 1982.

Being host to an extraordinary number of human beings from different parts of the world, we in the United States are thereby hosts to an extraordinary number of matured and developed artistic and technical traditions. It is this that the Folk Arts Program of the NEA celebrates through its National Heritage Fellowships. Each year, beginning in 1982, NEA intended to greet, salute, and honor a few examples of the dazzling array of artistic traditions inherited throughout our nation's fortunate history. Each year, another assortment of splendid master American folk artists and artisans representing still different artistic forms and traditions would be presented. The hope and belief was that this could continue far into the future, each year's group of artists demonstrating yet other distinctive art forms from the American experience.

The fifteen master traditional artists honored with the 1982 National Heritage Fellowships had each taken their respective art form to a new height. Many were old friends of the Festival, often having been invited to participate in its earlier years. Each one built upon the inventions, the perfected techniques, the aesthetic experiments of countless artists in the same tradition who had gone on before - singers, musicians, and artisans whose names we will never know. In honoring the recipients of the National Heritage Fellowships in 1982, NEA honored their artistic forebears as well. It is this, perhaps, that truly distinguished these awards - that in the persons of these outstanding individuals we can honor an entire tradition and the long line of earlier artists who have helped invent the many folk art forms that grace our land and our people.

Marjorie Hunt, Heritage Program Coordinator
Participants:
Fellowships Recipients

Dewey Balfa, Cajun fiddler, Basile, Louisiana

Joe Heaney, 1919-1984, Irish ballad singer, Seattle, Washington

Tommy Jarrell, Appalachian fiddler, Mt. Airy, North Carolina

Bessie Jones, 1902-1984, Georgia Sea Island Singer, Brunswick, Georgia

George Lopez, Hispanic woodcarver, Cordova, New Mexico

Brownie McGhee, 1915-1996, blues musician, Oakland, California

Hugh McGraw, Sacred Harp singer, Bremen, Georgia

Lydia Mendoza, Mexican-American singer, Houston, Texas

Bill Monroe, 1911-1996, bluegrass mandolinist and singer, Kentucky

Elijah Pierce, carver-painter Columbia, Ohio

Adam N. Popovich, Serbian-American instrumentalist, Dolton, Illinois

Georgeann Robinson, 1917-1986, Osage ribbonworker, Bartlesville, Oklahoma

Duff Severe, 1919-2004, saddle maker and rawhider, Pendleton, Oregon

Philip Simmons, 1919-2009, ornamental iron worker, Charleston, South Carolina

Sonny Terry, blues musician, Holliswood, New York

National Heritage Fellowships Participants

Crafts

Silvianita T. Lopez, 1901-1991, Hispanic woodcarver, Cordova, New Mexico

Orlene Ortiz, Hispanic woodcarver, Cordova, New Mexico

Ronnie Pringle, blacksmith, Charleston, South Carolina

Silas Sessions, blacksmith, Charleston, South Carolina

Music

Pedro Ayala, Mexican-American musician, Donna, Texas

José Silva, Mexican-American musician, Donna, Texas

Beausoleil -- BeausoleilDavid Doucet, guitarist, vocalist, Lafayette, LouisianaMichael Doucet, leader, fiddler, Lafayette, LouisianaErrol Verret, accordion player, Breaux Bridge, LouisianaBilly Ware, percussionist Lafayette, Louisiana

J.C. Burris, 1928-1988, blues harmonica player, San Francisco, California

Andy Cahan, banjo player, Galax, Virginia

Hazel Dickens and friends, bluegrass music, Washington, D.C.

Alice Gerrard, 1934-, vocalist, guitarist, Galax, Virginia

Styve Homnick, drummer, New York City, New York

Irish Tradition -- Irish TraditionBill McComiskey, accordion player, Baltimore, MarylandBrendan Mulvihill, 1954-, fiddler, Washington, D.C.Andy O'Brien, 1947-, guitarist, vocalist, Washington, D.C.

Mick Moloney, tenor banjo player, mandolinist, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Eugene O'Donnell, 1932-, fiddler, Willow Grove, Pennsylvania

Douglas Quimby, 1936-2007, Georgia Sea Island Singer, Brunswick, Georgia

Frankie Quimby, Georgia Sea Island Singer, Brunswick, Georgia

Charlie Sayles Blues Band -- Charlie Sayles Blues BandDarryl Anderson, bass player, Washington, D.C.Mark Puryear, guitarist, Washington, D.C.Charlie Sayles, leader, harmonica player, vocalist, Washington, D.C.Eddie Williams, drummer, Washington, D.C.Larry Wise, harmonica player, Alexandria, Virginia

Mike Seeger, 1933-2009, Appalachian style singer and instrumentalist, Lexington, Virginia

