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Film als medium, verstaanbaar voor iedereen

Author:
Sembène, Ousmane 1923-2007  Search this
Werk, Jan Kees van de 1948-  Search this
Smithsonian Libraries African Art Index Project DSI  Search this
Subject:
Sembène, Ousmane 1923-2007  Search this
Type:
Articles
Interviews
Place:
Senegal
Date:
1988
Topic:
Filmmakers  Search this
Call number:
NX5 .C968
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_492473

Xala, Ousmane Sembene 1976 : the carapace that failed

Author:
Mulvey, Laura  Search this
Smithsonian Libraries African Art Index Project DSI  Search this
Subject:
Sembène, Ousmane 1923-2007 Criticism and interpretation  Search this
Sembène, Ousmane 1923-2007 Xala  Search this
Type:
Articles
Place:
Senegal
Date:
1991
Topic:
Filmmakers  Search this
Call number:
NX1 .T445
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_494034

Djibril Diop Mambety / Keith Shiri

Author:
Shiri, Keith  Search this
Smithsonian Libraries African Art Index Project DSI  Search this
Subject:
Diop Mambéty, Djibril 1945-1998  Search this
Type:
Books
Place:
Senegal
Date:
1999
Topic:
Filmmakers  Search this
Call number:
PN1995.9.N4 B483
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_667696

Monroe Killy Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) films

Filmmaker:
Killy, Monroe P., 1910-  Search this
Extent:
6 Film reels
Culture:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Film reels
Date:
circa 1939-1949
Summary:
This collection contains 6 moving image films depicting the Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) community in Minnesota that were filmed by amateur filmmaker Monroe P. Killy, circa 1939-1949.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains 6 moving image films shot by Monroe P. Killy from 1939-1949. The films depict Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) community in Minnesota and include the following titles: Sugar Bush (1939), Chippewa Handicraft (1939), The Moccasin (1940), Wild Rice Harvest (1940), Anishinaabe (1949), and Pow-wow (date unknown).
Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
Films are arranged in 6 film canisters by date.
Biographical / Historical:
Monroe P. Killy was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota on October 28, 1910. He worked as an amateur photographer and ethnologist, while he managed the Eastman Kodak store Minneapolis laboratory. In addition to being an avid collector of American Indian cultural materials, he was also active in the Minneapolis Photographic Society. He died in 2010.
Related Materials:
The Minnesota Historical Society also holds Monroe P. Killy films.
Provenance:
Acquired from Monroe P. Killy in 1972.
Restrictions:
This collection is closed to researchers until it has been digitized.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Monroe Killy Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) films, image #, NMAI.AC.430; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.430
See more items in:
Monroe Killy Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) films
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv48aed88f6-7b98-42d0-b864-4da35bbd3d0e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-430

Sugar Bush

Filmmaker:
Killy, Monroe P., 1910-  Search this
Collection Filmmaker:
Killy, Monroe P., 1910-  Search this
Extent:
1 Film reel
Culture:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Film reels
Date:
1939
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is closed to researchers until it has been digitized.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Monroe Killy Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) films, image #, NMAI.AC.430; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Monroe Killy Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) films
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4f7e174db-e81d-4a02-a1e0-f32a2a4bf986
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-430-ref1

Chippewa Handicraft

Filmmaker:
Killy, Monroe P., 1910-  Search this
Collection Filmmaker:
Killy, Monroe P., 1910-  Search this
Extent:
1 Film reel
Culture:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Film reels
Date:
1939
Scope and Contents:
This film depicts Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) possibly at the Mille Lacs Indian Reservation in Minnesota, harvesting and preparing wild rice, spearfishing through ice, collecting sap and making maple syrup, playing games, gathering birchbark making birchbark items, and preparing skins for leather and sewing moccasins. Filmed by Monroe Killy in 1939.
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is closed to researchers until it has been digitized.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Monroe Killy Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) films, image #, NMAI.AC.430; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Monroe Killy Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) films
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv47a5edd33-cfbd-4efe-be29-bab504f1c9ce
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-430-ref2

The Moccasin

Filmmaker:
Killy, Monroe P., 1910-  Search this
Collection Filmmaker:
Killy, Monroe P., 1910-  Search this
Culture:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1940
Scope and Contents:
This film shows Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) women at Leech Lake, Minnesota tanning hides and making moccasins decorated with beadwork and a woman [Sahnish (Arikara) or Minitari (Hidatsa)] at Fort Berthold, North Dakota tanning cow hide and doing quillwork on clothing. Filmed by Monroe P. Killy in 1940.
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is closed to researchers until it has been digitized.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Monroe Killy Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) films, image #, NMAI.AC.430; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Monroe Killy Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) films
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4f18d0380-686d-4522-8f09-c984573e02da
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-430-ref3

