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[Miscellaneous Sites in Mexico]: looking toward the volcanoes Ixtaccihuatl (right) and Popocatepetl (left).

Colorist:
Van Altena, Edward  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
1 Lantern slide (col., 3.25 x 4 in.)
Type:
Archival materials
Lantern slides
Place:
Mexico
Date:
1937 Jan.
General:
Mount reads: "Edward Van Altena, 71-79 W. 45th St., N.Y.C."
Historic plate number: "82; 250."
Historic plate caption: "[Text in image:] El Popocatepetl Y El Ixtaccihuatl. Mex." Additional text and possible photographer's signature not legible.
This was likely a commercially produced image.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Fields  Search this
Farmers  Search this
Mountains  Search this
Villages  Search this
Church buildings  Search this
Volcanoes  Search this
Genre/Form:
Lantern slides
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, Item MX020046
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 2: International Garden Images / Mexico / MX020: Unidentified -- Miscellaneous Sites in Mexico
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb63cdd061b-1a91-408b-980b-67727e5f44d9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref4435

[Miscellaneous Sites in Mexico]: two farmers and an agave plant in an unidentified location.

Colorist:
Van Altena, Edward  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
1 Lantern slide (col., 3.25 x 4 in.)
Type:
Archival materials
Lantern slides
Place:
Mexico
Date:
1937 Jan.
General:
Mount reads: "Edward Van Altena, 71-79 W. 45th St., N.Y.C."
Historic plate number: "86; 85."
The lantern slide includes the text "Tipos Mexicanos," the number 85, and a logo of a reversed capital D and a capital E. This appears to have been a commercially produced lantern slide whose original source may not have been a photograph taken on the Garden Club of America trip. Therefore, the 1937 date may be questionable. Similar images are MX020049, MX020052 and MX020054.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Farmers  Search this
Men  Search this
Agaves  Search this
Genre/Form:
Lantern slides
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, Item MX020051
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 2: International Garden Images / Mexico / MX020: Unidentified -- Miscellaneous Sites in Mexico
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb66e69a2f9-57ac-4787-9e04-c4f2968c904b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref4438

[Miscellaneous Sites in Mexico]: a man, possibly harvesting agave, alongside a barrel-laden donkey in an unidentified location.

Colorist:
Van Altena, Edward  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
1 Lantern slide (col., 3.25 x 4 in.)
Type:
Archival materials
Lantern slides
Place:
Mexico
Date:
1937 Jan.
General:
Mount reads: "Edward Van Altena, 71-79 W. 45th St., N.Y.C."
Historic plate number: "86; 11."
The lantern slide includes the text "Tipos Mexicanos" and a logo of a reversed capital D and a capital E. This appears to have been a commercially produced lantern slide whose original source may not have been a photograph taken on the Garden Club of America trip. Therefore, the 1937 date may be questionable. Similar images are MX020049, MX020051, and MX020054.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Barrels  Search this
Farmers  Search this
Donkeys  Search this
Men  Search this
Agaves  Search this
Genre/Form:
Lantern slides
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, Item MX020052
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 2: International Garden Images / Mexico / MX020: Unidentified -- Miscellaneous Sites in Mexico
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6bc3d288f-7977-445f-a0db-1b48db6184d7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref4439

Medal, National Geographic Society Medal, Amelia Earhart

Manufacturer:
Medallic Art Company  Search this
Materials:
Overall: Bronze
Dimensions:
3-D: 0.4 × 6.2cm (3/16 × 2 7/16 in.)
Type:
AWARDS-Medals & Ribbons
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Date:
1932
Credit Line:
Gift of the Institute for Aeronautical Sciences
Inventory Number:
A19640145000
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nv9e6ace343-a60b-4063-a96c-a642ac76ca22
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A19640145000
Online Media:

Medal, Amelia Earhart

Manufacturer:
Medallic Art Company  Search this
Materials:
Overall: Gold
Dimensions:
3-D: 0.2 × 3.2cm (1/16 × 1 1/4 in.)
Type:
AWARDS-Medals & Ribbons
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Date:
ca. 1920-1930s
Credit Line:
Gift of the Institute of Aeronautical Sciences
Inventory Number:
A19640146000
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nv96fc97188-6049-41a7-a6ba-adb9e8826997
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A19640146000
Online Media:

Medal, Amelia Earhart, First Woman to Cross the Atlantic by Airplane

Manufacturer:
Whitehead-Hoag Co.  Search this
Materials:
Overall: Copper
Dimensions:
3-D: 0.2 × 3.1cm (1/16 × 1 1/4 in.)
Type:
AWARDS-Medals & Ribbons
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Date:
ca. 1920-1930s
Credit Line:
Gift of the Institute of Aeronautical Sciences.
Inventory Number:
A19640152000
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nv9f4428363-e62b-4bc6-b9c6-bc03903e6e40
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A19640152000
Online Media:

Ulysses S. Grant

Attribution:
Mathew Brady Studio, active 1844 - 1894  Search this
Sitter:
Ulysses Simpson Grant, 27 Apr 1822 - 23 Jul 1885  Search this
Medium:
Glass plate collodion negative
Dimensions:
Plate: 9.4 × 5.9 × 0.3 cm (3 11/16 × 2 5/16 × 1/8")
Type:
Photographic Negative
Place:
United States\District of Columbia\Washington
Date:
1864
Topic:
Interior  Search this
Personal Attribute\Facial Hair\Mustache  Search this
Personal Attribute\Facial Hair\Beard  Search this
Costume\Dress Accessory\Button\Brass  Search this
Ulysses Simpson Grant: Male  Search this
Ulysses Simpson Grant: Natural Resources\Agriculturist\Farmer  Search this
Ulysses Simpson Grant: Politics and Government\Cabinet Member\Secretary of War  Search this
Ulysses Simpson Grant: Military\Army\Officer\Civil War  Search this
Ulysses Simpson Grant: Military\Army\Officer\General  Search this
Ulysses Simpson Grant: Politics and Government\President of US  Search this
Ulysses Simpson Grant: Congressional Gold Medal  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; Frederick Hill Meserve Collection
Object number:
NPG.81.M108
Restrictions & Rights:
CC0
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4fa80d77b-8686-4f5a-8622-2746478e3933
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.81.M108
Online Media:

En Sus Puestos

Collection Creator:
Princeton University  Search this
Extent:
1 Poster (Full size; Multi-color, 94 x 69 cm)
Container:
Map-folder 49
Type:
Archival materials
Posters
Place:
Mexico
Image:
Main Image: Soldier holding rifle

Other Image(s): Flags of American nations. farmer planting seeds. Worker in factory.
Local numbers:
Princeton Poster# 484
General:
Issued by: Secretaria de Gobernacion

Artist(s): Pintura Original de Mariano Martinez. Idea y diseño de Luis Araiza
Note:
Pintura Original de Mariano Martinez. Idea y diseño de Luis Araiza
Printing Info:
Printer: Cooperacion de los Talleres Graficos de la Nacion

Received P. Lib. Aug. 19, 1943
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but is stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
Copyright status of items varies. Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Conservation/Food production  Search this
Recruiting and enlistment  Search this
War production  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Genre/Form:
Posters
Collection Citation:
Princeton University Posters Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Princeton University Poster Collection
Princeton University Poster Collection / Series 4: World War Two / Mexico
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8264ab48f-1dbd-493b-b851-df8eac93264a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0433-ref14588