The Popovich Brothers Tamburitza Orchestra -- The Popovich Brothers Tamburitza OrchestraBob Lalich, 1955-, tamburitza musician, Lansing, IllinoisJohn Lazich, tamburitza musician, Lansing, IllinoisPeter Mistovich, 1914-2001, tamburitza musician, Dolton, IllinoisTed Popovich, 1911-2005, tamburitza musician, South Chicago, Illinois
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives; please submit this form. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1982 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1982, Series 4
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1982 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5d16b2063-9f75-4699-ae31-295454060e31
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1982-ref31

Southeast Asian Americans

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The Southeast Asia Program of the 1980 Festival, building upon a small Vietnamese program in 1979, presented the traditional culture of immigrants from three mainland Southeast Asian countries: Khmer from Cambodia, Lao and Hmong from Laos, and Vietnamese. Wars and economic and political upheaval had recently made refugees of many people from these countries. Some had become part of the most recent wave of immigration to the United States, bringing with them rich traditional folk and classical cultures.

The folk arts of a people embellish the festivals and ceremonies of their lives and are produced in accord with the cycles of the community - the availability of raw materials and time of the craftspeople. While ceremonies and costumes were perhaps portable to a greater extent, one of the challenges facing new immigrants from Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia was to seek ways of preserving and adapting their crafts to the United States, which has its own holidays, work pace, and raw materials.

It was not only the lack of materials such as bamboo or indigo that challenged the persistence of traditional crafts, but also the available time. A large and complex Hmong textile might take two years to complete, but new immigrants did not have two years to devote to these tasks. The situation was similar with Cambodian weaving: done on a large rectangular loom, a scarf might take one month and a sampot (the traditional garment for men and women) might take two months. Along both of these dimensions - availability of materials and time-frame - Smithsonian organizers anticipated that the folk arts of Southeast Asians would be changed by the pressures of living in the United States.

For new arrivals to the United States who had left their homes so abruptly, the appliqued baby carrier, the sarong woven of silk and silver threads, and the mouth organ were all treasured mementos of the past and models for production and innovation of folk artistic forms. The new forms, the Smithsonian assumed, would be adapted to the American environment - some things would have to change. At the Festival, participants could represent only a tiny fraction of the traditions that originated in Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam, and that were continually being brought to America. Contributing immensely to the richness of our kaleidoscopic cultural quilt, they were deserving of the timely attention of the Folklife Festival.
Participants:
Hmong

Song Vu Chang, musician, storyteller, Providence, Rhode Island

Yeu Chang, 1929-, crafts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tolanda Hang, 1967-, singer, dancer, crafts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Chia Chue Kue, 1920-2001, musician, Providence, Rhode Island

Pia Lee, cook, Falls Church, Virginia

Yang See, presenter, Falls Church, Virginia

Pang Xiong, musician, singer, dancer, crafts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Long Yang, 1949-, musician, Arlington, Virginia

Vang Yang, musician, crafts, Providence, Rhode Island

Khmer

Phok Dul, crafts, Arlington, Virginia

Phoung Phan, musician, dancer, Arlington, Virginia

Moly Sam, dancer, Ocean City, New Jersey

Sam-Ang Sam, 1950-, dancer, musician, puppeteer, Ocean City, New Jersey

Sain Seng, cook, Arlington, Virginia

Heang K. Seng, 1947-1997, cook, Arlington, Virginia

Ven Wath, crafts, Providence, Rhode Island

Lao

Da Inthirath, musician, Herndon, Virginia

Nouaane Inthirath, musician, crafts, Herndon, Virginia

So Khamvonsgsa, musician, Alexandria, Virginia

Phouratsamy Naughton, 1938-2007, presenter, cook, Springfield, Virginia

Kham Souk Phanthavong, musician, Arlington, Virginia

Sing Soulamani, 1943-, crafts, Alexandria, Virginia

Vietnamese

Nguyen Ngoc Bich, 1937-, presenter, Springfield, Virginia

Anh Duy Dao, M.D., musician, singer, Butlerville, Indiana

Hoang Oanh, singer, Middlesex, New Jersey

Tam Vi Thuy, musician, Fairfax, Virginia

My Van, cook, Arlington, Virginia
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1980 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1980, Series 7
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1980 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5f1076fed-c9a3-44c2-bb58-342a805b2187
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1980-ref49

Pahiyas: A Philippine Harvest

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The Philippine folk artists who participated in the 1998 Festival shared a common involvement in elaborate systems of exchange, reciprocity, and gift-giving that characterize Filipino society - a theme that was chosen to structure the Festival program. Their lives could be read as essays on gift-giving: mentors of younger generations, diplomatic representatives to worlds outside their communities, custodians of artistic creation, performers and makers of the implements of celebrations. They represented the spirit of pahiyas, a word that collects notions of gem-like treasures and blessings. Pahiyas is a shower of gifts and blessings in the celebratory abundance of a harvest. Through these artists, the Philippines celebrated the centennial of its declaration of independence by asserting its freedom to construct the future with the culture of gift-giving.