Wild Rice Harvest

Filmmaker:
Killy, Monroe P., 1910-  Search this
Collection Filmmaker:
Killy, Monroe P., 1910-  Search this
Extent:
1 Film reel
Culture:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Film reels
Date:
1940
Scope and Contents:
This film shows a traditional Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) wild rice harvest including parching, threshing or jigging by foot power, and fanning. Participants are the John Chicag family and Gerald Strong. Filmed by Monroe P. Kelly (1910-2010) on the Nett Lake Indian Reservation, Minnesota in 1940.
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is closed to researchers until it has been digitized.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Monroe Killy Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) films, image #, NMAI.AC.430; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Monroe Killy Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) films
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4d82fdb85-994d-4c99-82b5-1df74043531e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-430-ref4

Anicnabe [Anishinaabe]

Filmmaker:
Killy, Monroe P., 1910-  Search this
Collection Filmmaker:
Killy, Monroe P., 1910-  Search this
Extent:
1 Film reel
Culture:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Film reels
Date:
1949
Scope and Contents:
This film shows pictographs on Drum Island, Nett Lake and spirit houses at Kathio, Mille Lacs Indian Reservation in Minnesota. The film also includes footage showing Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) games (stick game, moccasin game and bowl game) played at the 1949 Territorial Centennial at Itasca State Park and a pow-wow at Lake Calhoun during the 1949 Minneapolis Aquatennial. Filmed by Monroe Killy in 1949.
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is closed to researchers until it has been digitized.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Monroe Killy Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) films, image #, NMAI.AC.430; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Monroe Killy Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) films
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4a5a94a66-8a76-4ea2-9cc8-9bde377e600b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-430-ref5

Pow-wow

Filmmaker:
Killy, Monroe P., 1910-  Search this
Collection Filmmaker:
Killy, Monroe P., 1910-  Search this
Extent:
1 Film reel
Culture:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Film reels
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is closed to researchers until it has been digitized.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Monroe Killy Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) films, image #, NMAI.AC.430; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Monroe Killy Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) films
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4c5546e92-18db-4951-92c3-3fcae48ff02f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-430-ref6

Pearl Bowser Audiovisual Collection

Names:
Andrade-Watkins, Claire  Search this
Bambara, Toni Cade  Search this
Dash, Julie  Search this
Gerima, Haile  Search this
Greaves, William, 1953-2005  Search this
Gunn, Bill, 1934-1989  Search this
Jafa, Arthur  Search this
Jones, Robert Earl, 1904-2006  Search this
Massiah, Louis  Search this
Micheaux, Oscar, 1884-1951  Search this
Moses, Ethel  Search this
Robeson, Paul, 1898-1976  Search this
Sanchez, Sonia, 1934- (poet, reader)  Search this
Snead, James A., 1953-1989  Search this
Spence, Louise, 1945-  Search this
Tucker, Lorenzo  Search this
Donor:
Bowser, Pearl, 1931-  Search this
Extent:
approximately 100 Motion picture films
213 Sound cassettes (7 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Motion picture films
Sound cassettes
Sound cassette
Oral histories (document genres)
16mm motion picture film
Vhs (videotape format)
Place:
England
Harlem (New York, N.Y.)
Roanoke (Va.)
Memphis (Tenn.)
Date:
bulk 1920-2001
Biographical / Historical:
Pearl Bowser is a filmmaker, producer, author, lecturer, and highly acclaimed scholar of African American film who is recognized as an authority on the works of Oscar Micheaux, a noted writer, director, and producer of race films from 1919 to 1948.

Born Pearl Johnson on June 25, 1931, in Sugar Hill, Harlem, New York, she was named after her mother (also Pearl Johnson), a domestic worker who had been raised in a Catholic nunnery. On occasional Saturdays, the younger Pearl would accompany her mother to work in apartments in lower Manhattan, where she would assist her by folding handkerchiefs for a small allowance. After moving to a lower part of Harlem when she was about four years old, she met Harlem entrepreneur "Bumpy" Johnson, for whom she and other children in the neighborhood did odd jobs such as counting coins or attending to his ice-cream stand. Johnson, who would sometimes give the children joy rides in his Cadillac, occasionally allowed Pearl and the other children to borrow books from his extensive library, provided that they read them and submitted to a quiz.

As a child, Bowser had several racist encounters. For example, one of her white kindergarten teachers at her elementary school wore gloves in the classroom as to not touch Black pupils. She was also occasionally teased for having a gap between her teeth but felt insulated from sustained bullying because she had several older brothers who sometimes protected her. On a separate occasion, when she was about nine years old, her mother sent her on a trip from New York to the South to visit relatives. Although her mother had purchased tickets for her to be in a Pullman car, when she changed trains in Washington, DC., she was forced to ride in the car behind the engine, which left her covered in soot.