Leo Baekeland Diary Volume 53

Author:
Baekeland, L. H. (Leo Hendrik), 1863-1944  Search this
Collection Creator:
Baekeland, L. H. (Leo Hendrik), 1863-1944  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (6.0" x 3.5")
Container:
Box 21, Folder 8
Type:
Archival materials
Diaries
Date:
1933 June 16-1933 December 24
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Family -- 20th century  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diaries -- 20th century
Collection Citation:
Leo Baekeland Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Leo H. Baekeland Papers
Leo H. Baekeland Papers / Series 4: Diaries
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep862a4f046-f9b4-453c-a00d-455a17f6f153
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0005-ref342
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Leo Baekeland Diary Volume 53 digital asset number 1

John Peabody Harrington papers: Navajo (part 1)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Young, Robert W., 1912-2007  Search this
Clark, Ann Nolan, 1898-1995  Search this
La Farge, Oliver  Search this
Hoijer, Harry, 1904-1976  Search this
Van Valkenburgh, Richard F.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
59 Boxes
Culture:
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1935-1949
Scope and Contents:
This set of files contains Harrington's Navajo research. The materials consist of vocabulary, dictionary notes, grammar, rehearings of linguistic data, ethnobotany notes, ethnographic notes, texts, drafts and notes relating to primers, published and unpublished primers, unpublished and published papers, extracts from secondary sources, and miscellaneous notes.

The vocabulary section contains terms extracted from Young and Morgan's The Navaho Language, which were reheard principally to obtain Kiowa and Hano (Arizona Tewa) equivalences. Information is occasionally included from Harrington's Apache and Tewa notes. A brief typed vocabulary contains scattered grammatical material. There is also a slipfile of terms based mainly on An Ethnological Dictionary of the Navaho Language. It contains annotations and relevant excerpts from Harrington-Young correspondence. Plant names wIth Young's annotations are based on W. L. Jepson's A Manual of Flowering Plants of California (1925) and Washington Matthews' The Navajo Names for Plants (1886). Of the twenty semantic categories, the sections on animals, animal parts, plants, and placenames are particularly substantial.

The dictionary section consists of lexical terms from the Bureau of Indian Affairs' "Navajo Phrase Book," obtained from Willard Beatty and sent by Harrington to Young for rehearings. Navajo entries with Kiowa equivalences were apparently taken from a manuscript for a dictionary by Young. Two miscellaneous groups of entries are in Navajo/English.

The material on Navajo grammar is extensive and includes notes, drafts of a manuscript, excerpts from secondary sources, correspondence between Young and Harrington, and slips. The file was for proposed publications ranging from introductory manuals to the structuring of a comprehensive Navajo grammar.

A further substantial body of grammatical material is found on large slips. These include information from Young's voluminous correspondence, not otherwise interfiled. Part of this section is a further rehearing by Young of Morice's The Carrier Language. Another group of notes records comparisons with several southern Athapascan languages, evidently based on Young's notes, vocabulary items, correspondence, and other undocumented material. Harrington also used the slipfile format to index questions which he had earlier sent to Young.

Most of the rehearings of lingustic data are of Edward Sapir's linguistic terms by Young in 1940 and 1941. Though the copied materials may be similar in content, they do not appear to be exact duplicates of the Sapir linguistic holdings at the American Philosophical Society. Young also reheard terms from Hoijer's Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Texts late in 1940. George E. Hood commented on Hoijer's "The Southern Athapascan Languages," possibly at about the same time. There are typed excerpts from Young's May 1938 letters regarding Morice's The Carrier Language and miscellaneous linguistic information given by Hood and reheard by Richard Long. Other miscellaneous rehearings are with Alfred Sanchez (abbreviated"Alf." or "Alfredo"), Willietto Antonio, George Hood, and Robert Young (September 1939); and with Howard Gorman, Albert Sandoval, and John Charles (1939). There is also a rehearing with Henry Tsosie of terms from Gladys A. Reichard and Adolph Dodge Bittany's Agentive and Causative Elements in Navaho (1940), including some excerpts from the book. Finally, in February 1941, he reheard the vocabulary of Pedro Bautista Pino with Howard Gorman; Young did not consider these terms to be Navajo.

The files also contains Harrington's notes on Navajo names for plants, gathered from secondary sources and possibly original data from colleagues or friends. Young also annotated some of the notes.

Harrington's ethnographic files includes notes, vocabulary, and illustrations on the structure of dwelling places as well as some information on the mythic origins of the Navajo. Many of the illustrations are by Charles Keetsie Shirley. On the same subject is a set of cards in Young's hand which was sent to Harrington at Fort Wingate in August 1939. At Harrington's request, Young also translated what appears to be a lesson on hogans, possibly a section of a proposed text for instructional purposes. A group of Chaco Canyon placenames were given by Ed Henry in June 1939; several others were extracted from various secondary sources. Other ethnographic subjects briefly covered are the Hoop and Pole game, a social and economic survey questionnaire, White Hat's funeral (1939), the Lord's Prayer as recorded by Berard Haile, and notes on Sandoval's sound recordings. Malcolm Farmer supplied nonlinguistic information and there is a small set of highly miscellaneous ethnographic and historical notes.

The text section contains billingual texts that Young collected and sent to Harrington in 1936. They were written with interlinear translations and followed by a precis in English. Titles include: "Deer and Coyote," "Where the People Came Out," "A Wedding Ceremonial," and "The Woman Who Changed into a Bear." A recording session on October 31, 1949, with Dick Left, Richard Long, and Harry (not further identified) provided Navajo songs, ceremonies, and legends. Harrington's notes supply the identity of the discs and peripheral information such as the gestures accompanying the songs. Some linguistic annotations are interspersed. The discs described in the notes have not been located.

Notes, drafts, and mockups from Harrington and Young's work creating Navajo primers are also present. During the course of their work together from 1937 to 1939, Harrington and Young prepared drafts for two primers, "Little Bear Primer" and "Spotted Dog Primer," a pre-primer (probably the so called "Doda Primer"), and a playbook or cut-out book. Despite an assurance that at least both of the major works were to be printed, neither of the primers were ever published. He and Young also served as translators for a set of four primers in the "Little Herder" series, and Harrington was also credited with developing the "Harrington-La Farge phonetic system" utilized in the three-volume set entitled Little Man's Family. Harrington and Young also helped translate Ann Nolan Clark's "Who Wants To Be a Prairie Dog?"

Other materials related to Harrington's writing include notes for his "Southern Peripheral Athapaskawan Origins, Divisions, and Migrations" and preliminary drafts and notes for the Navajo portion of "Earliest Navaho and Quechua" (1944) coauthored by Robert W. Young. There are also notes and drafts for his unpublished writings, among which include "Navaho Mouthmap," "The Indian Dog Comes into His Own,"and "What Light Can Navajo Throw on Indogermanic Reconstruction?"

Among his miscellaneous notes is a comparison of Navajo with other Indian languages. There are brief notes on trips made in 1940, a list of the names of non-Indians, miscellaneous correspondence, and notes which are neither linguistic nor ethnographic.

Because of their long-term collaboration, Young's notes are inextricably intermixed with those of Harrington. Although some are labeled "Y," Young's unlabeled contributions can be identified through his handwriting and printing, and even with his style. Other hand-copied material is the work of B.A.E. assistant, Arvilla Johnson. Harrington's daughter Awona produced many of the copies in eighteen-point type.
Biographical / Historical:
Although John P. Harrington published brief articles on Navajo in 1911 and 1929, his most sustained work in this language spanned the years 1935 to 1946. Correspondence and reports indicate that during this period he was in the field from July to November 1939, and from August to mid-November 1940 at such places as Fort Wingate and Gallup, New Mexico, and Phoenix, Tuba CIty, and Window Rock, Arizona. His success in the field is due in no small part to his brilliant young collaborator, Robert W. Young, whom he first contacted in August 1936 and with whom he carried on an extensive correspondence into the mid-1940s. In fact their joint efforts in Navajo were accomplished mainly by mail.

