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John Taylor Arms papers

Creator:
Arms, John Taylor, 1887-1953  Search this
Names:
Artists for Victory, Inc.  Search this
New York World's Fair (1939-1940 : New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Society of American Etchers  Search this
Brown, Bolton, 1864-1936  Search this
Extent:
4 Linear feet ((on 2 microfilm reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1910-1952
Scope and Contents:
Two volumes of consignment records of prints; sketchbooks and drawings of French architecture; writings, including a notebook on printmaking made while studying with Bolton Brown; a notebook of engineering drawings for Princeton; a scrapbook; minutes of Art Association Representatives, New York World's Fair; Artists for Victory minutes and scrapbook; National Academy of Design catalogs, 1948-1952; Society of American Etchers catalogs, 1950-1952; writings; and scrapbooks, 1932-1937.
Biographical / Historical:
Printmaker; Fairfield, Ct. and Washington, D.C. Served as president of the Society of American Etchers. Studied architecture before turning to etching and printmaking.
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming 1986 by Bryn Mawr College.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Printmakers -- United States  Search this
Topic:
Prints -- Technique -- United States  Search this
Printing -- societies, etc  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.armsjota
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-armsjota

Morris Henry Hobbs papers

Creator:
Hobbs, Morris Henry, 1892-1967  Search this
Names:
Bromeliad Society  Search this
Chicago Society of Etchers  Search this
Louisiana Society of Etchers  Search this
New Orleans Art League  Search this
Arms, John Taylor, 1887-1953  Search this
Jacques, Bertha  Search this
Smith, Lyman B.  Search this
Extent:
4.7 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Architectural drawings
Prints
Scrapbooks
Diaries
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Date:
circa 1901-2014
Summary:
The papers of etcher Morris Henry Hobbs measure 4.7 linear feet and date from circa 1901-2014. His career as an artist in Chicago and New Orleans is documented through biographical material, correspondence, writings, professional files, printed material, photographs, artwork, and four sketchbooks.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of etcher Morris Henry Hobbs measure 4.7 linear feet and date from circa 1901-2014. His career as an artist in Chicago and New Orleans is documented through biographical material, correspondence, writings, professional files, printed material, photographs, artwork, and four sketchbooks.

Biographical material includes chronologies, biographical statements, and documentation on his home and studio. Correspondence includes letters to friends and family regarding art, travel, and botany. Of note are letters from the etchers John Taylor Arms and Bertha Jaques and botanist Lyman Smith. Writings consist of Hobbs' diary kept during World War I while serving in the U.S. Army, journal pages documenting his move to New Orleans, and garden notebooks. Professional files include documents relating to Hobbs' memberships and activities in the Bromeliad Society, Chicago Society of Etchers, Louisiana Society of Etchers, New Orleans Art League, and other organizations. Also included are exhibition records, price lists, and sales records.

Printed material includes clippings and exhibition announcements documenting his career as well as published versions of his etchings. Photographs and slides are of Hobbs, family and friends, trips abroad, and his properties in New Orleans and Mandeville, Louisiana. Artwork includes architectural renderings, sketches of Chicago, France, and New Orleans, and an annotated scrapbook containing original etchings. Four sketchbooks include figure drawings and landscapes in pencil and ink.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1918-2014 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1921-1993 (0.7 linear feet; Boxes 1 and 5)

Series 3: Writings, 1918-2014 (0.3 linear feet; Boxes 1-2)

Series 4: Professional Files, 1922-2014 (1.0 linear foot; Boxes 2-3)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1929-2014 (0.6 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1901-1991 (0.6 linear feet; Boxes 3-4)

Series 7: Artwork, circa 1919-1950s (0.3 linear feet; Boxes 4-5)