An avid reader, Pearl excelled in elementary and high school and received a scholarship to attend Brooklyn College, where she majored in biology. She supplemented her income by recording the numbers in one of Bumpy Johnson's shops. Disappointed with the quality of the education she was receiving, Bowser withdrew from Brooklyn College, eventually landing a job at CBS where she worked on a team that analyzed Nielsen ratings.

In 1955, Pearl married fellow New Yorker LeRoy Bowser. By the mid-1960s, although Pearl and LeRoy Bowser had separate interests, they both were working simultaneously in the civil rights movement. While LeRoy was active in Brooklyn CORE (Congress of Racial Equality) and went to the South in the summer to teach for what was the beginning of HeadStart, Pearl, along with other production activists, took to the streets documenting African American culture and issues—working to bring these films to schools. Additionally, Bowser wanted to write a cookbook to earn funds for Brooklyn's CORE organization. She was approached by David Davis, the editor of Tuesday Magazine. Tuesday had distribution in the Herald Tribune across the country as a Sunday supplement. As the urban-world magazine exploded in Black communities, "Joan" Bowser's two-page pictorials on Southern cooking with a set of recipes became very popular in the five years she wrote them. Bowser retained copyrights to the articles, and easily completed her cookbook a short time later.

Bowser's colleague at ABC, Charles Hobson, found a used book written by Peter Noble about Black films and Oscar Micheaux. The volume was slim and contained what little information contained in the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) files. Hobson and his colleagues wanted to write a book about the topic, and they assigned Bowser to begin the research. As part of the project, Bowser went to California to interview actors who may have been in early Black films or may have worked with Micheaux. What she learned began her intensive scholarship into Micheaux and his fellow filmmakers.

In 1971, she organized her first film festival, the Black Film History Series. In 1979, she organized the nation's first American women's film festival in New York City. She also presented a major retrospective, Independent Black American Cinema 1920-1980, which toured the country during 1981 and 1982. She also directed the Journey Across Three Continents film and lecture series, which toured the country from 1983-1985. Bowser also served as president of the prestigious Flaherty Film Seminar in 1987. In 1989, she, alongside Grant Munro, programmed the 35th Flaherty Film Seminar, which featured films such as Finzan, Zajota and the Boogie Spirit, Daughters of the Dust, and many more. She has also been a judge at the world-renown Pan-African Film and Television Festival of Ouagadougou (FESCPACO) in Burkina Faso (formerly known as Upper Volta).

In the 1980s Bowser was awarded an independent artists grant by the Ford Foundation to travel west and collect oral histories from individuals in Oscar Micheaux's orbit, loosely following the route he would have travelled decades earlier. Stopping in cities such as Roanoke, Virginia; Memphis, Tennessee; and Jackson, Mississippi, she collected dozens of oral histories from actors, actresses etc. that knew Oscar Micheaux. Through this research she became an eminent figure in the Black independent film industry. Working as a programmer, she travelled around the United States and the world showing films by domestic and Black filmmakers within the Diaspora.

Despite her wealth of experience working as a programmer, it wasn't until the 1990s that Bowser made her directorial debut with the documentary film Midnight Ramble. Funded by American Experience, the film looks at African Americans and Hollywood movies from 1910 through the 1950s. In 2000, she, along with Louise Spence, co-authored Writing Himself into History: Oscar Micheaux, His Silent Films and His Audiences, a book about the pioneering filmmaker. Additionally, she is founder and director of Chamba Educational Film Services, a film distribution company that specialized in distributing films by African American filmmakers. In the early 1980s, she renamed her company/collection as African Diaspora Images, a collection of historical and contemporary films documenting Black film history. She subsequently joined Third World Newsreel, where she was director of their theater department.

In 2012, Pearl Bowser donated her extensive collection of books, sound cassettes, films, film memorabilia, and papers to the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Sources:

1940 United States Federal Census; New York, New York, New York, population schedule, p. 61B, house number 1486, family 195, Pearl Bowser; Ancestry.com. 1940 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012 accessed: 10 Sept 2022); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm: m-t0627-02665

Bowser, Pearl. Pearl Bowser Oral History. Interview by Tuliza Fleming and Jennifer Lyon, July 21, 2011.
Provenance:
Acquired as a donation from Pearl Bowser in 2012.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access to collection materials requires an appointment.
Occupation:
Filmmakers  Search this
Actors -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Documentary films  Search this
Film festivals  Search this
African American actors  Search this
African American actresses  Search this
African diaspora  Search this
Race films  Search this
African American motion picture producers and directors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Meetings  Search this
Conferences  Search this
Lectures and lecturing  Search this
Amateur films  Search this
Motion picture soundtracks  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Radio broadcasts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound cassette
Oral histories (document genres)
16mm motion picture film
VHS (videotape format)
Citation:
Pearl Bowser Collection, National Museum of African American History and Culture
Identifier:
NMAAHC.A2012.79.AV
See more items in:
Pearl Bowser Audiovisual Collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/io3209e9c6d-3045-4a0a-941e-6519385b18d5
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmaahc-a2012-79-av