Harrington collaborated or corresponded with others, among whom were Ann Nolan Clark, Oliver La Farge, Francis Elmore, Harry Hoijer, William Hill, and Richard Van Valkenburgh. He also contacted various university professors and graduate students, some of whom taught at such programs as those directed by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (Camp Wycliffe) and the University of New Mexico School of American Research.

Harrington consulted a wide array of secondary sources and reheard or compared data from them which he later combined with original notes. These include several hundred terms from then-unpublished manuscripts of Edward Sapir, and two of Harry Hoijer's publications--Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Texts (1938) and "The Southern Athapascan Languages" (1938). He made extensive use of two works published by the Franciscan Fathers, An Ethnological Dictionary of the Navaho Language (1910) and A Vocabulary of the Navaho Language (1912). He turned to W. L. Jepson and Washington Matthews for botanical terms, and to Adrien G. Morice for Carrier comparisons. In a search for precise grammatical terminology, he consulted a score or more of grammars, dictionaries, and publications on language and linguistics in Latin, Greek, Indo-Germanic, and several Arabic languages. Most prominent are Walter A. Ripman's Latin Handbook (1930) and Alan H. Gairdner's publication on Arabic phonetics (1935).

He worked with many Navajo speakers, some of whom were well-educated. Mentioned frequently are Willietto Antonio, Chee Dodge, Howard Gorman, George E. Hood, Hoskie Naswood, Albert Sandoval (also called "Chic"), Charles Keetsie Shirley, and Sam Tilden.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into two catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the catalog record for John Peabody Harrington papers: Navajo (part 2) to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Navajo files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Navajo language  Search this
Kiowa language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Carrier language  Search this
Athapascan languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Zoology -- nomenclature  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest / 4.2: Navajo
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a20de076-50c6-4ba1-a37d-c9dbdce60655
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17243

John Peabody Harrington papers: Navajo (part 2)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Young, Robert W., 1912-2007  Search this
Clark, Ann Nolan, 1898-1995  Search this
La Farge, Oliver, 1901-1963  Search this
Hoijer, Harry, 1904-1976  Search this
Van Valkenburgh, Richard F.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
59 Boxes
Culture:
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1935-1949
Scope and Contents:
This set of files contains Harrington's Navajo research. The materials consist of vocabulary, dictionary notes, grammar, rehearings of linguistic data, ethnobotany notes, ethnographic notes, texts, drafts and notes relating to primers, published and unpublished primers, unpublished and published papers, extracts from secondary sources, and miscellaneous notes.

The vocabulary section contains terms extracted from Young and Morgan's The Navaho Language, which were reheard principally to obtain Kiowa and Hano (Arizona Tewa) equivalences. Information is occasionally included from Harrington's Apache and Tewa notes. A brief typed vocabulary contains scattered grammatical material. There is also a slipfile of terms based mainly on An Ethnological Dictionary of the Navaho Language. It contains annotations and relevant excerpts from Harrington-Young correspondence. Plant names wIth Young's annotations are based on W. L. Jepson's A Manual of Flowering Plants of California (1925) and Washington Matthews' The Navajo Names for Plants (1886). Of the twenty semantic categories, the sections on animals, animal parts, plants, and placenames are particularly substantial.

The dictionary section consists of lexical terms from the Bureau of Indian Affairs' "Navajo Phrase Book," obtained from Willard Beatty and sent by Harrington to Young for rehearings. Navajo entries with Kiowa equivalences were apparently taken from a manuscript for a dictionary by Young. Two miscellaneous groups of entries are in Navajo/English.

The material on Navajo grammar is extensive and includes notes, drafts of a manuscript, excerpts from secondary sources, correspondence between Young and Harrington, and slips. The file was for proposed publications ranging from introductory manuals to the structuring of a comprehensive Navajo grammar.

A further substantial body of grammatical material is found on large slips. These include information from Young's voluminous correspondence, not otherwise interfiled. Part of this section is a further rehearing by Young of Morice's The Carrier Language. Another group of notes records comparisons with several southern Athapascan languages, evidently based on Young's notes, vocabulary items, correspondence, and other undocumented material. Harrington also used the slipfile format to index questions which he had earlier sent to Young.

Most of the rehearings of lingustic data are of Edward Sapir's linguistic terms by Young in 1940 and 1941. Though the copied materials may be similar in content, they do not appear to be exact duplicates of the Sapir linguistic holdings at the American Philosophical Society. Young also reheard terms from Hoijer's Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Texts late in 1940. George E. Hood commented on Hoijer's "The Southern Athapascan Languages," possibly at about the same time. There are typed excerpts from Young's May 1938 letters regarding Morice's The Carrier Language and miscellaneous linguistic information given by Hood and reheard by Richard Long. Other miscellaneous rehearings are with Alfred Sanchez (abbreviated"Alf." or "Alfredo"), Willietto Antonio, George Hood, and Robert Young (September 1939); and with Howard Gorman, Albert Sandoval, and John Charles (1939). There is also a rehearing with Henry Tsosie of terms from Gladys A. Reichard and Adolph Dodge Bittany's Agentive and Causative Elements in Navaho (1940), including some excerpts from the book. Finally, in February 1941, he reheard the vocabulary of Pedro Bautista Pino with Howard Gorman; Young did not consider these terms to be Navajo.

The files also contains Harrington's notes on Navajo names for plants, gathered from secondary sources and possibly original data from colleagues or friends. Young also annotated some of the notes.

Harrington's ethnographic files includes notes, vocabulary, and illustrations on the structure of dwelling places as well as some information on the mythic origins of the Navajo. Many of the illustrations are by Charles Keetsie Shirley. On the same subject is a set of cards in Young's hand which was sent to Harrington at Fort Wingate in August 1939. At Harrington's request, Young also translated what appears to be a lesson on hogans, possibly a section of a proposed text for instructional purposes. A group of Chaco Canyon placenames were given by Ed Henry in June 1939; several others were extracted from various secondary sources. Other ethnographic subjects briefly covered are the Hoop and Pole game, a social and economic survey questionnaire, White Hat's funeral (1939), the Lord's Prayer as recorded by Berard Haile, and notes on Sandoval's sound recordings. Malcolm Farmer supplied nonlinguistic information and there is a small set of highly miscellaneous ethnographic and historical notes.

The text section contains billingual texts that Young collected and sent to Harrington in 1936. They were written with interlinear translations and followed by a precis in English. Titles include: "Deer and Coyote," "Where the People Came Out," "A Wedding Ceremonial," and "The Woman Who Changed into a Bear." A recording session on October 31, 1949, with Dick Left, Richard Long, and Harry (not further identified) provided Navajo songs, ceremonies, and legends. Harrington's notes supply the identity of the discs and peripheral information such as the gestures accompanying the songs. Some linguistic annotations are interspersed. The discs described in the notes have not been located.

Notes, drafts, and mockups from Harrington and Young's work creating Navajo primers are also present. During the course of their work together from 1937 to 1939, Harrington and Young prepared drafts for two primers, "Little Bear Primer" and "Spotted Dog Primer," a pre-primer (probably the so called "Doda Primer"), and a playbook or cut-out book. Despite an assurance that at least both of the major works were to be printed, neither of the primers were ever published. He and Young also served as translators for a set of four primers in the "Little Herder" series, and Harrington was also credited with developing the "Harrington-La Farge phonetic system" utilized in the three-volume set entitled Little Man's Family. Harrington and Young also helped translate Ann Nolan Clark's "Who Wants To Be a Prairie Dog?"