Series 8: Sketchbooks, 1930s-1950s (0.2 linear feet; Box 4)
Biographical / Historical:
Morris Henry Hobbs (1892-1967) was an etcher in Chicago and New Orleans. Hobbs was born in Rockford, Illinois, and raised in Chicago. As a teenager he took classes at the Art Institute of Chicago and at the age of 17 was hired as a draftsman at an architectural firm. From 1918-1919, he served in France with the Allied Expeditionary Force. While there he contracted influenza which resulted in the loss of his hearing. After the war he lived in Toledo, Ohio, with his wife and two daughters and worked at an architectural firm. He also learned printmaking techniques from etcher J. Ernest Dean and began exhibiting his work. In 1927, he returned to Chicago with his family and in 1930 became director of the Chicago Society of Etchers. During his career he was active in many arts and printmaking organizations.

In 1938, Hobbs traveled to New Orleans for an extended visit, opened a studio space, and began a ten-year project of etching French Quarter scenes. A year later he moved to New Orleans permanently and became the first president of the Louisiana Society of Etchers. In 1942, he married Alice "Judy" Seddon. In 1948, he was hired as a designer for the architectural firm Favrot, Reed, Mathes and Bergman, and was employed there until his death. Also at this time, he and his wife establish a country home in Mandeville, Louisiana, where he built a greenhouse and cultivated tropical bromeliads. They kept an apartment in the French Quarter as a weekday residence.

In 1960, Hobbs began a series of watercolors depicting bromeliads and in the subsequent years traveled to Costa Rica, Guatemala, and Trinidad to collect specimens for a potential book project. He died in 1967 at the age of 75 and that year the Reinike Gallery held a retrospective of his work. His wife Alice Seddon Hobbs died in 1993 at the age of 95.
Provenance:
Donated in 2014 by Reed Isbell-Hobbs, widow of Morris Henry Hobbs' son William Hobbs.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Morris Henry Hobbs papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Etchers -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Etchers -- Louisiana -- New Orleans  Search this
Topic:
Gardening  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Genre/Form:
Architectural drawings
Prints
Scrapbooks
Diaries
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Citation:
Morris Henry Hobbs papers, circa 1901-2014. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.hobbmorr
See more items in:
Morris Henry Hobbs papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hobbmorr

Oral history interview with June Schwarcz

Interviewee:
Schwarcz, June, 1918-2015  Search this
Interviewer:
Fisch, Arline M.  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Bellas Artes (Santa Fe, N.M.)  Search this
De Vera Gallery  Search this
Japonesque Gallery  Search this
Mobilia Gallery  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Pratt Institute  Search this
Susan Cummins Gallery  Search this
Sybaris Gallery  Search this
Brancusi, Constantin, 1876-1957  Search this
Letchzin, Stanley  Search this
Louis, Morris, 1912-1962  Search this
Noguchi, Isamu, 1904-1988  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Extent:
75 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2001 January 21
Scope and Contents:
An interview of June Schwarcz conducted 2001 January 21, by Arline M. Fisch, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Schwarcz's home and studio, Sausalito, California.
Schwarcz speaks of her family background; early interest in color and form; studies at Pratt Institute; working in as a package designer and free-lance designer for department stores such as Macy's in New York and Hochschild-Kohn in Baltimore; living in Chicago, Brazil, and Denver; learning about enamels from a group of "housewives" in Denver; reading Kenneth Bates's book [Enameling: Principles and Practice] "as if it were the Bible"; visiting America House and meeting Dominick Maillard; settling in Sausalito, California, in 1954; the comparison of natural erosion in streams and rocks to etched surfaces; sources of inspiration including fog, folk art, African art, ancient Chinese ceramics, the Japanese aesthetic, ethnic clothing and fabrics, pleats and folds, and works by Isamu Noguchi, Constantin Brancusi, Morris Louis, and Mark Rothko; the practice of working on several pieces at one time; the influence of two books, Santayana's "The Sense of Beauty" and Junichiro Tanizaki's "In Praise of Shadows;" her desire to "making things that are beautiful"; her husband's support and assistance with tools, materials, and techniques; the significance of various tools and equipment; developing forms through paper patterns; the body as vessel; color as "personality"; technical pitfalls of the enameling process; technical problems of electroplating; the 1974 World Craft Conference in which Stanley Letchzin presented his findings on electroforming; meeting Letchzin and comparing processes; the difficulties in selling work; the lack of an audience; teaching workshops at Arrowmont and Vail; aversion to teaching and commissions; relationships with Susan Cummins Gallery, Bellas Artes Gallery, Japonesque Gallery, De Vera Gallery, Sybaris Gallery, and Mobilia Gallery; travel to Europe and Japan; honors and awards; and interest in transparent enamels. Schwarcz also describes her use of basse taille, plique-à-jour, electroplating, electroforming, brush plating, raku, scotchbrite, and Mi-Tique (patina solutions). She also recalls development of each piece in her retrospective catalog, "June Schwarcz : forty years, forty pieces" (San Francisco Craft & Folk Art Museum, 1998) and concludes the interview by discussing five current pieces in progress.
Biographical / Historical:
June Schwarcz (1918-2015) was an enamaler from Sausalito, California. Arline M. Fisch (1931-) is a metalsmith from San Diego, California.
General:
Originally recorded as 4 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 7 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 36 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Enamelers -- California  Search this
Topic:
Enamels and enameling -- Technique  Search this
Enamels and enameling -- Study and teaching  Search this
Metal-workers -- California -- San Francisco -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.schwar01
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-schwar01