At the start of work on the Philippine Festival program, the first order of business was to define an approach that engaged not only how intricately Filipinos articulate identity and reweave tradition with 20th-century passions, but also how they do so while simultaneously expressing delight and dignity, vivacity and solemnity. The demand for accuracy of representation was extraordinarily high. The project was negotiated by the Philippine Centennial Commission with the Smithsonian in the context of the Philippine Centennial celebrations in the Philippines and of the associated events planned in many cities in the United States.

It was clear to the project team from the outset that during these celebrations, Filipinos wished to signal their arrival at a juncture in history where they could enjoy a complex understanding of the deepest sources of cultural pride. The project's goal was to express a sophisticated sense of the dynamics of folklife in a national formation. Thus, the Cultural Center of the Philippines (CCP), the implementing agency for the project on the Philippine side, assembled a project team of independent cultural workers and worked with the Smithsonian to create a Festival concept - pahiyas - and corresponding presentation to communicate that sense of arrival and to register that refined understanding.

The 80 Philippine master artists honored by the Smithsonian Institution and their nation have in common - aside from their levels of achievement - a strength of character that has enabled them to meet the challenge of modernity by accepting and reworking certain aspects of it. Many of the artists were savvy about recordings and other forms of documentation, marketing techniques, alliances with other communities and countries, public presentations, discussions, and political action. Individually and as a group they laid to rest the weary stereotypes of the primitive or the abject rural peasant. Although many of them were poor by the standards of urban society, they all projected to Festival visitors a grace, a pride, and a sense of assurance that seemed to issue from the aesthetic pleasure and wisdom inherent in their chosen art forms.

Richard Kennedy and Marian Pastor Roces were Curators, with Ramon Obusan as Program Director and Eva Mari G. Salvador and Andrea Yangas as Program Coordinators. Flora Elena R. Mirano was Research Director and Ricardo Trimillos was Research Associate.

The Philippines program was produced in collaboration with the Cultural Center of the Philippines and the Philippine Centennial Commission and was supported by the American International Group, Inc., The Starr Foundation, Bell Atlantic, the Asian Cultural Council, and the Philippine Centennial Foundation/USA.
Researchers:
Marialita Yraola (supervising researcher), Edna Marcil M. Martinez (senior researcher), Eduardo Borbon, Ricardo Cruz, Leonido Gines, Jr., Maria Patricia B. Silvestre, Dennis Julio Y. Tan
Presenters:
Paulo Alcazaren, Carmencita J. Bernardo, Eduardo Borbon, Joseph Cristobal, Ricardo Cruz, Frank I. Depakakibo, Leonido Gines, Jr., Pacita O. Ignacio, Amelio B. Manzano, Edna Marcil M. Martinez, Jojo Mata, Flora Elena Mirano, Oliver Patino, Maria Patricia B. Silvestre, Dennis Julio Y. Tan, Marialita Yraola, Consuelo Zapata
Participants:
Cluster A: Binding, Weaving, Lashing

Lydia Ignacio Fojas, boat builder, Aklan Province, Philippines

Norman P. Fojas, boat builder, Aklan Province, Philippines

Lang Sengid Kambay, epic singer, South Cotabato Province, Philippines

Miguelito V. Abuso, -- kiping -- maker, Lucban, Quezon Province, Philippines

Sylvio S. Bobos, traditional builder, Manila, Philippines

Arnelio Manzano, traditional builder, Manila, Philippines

Miguelita A. Bangkas, weaver, Davao del Sur Province, Philippines

Baingan Adzad Dawan, weaver, Maguindanao Province, Philippines

Susima M. Dela Cruz, weaver, Aklan Province, Philippines

Salinta Barra Monon, weaver, Davao del Sur Province, Philippines

Rhodora D. Sulangi, weaver, Aklan Province, Philippines

Maria Todi Wanan, weaver, South Cotabato Province, Philippines

Cluster B: Beating, Tapping, Pounding

Roberto L. Gorobat, goldsmith, Paracale, Bicol, Philippines

Julio R. Ramirez, silversmith, Pampanga Province, Philippines

Cluster C: Carving, Incising, Molding

Bua Hudasan Kara, boat builder, Maguindanao Province, Philippines

Fermin R. Cadapan, carver, Paete, Laguna Province, Philippines

Rodico A. de Dios, carver, Pampanga Province, Philippines

Leon D. Tayaban, carver, Ifugao Province, Philippines

Zacaria Akman Amboa, -- kulintang -- maker, Maguindanao Province, Philippines

Philippine Kitchen

Milagros S. Enriquez, Malolos, Bulacan Province, Philippines

Nicanora Teresa C. Santiago, Malolos, Bulacan Province, Philippines

Basketball Court

ARNIS MASTERS, CEBU CITY -- ARNIS MASTERS, CEBU CITYArnold G. Canete, Cebu City, PhilippinesMario Isagani A. Talledo, Cebu City, Philippines