National Anthropological Film Center films of Tibetan Buddhists in South India

Creator:
National Anthropological Film Center (U.S.)  Search this
Maradol, Mathias  Search this
Cinematographer:
Dorjee, Ragpa  Search this
Filmmaker:
Maloney, M. Michael  Search this
Extent:
Film reels (color sound; 162,774 feet)
Linear feet
Culture:
Tibetans  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Film reels
Sound films
Place:
South Asia
India
Date:
1979-1982
Scope and Contents:
Collection consists of full film record and edited film documenting Tibetan Buddhist communities in South India. Collection also contains associated texts, still film, sound recordings, annotations (recorded narratives), production logs, and field notes.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or Anthropology Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Provenance:
Received from the National Anthropological Film Center in 1986.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Buddhism  Search this
Buddhist monasteries  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound films
Citation:
National Anthropological Film Center films of Tibetan Buddhists in South India, Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
HSFA.1986.13SIND
See more items in:
National Anthropological Film Center films of Tibetan Buddhists in South India
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc9b7777467-d262-4ef2-ad94-3c3e10078e59
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-hsfa-1986-13sind
Online Media:

Newari Film Project (1986.13.1-9)

Collection Creator:
National Anthropological Film Center (U.S.)  Search this
Johnson, Barbara  Search this
Dorjee, Ragpa  Search this
Reinhard, Johan  Search this
Extent:
1 Film reel (color sound, 16mm)
Type:
Archival materials
Film reels
Date:
1978
Scope and Contents:
Film footage shot by Barbara Johnson among the Jyapu subcaste of the Newars of Tawnany Tole, Thecho village in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal; August l9, mid-day, Gai Jattra (an annual festival to both honor and aidthe souls of recently deceased relatives) processions coming through the courtyard filmed from the third floor window of the house where the filmmaker stayed. August 20, 1PM, Gai Jattra processions continued, and views of the courtyard in rain. August 20, 2 - 4PM views of the courtyard during and after rain; a group of exuberant boys playing and throwing sticks in the air. (worship) at the courtyard's Buddha (also called "chaittya")statue; they sprinkle water libations on it from brass pitchers, circle it and bow their foreheads to the small Buddhas carved into each of the four sides of the statue. Other women wait for water at the courtyard water tap; some women and girls at the tap wash containers, a girl with a brass offering plate puts a "tikka", or dot of sinduri (a fine red powder mixed to a paste with water and sometimes curd) on the foreheads of a few younger girls standing around.
General:
Local Numbers: HSFA 1986.13.1-9
See more items in:
National Anthropological Film Center films of Nepal
National Anthropological Film Center films of Nepal / Newari Film Project (1986.13.1)
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc998dfbd7b-39eb-4a43-88c0-dbc1e99e7967
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-hsfa-1986-13npl-ref10

Newari Film Project (1986.13.1-14)

Collection Creator:
National Anthropological Film Center (U.S.)  Search this
Johnson, Barbara  Search this
Dorjee, Ragpa  Search this
Reinhard, Johan  Search this
Extent:
1 Film reel (color sound, 16mm)
Type:
Archival materials
Film reels
Date:
1978
Scope and Contents:
Film footage shot by Barbara Johnson among the Jyapu subcaste of the Newars of Tawnany Tole, Thecho village in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal; August 30, 3 to 5 PM, children playing in the Tawnany Tole courtyard. Older girls entertain themselves by walking with one girl's younger brother who is just learning to walk. A favorite activity of girls in their early teens is to entertain a crawling age baby. They talk about their siblings as "my little boy" and "your little girl" to each other. See camera log page 7, CR 40, for filmmaker's speculations about the engaging personalities of the children who have the benefit of older siblings who lavish this kind of attention on them. This footage includes a circle game and noisy group play, and ends with views of old men in the courtyard. August 31, 7 to 10 AM, courtyard early morning activities. Quiet vignettes show small fairly quiet groups of both children and adults before they go inside to eat the morning meal of rice. There is a shot of a bicycle belonging to a man named Bailal, son of the sister of the head of one of the better off households in the courtyard. Bailal and his wife occupy a poor back house off of the main house, presumably because his father, from another village, did not leave him any house or land. He holds a menial job in Kathmandu, and the bicycle is his means of transportation. Just before the shot of the bicycle was filmmed Bailal's cousin Godi, the only son of the head of the household, walked up to the bicycle, kicked it, and went inside his house and started yelling at someone outside, presumably Bailal. His yelling can be heard during l or 2 shots after the bicycle shot. Later film shows a group of children focusing around a pit openning activity. A girl in a gold color print dress had just done something to a little boy in the background to make him cry. Film shows a variety of touching and small interactions. September 1, more courtyard activities, a mother and girls in doorway pleasurably socializing, another mother, Tulushimaya, grooming one of her daughters in the open way house building in the center of the courtyard, children play with kites.
General:
Local Numbers: HSFA 1986.13.1-14
See more items in:
National Anthropological Film Center films of Nepal
National Anthropological Film Center films of Nepal / Newari Film Project (1986.13.1)
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc9c4c0cb21-c918-4fb7-9211-c4ea485bdeb8
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-hsfa-1986-13npl-ref15