Other materials related to Harrington's writing include notes for his "Southern Peripheral Athapaskawan Origins, Divisions, and Migrations" and preliminary drafts and notes for the Navajo portion of "Earliest Navaho and Quechua" (1944) coauthored by Robert W. Young. There are also notes and drafts for his unpublished writings, among which include "Navaho Mouthmap," "The Indian Dog Comes into His Own,"and "What Light Can Navajo Throw on Indogermanic Reconstruction?"

Among his miscellaneous notes is a comparison of Navajo with other Indian languages. There are brief notes on trips made in 1940, a list of the names of non-Indians, miscellaneous correspondence, and notes which are neither linguistic nor ethnographic.

Because of their long-term collaboration, Young's notes are inextricably intermixed with those of Harrington. Although some are labeled "Y," Young's unlabeled contributions can be identified through his handwriting and printing, and even with his style. Other hand-copied material is the work of B.A.E. assistant, Arvilla Johnson. Harrington's daughter Awona produced many of the copies in eighteen-point type.
Biographical / Historical:
Although John P. Harrington published brief articles on Navajo in 1911 and 1929, his most sustained work in this language spanned the years 1935 to 1946. Correspondence and reports indicate that during this period he was in the field from July to November 1939, and from August to mid-November 1940 at such places as Fort Wingate and Gallup, New Mexico, and Phoenix, Tuba CIty, and Window Rock, Arizona. His success in the field is due in no small part to his brilliant young collaborator, Robert W. Young, whom he first contacted in August 1936 and with whom he carried on an extensive correspondence into the mid-1940s. In fact their joint efforts in Navajo were accomplished mainly by mail.

Harrington collaborated or corresponded with others, among whom were Ann Nolan Clark, Oliver La Farge, Francis Elmore, Harry Hoijer, William Hill, and Richard Van Valkenburgh. He also contacted various university professors and graduate students, some of whom taught at such programs as those directed by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (Camp Wycliffe) and the University of New Mexico School of American Research.

Harrington consulted a wide array of secondary sources and reheard or compared data from them which he later combined with original notes. These include several hundred terms from then-unpublished manuscripts of Edward Sapir, and two of Harry Hoijer's publications--Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Texts (1938) and "The Southern Athapascan Languages" (1938). He made extensive use of two works published by the Franciscan Fathers, An Ethnological Dictionary of the Navaho Language (1910) and A Vocabulary of the Navaho Language (1912). He turned to W. L. Jepson and Washington Matthews for botanical terms, and to Adrien G. Morice for Carrier comparisons. In a search for precise grammatical terminology, he consulted a score or more of grammars, dictionaries, and publications on language and linguistics in Latin, Greek, Indo-Germanic, and several Arabic languages. Most prominent are Walter A. Ripman's Latin Handbook (1930) and Alan H. Gairdner's publication on Arabic phonetics (1935).

He worked with many Navajo speakers, some of whom were well-educated. Mentioned frequently are Willietto Antonio, Chee Dodge, Howard Gorman, George E. Hood, Hoskie Naswood, Albert Sandoval (also called "Chic"), Charles Keetsie Shirley, and Sam Tilden.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into two catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the catalog record for John Peabody Harrington papers: Navajo (part 1) to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Navajo files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Navajo language  Search this
Kiowa language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Carrier language  Search this
Athapascan languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Zoology -- nomenclature  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest / 4.2: Navajo
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw319a390f3-cfe7-4322-97c0-fe170d37113c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17244

Quiche

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Gates, William, 1863-1940  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
12 Boxes
Culture:
Quiché Indians  Search this
Indians of Central America -- Guatemala  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Folklore
Date:
1922-1948
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Mexico/Central America/South America series contains Harrington's Quiche research. The materials consist of linguistic notes, documents from the files of William Gates, grammar, records relating to the "Popul Vuh," and miscellaneous notes.

The linguistic notes contains material elicited from Cipriano Alvaredo. The contents include Quiche (Q.) vocabulary as well as phrases and short texts, including a Quiche poem. Some terms were evidently elicited as a rehearing of Cakchiquel words (labeled "Cak.") excerpted from Brinton's published version of the "Annals of Cakchiquel" and lexical items extracted from Brasseur de Bourbourg's version of the "Popul Vuh." There is extensive commentary on the phonetics of the language, much of which makes reference to kymograph tracings (abbreviated "Tr.;" see "Documents from the Files of William Gates," Items 1 and 2), to the alphabet pronounced into the pallophotophone, and to vowels pronounced for the motion picture footage. Many notes deal with regressive assimilation and diphthongs. Pages 21 to 24 contain notes in the hand of William Gates and sheets 58 and 59 provide a summary by him of the work which he undertook with Harrington and Alvaredo. Also included are a few miscellaneous notes on early English and the science of language. A portion of the notes, dated December 24, 1922 and labeled "Esselen," may be a rehearing of the Esselen vocabulary compiled and published by A. L. Kroeber. It is not clear whether Harrington was utilizing this source merely as an aid to elicitation or for comparative purposes.

The files of William Gates is comprised of numbered documents based on the work which Gates undertook with Harrington and Alvaredo. Each subsection is preceded by an index card drafted by Gates. Section 1, consisting of twelve pages of kymographic tracings of Quiche words, is followed by 210 pages of photostatic copies of mounted tracings, which are arranged in book form. These are followed by India ink copies of the tracings. Part 3 contains field notes recorded by Harrington; some of these notes duplicate material filed under "Linguistic Notes." Section 4 is a bound checklist (nineteen pages) by Gates of kymographic cylinders made at Auburn Hill. Section 5 is a bound typescript (220 pages) of Vocabulario de lengua quiche, by Domingo Basseta. Gates recorded commentary which he obtained from Alvaredo in the margins in pencil. He recorded any annotations provided by Harrington in ink and labeled them "JPH." A related typescript, labeled as item 6, presents Harrington's transcription of the Basseta vocabulary. There is no item number 7. Section 8 is a five-page typed carbon of an article by Gates titled "Modern Linguistic Apparatus." It includes a discussion of the work undertaken with Harrington and Alvaredo using the kymograph and the pallophotophone. Additional notes on the second device are filed as item 9. Also in Gates' hand is a "list of words for study of accent," classified as item 10. Sections 11 and 12 consist of correspondence. The first concerns work with Alvaredo on the kymograph and the pallophotophone. The second contains letters exchanged between Alvaredo and Gates in Quiche, Spanish, and English. The final numbered section, part 13, includes photographs and a newspaper article from the Washington Star, January 1923. Also from Gates' files are several unnumbered items: a letter to Harrington from E. B. Allen regarding a plan to publish Maya material; notes on phonetics, presumably taken from a notebook by Gates, and interleaved with heading sheets by Harrington; and a brochure on the Gates Collection which was to be put up for sale in New York.