KULINTANG -- ENSEMBLE, MAGUINDANAO PROVINCE -- KULINTANG ENSEMBLE, MAGUINDANAO PROVINCEAga Mayo Butocan, leader, Maguindanao Province, PhilippinesSinsuat Delawangan Dalgan, Maguindanao Province, PhilippinesKanapia Sibay Kalanduyan, Maguindanao Province, PhilippinesDinanding Dilawangan Kalimudan, Maguindanao Province, PhilippinesLabaya Sagire Piang, Maguindanao Province, PhilippinesSamaon Silongon Solaiman, kudyapi player, Maguindanao Province, Philippines

PASIKING (KALINGA ENSEMBLE), KALINGA-APAYAO PROVINCE -- PASIKING (KALINGA ENSEMBLE), KALINGA-APAYAO PROVINCEBenicio D. Sokkong, leader, Kalinga-Apayao Province, PhilippinesDamaso L. Balway, Kalinga-Apayao Province, PhilippinesCalixto B. Cabannag, Kalinga-Apayao Province, PhilippinesInocencio L. Damagon, Kalinga-Apayao Province, PhilippinesJose Marie K. Felipe, Jr., Kalinga-Apayao Province, PhilippinesImelda S. Polittude, Kalinga-Apayao Province, PhilippinesBenedicto L. Damagon, dancer, Kalinga-Apayao Province, PhilippinesFidel P. Tayawa, dancer, Kalinga-Apayao Province, Philippines

TALAANDIG ENSEMBLE, BUKIDNON PROVINCE -- TALAANDIG ENSEMBLE, BUKIDNON PROVINCEVictorino Saway, leader, Bukidnon Province, PhilippinesJean S. Gangga, Bukidnon Province, PhilippinesMarlon P. Necosia, Bukidnon Province, PhilippinesAdolino L. Saway, Bukidnon Province, PhilippinesRodelio L. Saway, Bukidnon Province, PhilippinesLiza L. Saway, Bukidnon Province, PhilippinesOrlanda P. Saway, Bukidnon Province, PhilippinesNarita T. Sihagan, Bukidnon Province, Philippines

Chapel

CHORAL ENSEMBLE, BACONG, NEGROS ORIENTAL PROVINCE -- CHORAL ENSEMBLE, BACONG, NEGROS ORIENTAL PROVINCEExuferio V. Tinguha, choirmaster & parol maker, Bacong, Negros Oriental Province, PhilippinesGlenn S. Aurea, parol-makingassistant, Bacong, Negros Oriental Province, PhilippinesLeona R. Aurea, cantora, soprano, Bacong, Negros Oriental Province, PhilippinesSimplicia V. Baro, cantora, soprano, Bacong, Negros Oriental Province, PhilippinesCatalina T. Gajilomo, cantora, soprano, Bacong, Negros Oriental Province, PhilippinesAngel M. Honculada, parol-making assistant, Bacong, Negros Oriental Province, PhilippinesGenoveva T. Sagarino, cantora, alto, Bacong, Negros Oriental Province, PhilippinesSylvia T. Vendiola, cantora, soprano, Bacong, Negros Oriental Province, Philippines

MUSICONG BUMBONG, -- BULACAN PROVINCE -- MUSICONG BUMBONG, BULACAN PROVINCEAlfredo C. Anastacio, snare drum, Bulacan Province, PhilippinesAntonio A. Anastacio, harmonica, Bulacan Province, PhilippinesRodrigo C. Anastacio, bass drum, Bulacan Province, PhilippinesAntonio D. Bautista, trombone, Bulacan Province, PhilippinesRoberto C. Capiral, trumpet, Bulacan Province, PhilippinesEmesto B. de Dios, trombone, Bulacan Province, PhilippinesRoderic C. Garcia, cymbals, Bulacan Province, PhilippinesMelchor F. Gimenez, clarinet, Bulacan Province, PhilippinesBernabe A. Ignacio, bamboo bass, Bulacan Province, PhilippinesZosimo B. Miday, trumpet, Bulacan Province, PhilippinesRizalino A. Remigio, saxophone, Bulacan Province, PhilippinesDomingo M. Rosco, saxophone, Bulacan Province, PhilippinesRoman A. Santa Ana, bamboo bass, Bulacan Province, PhilippinesMaximo C. Santiago, harmonica, Bulacan Province, Philippines

RONDALLA MARIKINA, MARIKINA CITY, MANILA -- RONDALLA MARIKINA, MARIKINA CITY, MANILAMarcial R. de Jesus, Marikina City, Manila, PhilippinesArcadio R. dela Cruz, Marikina City, Manila, PhilippinesEdgardo G. Labrado, Marikina City, Manila, PhilippinesRodolfo T. Poblea, Marikina City, Manila, PhilippinesMontano M. Santos, Marikina City, Manila, PhilippinesTeofilo M. Santos, Marikina City, Manila, Philippines

