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Edwin Lord Weeks papers, [ca. 1885-1976]

Creator:
Weeks, Edwin Lord, 1849-1903  Search this
Place:
Cairo (Egypt) -- Description and travel
Morocco -- Pictorial works
Africa, North -- Pictorial works
Topic:
Heraldry  Search this
Exoticism in art  Search this
Cedar of Lebanon -- Description and travel  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)10803
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)214537
AAA_collcode_weekedwi
Theme:
American Art and Artists in a Global Context
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_214537

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2014 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Business records
Negatives
Digital images
Plans (drawings)
Memorandums
Slides (photographs)
Notes
Videotapes
Video recordings
Audiotapes
Photographic prints
Contracts
Sound recordings
Correspondence
Audiocassettes
Date:
June 25-July 6, 2014
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 2014 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 4 series.

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: China: Tradition and the Art of Living

Series 3: Kenya: Mambo Poa

Series 4: Special Events
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 2014 Smithsonian Folklife Festival was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
For forty-eight years, the Smithsonian Folklife Festival has gathered people from around the globe on the National Mall to celebrate the best of the human spirit. In response, millions of visitors have been inspired, challenged, and delighted by culture bearers manifesting the ordinary and the astounding. The Folklife Festival's history is a remarkable one in which creativity and culture have transformed grass, gravel, and trees into a vibrant landscape for exploration and exchange.

The 2014 Festival added another chapter to that history with programs illuminating the cultural heritage of China and Kenya. With song and story, movement and craft in tow, exemplars of traditional genres demonstrated practices that continue to resonate in our modern world. The alchemy of their presence and the curiosity of visitors is what drives the Festival.

The 2014 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 25-29 and July 2-6) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 9th Street and 12th Street, south of the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). It featured two programs and special events including the Rinzler Concert.

The 2014 guide included participant lists for each program, a site plan, and daily schedules.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

Michael Atwood Mason, Director; Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Sabrina Lynn Motley, Festival Director; Cristina Díaz-Carrera, Production Manager; Education and Program Support: Betty Belanus, Education Specialist, Evaluation Coordinator; Olivia Cadaval, Cross-Cultural Programs Coordinator; Marjorie Hunt, Family Activities Consultant (Kenya); Diana N'Diaye, Curator; Arlene Reiniger, Intern Coordinator; Arnie Malin, Foodways Coordinator; Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections: Jeff Place, Archivist; Stephanie Smith, Photo Documentation Coordinator; Dave Walker, Audio Documentation Coordinator; Cecilia Peterson, Project Archivist; Greg Adams, Processing Archivist

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage Advisory Council

Ellen McCulloch-Lovell, Chair; Cathy Sulzberger, Co-Chair; Bill Ivey, Dawn McCall, Susan Norton, Anna Maria Ochoa, George Papagiannis, Frederik Paulsen, Jennifer Cover Payne, Ann Elizabeth Sheffer, Deborah Wong, Council Members; Libby O'Connell, J. Scott Raecker, Honorary; Patricia Shehan-Campbell, G. Wayne Clough, Richard Kurin, Michael Atwood Mason, Daniel Sheehy, Ex Officio

National Park Service

Jonathan B. Jarvis, Director; Robert Vogel, Superintendent, National Mall and Memorial Parks

The Festival was supported by federally appropriated funds; Smithsonian trust funds; contributions from governments, businesses, foundations, and individuals; in-kind assistance; and food, recording, and craft sales.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2014 Smithsonian Folklife Festival forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Folk music  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
World music  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Genre/Form:
Business records
Negatives
Digital images
Plans (drawings)
Memorandums
Slides (photographs)
Notes
Videotapes
Video recordings
Audiotapes
Photographic prints
Contracts
Sound recordings
Correspondence
Audiocassettes
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2014 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2014
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2014 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-2014

Metropolitan Washington

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The Smithsonian has long counted on Washington area residents as an audience for its many museums and programs. In this first of a planned multi-year program, tables were turned as traditional musicians from local black, Hispanic and Asian American communities told Festival visitors about the social organizations and the multi-cultural urban context within which their aesthetic expressions flourish. Washington, the residential city beyond the national monuments, burgeons with cultures transplanted from beyond urban, state, and national boundaries as well as with hybrid traditions newly rooted in an urban environment. Over the next several years the Office of Folklife Programs intended to explore the fascinating, vital, and variegated pool of cultures that enliven the Washington metropolitan area. The 1987 program gave special emphasis to music among Washington's communities.