Grammatical notes on the Quiche language are arranged in four sections. The first part consists of a draft of a grammar under the heading "Quiche Grammar and Restored Popul Yuh Text wIth Translation." Material on hand includes notes and an outline for the proposed paper, interspersed with slips from Harrington's early fieldwork. Topics covered encompass phonetics, interjections, verbs, numerals, adjectives, adverbs, and prepositions. A great deal of data were excerpted from the works of Brasseur de Bourbourg (abbreviated "Bras.") and Basseta, as well as from the Diccionario cakchiquel-espanol (abbreviated "Cak-dict."), compiled by Carmelo Saenz de Santa Maria. A second rough draft for a grammar of Quiche comprises the second section. A typed manuscript of 421 pages (former B.A.E. ms. 4781) titled "Quiche Grammar" was submitted to the bureau on March 25, 1948. Although it was prepared for publication as B.A.E. Bulletin 167, it was never released by the editor's office. This version of the grammar consists of textual descriptions and illustrative examples covering phonetics and morphology. A selection from the first part of the "Popul Vuh" is appended at the end of the grammar. Interlinear translations and notes accompany the native text. The two remaining sections of grammatical material consist of slipfiles, which Harrington compiled during the course of his fieldwork in 1922. The first set of slips, labeled "Quiche appendix -not yet put into typewriting," was to be the source of the semantic vocabulary for the first draft of the grammar. The second group, termed by Harrington "Rejects 1947 & Jan. 1948," constitutes the residue of his files after he had removed all slips which he intended to use in the body of his grammar or the appendix.

Harrington considered the "Popul Vuh" to be "the most remarkable manuscript survival . . . from ancient times in all the Maya area." The records he accumulated which relate to this literary work are of several types. The first is a file of a 491-page transcription of the text as dictated by Cipriano Alvaredo in December 1922. It contains occasional interlinear translations in a mixture of Spanish and English with some annotations on orthography. A second set of notes consists of copies of the text which Harrington and his associate John T. Linkins made from January to March in 1948. Quiche, French, and Spanish versions of the text are interfiled: they continue only through chapter five. The Quiche text and French translation were extracted from Brasseur de Bourbourg and the two Spanish translations and some additional notes from Adrian Recinos and Villacorta and Rodas. Related documents include commentary from Brasseur de Bourbourg and Villacorta and Rodas which was not incorporated into the previous file. There are also miscellaneous notes on various secondary sources.

The remaining material in this subseries include a typed vocabulary from an unidentified written source, excerpts from Aleman's Quiche grammar, and notes on a meeting which Harrington had with William Gates on September 13, 1935.
Biographical / Historical:
For approximately eighteen days from late November to mid-December 1922, Harrington interviewed Cipriano Alvaredo (abbreviated "Cip."), a native of Guatemala. This study was undertaken with the close cooperation of William Gates, founder of The Maya Society, at his home in Charlottesville, Virginia. Gates had brought the "peasant farmer" to the United States the preceding July and prepared for their joint sessions by reviewing Domingo Basseta's Vocabulario de lengua quiche with Alvaredo shortly before Harrington's arrival.

Together they reexamined the dictionary, word by word with Harrington recording Alvaredo's commentary in phonetic script. Alvaredo then dictated the entire "Popul Vuh" (P.V.), a Quiche text which deals with the mythology and historical traditions of the ancient Maya tribe. They also recorded some seventy pages of another native text, the "Annals of Cakchiquel." In addition, some grammatical work was undertaken based on Brasseur de Bourbourg's Grammaire de la langue quichee.

Four days were spent making phonetic tracings on the Rousselot kymograph, which Harrington had brought with him. Under the direction of Professor Charles A. Hoxie of the General Electric Company, pitch studies were made using the pallophotophone, an instrument which records vibrations on film. A series of motion pictures was also taken.

Harrington had intermittent plans to return to his early study of Quiche. In 1937 and 1938 he proposed that Edgar L. Hewett publish a new edition of the "Popul Vuh" text to be coauthored by himself and Robert W. Young. In 1943, 1944, and 1947 he corresponded with Dr. Henry McComas, brother-in-law of William Gates; Edward Brown Allen; and M. Wells Jakeman of Brigham Young University regarding publication of the text, this time in mimeograph format. None of these proposals resulted in the preparation of a new manuscript. It appears that all publication plans were abandoned for lack of funds.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Quiché language  Search this
Cakchikel language  Search this
Esselen language  Search this
Mayan languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Phonetics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Folklore
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 7.3
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 7: Mexico/Central America/South America
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw325893d1a-68f1-40b6-9827-48904a31fdc6
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15109
Online Media:

Pre-Pottery Farmers on the Pacific Coast of Southern Mexico

Author:
Piperno, Dolores R.  Search this
Kennett, Douglas J.  Search this
Voorhies, Barbara  Search this
Walsh, Megan K.  Search this
Jones, John G.  Search this
Neff, Hector  Search this
Culleton, Brendan J.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2010
Topic:
Anthropology  Search this
Natural History  Search this
Tropics  Search this
Biology  Search this
See others in:
Anthropology
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_92720

Do Bird Friendly® Coffee Criteria Benefit Mammals? Assessment of Mammal Diversity in Chiapas, Mexico

Author:
Rice, Robert A.  Search this
Caudill, S. Amanda  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2016
Topic:
Zoology  Search this
Animals  Search this
Veterinary medicine  Search this
Animal health  Search this
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_141054

Lilian Swann Saarinen papers

Creator:
Saarinen, Lilian Swann, 1912-1995  Search this
Names:
Cambridge Art Center  Search this
Cranbrook Academy of Art -- Faculty  Search this
G Place Gallery (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Knoll Associates, inc.  Search this
Massachusetts Institute of Technology -- Faculty  Search this
Midtown Galleries (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Otava Publishing Company  Search this
Reynal & Hitchcock  Search this
Armitage, Merle, 1893-1975  Search this
Crosby, Caresse, 1892-  Search this
Eames, Charles  Search this
Eames, Ray  Search this
Koch, Carl  Search this
Kreis, Henry, 1899-1963  Search this
Milles, Carl, 1875-1955  Search this
Moholy-Nagy, László, 1895-1946  Search this
Moholy-Nagy, Sibyl, 1905-  Search this
Saarinen, Eero, 1910-1961  Search this
Saarinen, Eliel, 1873-1950  Search this
Saarinen, Loja  Search this
Venturi, Robert  Search this
Weese, Harry, 1915-1998  Search this
Extent:
9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Blueprints
Diaries
Illustrations
Sketches
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Date:
circa 1909-1977
Summary:
The papers of Cambridge sculptor and illustrator, Lilian Swann Saarinen, measure nine linear feet and date from circa 1909 to 1977. The collection documents Saarinen's career through correspondence with artists, architects, publishers, and gallery owners; writings and notes, including manuscripts and illustrations for children's books and publications; project and teaching files; financial records; artwork, including numerous project sketches; and photos of Saarinen and her artwork. Saarinen's personal life is also documented through diaries and correspondence with friends and family members, including Eero Saarinen, to whom she was married from 1939-1953.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Cambridge sculptor and illustrator, Lilian Swann Saarinen, measure nine linear feet and date from circa 1909 to 1977. The collection documents Saarinen's career through correspondence with artists, architects, publishers, and gallery owners; writings and notes, including manuscripts and illustrations for children's books and publications; project and teaching files; financial records; artwork, including numerous project sketches; and photos of Saarinen and her artwork. Saarinen's personal life is also documented through diaries and correspondence with friends and family members, including Eero Saarinen, to whom she was married from 1939-1953.

Biographical material consists of resumes and biographical sketches, as well as a 1951 blueprint for the Eero Saarinen and Associates Office Building in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan.

Correspondence documents Saarinen's personal and professional life through letters to and from Eero Saarinen and other family members, including six letters from Loja Saarinen; correspondence with artists and architects, including Merle Armitage, Charles and Ray Eames, Carl Koch, Henry Kreis, Carl Milles, Laszlo and Sibyl Moholy-Nagy, Robert Venturi, and Harry Weese; and friends and colleagues at the Cranbrook Academy of Art and Knoll Associates. Also documented is Saarinen's business relationship with Midtown Galleries and Caresse Crosby, and publishers and publications including Child Life, Interiors, Otava Publishing Company, and Reynal & Hitchcock, Inc.