SUBLI -- ENSEMBLE, BATANGAS PROVINCE -- SUBLI ENSEMBLE, BATANGAS PROVINCEAbdon O. Cruzat, leader, Batangas Province, PhilippinesRufina V. Boongaling, dancer, Batangas Province, PhilippinesBeda M. Dimayuga, dancer, Batangas Province, PhilippinesBibiana C. Escalona, dancer, Batangas Province, PhilippinesMiguela C. Maquimot, dancer, Batangas Province, PhilippinesSimeon C. Maquimot, dancer, Batangas Province, PhilippinesLeonardo E. Valdez, dancer, Batangas Province, PhilippinesFelix C. Cruzat, drummer, Batangas Province, PhilippinesSeverino D. Cruzat, drummer, Batangas Province, PhilippinesJose E. Manalo, drummer, Batangas Province, Philippines
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1998 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1998, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1998 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk567abda6f-aa19-4cea-bca7-442d0ccf7d9e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1998-ref26

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Digital images
Audiocassettes
Audiotapes
Photographic prints
Contracts
Notes
Correspondence
Plans (drawings)
Memorandums
Business records
Negatives
Video recordings
Videotapes
Sound recordings
Slides (photographs)
Place:
Caribbean Area
Latin America
Date:
July 1-10, 1994
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1994 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: The Commonwealth of The Bahamas

Series 3: Culture and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean

Series 4: Masters of Traditional Arts: The National Endowment for the Arts National Heritage Fellows

Series 5: Thailand: Household, Temple Fair & Court
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1994 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The 1994 Festival featured four programs. In The Bahamas program, Americans could find intriguing connections to a shared history embodied in the traditions of the descendants of Africans, free and enslaved, British Loyalists, Seminoles, and many other immigrants. More than just beautiful sun, sea, and sand, The Bahamas, and especially its Family Islands, are home to a rich diversity of cultural communities and practices. Also on the Mall, yet half a world away, was Thailand, a nation that never acceded to colonial rule and whose ancient traditions are very much alive in contemporary households, temples, and the royal court. Given the growing economic and political importance of Asia and the Pacific Rim, visitors had the opportunity to better understand Thailand's cultural traditions. The program on Culture and Development, a collaborative effort with the Inter-American Foundation, recognized the value of local cultural resources and practitioners and their role in development efforts. A strategy of appropriately utilizing a community's cultural resources often succeeds not only in stimulating economic growth, but also in promoting self-worth and popular participation in civic life. The program on Masters of Traditional Arts paid tribute to National Heritage Fellowship awardees from 17 states representing a broad range of American traditions. The awards, made annually by the National Endowment for the Arts, honor our human national treasures, those exemplary folk artists whose work expresses the history, identity, beliefs, and values of their communities.

These programs were seen by Smithsonian organizers as more than just separate living exhibits. As a whole, they demonstrated convincingly that across the United States and around the world, traditional culture was with us, not just as atomistic survivals, but as part of social fabrics woven by individuals, communities, and nations. The folks at the Festival live contemporary lives. They are just as contemporary as the genetic engineer, cable television network shopper, or government bureaucrat. The traditions they carry are embedded in modern life. Yes, sometimes we find these traditions are on the margins, but most often they are in an ongoing, creative tension with new innovations and technical and social changes. These traditional ways of doing, making, and being are continually, sometimes even daily, reinvented and applied to the circumstances of individual and institutional life. Innovation and tradition are not opposites, but are processually related to how we use our cultural inheritance - whether that be in music or the museum, handicraft or statecraft - to define and shape the future. The dialogue created at the Festival, in which cultural traditions were respectfully presented, discussed, and even passed along, was therefore considered to be vital to our continued civic health.

On the second day of the 1994 Festival, its founder Ralph Rinzler passed away after a long illness. On July 7, 1994, a memorial service was organized by Ralph's friends and associates (see the recordings in the Masters of Traditional Arts program). Clydia and Reeves Nahwooksy provided a Comanche Baptist invocation. Mile Seeger, Guy Carawan, and Bill Monroe played and sang. Bernice Reagon sang, as did the Bahamians. Bess Hawes, Jeffrey LaRiche, Ann Romano, and James Early spoke of his legacy. Memorial messages were read from Pete Seeger, Alan Lomax, Henry Glassie, Roger Abrahams, Rajeev Sethi, and others. Lucille Dawson spoke about the profound effects the Festival's Native American programs had had on Indian education and civil rights, and Mike Thomas spoke for the Smithsonian custodians who always found in Ralph a friend and supporter. Other impromptu memorials were conducted by the Bahamian and Thai participants.

The 1994 Festival took place during two four-day weeks (July 1-4 and July 7-10) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 12th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History (see site plan).

The 1994 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; essays provided background on the Festival and each of the four programs.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife Programs & Cultural Studies.