Music is a central part of festive occasions and celebrations as well as an integral feature of everyday life. People mark what they feel is distinctive and valuable through the use of music, frequently accompanied by dance and ritual. For instance, various Asian communities of Washington have maintained some of the seasonal ceremonies of their homelands, such as Lao or Chinese New Year's celebrations. These elaborate and colorful ceremonial events incorporate music, costumes, parades, food, and dance and draw community members from the entire eastern seaboard.

African American gospel music thrives in a variety of forms in Washington, ranging from the harmonies of traditional quartet groups to the sounds of more contemporary soloists, ensembles, and choirs, some of which blend classical techniques with more traditional black gospel music. Hundreds of churches support numerous choirs, smaller family groups, and other ensembles and soloists who provide their memberships with gospel music. Gospel music is central to a variety of community events in addition to regular services: for example, pastor, choir, and church anniversary celebrations, as well as funerals are filled with gospel music.

Particularly within Washington's growing Latino community, sharing of traditions has resulted in a synthesis or pan-ethnic style, celebrating a multicultural heritage. In this urban milieu Hispanic, Caribbean, and African musicians constantly create new urban performance forms by drawing fragments from known repertoires and styles and transforming them into new expressions through the use of new harmonies, updated texts, and changes in tempo, rhythmic configurations, or performance style.

Phyllis M. May-Machunda served as Curator of the Metropolitan Washington program and Camila Bryce-Laporte as Assistant Program Coordinator.

The Metropolitan Washington program was made possible in part by the Music Performance Trust Funds, a non-profit organization created by U.S. recording companies to fund live and free performances (Trustee: Martin A. Paulson).
Fieldworkers:
Camila Bryce-Laporte, Arnaé Burton, Olivia Cadaval, Mia Gardener, Richard Kennedy, Michael Licht, Phyllis M. May-Machunda, Daniel Sheehy, Daphne Shuttleworth, Nicholas R. Spitzer, Kazadi wa Mukuna
Presenters:
Arnaé Burton, Kathy Bullock, Alicia María González, Richard Kennedy, David T. Lee, Von Martin, Oscar Ordenes, Daniel Sheehy, Nicholas R. Spitzer, Richard Spottswood, Nap Turner, Kazadi wa Mukuna, Pearl Williams-Jones
Participants:
John Cephas and Phil Wiggins, blues, Washington, D.C.

Choraliers, 1st Baptist Church of Deanwood, gospel, Washington, D.C.

Comparsa Panameña, Panamanian costume band, Washington, D.C.

Conrado Rosales y la Banda Salvadorena, Salvadoran music, Washington, D.C.

Cubanakán, Afro-Cuban music, Washington, D.C.

Hazel Dickens, traditional southern mountain music, Washington, D.C.

Emmanuel Choraleers, gospel, Washington, D.C.

The Four Echoes, gospel, New Carrolton, Maryland

The Garcia Family, Mexican children's games, Washington, D.C.

Great Change Ensemble, gospel, Seat Pleasant, Maryland

Grupo Batuque, Brazilian samba band, Silver Spring, Maryland

Han Sheng Chinese Opera Institute, Peking opera, Washington, D.C.

Bill Harris, 1925-, blues, Washington, D.C.

Lisa Henderson, 1958-, gospel, Washington, D.C.

Image, soca, calypso music, Dale City, Virginia

John Jackson (1924-) & James Jackson, blues, Fairfax Station, Virginia

Flory Jagoda, Ladino music, Falls Church, Virginia

Jah Honey & the Unconquered People, reggae music, Washington, D.C.

The Junkyard Band, go-go music, Washington, D.C.

Kankouran, West African drumming, Washington, D.C.