Oral history interview with Judy Chicago

Interviewee:
Chicago, Judy, 1939-  Search this
Interviewer:
Richards, Judith Olch  Search this
Names:
ACA Galleries  Search this
LewAllen Contemporary (Gallery)  Search this
Bergen, Jeffrey, 1955-  Search this
Bullard, E. John(Edgar John), 1942-  Search this
Copeland, John  Search this
Dobbins, Norman  Search this
Dobbins, Ruth  Search this
Flack, Audrey  Search this
Hopkins, Henry, 1928-2009  Search this
LaMonte, Karen, 1967-  Search this
Lemon, Jack  Search this
LewAllen, Arlene  Search this
Lu, Jie, 1958-  Search this
Lucie-Smith, Edward  Search this
Marisol, 1930-  Search this
McFadden, David Revere  Search this
Neel, Alice, 1900-1984  Search this
Perkins, Flo  Search this
Pruitt, Tom  Search this
Rodee, Susannah  Search this
Rosenberg, Harold, 1906-1978  Search this
Saint-Phalle, Niki de, 1930-2002  Search this
Schneemann, Carolee, 1939-  Search this
Semmel, Joan, 1932-  Search this
Taylor, Mary, 1947-  Search this
Thompson, Viki D., 1947-  Search this
Woodman, Donald  Search this
Youdelman, Nancy, 1948-  Search this
Extent:
74 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2009 August 7-8
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Judy Chicago conducted 2009 August 7 and 8, by Judith Olch Richards, for the Archives of American Art, at Chicago's home and studio, in Belen, New Mexico.
Chicago speaks of her work since the late 1980s, having previously discussed her early life and works; printmaking projects with various print studios around the country; giving archived documents to important museums; creating a foundation with her husband Donald Woodman to protect the legacy of their art; the non-profit organization she started in 1978, Through the Flower; her studio practices and her most practiced techniques; keeping a regular schedule; her interest in collaborative projects such as The Dinner Party [1974-1979], the Birth Project [1980-1985], the Holocaust Project [1985-1993] and Resolutions: A Stitch in Time [1994-2000]; working with various textile and glass artists; feeling a kin with other female artists, like Nikki de Saint Phalle and Marisol Escobar; the responsibility she feels to share underrepresented information; her enjoyment of the process of making art and the hope that she creates art that is not bound by time; her relationships with galleries though the years including the ACA Galleries in New York and LewAllen Contemporary in Santa Fe; her intention in making art was not create proactive or controversial art; various teaching positions; her interest in combining text and images in works like Song of Songs [1997-1999]; her more current interest in glass; experimenting with the techniques of casting and etching to achieve her desired images; her want to change institutional policies that underrepresent women artists in museums and the absence of images of women by women artists. Chicago also recalls Henry Hopkins, Mary Ross Taylor, Susannah Rodee, John Bullard, Jack Lemon, Alice Neel, Edward Lucie-Smith, John Copeland, Harold Rosenberg, Carolee Schneemann, Jeffery Bergen, Audrey Flack, Joan Semmel, Nancy Youdelman, David McFadden, Viki Thomson Wylder, Tom Pruitt, Arlene LewAllen, Flo Perkins, Norman and Ruth Dobbins, Karen LaMonte, Lu Jie and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Interviewee Judy Chicago (1939- ) is a feminist artist and author who lives and works in Belen, New Mexico. Interviewer Judith Olch Richards (1947- ) is former executive director of iCI in New York, New York.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 compact discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 40 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Women sculptors -- New Mexico -- Interviews  Search this
Feminism and art  Search this
Women painters -- New Mexico -- Interviews  Search this
Women photographers -- New Mexico -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- Technique  Search this
Glass artists -- New Mexico -- Interviews  Search this
Women printmakers -- New Mexico -- Interviews  Search this
Function:
Artists' studios -- New Mexico
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.chicag09
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-chicag09