Center for Folklife Programs & Cultural Studies

Richard Kurin, Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Anthony Seeger, Director, Smithsonian/Folkways Recordngs; Peter Seitel, Senior Folklorist; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist; Richard Kennedy, Program Analyst; Carla Borden, John Franklin, Program Managers; Olivia Cadaval, Amy Horowitz, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Folklorists/Curators; Betty Belanus, Education Specialist; Arlene L. Reiniger, Program Specialist; Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Kenneth M. Bilby, Roland Freeman, Ivan Karp, Alan Lomax, Worth Long, Research Collaborators

Folklife Advisory Council

Roger Abrahams, Jacinto Arias, Jane Beck, Pat Jasper, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Bernice Reagon, John Roberts, Carol Robertson, Gilbert Sprauve, Jack Tchen, Ricardo Trimillos, Carlos Vélez-Ibáñez

National Park Service

Roger Kennedy, Director; Robert G. Stanton, Regional Director, National Capital Region
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
World music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Audiocassettes
Audiotapes
Photographic prints
Contracts
Notes
Correspondence
Plans (drawings)
Memorandums
Business records
Negatives
Video recordings
Videotapes
Sound recordings
Slides (photographs)
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1994
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5ddc8ca3e-7575-4fbe-aeaa-f2be18f19d0d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1994

Festival Recordings: AFS Centennial Stage: Crossing the Line: Folk-Artist-Folklorist? (Sacks, Jabbour, Wade)

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. American Folklore Society Centennial Program 1988 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Artist:
Wade, Stephen  Search this
Sacks, Howard L.  Search this
Jabbour, Alan  Search this
Lloyd, Timothy, 1951-  Search this
Performer:
Wade, Stephen  Search this
Sacks, Howard L.  Search this
Jabbour, Alan  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
sound-tape reel (analog, 7 in.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Ohio
Date:
1988 June 23
Local Numbers:
FP-1988-7RR-0086
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 23, 1988.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Banjo  Search this
Violin  Search this
Folklore -- Study and teaching  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1988, Item FP-1988-7RR-0086
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: American Folklore Society Centennial / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5385cd4fd-05c1-41ad-ba9e-2bb010d3f142
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1988-ref568

Festival Recordings: AFS Centennial Stage: Crossing the Line: Folk Artist-Folklorist (Brassieur, Licht, Bustin, Hickerson

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. American Folklore Society Centennial Program 1988 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Hickerson, Joseph Charles, 1935-  Search this
Artist:
Lloyd, Timothy, 1951-  Search this
Bustin, Dillon  Search this
Licht, Michael S.  Search this
Brassieur, C. Ray  Search this
Performer:
Bustin, Dillon  Search this
Licht, Michael S.  Search this
Brassieur, C. Ray  Search this
Field worker:
Brassieur, C. Ray  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
sound-tape reel (analog, 7 in.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Massachusetts
Louisiana
Date:
1988 June 25
Local Numbers:
FP-1988-7RR-0100
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 25, 1988.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Folklore -- Study and teaching  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1988, Item FP-1988-7RR-0100
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: American Folklore Society Centennial / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk56a6bc7ce-5dbb-4e48-8fd0-8fc5d7c591b1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1988-ref582

Festival Recordings: AFS Centennial Stage: Crossing the Line: Folk Artist-Folklorist (Wade, Hardesty, Sacks)

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. American Folklore Society Centennial Program 1988 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Artist:
Wade, Stephen  Search this
Sacks, Howard L.  Search this
Hardesty, Clifford, 1921-  Search this
Lloyd, Timothy, 1951-  Search this
Performer:
Wade, Stephen  Search this
Sacks, Howard L.  Search this
Hardesty, Clifford, 1921-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
sound-tape reel (analog, 7 in.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Anglo-American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Ohio
Date:
1988 June 26
Local Numbers:
FP-1988-7RR-0111
General:
Crossing The Line: Folk Artist-Folklorist; Stephen Wade, Clifford Hardesty, Howard Sacks, Tim Lloyd Reel 7 0f 8
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 26, 1988.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Banjo  Search this
Violin  Search this
Folklore -- Study and teaching  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1988, Item FP-1988-7RR-0111
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: American Folklore Society Centennial / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5a997e14a-7b34-497d-829d-dbb7d84f7668
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1988-ref593

Festival Recordings: AFS Centennial Stage: Personal Politics: Folk Community Members and Folklorists (Kanahele, Hickerson

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. American Folklore Society Centennial Program 1988 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Artist:
Green, Rayna  Search this
Cantú, Norma Elia, 1947-  Search this
Gonzales, Teresita  Search this
Martin, Lynn  Search this
Camp, Charles  Search this
Pearson, Barry Lee  Search this
Hickerson, Joseph Charles, 1935-  Search this
Kanahele, Pua Kanakaʻole  Search this
Performer:
Green, Rayna  Search this
Cantú, Norma Elia, 1947-  Search this
Martin, Lynn  Search this
Pearson, Barry Lee  Search this
Hickerson, Joseph Charles, 1935-  Search this
Kanahele, Pua Kanakaʻole  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
sound-tape reel (analog, 7 in.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Texas
Laredo (Tex.)
Hawaii
Hilo (Hawaii)
Maryland
Date:
1988 June 30
Track Information:
101 Personal Politics: Folk Community Members and Folklorists / Lynn J. Martin, Norma Elia Cantú, Rayna Green.