Khmer Traditional Music Ensemble, traditional Cambodian music, Silver Spring, Maryland

Kings of Harmony, gospel, Lanham, Maryland

Djimo Kouyate, Mandingo griot music, Washington, D.C.

Los Fuertes de Colombia, Colombian music, Silver Spring, Maryland

James Kika Makubuya, 1945-, Ganda music, Washington, D.C.

Mattie Johnson & the Stars of Faith, gospel, Washington, D.C.

McCollough Kings of Harmony Spiritual Band, gospel brass band, Washington, D.C.

Mt. Bethel Baptist Church Choral Choir, gospel, Washington, D.C.

Nguyen Dinh Nghia & Daughters, traditional Vietnamese music, Vienna, Virginia

ODADAA!, Ga music, Alexandria, Virginia

Kambo Oholara, Macujumbe stilt walker, Washington, D.C.

Ollantay, Bolivian urban music, Arlington, Virginia

Potomac Valley Boys, bluegrass, Leesburg, Virginia

Prophecy, gospel, Washington, D.C.

Alberto Rios y sus Paraguayos, Paraguayan music, Washington, D.C.

Ross School, Salvadoran children's games, Washington, D.C.

Rumiñahui, Andean music from Ecuador, Wheaton, Maryland

St. Augustine Gospel Choir, gospel, Washington, D.C.

St. Teresa of Avila Choir, gospel, Washington, D.C.

Sons of Grace, United House of Prayer, gospel, Washington, D.C.

The Sounds of Africa, Zairian urban music, Silver Spring, Maryland

Don Stover, traditional banjo music, Brandywine, Maryland

The Teagle Family, gospel, Laurel, Maryland

Trinidad Steel Band, calypso pan music, Washington, D.C.

Don Vails & the Salvation Corps, gospel, Hyattsville, Maryland

Vision, gospel, Hyattsville, Maryland
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1987, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1987-ref26

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Digital images
Business records
Contracts
Notes
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Negatives
Audiotapes
Memorandums
Slides (photographs)
Audiocassettes
Photographic prints
Video recordings
Videotapes
Date:
June 25-July 5, 1992
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1992 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: The Changing Soundscape in Indian Country

Series 3: Creativity and Resistance: Maroon Culture in the Americas

Series 4: New Mexico

Series 5: Workers at the White House
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1992 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The Columbus Quincentenary that was commemorated in 1992 gave pause to reflect on the forces that over the preceding 500 years had shaped social life in the Americas. The Festival programs on New Mexico, Maroons, and American Indian musics illustrated important historical and ongoing processes through which communities establish cultural identities in complex and dynamic social circumstances.

"The Changing Soundscape in Indian Country," produced jointly with the National Museum of the American Indian, explored ways that Indian musicians and their communities creatively adapted elements from the musical traditions brought to this continent from Europe, Africa, and elsewhere. Although many of the forms of this Indian music are non-Indian in origin, the themes and performance styles clearly address Indian experience and aesthetic expectations. In their creative hands, as Festival visitors could experience first-hand, external musical influences became part of the self-definition of Indian identity and trenchant commentary on what had been happening in "Indian Country" over the past five centuries.

Nowhere is the connection between creativity and self-definition more clear than in the cultural identities of contemporary Maroon peoples, whose ancestors escaped plantation slavery in the Americas and founded independent societies. Faced with the task of constructing and defending their positions, Maroons creatively defined themselves from a variety of sources. While their political institutions, expressive arts, religions, and other social forms were predominantly African in origin, they drew from a broad range of African cultures, and from European and Native American cultures as well. Much of the aesthetic component of Maroon cultures - their vibrant traditions of verbal and visual arts, shared with Festival visitors on the National Mall - encourages the cohesiveness of their society and voices themes that embody common experience and interest.

The Spanish Conquest established the Western Hemisphere's European presence and its most widely spoken language. While the original conquerors' culture did not value the Native cultures it encountered, over the centuries segments of Hispanic and Native American and later English-speaking and other populations engaged one another, by necessity, in ways that gave rise to today's rich array of cultural identities. New Mexico's distinctive cultural landscape took shape in this way, represented by some peoples who sustain their cultural identities through centuries-old combinations of Indian and European forms of thought and action, and by others whose basis of identity lies in reaffirming the wisdom and relevance of ancestral ways. Festival visitors could witness how, in New Mexico, cultural identity reflects the changes that continue to be wrought from the varieties of these social encounters.