Harold Weston papers

Creator:
Weston, Harold, 1894-1972  Search this
Names:
Adirondack Trail Improvement Society  Search this
Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies (UNITED STATES OF AMERICA). Americans-in-Britain Outpost  Search this
Corcoran Gallery of Art  Search this
Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors  Search this
Food for Freedom, Inc.  Search this
Harvard Lampoon (Organization)  Search this
Harvard University -- Students  Search this
International Association of Art. United States Committee  Search this
Montross Gallery  Search this
National Council on the Arts and Government  Search this
National Endowment for the Arts  Search this
New York State Council on the Arts  Search this
Phillips Collection  Search this
Studio House (Phillips Memorial Gallery)  Search this
Carmichael, Leonard, 1898-  Search this
Dows, Olin, 1904-1981  Search this
Mumford, Lewis, 1895-1990  Search this
Phillips, Duncan, 1886-1966  Search this
Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962  Search this
Rosenfeld, Paul, 1890-1946  Search this
Sizer, Theodore, 1892-1967  Search this
Weston, Faith  Search this
Extent:
24.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Christmas cards
Notes
Etchings
Speeches
Articles
Postcards
Poems
Woodcuts
Sketches
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Glass negatives
Lantern slides
Copper plates
Place:
Adirondack Mountain Reserve (N.Y.)
Date:
1894-1978
bulk 1912-1972
Summary:
The papers of modernist painter and activist Harold Weston (1894-1972) date from 1894 to 1978 and measure 24.3 linear feet. The papers focus on Weston's painting career and his involvement with humanitarian and artistic causes. Found are biographical materials, correspondence, personal business records, association and organization records, commission and project files, materials relating to Weston's book Freedom in the Wilds, writings, artwork, printed materials, two scrapbooks, and photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of modernist painter and activist Harold Weston (1894-1972) date from 1894 to 1978 and measure 24.3 linear feet. The papers focus on Weston's painting career and his involvement with humanitarian and artistic causes. Found are biographical materials, correspondence, personal business records, association and organization records, commission and project files, materials relating to Weston's book Freedom in the Wilds, writings, artwork, printed materials, two scrapbooks, and photographs. The papers document his involvement with the Committee to Defend America, Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors, Food for Freedom, the International Association of the Plastic Arts, National Countil on the Arts and Government, National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council for the Arts, Reconstruction Service Committee, and the YMCA in Baghdad.