102 Crossing the Line: Folk Artist-Folklorist / Barry Lee Pearson, Joseph Charles Hickerson, Pua Kanaka'ole Kanahele.
Local Numbers:
FP-1988-7RR-0130
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 30, 1988.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Ethics  Search this
Political science  Search this
Folklore -- Study and teaching  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1988, Item FP-1988-7RR-0130
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: American Folklore Society Centennial / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk577f0e38d-5613-4343-a457-5fe484707b01
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1988-ref612

Festival Recordings: AFS Centennial Stage: Crossing the Line: Folk Artist-Folklorist (Ancelet, Cantu, March, Boyer)

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. American Folklore Society Centennial Program 1988 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Artist:
Ancelet, Barry Jean  Search this
Cantú, Norma Elia, 1947-  Search this
March, Richard, 1946-  Search this
Boyer, Horace Clarence, 1935-  Search this
Performer:
Cantú, Norma Elia, 1947-  Search this
March, Richard, 1946-  Search this
Boyer, Horace Clarence, 1935-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
sound-tape reel (analog, 7 in.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Texas
Laredo (Tex.)
Wisconsin
Massachusetts
Date:
1988 July 2
Contents:
CROSSING THE LINE: FOLK ARTIST-FOLKLORIST; BARRY JEAN ANCELET, NORMA CANTU, RICHARD MARCH, HORACE BOYER REEL 3 0F 9
Local Numbers:
FP-1988-7RR-0142
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 2, 1988.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Polka (Dance)  Search this
Folklore -- Study and teaching  Search this
Fire extinction  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1988, Item FP-1988-7RR-0142
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: American Folklore Society Centennial / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5bae999ec-e946-4359-bea1-be43ddeda4d6
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1988-ref624

Festival Recordings: Narrative Stage: Conserving Ethnic Traditions; Irish Music: Federal Cylinder Project; Kiowa & Luiseno

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Cultural Conservation Program 1985 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
sound tape reel
1 Item (sound-tape reel, analog, 7 in.)
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1985 June 28
Local Numbers:
FP-1985-7RR-0403
Publication, Distribution, Etc. (Imprint):
United States Cultural Conservation Program 1985
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 28, 1985.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Narratives  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1985 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1985, Item FP-1985-7RR-0403
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1985 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1985 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: Cultural Conservation / 2.1: Fieldwork
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk53d92b42b-fa9a-45a6-98fb-b4a5dfb87d3f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1985-ref1225
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Festival Recordings: Narrative Stage: Conserving Ethnic Traditions; Irish Music: Federal Cylinder Project; Kiowa & Luiseno digital asset number 1

Festival Recordings: Narrative Stage: Conserving American Indian Culture: Various

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Cultural Conservation Program 1985 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
sound tape reel
1 Item (sound-tape reel, analog, 7 in.)
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1985 July 3
Local Numbers:
FP-1985-7RR-0413
Publication, Distribution, Etc. (Imprint):
United States Cultural Conservation Program 1985
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 3, 1985.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Narratives  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1985 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1985, Item FP-1985-7RR-0413
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1985 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1985 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: Cultural Conservation / 2.1: Fieldwork
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5e58147a1-88ef-4c7b-85a0-4a84a8cd4d89
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1985-ref1235
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Festival Recordings: Narrative Stage: Conserving American Indian Culture: Various digital asset number 1

Festival Recordings: Narrative Stage: Cowboys continued: Native American & Hawaiian Music: NEA Folk Arts Program: Kmhmu

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Cultural Conservation Program 1985 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
sound tape reel
1 Item (sound-tape reel, analog, 7 in.)
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1985 July 7
Local Numbers:
FP-1985-7RR-0431
Publication, Distribution, Etc. (Imprint):
United States Cultural Conservation Program 1985
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 7, 1985.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1985 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1985, Item FP-1985-7RR-0431
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1985 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1985 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: Cultural Conservation / 2.1: Fieldwork
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5c74cfc0e-b8d1-420f-8b57-0c688a7ce262
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1985-ref1253
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Festival Recordings: Narrative Stage: Cowboys continued: Native American & Hawaiian Music: NEA Folk Arts Program: Kmhmu digital asset number 1