The 1992 Festival also marked the 200th anniversary of the White House. Not a king's palace but rather "the people's house," the White House is at once national symbol, executive office and conference center, ceremonial setting, museum, tourist attraction, and family residence. The Festival revealed the culture of White House workers, who supported this broad array of functions over a span of history shaped by remarkable events, people and social change. White House workers had made the White House work with their labor and dedication. The Festival's living exhibition presented some of the skills, experiences, and values through which they gave shape to their occupational identities, calling visitors' attention to an important human component of the 200 year institutional history.

The 1992 Festival took place during two five-day weeks (June 25-29 and July 2-5) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 13th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan).

The 1992 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; keynote essays provided background on the Festival and each of the four programs, with shorter essays spotlighting particular traditions and offering a forum for statements from Maroon spokespeople.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife Programs & Cultural Studies.

Center for Folklife Programs & Cultural Studies

Richard Kurin, Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Anthony Seeger, Director, Smithsonian/Folkways Recordings; Peter Seitel, Senior Folklorist; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist; Olivia Cadaval, Director, Quincentenary Projects; Richard Kennedy, Program Analyst; Vivian Chen, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Folklorists; Ken Bilby, Marjorie Hunt, Curators; Carla Borden, John Franklin, Program Managers; Arlene L. Reiniger, Program Specialist; Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Betty Belanus, Frank Proschan, Nicholas Spitzer, Research Associates

Folklife Advisory Council

Roger Abrahams, Jacinto Arias, Jane Beck, Pat Jasper, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Bernice Reagon, John Roberts, Carol Robertson, Gilbert Sprauve, John Tchen, Ricardo Trimillos, Carlos Vélez-Ibáñez

National Park Service

James M. Ridenour, Director; Robert G. Stanton, Regional Director, National Capital Region
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Folklore  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
World music  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Digital images
Business records
Contracts
Notes
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Negatives
Audiotapes
Memorandums
Slides (photographs)
Audiocassettes
Photographic prints
Video recordings
Videotapes
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1992
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1992

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Business records
Sound recordings
Negatives
Video recordings
Correspondence
Plans (drawings)
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Videotapes
Notes
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Slides (photographs)
Audiotapes
Digital images
Date:
June 23-July 4, 1995
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1995 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 6 series.

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: The Cape Verdean Connection

Series 3: The Czech Republic: Tradition and Transformation

Series 4: Heartbeat: The Voices of First Nations Women

Series 5: Russian Roots, American Branches: Music in Two Worlds

Series 6: Special Events
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1995 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The 1995 Festival featured American Indian women's musical traditions, the heritage of the Czech Republic and Czech Americans, music of Russian and Russian American groups, and the cultural life of the Cape Verdean community. These programs testified to the vitality of the human spirit, and to how people, ideas, and forms of cultural expression increasingly cross boundaries of geography, politics, language, race, and gender. Special events included evening concerts devoted to African immigrant communities in the Washington, D.C. area and a memorial concert for Festival founding director, Ralph Rinzler.

Heartbeat: The Voices of First Nations Women presented the musical culture of American Indian women. The program examined how these women express their identity through the use of a variety of musical forms - from traditional songs of home to contemporary songs of Indian life, from the appropriation of men's music to the fusion of root music with country, folk, blues, and gospel.

The Czech Republic: Tradition and Transformation provided a broad survey of the ways national, regional, ethnic, and local traditions have been defined in a complex state located at the crossroads of Central Europe. The "Velvet Revolution" of 1989 and the separation of the Czech and Slovak Republics in 1993 have prompted further examinations of cultural identity, the relationship between the state and popular expression, creativity and tradition. Czech Americans, too, have looked at these changes and the reestablishment of relationships to their ancestral homeland.