Newari Film Project (1986.13.1-16)

Collection Creator:
National Anthropological Film Center (U.S.)  Search this
Johnson, Barbara  Search this
Dorjee, Ragpa  Search this
Reinhard, Johan  Search this
Extent:
1 Film reel (color sound, 16mm)
Type:
Archival materials
Film reels
Date:
1978
Scope and Contents:
Film footage shot by Barbara Johnson among the Jyapu subcaste of the Newars of Tawnany Tole, Thecho village in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal: September 4, mid morning and late afternoon; A group of boys antagonize a 5 year old boy. He makes an angry gesture, common among adults, with the back of his hand, but does not actually strike anyone. See filmmaker's camera log for CR46 for more background on the interaction with this boy. September 5 late afternoon, September 6 mid-morning, and September 13, early and late morning: A father sits in a doorway with his children; several boys play a hand slapping game, one boy holds a hand out as another boy pats it several times with the palms of both hands; some girls play jump rope as some boys play a pitching game with stones. Boys and girls often play separately. People gather around the water tap to wait for the water to be turned on. Mustard seed that has been drying in the sun is put in a sack. As their mother spreads mustard seed to dry on a mat two young children tie leaves, with holes cut in them for their eyes, on their faces with twine, imitating a masked dancer, a man masquerading as a witch figure, they had seen the evening before. An older woman uses a traditional kitchen utensil to cut a type of leaf stalk that will be eaten with the morning meal. A courtyard mother nurses her only child, a walking age little girl.
General:
Local Numbers: HSFA 1986.13.1-16
See more items in:
National Anthropological Film Center films of Nepal
National Anthropological Film Center films of Nepal / Newari Film Project (1986.13.1)
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc96d612f69-99fd-488e-bcdc-7378d2a71dc3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-hsfa-1986-13npl-ref17

Newari Film Project (1986.13.1-18)