Margery Hoffman Smith papers relating to Timberline Lodge, Oregon, 1939-1948

Creator:
Smith, Margery Hoffman, 1888-1981  Search this
Subject:
Dell, Floyd  Search this
Griffith, Emerson J.  Search this
Timberline Lodge (Mount Hood, Or.)  Search this
United States. Works Progress Administration  Search this
New York World's Fair (1939-1940 : New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Topic:
New Deal art  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Handicraft  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Craft  Search this
New Deal  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)8695
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)210875
AAA_collcode_smitmarg
Theme:
Women
Lives of American Artists
Craft
New Deal
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_210875

Joyce J. Scott papers, 1914-2019, bulk 1970s-2000s

Creator:
Scott, Joyce J., 1948-  Search this
Subject:
Scott, Elizabeth Talford  Search this
Type:
Performances (creative events)
Sketchbooks
Interviews
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Photograph albums
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Women performance artists  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Women jewelers  Search this
Theme:
African American  Search this
Women  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)21713
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)398529
AAA_collcode_scotjoyc
Theme:
African American
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_398529
Online Media:

Pappy Kitchens and the saga of Red Eye the rooster William Dunlap ; with an introduction by Jane Livingston

Author:
Dunlap, William 1944-  Search this
Writer of introduction:
Livingston, Jane  Search this
Subject:
Kitchens, Pappy 1901-1986 Criticism and interpretation  Search this
Physical description:
107 pages 24 cm
Type:
Books
Illustrated books
Criticism, interpretation, etc
Illustrated works
Ouvrages illustrés
Place:
Mississippi
Date:
2019
Topic:
Outsider art  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1153576

Oral history interview with Chuck and Jan Rosenak

Interviewee:
Rosenak, Chuck  Search this
Rosenak, Jan  Search this
Interviewer:
Kirwin, Liza  Search this
Names:
Museum of American Folk Art  Search this
Extent:
55 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1998 December 10
Scope and Contents:
Oral history interview of Chuck and Jan Rosenak conducted 1998 December 10, by Liza Kirwin, for the Archives of American Art.
Kirwin conducted the interview in preparation for an exhibit in AAA's New York Regional Center, "In Sight: Portraits of Folk Artists," by Chuck Rosenak, January 22- April 30, 1999. The interview was conducted in Tesuque, N.M. The Rosenaks speak about their involvement with the American folk art world; their collecting interests; their relationship with Robert Bishop, Herbert Waide Hemphill, Jr., Michael Hall, Jeffrey Camp, Lee Kogan, and others; and their books, including the Museum of American Folk Art Encyclopedia of American Folk Art and Artists (1990), Contemporary American Folk Art: A Collector's Guide (1996), The People Speak: Navajo Folk Art (1994), and The Saint Makers: Contemporary Santeras Y Santeros (1998).
Chuck Rosenak also discusses his photographs of folk artists with emphasis on his images of Leroy Archuleta, Loy A. Boslin (The Rhinestone Cowboy), Raymond Coins, Rowell Darmafall ("Glassman"), Gerald "Creative") DePrie, Mamie Deschillie, Bertha Halozon, Bessie Harvey, Bruce Hathale, Nicholas Herrera, Rev. John "J.L." Hunter, Elizabeth Willeto Ignacio, Clyde Jones, Mark Casey Milestone, Louise Nez, Florence Riggs, Rodney Rosebrrok, Herbert Singleton, Q.J. Stevenson, David Strickland, Jimmy Lee Sudduth, Horacio Valdez, and Rose Williams.
Biographical / Historical:
Chuck Rosenak (1927- ) is a collector and author from Tesuque, N.M.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 51 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics, and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Folk artists -- United States  Search this
Topic:
Folk art -- Collectors and collecting -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- Interviews  Search this
Navajo Indians -- Art  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Navajo Indians -- Social life and customs  Search this
Santeros  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.rosena98
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9e85e5b3b-d215-469d-90a7-8e89c5d520c9
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rosena98
Online Media:

1850 - 1851 Eliza Jane Baile's "Bride's" Quilt

Maker:
Baile, Eliza Jane  Search this
Physical Description:
fabric, cotton (overall material)
thread, cotton, wool (overall material)
filling, cotton (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 93 in x 93 in; 237 cm x 237 cm
Object Name:
quilt
Place made:
United States: Maryland, Carroll county
Date made:
1850-1851
Subject:
Quilting  Search this
Weddings  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Miss Addie Baile Manahan
ID Number:
TE.T011149
Accession number:
202673
Catalog number:
T11149
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Textiles
Textiles
Domestic Furnishings
Quilts
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746ac-36bf-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_556365
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Jack Savitsky, 1990 July 9

Interviewee:
Savitsky, Jack, 1910-1991  Search this
Interviewer:
Lindsey, Jack  Search this
Subject:
McCarthy, Justin  Search this
Strauser, Sterling  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Painters -- Pennsylvania -- Lansford -- Interviews  Search this
Self-taught artists -- Pennsylvania -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12320
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213633
AAA_collcode_savits90
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213633

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