A third program, Russian Roots, American Branches: Music in Two Worlds, explored the musical culture of Old Believers and Molokans, Russian religious communities created in the 17th and 18th centuries. The program united immigrant communities long established in the United States with those from Russia, and brought together people who, although separated by generations and different social environments, have nonetheless faced parallel issues with regard to cultural persistence and adaptation.

All these programs involved complex institutional arrangements, local-level research and documentation, and strong commitment to and pride in Festival representation. The Cape Verdean Connection program well demonstrated these processes. Cape Verde is an independent island nation and former Portuguese colony located off the west coast of Africa. Cape Verdean Americans, now numbering about 400,000, most born and raised here, historically settled in New England during the 18th century, playing instrumental roles in the whaling and cranberry industries. Cape Verdeans had an important story to tell about their role in American life, their immigrant and continuing transnational cultural experience, their multiracial heritage, and their enduring sense of community - a story with much to tell others as well. Cape Verdeans provided the impetus for the Festival program, carried out most of the research in concert with Smithsonian scholars, led the effort to raise funds from governments, foundations, corporations, and individuals through benefit dances, auctions, and other community events, and, as is fitting, joined with the Smithsonian to share their experiences with the American public.

The 1995 Festival took place during two five-day weeks (June 23-27 and June 30-July 4) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 13th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). It featured four programs and several special events.

The 1995 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; essays provided background on the Festival and each of the four programs.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife Programs & Cultural Studies.

Center for Folklife Programs & Cultural Studies

Richard Kurin, Director; Richard Kennedy, Deputy Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Anthony Seeger, Director, Smithsonian/Folkways Recordngs; Peter Seitel, Senior Folklorist; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist; Betty Belanus, Olivia Cadaval, Amy Horowitz, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Curators, Folklorists, Educational and Cultural Specialists; Carla M. Borden, John W. Franklin, Charlene James-Duguid, Program Managers; Felicia Erickson, Arlene L. Reiniger, Mary Van Meter, Program Specialists; Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Kenneth M. Bilby, Roland Freeman, Ivan Karp, Corrine Kratz, Alan Lomax, Worth Long, Yook Jung Park, Kate Rinzler, Research Associates & Collaborators

Folklife Advisory Council and Folkways Advisory Council

Roger Abrahams, Jacinto Arias, Michael Asch, Jane Beck, Don DeVito, Pat Jasper, Ella Jenkins, Jon Kertzer, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, John Nixdorf, Bernice Reagon, John Roberts, Carol Robertson, Gilbert Sprauve, Jack Tchen, Ricardo Trimillos, Carlos Vélez-Ibáñez

National Park Service

Roger Kennedy, Director; Robert G. Stanton, Regional Director, National Capital Region
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Folk art  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
World music  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Business records
Sound recordings
Negatives
Video recordings
Correspondence
Plans (drawings)
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Videotapes
Notes
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Slides (photographs)
Audiotapes
Digital images
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1995
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1995

Edwin Lord Weeks papers

Creator:
Weeks, Edwin Lord  Search this
Extent:
0.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Cairo (Egypt) -- Description and Travel
Morocco -- Pictorial works
Africa, North -- Pictorial works
Date:
[ca. 1885-1976]
Scope and Contents:
Paintings in watercolor (18), oil (54), and drawings in graphite (5), pen and ink (3), and pastel (1), capture the exoticism of Weeks' travel in the Near East and North Africa, his interest in medieval armour and love of the New England seashore. Also included are a family crest; animal studies; a 3 p. typescript titled "Cairo Notes"; a 3 p. account of travel to the Cedars of Lebanon via Beirut and Akora; photographs of Weeks in costume and at home in Paris, his work, and the family grocery store in Boston; travel photographs; an exhibition catalog; and clippings.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, illustrator, author, photographer, explorer; Paris, France. Born in Boston, Mass. and raised in Newtonville, Mass., Weeks studied in the American public school system and at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris, with Gerome and Bonnat. He married his cousin Frances Rollins Hale and was a close friend of illustrator Frank T. Merrill. Weeks travelled extensively in Egypt, Jerusalem, Damascus and Morocco, maintaining a studio in Paris and frequenting South Berwick, Maine where his sister Mrs. W.A.H. (Minnie) Goodwin and her family lived. His specialty was North African orientalist genre painting.
Provenance:
Donated by Mervin Bronson 1991 "in memory of Burton W.F. Trafton, Jr." Bronson received the material from his friend Trafton, a distant descendant of Weeks. Many of the artworks and photographs are labelled "Elizabeth Goodwin," who was presumably Weeks' niece.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Watercolorists  Search this
Illustrators  Search this
Painters -- France -- Paris  Search this
Topic:
Heraldry  Search this
Exoticism in art  Search this
Cedar of Lebanon -- Description and Travel  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.weekedwi
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-weekedwi