Collection Creator:
National Anthropological Film Center (U.S.)  Search this
Johnson, Barbara  Search this
Dorjee, Ragpa  Search this
Reinhard, Johan  Search this
Extent:
1 Film reel (color sound, 16mm)
Type:
Archival materials
Film reels
Date:
1978
Scope and Contents:
Film footage shot by Barbara Johnson among the Jyapu subcaste of the Newars of Tawnany Tole, Thecho village in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal: September 15, 4PM, CR52: a boy and girl play a sitting game with stones under the Buddha statue or Chaitya in the Tawnany Tole courtyard while the girl's two year old brother plays with water nearby. The girl lifts her brother out of the water, laughing. See filmmaker's daily log for description of festival preparations beginning this day. It was the first day of the festival called Indra Jattra in Nepali, though the filmmaker's "mother" referred to it as YenyaPhuni. Phuni means full moon. Special foods were cooked during the day, including roast meat and small bean cakes, everyone bathed and put on clean clothes, and in the evening there were household rituals and a sharing of ceremonial food among neighbors in the courtyard. September 16, late morning to mid-day, CR 53 and 54: preparation for and activity of a full moon Buddhist religious ceremony (Phuni Puja) in the Tawnany courtyard. Bamboo poles hold a mandop, or fringed white canopy abouve the courtyard's small stupa, or Buddha statue. Colorful paper ornaments are huyng from the canopy; rows of small shallow clay pots to hold oil and wicks, called dep, are placed in tiers in front of the statue. A Buddhist priest, or Gubaju, from the village of Baregaon, directs the preparations, leads the singing and chanting, and intructs the participants throughout the ceremony. During the preparations, filmed from the filmmaker's third floor window, the Gubaju sits on a mat with several men; between their palms they all roll clay into small conical shapes resembling the stupa and place them on a brass plate. A kailash, or brass vessel filled with water and flowers, symbolizing the universe, is placed on the ground before the statue. Eventually a spirit invoked in the worship activities will enter the vessel. Several kinds of rice are used to decorate the area around the statue. The priest decorates a plate holding flowers and some rice with red "holy powder", a fine dust, and then puts the plate in a small brick-lined depression in front of the Buddha. A boy helps the priest wrap pieces of string into circles; these will later be used by the participants in the ceremony, who will at appointed moments during the worship drape them around water and flower vessels. A sunkha, or large conch shell, one of eight auspicious symbols of the universe, is placed on a small iron tripod between the priest and the statue. Women are tending grains and chillies spread to dry on mats throughout the courtyard. Children of all ages play and watch the preparations for the ceremony. Many, both boys and girls, are holding or watching their younger siblings. A boy and girl get into an argument when the boy takes something from the girl and tries to stick it into the cloth wrapped around her waist, called a "janni". She slaps his arm and chases him, he pushes her, and they start to fight facing each other. At this point a young teenage girl and a woman with a baby rush in and laughingly separate them. The puja is nearly ready to begin. A boy reads from a prayer book as the oldest man in the courtyard, sitting next to the priest, and probably the man who has financed the ceremony, drips water slowly out of a smaller conch shell as the priest begins to recite prayers. The priest then gives the man some flower petals, which he shreds and places on the spot where he dripped the water; the priest rings a bell, a female symbol of mercy. A metal crown with a double trident embossed on its top sits in front of him, indicating that he is a tantric buddhist priest. When it starts to rain several women who have been watching the ceremony scatter to gather the grains they have had drying on mats. A woman gets her 7 - 8 year old son away from the puja and tells him to gather up the corn from a mat while she puts away grain from another mat. Someone brings umbrellas to the priest and the other men seated around the statue.
General:
Local Numbers: HSFA 1986.13.1-18
See more items in:
National Anthropological Film Center films of Nepal
National Anthropological Film Center films of Nepal / Newari Film Project (1986.13.1)
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc974d48a86-6b0c-40a0-833c-7fed695ce88b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-hsfa-1986-13npl-ref19

Newari Film Project (1986.13.1-1)

Collection Creator:
National Anthropological Film Center (U.S.)  Search this
Johnson, Barbara  Search this
Dorjee, Ragpa  Search this
Reinhard, Johan  Search this
Extent:
1 Film reel (color sound, 16mm)
Type:
Archival materials
Film reels
Date:
1978
Scope and Contents:
Film footage shot by Barbara Johnson among the Jyapu subcaste of the Newars of Tawnany Tole, Thecho village in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal; July l, 7AM, groups of women planting rice in paddies and men using hoes to loosen the soil in adjacent fields west of courtyard Tawnany Tole; until 4 PM courtyard residents trading wheat for fruit with someone from outside of Thecho; scenes of courtyard activities such as women and girls grooming each other, children playing and infant care; peppers drying on mats are scattered throughout the courtyard; 4 to 5 PM outside a house sw of courtyard, villager interest in filmmaker and camera. July 16 10 AM and July 17 before 7AM, courtyard during and after rain, children playing, filmed from 3rd floor kitchen window of Nakali's house where filmmaker stayed.
General:
Local Numbers: HSFA 1986.13.1-1
See more items in:
National Anthropological Film Center films of Nepal
National Anthropological Film Center films of Nepal / Newari Film Project (1986.13.1)
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc9a562991e-ddfa-40ca-a23e-231f0f3a969a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-hsfa-1986-13npl-ref2

Newari Film Project (1986.13.1-19)