Writings and Notes document Saarinen's work on several children's publications, including Picture Book Zoo (1935) and Who Am I? (1946), through correspondence, notes, manuscript drafts, and extensive sketches. This series also includes Saarinen's ideas for other publications and incorporates some early writings and notes, as well as typescripts of her reminiscences about Eliel Saarinen, the Saarinen family, and the Cranbrook Academy of Art.

Diaries consist of bound diary volumes, loose-leaf journal entries, and heavily annotated engagement calendars, documenting Saarinen's personal life, artistic aspirations, and career development from the 1930s-1970s. This material provides a deeply personal view of the emotional landscape of Saarinen's life, her struggles to balance her identity as a working artist with the roles of wife, mother, and homemaker, and the complex, and often competing, relationships within the renowned architectural family into which she married.

Project files document Saarinen's work on book cover designs, federal and post office commissions in Bloomfield, Indiana, Carlisle, Kentucky, and Evanston, Illinois, reliefs for the Crow Island School in Winnetka, Illinois, and other important commissions including the Harbor National Bank Clock in Boston, Massachusetts, the KLM Airlines installation at JFK Airport, the Fountain of Noah sculpture at the Northland Center in Detroit, Michigan, and the interior of Toffenetti's restaurant in Chicago, Illinois. Also documented is her role in designs for the Gateway Arch in St. Louis, with Eero Saarinen.

Teaching files document Saarinen's "Language of Clay Course" which she taught at Cambridge Art Center and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Financial records document exhibition and sales expenses for two exhibitions, including her show at G Place Gallery in 1944.

Printed material consists of clippings about Saarinen and her family, exhibition announcements and catalogs for herself and others, and reference files from the 1930s-1940s, primarily comprising clippings of animals.

Additional printed material documenting Saarinen's career can be found in one of two scrapbooks found in the collection. An additional scrapbook consists of clippings relating primarily to Saarinen's parents.

Artwork comprises extensive sketches, particularly animal and figure sketches, in graphite, crayon, ink, pastel, and watercolor. The sketches demonstrate in particular Saarinen's developing interest in and skill with animal portraiture from her childhood to the 1960s.

Photographs are primarily of artwork and Saarinen's 1944 exhibition at G Place Gallery. Also found are one negative of Saarinen, probably with Eero Saarinen, and a group photo including Lilian, Eero, and Eliel Saarinen with the model for the Detroit Civic Center, circa 1940s.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1930s-1960s (3 folders; Box 1, OV 12)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1920-1974 (1.9 linear feet; Boxes 1-2, 8, OV 12)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1920s-1973 (1.3 linear feet, Boxes 2-3, 8, OVs 13-16)

Series 4: Diaries, 1930-1973 (1.4 linear feet, Boxes 3-5, 8)

Series 5: Project Files, 1931-1966 (1.7 linear feet, Boxes 5-6, 8, OVs 17-19)

Series 6: Teaching Files, 1966-1970 (3 folders, Box 6)

Series 7: Financial Records, 1940s-1970s (2 folders, Box 6)

Series 8: Printed Material, circa 1930s-1970s (0.2 linear feet, Box 6)

Series 9: Scrapbooks, circa 1909-1974 (2 folders; Boxes 6, 9)

Series 10: Artwork, circa 1920s-circa 1960s (1.7 linear feet, Boxes 6-7, 9-10, OVs 20-27)

Series 11: Photographs, circa 1940s, 1977 (0.5 linear feet, Boxes 7, 11, OV 27)
Biographical / Historical:
Cambridge artist and sculptor, Lilian Swann Saarinen (1912-1995), studied at the Art Students League with Alexander Archipenko in 1928, and later with Albert Stewart and Heninz Warneke from 1934-1936, before moving to Michigan where she studied with Carl Milles at the Cranbrook Academy of Art from 1936-1940. Saarinen was an accomplished skier and a member of the 1936 US Olympic ski team.

At Cranbrook, Swann met architect Eero Saarinen, whom she married in 1939. She subsequently worked with Saarinen's design group on a variety of projects, including the Westward Expansion Memorial, which later became known as the "Gateway Arch" in St. Louis. Lilian and Eero had a son, Eric, and a daughter, Susie, before divorcing in 1953.

Saarinen, who had developed an affinity for drawing animals in childhood, specialized in animal portraits in a variety of sculptural media. In 1939, she exhibited her sculpture Night, which depicted Bagheera the panther from Rudyard Kipling's Jungle Book, at the World's Fair. The sculpture was placed in the Boston Public Garden in 1986. In the 1930s and 1940s Saarinen was commissioned to work on a variety of architectural projects, including reliefs for post offices in Bloomfield, Indiana, Carlisle, Kentucky, and Evanston, Illinois, and the Crow Island School in Winnetka, Illinois. She also executed commissions for the Harbor National Bank in Boston, KLM (Royal Dutch Airlines) at JFK Airport, the Northland shopping Center in Detroit Michigan, and Toffenetti's Restaurant in Chicago.

Saarinen was a contributing author and illustrator for a variety of publications, including Child Life, Interiors and Portfolio: An Intercontinental Quarterly. In 1935 she illustrated Picture Book Zoo for the Bronx Zoo and in 1946 Reynal & Hitchcock, Inc. published Who Am I?, a children's book which Saarinen wrote and illustrated.

Saarinen taught ceramic sculpture to soldiers for the Red Cross Arts and Skills Unit rehabilitation program in 1945, served on the Visiting Committee to the Museum School at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, from 1959-1964, where she taught ceramics, and later taught a course entitled "The Language of Clay" at the Cambridge Art Center and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. One of Saarinen's private students at Cambridge was her cousin, Edie Sedgwick.

Saarinen died in Cohasset, Massachusetts, in 1995 at the age of 83.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reels 1152 and 1192) including a scrapbook containing clippings, copies of letters and telegrams received, and reproductions of Saarinen's work. There is a copy of Saarinen's book, "Who Am I?", and three albums containing photographs of Saarinen, photographs and reproductions of her work, a list of exhibitions, quotes about her, and writings by her about sculpture. Lent material was returned to the lender and is not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Lilian Swann Saarinen donated the collection in 1975. She lent additional materials for microfilming in 1976.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Sculptors -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Illustrated books, Children's  Search this
Gateway Arch (Saint Louis, Mo.)  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Illustrators -- Massachusetts  Search this
Art, Municipal  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Women illustrators  Search this
Function:
Art commissions
Genre/Form:
Blueprints
Diaries
Illustrations
Sketches
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Lilian Swann Saarinen papers, circa 1909-1977. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.saarlili
See more items in:
Lilian Swann Saarinen papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw97f1e4305-3886-479a-9db7-48c98fd8d2dd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-saarlili
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  • View Lilian Swann Saarinen papers digital asset number 1
Online Media:

Katherine Joseph photographing parade float

Collection Creator:
Joseph, Katherine  Search this
Hertzberg, Suzanne  Search this
Container:
Box 4, Folder 1
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
1941-04-06
Scope and Contents:
Mexico City, Palm Sunday parade. Decorative ribbons printed with "A1 martyr del agrigarios" (to? the martyr of farmers) and "Comunidades agrarias" (farming communities). Photo by Andree Vilas Graham.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Copyright held by donor. Written permission required prior to obtaining reproductions. Consult with Archives Center staff for contact information. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Katherine Joseph Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Katherine Joseph Papers
Katherine Joseph Papers / Series 4: Photographic Prints and Negatives
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8a9b63fe4-1acf-4472-b3e3-05a617b096d1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0944-ref592