Biographical materials include biographical sketches and resumes, including a short biography written by Faith Weston in 1969. There are records from his school years at Exeter Academy and Harvard University that include yearbooks, report cards, scholarship information, Harvard Lampoon materials, and a diploma from Harvard. Also found are materials relating to Faith Weston, membership cards, memorials information, passports and travel papers, and wedding wishes.

Correspondence from Harold Weston dates from his school years up until his death in 1972. In letters to his family, Weston discusses his education; his travel and activities in the Middle East during World War I; the Adirondacks; convalescense in France in the mid-1920s; his immediate family life; and exhibitions. Also found are holiday cards designed and printed by Weston. The majority of correspondence is with his father S. Burns Weston, mother Mary, sister Esther, brother Carl, Faith Weston and the Borton family, children Barbara, Bruce, and Haroldine, and others. Also found are letters between Weston and friend Theodore Sizer and Duncan Phillips of the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C.

Personal business and financial records relating to Weston's exhibitions include delivery receipts, agreements, hand-drawn gallery plans for exhibitions, lists of exhibitions, framing invoices, legal information, pricelists, records of sales, and lists of works of art. Galleries with which Weston held exhibitions, sold, or lent works of art include Boyer Galleries, Corcoran Gallery, the Gallery in Paoli, Montross Gallery, the Phillips Collection, and Studio House Galleries.

Records relating to Harold Weston's memberships and involvement with professional associations and service organizations are from the Adirondack Trail Improvement Society, the Committee to Defend America, Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors, Food for Freedom, International Association of the Plastic Arts/International Arts Association, National Countil on the Arts and Government, National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts, Reconstruction Service Committee, and the Young Men's Christian Association, Baghdad. The files include correspondence, financial records, meetings and membership information, notes, organizational history, photographs, printed materials, programs and activities records, speeches, and writings.

Files that document Weston's Building the United Nations and the Treasury Relief Project sponsored "Procurement Building Murals" are found within the Commissions and Project files series. The files include correspondence, financial information, legal documents, photographs of the works of art and research photos, and printed materials. Correspondence of note includes letters written by Lewis Mumford, Duncan Phillips, Eleanor Roosevelt on behalf of Weston's Building of the United Nations and letters from Leonard Carmichael, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. Letters from Olin Dows of the Treasury Relief Art Project are within correspondence relating to the "Procurement Building Murals." Also found are preliminary sketches of the murals.

The Freedom in the Wilds series contains materials relating to the book which combined Weston's autobiography with a history of the Adirondack Mountain Reserve. Additional writings and notes are by Harold Weston and others, and include articles, poetry, notes, speech notes and speeches, and lists. Harold Weston's articles include "Persian Caravan Sketches" published in 1921 discussing his travels throughout the Middle East. Other articles are written by Duncan Phillips, Paul Rosenfeld, Barbara Weston, and Faith Weston. Also found are postcards annoted with notes by Harold Weston about his travels.

Artwork inlcudes sketches, etchings, copperplates, and woodcuts. There are copperplates entitled "Shroud" and of the series Building the United Nations for the Harvard Alumni bulletin in 1957; an untitled etching by Weston; sketches including those from Baghdad and watercolor sketches; a woodcut of the 1924 Weston holiday card; and scattered unsigned sketches probably not by Weston.

Printed materials include calendars with notations; clippings; exhibition catalogs and announcements for Weston's exhibitions dating from 1922-1976 and for others; gallery tags or labels for paintings shown in exhibitions; reproductions of illustrations for the Harvard Lampoon and full issues from 1911-1916; materials relating to the Harvard production of Henry IV, for which Weston designed the sets; reproductions of works of art by Weston and by others; school seals; and various art related publications.