Collection Creator:
National Anthropological Film Center (U.S.)  Search this
Johnson, Barbara  Search this
Dorjee, Ragpa  Search this
Reinhard, Johan  Search this
Extent:
1 Film reel (color sound, 16mm)
Type:
Archival materials
Film reels
Date:
1978
Scope and Contents:
Film footage shot by Barbara Johnson among the Jyapu subcaste of the Newars of Tawnany Tole, Thecho village in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal: September 16, CR55, the latter part of a several hour Buddhist full-moon ceremony (the Phuni Puja during Yenya Phuni) in the Tawnany Tole courtyard. The ceremony continues outside in spite of a lasting but light rain. The several men and boys and the women who are participating sit in rows around all four sides of the courtyard's Buddha statue sharing umbrellas. The Gubaju, or Buddhist priest, wears a wide red sash diagonally across his left shoulder. The participants enclose grains of rice in their palms which they then hold vertically and close to their chests as the priest prays; when he rings a bell they chant and sing. They raise their hands in unison above their heads, lower their heads and then their hands. At the end of the song they toss the grains into the air and unfold their hands. Other villagers stand around and watch. One adolescent girl holds her 1 - 2 yr. old brother or nephew, their faces close together, subtly interacting. Then her mother teasingly play-hits her daughter's head, and the young boy imitates her, repeatedly hitting his sister/aunt, which she tolerates without protest. Phuni Puja lasted 1 -2 hours after filming stopped, and ended with the Gubaju giving tikas to all the participants. See filmmaker's daily log for a description of nighttime processions that took place in Thecho that evening, the night of the full moon. On September 17, CR 56, the morning following the Puja, some film shot in the third floor kitchen of the house next to where the filmmaker stayed. The family who lives there operates a drinking and gambling "shop" in their kitchen which attracts small numbers of local men many nights of the week.The mother is cooking while her youngest daughter, Cyrimaya, lies on the floor. Glass bottles used to store twon (rice beer) can be seen.Outside, children play in the courtyard way-house as the rain continues. Two boys wash and stack leaves left over from the ceremony the day before in the small brick lined square which encloses the image of the serpent deity or "Nag", in front of the Buddha statue. A group of 4 - 8 year old boys talk, tease and splash barefoot in courtyard puddles. Girls are crocheting in the wayhouse. Later as the sun comes out people sit near the Buddha statue. A girl continues to crochet. A mother calls to an older daughter and tells her to hurry somewhere, while she sits and enjoys playing with her young son. CR 57 continues in the late afternoon of Sept. 17. Three courtyard women work together cleaning mustard seed, winnowing it to let the debris fly out of it and letting the seeds accumulate in a large central pile.The cooperative work proceeds in a social atmosphere of talking, smiling, sharing a cigarette. The women's husbands bring them more sacks of mustard seeds, which are one of the agricultural specialties of Thecho, used to make the cooking oil used throughout the Kathmandu Valley. Thecho farmers use mustard oil for trading with other villages in the valley. Many women and children are in the courtyard at this time of day. A group of boys plays near the Buddha statue. A grandmother comes to remove a toddler who has begun to get into the seeds. Another crawling baby is tolerated by her mother, saying "be, be" meaning give, or move away, until she makes eye contact with the same grandmother, who comes to remove the child. More children are tolerated near the edge of the work area.
General:
Local Numbers: HSFA 1986.13.1-19
See more items in:
National Anthropological Film Center films of Nepal
National Anthropological Film Center films of Nepal / Newari Film Project (1986.13.1)
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc9e3dcb6f4-4036-4a01-be56-8b8c6bd1368d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-hsfa-1986-13npl-ref20

Newari Film Project (1986.13.1-25)

Collection Creator:
National Anthropological Film Center (U.S.)  Search this
Johnson, Barbara  Search this
Dorjee, Ragpa  Search this
Reinhard, Johan  Search this
Extent:
1 Film reel (color sound, 16mm)
Type:
Archival materials
Film reels
Date:
1978
Scope and Contents:
Film footage shot by Barbara Johnson among the Jyapu subcaste of the Newars of Tawnany Tole, Thecho village in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal; CR 73, October 3, early morning in the Tawnany Tole courtyard. Older girls with younger brothers on their backs check their crocheting together. A young girl sits near the courtyard statue of Buddha while other children climb on it and play a stone toss game. Children share. Younger girls watch an older girl crochet, while a courtyard man, Bailal, works of his bicycle in the background. Bailal has a menial job in Kathmandu. An older sister takes a piece of rope from her younger sister and brings it to the courtyard way-house, or pathi. A grandmother arranges her hair while her grandchild climbs on her lap. Tulushimaya's children look out on the courtyard from their doorway, one of the girls urinates into the courtyard gutter. A group of children leave the courtyard together, younger children on the backs of 7 - 8 year old girls, to do some work outside the courtyard. Four year old Nankumari sitts on a mat in the courtyard, smiles at the camera. Later she gets absorbed in working with a needle(?), while her older sister Mayle stands nearby with her baby brother on her back. Another older girl sits with her younger sibling who is looking at a piece of corn husk. Three boys wind up some rope in the way-house. A mother helps her son remove his shirt, then checks it for body lice. She dries her wet hair in the sun, her son brings her a flower, and then nurses, as others are spreading grains out on mats in the courtyard. CR 74, mid-dayon October 3, the widow Nakali, with whom the filmmaker stayed, beats some dried branches (from old chilli pepper plants?) in front of her house, while the children from next door, her great neices, watch and squabble with each other. The younger girl, Cyrimaya, has something that her older sister Nankumari takes. When Cyrimaya can't get it back she takes a coin from her pocket and conspicuously holds, drops and picks it up while Nakali works. Tulushimaya, mother of 6 daughters, no sons, puts silver barretts in her oldest daughter's hair, while a group of women, older girls and children sit in the courtyard way-house. Nakali sits outside her house, shooing chickens from grain spread on mats with a long stick, and talking with Cyrimaya and Nankumari. Three boys of different ages play. Two older girls who are relatives of Nakali, Baramaya and Gangamaya, tie up chilli branches and corn stalks. A cry goes out that it's raining "Wa walla" and everyone in the courtyard moves to get the grain off their mats. Cyrimaya and her mother, Gyanmaya put grain in a sack, then Cyrimaya plays with a winnowing basket, rolls up a mat, and imitates her mother while her mother works. A boy nearby hits and pushes a dog. CR 75, 6 - 7:30 AM, October 4, scenes around the courtyard water tap, which runs once in the morning and once in the evening each day. Boys dressed in school clothes wash their faces, a woman fills a water jar, a father comes out of his house and calls his daughters. A sister washes her younger brother's face, and they have to move to let water buffalos pass. Another girl sets a dish of flowers on a water jar while she washes her face. The oldest grandfather in the courtyard and some girls all perform morning devotions around the Buddha statue, offering water libations, flowers, touching their heads to each of 4 sides of the Buddha statue, circling clockwise 3 times, and marking themselves with red powder tikka marks on their foreheads. Other children come and remove the flowers from the statue. Children play in and near thecourtyard way-house as it starts to rain.
General:
Local Numbers: HSFA 1986.13.1-25
See more items in:
National Anthropological Film Center films of Nepal
National Anthropological Film Center films of Nepal / Newari Film Project (1986.13.1)
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc91b7c61e4-589b-4eb1-8686-863221194537
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-hsfa-1986-13npl-ref24