Book, Amelia Earhart, "The Fun of It"

Lender:
Barbara E. Brennan  Search this
Materials:
paper, cardstock, canvas, paint
Dimensions:
3-D: 13.7 x 3.8 x 20cm, 0.5kg (5 3/8 x 1 1/2 x 7 7/8 in., 1lb.)
Type:
LITERATURE AND RESEARCH-Books (under Library)
Credit Line:
On loan from Barbara Brennan, Falls Church, VA
Inventory Number:
I20101339001
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nv921a6f32f-1722-435d-aee6-ebe031c99829
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_I20101339001

Book, Amelia Earhart, "The Fun of It"

Materials:
paper, cardstock, canvas, paint
Dimensions:
3-D: 13.7 x 3.8 x 20cm, 0.5kg (5 3/8 x 1 1/2 x 7 7/8 in., 1lb.)
Type:
LITERATURE AND RESEARCH-Books (under Library)
Credit Line:
On loan from Dorothy Cochrane
Inventory Number:
I20211460001
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nv90a2f16d9-b76e-469a-84f9-715ec6ed6503
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_I20211460001

Culture and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Can the culture of native peoples be a springboard for development, or does it inevitably block progressive change, creating permanent backwaters in society? For much of the 20th century, official development doctrine viewed indigenous culture as a barrier to improvement. Development policies in Latin America after World War II assumed it was necessary to "integrate" and "assimilate" indigenous peoples into the cultural mainstream of a modern industrializing society. Planning documents from that era frequently describe indigenous beliefs and customs as "backward" and "worn-out traditions" obstructing the path to modernization and economic progress. Perhaps it is not suprising that 40 years of these policies failed to produce most of their desired results.

Yet experiences in participatory development, alternative trade markets, and local education suggest sound ways to organize development projects and to build strategies for social change. Among the latter is an approach that Festival researchers referred to as "ethnodevelopment," which strategically places culture at the center of rural development planning. Local development projects that take this approach demonstrate how indigenous culture - technologies, knowledge, organizational skills, and talents of Indian groups - can be engaged for effective and sustainable development. Strategies for self-reliance like these create local political empowerment and socioeconomic revitalization and may even bring about reform of state policy.

As a group, the ethnodevelopment projects represented at this year's Festival combine the recovery of cultural and organizational resources with the use of technologies developed relatively recently, such as community-based surveying and radio broadcasting. All of these strategies serve the ultimate goal of empowering the original inhabitants of our hemisphere as active participants in their own development. Festival audiences had the opportunity to meet representatives of a range of development projects from throughout the hemisphere, to see them producing their crafts, and to discuss with them the challenges of sustainable development that respects community values and aspirations.

Olivia Cadaval and Kevin "Benito" Healy were Curators, and Cynthia Vidaurri was Program Coordinator, with Chuck Kleymeyer and Peter Seitel as Principal Advisors. Country Advisors included: William Barbieri, Guy Branch, John Burstein, Denise Humphreys, Christine Krueger, Robert Maguire, Eric Olson, and Kaye Pyle. Country Coordinators were: Amankay Instituto de Estudos a Pesquisas – Brazil; Eficiencia y Desarrollo (EFDES) - Chile; Grupo Para el Desarrollo Empresarial (GRUDEM) - Panama; Institute de Consultation, d'Evaluation et de Formation (ICEF) - Haiti; Seguimiento, Análisis y Evaluación para el Desarrollo (SASE) - Peru; Servicio de Apoyo Local (SALDEBAS) - Mexico; Servicios Multiples de Desarrollo "SEMILLA" - Bolivia; Sistemas de Consulta y Servicios, S.A. (CONSULTA) - Guatemala; Sistemas de Investigación y Desarrollo Comunitario (COMUNIDEC) – Ecuador.

Culture & Development in Latin America & the Caribbean was made possible with the collaboration of the Inter-American Foundation in celebration of its 25th anniversary of promoting grassroots development, with support from Fundación Esquel Ecuador, The Synergos Institute, and PROANDES-UNICEF.
Researchers:
Eligio Alvarado, Evelyn Barrón, Verónica Cereceda, Mac Chapin, Jhonny Dávalos, Manuel Fernández de Villegas Medina, Ismael Ferreira de Oliveira, Gisele Fleurant, Nicanor González, Alan Kolata, Pilar Larreamendi Moscoso, Gabriel Martinez, Carlos Moreno, Fernando Moreno, Rita Murillo, Santiago Pórcel, Juana Quidel, Julio Quispe Cruz, Rosa Rapimán, Mari Lyn Salvador, Oswaldo Sundt Rivera, Victor Toledo Llancaqueo, Antonio Ugarte, Néestor Moises Vega Pardo, Elayne Zorn
Presenters:
Evelyn Barrón, Michael Binford, Mac Chapin, Manuel Fernández de Villegas Medina, Ismael Ferreira de Oliveira, Gisele Fleurant, Nicanor González, Alan Kalata, Pilar Larreamendi Moscoso, Ruth Llanos, Gabriel Martinez, Carlos Moreno, Rita Murillo, Santiago Pórcel, Linda Rabben, Mari Lyn Salvador, Oswaldo Sundt Rivera, Bill Threlkeld, Victor Toledo Llancaqueo, Antonio Ugarte, Néstor Moises Vega Pardo, Elayne Zorn
Participants:
Participants

Associaçāo dos Pequenos Agricultores do Estado da Bahia -- Associaçāo dos Pequenos Agricultores do Estado da BahiaIsmael Ferreira de Oliveira, sisal farmer, Bahia, BrazilIvone Gonçalves de Oliveira, singer, sisal farmer, Bahia, BrazilStefhan Klasson, sisal farmer, Bahia, BrazilErenita Lionícia de Oliveira, singer, sisal farmer, Bahia, BrazilLorismar Lopes Araújo, singer, musician, sisal farmer, Bahia, BrazilLourisvaldo Lopes Araújo, singer, musician, sisal farmer, Bahia, BrazilMisael Lopes da Cunha, sisal farmer, Bahia, BrazilRenato Lopes da Cunha, sisal farmer, Bahia, BrazilReinaldo Lopes de Oliveira, sisal farmer, Bahia, Brazil

Comité Artisanal Haitien -- Comité Artisanal HaitienJean-Patrice Demosthene, 1940-, furniture maker, Port-au-Prince, HaitiRomanès Alphonse Jean¬ Louis, 1924-, hat maker, Port-au-Prince, HaitiMichée Ramil Rémy, 1970-, metal sculptor, Port-au-Prince, HaitiLèmira Valbrun, 1955-, basket weaver, Port-au-Prince, HaitiMarie-Carmel Darismé, 1964-, organization advisor, Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Asur, Federacion Jalq'atarabuco -- Asur, Federacion Jalq'atarabucoMarcos Cruz Mostacedo, tapestry maker, storyteller, Sucre, BoliviaAlejandro Romero, hat maker, musician, Sucre, BoliviaSimón Mamani Ventura, dyer, weaver, Sucre, BoliviaValentina Romero de Mamani, weaver, Sucre, BoliviaTeresa Ventura Mamani, weaver, musician, Sucre, BoliviaDamián Chambi Tardío, dancer, instrument maker, Sucre, BoliviaDemetrio Condori Vargas, dancer, musician, Sucre, BoliviaCasiano Gonzáles Gonzáles, dancer, weaver, Sucre, BoliviaJosé Pachacopa Yampa, dancer, musician, Sucre, BoliviaFaustina Quispe Gonzáles, weaver, dancer, Sucre, BoliviaJosé Vargas Quispe, dancer, musician, Sucre, BoliviaTomasa Vela Quispe, weaver, singer, Sucre, Bolivia