Scientist or Guinea Pig: Science In Space - STEM in 30

Creator:
National Air and Space Museum  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2016-11-24T00:52:20.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Aeronautics;Flight;Space Sciences  Search this
See more by:
airandspace
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
YouTube Channel:
airandspace
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_9s_CSn1N9Bg

Egyptian mummy CT scan video, Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History

Creator:
Office of Public Affairs  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2011-08-15T15:13:31.000Z
YouTube Category:
Science & Technology  Search this
Topic:
Science  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianScience
Data Source:
Office of Public Affairs
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianScience
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_puCnWbGvcAU

Baby Elephant Shrew - February 2009

Creator:
National Zoo  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2009-02-26T20:06:27.000Z
YouTube Category:
Pets & Animals  Search this
Topic:
Zoology;Animals;Veterinary medicine;Animal health  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNZP
Data Source:
National Zoo
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNZP
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_-wrIOW8mcvQ

Aga Khan Master Musicians, Hosted by Wu Man, pipa

Creator:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-11-15T00:30:09.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, Asian  Search this
See more by:
FreerSackler
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
YouTube Channel:
FreerSackler
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_UTgSm5fuIAA

National Museum of African Art Presents Vernon Reid and Artificial Afrika

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2011-09-27T21:06:02.000Z
YouTube Category:
Music  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianVideos
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianVideos
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_vaj8ih3x0G4

COLLECTIVE MEMORY: STORYTELLING AND COLLABORATION IN THE WRITING OF HISTORY

Creator:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-06-11T20:16:09.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
Topic:
Design  Search this
See more by:
cooperhewitt
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
YouTube Channel:
cooperhewitt
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_MZaSnezKywQ

Inka Engineering Symposium 6: Road Construction Technologies

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2013-11-20T15:52:29.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_DwvIuuVepyU

Stellar Connections: Explorations in Cultural Astronomy - Pt. 4, Babatunde Lawal

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
Interviews
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2012-10-24T17:19:28.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_FCkhZZP3HfQ

Hawaii Festival 2016 - He Lani Ko Luna (A Sky Above)

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2016-06-08T13:49:35.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_0Kbu29V_P-Q

Inka Road Symposium 10: Inka and Modern Engineering in the Andes

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2015-07-15T18:45:36.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_tv1fiW45HKA

ʻAe Kai: A Culture Lab on Convergence

Creator:
Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2017-06-27T17:27:11.000Z
YouTube Category:
Nonprofits & Activism  Search this
Topic:
Asian Americans  Search this
See more by:
apacenter
Data Source:
Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
YouTube Channel:
apacenter
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_LRoQGJa6rZM

Africa and the Radio Universe

Creator:
National Museum of African Art  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2012-06-18T15:54:17.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, African  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianAfricanAr
Data Source:
National Museum of African Art
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianAfricanAr
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_8940yUWHt2A

Forging: The Blacksmith’s Tools

Creator:
National Museum of African Art  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2019-04-05T16:30:20.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, African  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianAfricanAr
Data Source:
National Museum of African Art
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianAfricanAr
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_Hd4k6lb3O4E

Toga Nu and Cheko: Change and Continuity in the Art of Mali

Creator:
National Museum of African Art  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2017-04-28T16:56:42.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, African  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianAfricanAr
Data Source:
National Museum of African Art
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianAfricanAr
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_kF3F5xfUEKM

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