Newari Film Project (1986.13.1-29)

Collection Creator:
National Anthropological Film Center (U.S.)  Search this
Johnson, Barbara  Search this
Dorjee, Ragpa  Search this
Reinhard, Johan  Search this
Extent:
1 Film reel (color sound, 16mm)
Type:
Archival materials
Film reels
Date:
1978
Scope and Contents:
Film footage shot by Barbara Johnson among the Jyapu subcaste of the Newars of Tawnany Tole, Thecho village in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal: October 9, 9 AM,CR 85, View of the large water tank (man-made pond) east of Tawnany Tole courtyard, and the main street through Thecho, filmed from the 4th story rooftop of a courtyard house. All the varied uses of the water tank can be seen: washing clothes and dishes, drawing water, bathing, shampooing, and swimming. This is the day before Mauni, (Durga Puja in Nepali) and everyone in the village bathes and puts on clean clothes before the festival. Women and children can be seen washing their hair with the hulls of already pressed mustard seeds. Some boys use soap to shampoo and then swim to rinse off. A deaf boy from the courtyard is among this group of boys. A 6 - 8 year old girl bathes and shampoos her younger sister, holding her upside down to rinse her hair in the tank. A mini-bus stops on the road that passes the tank to pick up passengers wishing to go in the direction of Chappa Gaon, the next village south of Thecho. CR 86 continues around mid-day October 9, showing women and children sitting on mats in the courtyard and talking while drying off after bathing. The women have not put their blouses on yet, and their young children nurse while they talk. Two boy cousins gently play-wrestle on the courtyard mats. One woman, named Yele because she comes from Yele, or Patan, scratches her son's head while her daughter nurses. Her son has an itchy and painful skin condition, and both her children are among the few in Thecho who seem malnourished. A man joins the group to socialize, as does his mother, both wearing white because they are mourning the death of their father/husband. CR 87 takes place the next day, showing how the beginning of Mauni was observed in Nakali's house, where the filmmaker stayed. Between 7:30 and 8:30 AM Nakali, with the help of an old woman neighbor, and the daughter of her neice, prepares the ritual objects, including a brass plate holding flowers, rice and other foods, circles of string, a bottle containing rice beer, or twon. Nakali markes a raw egg with red powder, places a coin on the plate. She lights a wick in a brass oil lamp, and then her teenage great-nephew who has come in to help her, confers with her about what to do and places some of the ritual items on a collection of the household knives and tools, asks Nakali if that's all he needs to do, if he should kill the chicken. She says yes, and he takes the chicken she has been fattenning up for weeks and after a couple of tries, cuts its head off. He spatters the blood over the tools, and then Nakali tells her great neice to take the chicken upstairs. The rest of the roll shows a group of courtyard people, some young men and a married man and his daughter, socializing in the third floor kitchen of the house next to Nakali, with Nakali's nephew Juguta and his family. Visiting and drinking are a primary occupation during festival days.
General:
Local Numbers: HSFA 1986.13.1-29
See more items in:
National Anthropological Film Center films of Nepal
National Anthropological Film Center films of Nepal / Newari Film Project (1986.13.1)
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc93e57310e-e15f-4fc8-98f7-5ca8127a05d3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-hsfa-1986-13npl-ref25

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