Proyecto Camellones Experimentales -- Proyecto Camellones ExperimentalesJulio Arce, 1959-, raised-field farmer, Beni, BoliviaMarcial Fabricano, 1953-, raised¬-field farmer, Beni, BoliviaSegundino Matareco, 1963-, raised-field field farmer, Beni, Bolivia

Centro de Capacitación Integral de la Mujer Campesina -- Centro de Capacitación Integral de la Mujer CampesinaTrinidad Andrade, 1971-, educator, Ruro, BoliviaUbaldina Salinas de Quispe, 1957-, educator, Ruro, BoliviaGermán Treviño, 1958-, illustrator, Ruro, Bolivia

El Ceibo -- El CeiboBernardo Apaza, cacao farmer, 1956-, El Ceibo, BoliviaJuan Choconi, cacao farmer, El Ceibo, BoliviaGualberto Condori, 1958-, cacao farmer, El Ceibo, BoliviaJuana Fañio, 1945-, cacao farmer, El Ceibo, BoliviaFlorentino Maceda, 1948-, cacao farmer, El Ceibo, BoliviaGabriel Natte, 1948-, cacao farmer, El Ceibo, Bolivia

Fundacion Winayarka -- Fundacion WinayarkaManuel Calizaya Mendoza, 1955-, raised-field farmer, Tiwanaku, BoliviaSejia Flores Mamani, 1958-, raised-field farmer, Tiwanaku, Bolivia

Tierras Indigenas del Darien 1993, Zonas de Subsistencia -- Tierras Indigenas del Darien 1993, Zonas de SubsistenciaManuel Ortega, land surveyor, mapmaker, Darién, PanamaFacundo Sanapí, land surveyor, coordinator, Darién, Panama

Congreso Kuna -- Congreso KunaNicanor González, 1959-, Kuna interpreter, Comarca de San Blas, PanamaLeonides Cantule Váldez, Kuna cacique, oral historian, Comarca de San Blas, Panama

Cooperativa Productores de Molas -- Cooperativa Productores de MolasRodolfina Andreve, 1951-, mola maker, Panama, PanamaSerafina López, 1937-, mola maker, Panama, Panama

Cooperación para el Desarrollo Rural de Occidente -- Cooperación para el Desarrollo Rural de OccidenteTiburcio Martín Baquiax Vasquez, weaver, marimba player, Totonicapán, GuatemalaCecilio Luis Turnil, weaver, Totonicapán, GuatemalaFrancisco Sic, master weaver, Totonicapán, GuatemalaJuana Felipa Sic Son, weaver, cook, Totonicapán, GuatemalaAna Victoria García, natural medicine, cook, weaver, Totonicapán, Guatemala

Indigenas de la Sierra de Madre de Motozintla -- Indigenas de la Sierra de Madre de MotozintlaPadre Jorge Aguilar Reyna, 1961-, organization advisor, Chiapas, MexicoOlivar Laynes Ramírez, 1960-, coffee farmer, Chiapas, MexicoCiro Pérez Gómez, 1950-, coffee farmer, Chiapas, MexicoVidal de León Gómez, coffee farmer, Chiapas, MexicoGuadalupe Morales Zunun, 1953-, coffee farmer, Chiapas, MexicoAdelaida Diaz López, coffee farmer, Chiapas, Mexico

Casa de la Mujer Mapuche -- Casa de la Mujer MapucheMaría Eugenia Antipán Peralta, 1952-, weaver, Temuco, ChileHaydee Mónica Chequián Elgueta, 1968-, organization advisor, Temuco, ChileCarolina Huaiquinao Huichacura, 1970-, weaver, Temuco, ChileMatilde Mariquéo Sandoval, weaver, Temuco, ChileMaría Teresa Quintriqueo Huentenao, weaver, Temuco, ChileRosario Pilar Quiribán Nahuel, 1962-, weaver, Temuco, Chile

Asociación Artesanal Cacha -- Asociación Artesanal CachaMaría Rosa Morocho Hipo, 1970-, weaver, Provincia del Chimborazo, EcuadorJuan Leonardo Pilataxi Illapa, 1955-, weaver, Provincia del Chimborazo, EcuadorSegundo Angel Sucuy Aguagallo, 1968-, weaver, Provincia del Chimborazo, Ecuador

Radio Latacunga -- Radio LatacungaJorge Gonzalo Guamán Coronel, 1965-, radio reporter, broadcaster, Provincia de Cotopaxi, EcuadorMaría Martina Ninasunta Changoluisa, 1967-, radio reporter, broadcaster, Provincia de Cotopaxi, Ecuador

Federación de Centros Shuar-Achuar -- Federación de Centros Shuar-AchuarShamich Kintiu Chanketat, 1945-, craftsperson, Oriente, EcuadorAlbino María Utitiaj, 1951-, educator, Oriente, EcuadorCarlos Miguel Tankamash, oral historian, Oriente, EcuadorKayap Shimpiu Masuk, 1946-, craftsperson, Oriente, EcuadorFelipe Tsenkush, oral historian, Oriente, EcuadorPedro Yu Mukuip, topographer, Oriente, Ecuador

Taquile -- TaquileAlejandro Flores Huatta, 1954-, weaver, dancer, musician, Taquile, PeruJesús Marca Quispe, 1945-, weaver, dancer, musician, Taquile, PeruAlejandro Huatta Machaca, 1954-, weaver, dancer, musician, Taquile, PeruSalvador Huatta Yucra, 1940-, weaver, dancer, musician, Taquile, PeruMarcelina Marca Machaca, 1967-, weaver, dancer, Taquile, PeruMariano Flores Huatta, 1954-, weaver, dancer, musician, Taquile, PeruJuan Quispe Huatta weaver, 1977-, dancer, musician, Taquile, PeruTeodocia Quispe Huatta, 1976-, weaver, dancer, Taquile, Peru
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1994, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk58e2c3df4-f770-4179-8ba4-58c2d1bb1600
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1994-ref26

Festival Recordings: Agriculture and Development: Struggle and Sisal in Brazil; Organic Coffee in Chiapas; Chocolate

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Culture and Development Program 1994 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Watson, Matt (recorder)  Search this
Johnson, Van (recorder)  Search this
Artist:
Associacao Dos Peque Nos Agricultores Do Estado  Search this
Indigenas de la Sierra de Madre de Motozintla  Search this
Performer:
Associacao Dos Peque Nos Agricultores Do Estado  Search this
Indigenas de la Sierra de Madre de Motozintla  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Brazilians  Search this
Mexicans  Search this
Bolivians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Brazil
Salvador (Brazil)
Mexico
Chiapas (Mexico)
Bolivia
El Ceibo (Bolivia)
Date:
1994 July 1
Contents:
Struggle and Sisal in Brazil; Organic Coffee in Chiapas; Organic Chocolate from Bolivia
Track Information:
101 Struggle and Sisal in Brazil / Associacao Dos Peque Nos Agricultores Do Estado.

102 Organic Coffee in Chiapas / Indigenas de la Sierra de Madre de Motozintla.

103 Organic Chocolate from Bolivia: Farmers from El Ciebo.
Local Numbers:
FP-1994-CT-0222
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 1, 1994.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Agriculture, Cooperative  Search this
Coffee  Search this
Agriculture  Search this
Chocolate  Search this
Cacao  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1994, Item FP-1994-CT-0222
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife / Series 3: Culture and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean / 3.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5fb7ca086-c458-4f3a-b272-d5c2e3cbf910
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1994-ref661

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