There are two scrapbooks compiled by Faith Weston about her husband. The first contains materials relating to Weston's activity with the International Association of the Plastic Arts Conference of 1963, including a letter and photograph of President John F. Kennedy. The second scrapbook dates from 1977 and consists of general clippings relating to Weston's career, dating from 1917 to 1952 with additional materials added by Faith in 1977.

Photographs are of Weston, family members, exhibitions and installations, and works of art by Weston and others. There are also numerous photographs of Weston's travel through the Adirondacks, the Middle East, Europe, and India. Also found are glass plate negatives of works of art painted in France between 1926-1930; scattered glass plate negatives of Baghdad and the Middle East; glass plates belonging to S. Burns Weston of the Adirondacks, circa 1900; and approximately 100 lantern slides of the various Middle Eastern cities and ruins - probably used by Weston to illustrate his talks given in the 1920s.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series. Glass plate negatives are housed separately and closed to researchers:

Series 1: Biographical Information, 1896-1974 (Box 1, 38; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1894-1975 (Box 1-3, 38; 2.5 linear feet)

Series 3: Personal Business and Financial records, 1912-1977 (Box 4; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 4: Associations and Organizations records, 1916-1972 (Box 4-10, 37-38; 6.5 linear feet)

Series 5: Commissions and Project files, 1935-1965 (Box 10-12, 38, OV 39; 1.4 linear feet)

Series 6: -- Freedom in the Wilds -- records, late 1960s-1976 (Box 12-13; 1.8 linear feet)

Series 7: Writings and Notes, 1912-1975 (Box 13-14; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 8: Artwork and Artifacts, circa 1917-1967 (Box 14, 21; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 9: Printed Material, circa 1900-1978 (Box 15-18, 38; 2.5 linear feet)

Series 10: Scrapbooks, circa 1963-1977 (Box 17-18; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 11: Photographs, circa 1900-1975 (Box 18-20, 22-36, 38; 4.8 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Modernist painter and federal Treasury Relief Art Project artist Harold Weston (1894-1972) worked primarily in New York City and St. Huberts, New York in the Adirondacks. Weston was president of the U.S. Commission of the International Association of Art/Plastic Arts and the Federation of Modern Painters and Scultors. He was also chairman of the National Council on the Arts and Government and active with various political and humanitarian causes.

Harold Weston was born in 1894 in Merion, Pennsylvania into a privileged family. He attended school in Europe as a teenager, where he began to draw and sketch. In 1910, Harold contracted Polio which left him with a weak leg. After graduating from Exeter Academy, Harold entered Harvard University with the class of 1916 and was active in the Delta Upsilon Club and the Harvard Lampoon, for which he illustrated.

Despite his leg, Weston was determined to serve in some form during World War I. He traveled to Baghdad and volunteered with the YMCA. Here he started the Baghdad Art Club and organized exhibitions of soldier art. He remained in the Middle East until 1919 and served as the official painter for the British Army. The colors and the landscape of the region also inspired later works of art.

Upon returning to the United States, Weston built a one-room cabin in the Adirondack Mountains, where he lived and painted. He had his first one-man exhibtition at the Montross Gallery in 1922. In 1923, he married Faith Borton who moved with him to the Adirondacks. His wife inspired his series of "landscape nudes" which treated the body with different techniques that would typically be used in landscape painting. After suffering from a kidney infection in 1925, Weston and his wife moved to Ceres, France to recover. Weston continued to paint and started a family with Faith while in France. In 1930, the family moved back to the United States and lived in Greenwich Village, New York.

From 1936-1938, Harold Weston worked with the federal Treasury Relief Art Project and painted murals in the Procurement Building in Washington, D.C. The murals represent the growth of public buildings during the Great Depression. He took on a second major project to document the contruction of the United Nations in a series of six paintings. Later, the Smithsonian Instution received the paintings as gifts through an independent committee.

In addition to painting, Harold Weston devoted himself to public service by becoming involved in humanitarian causes, artist professional organizations, and federal government support of the arts. Weston served as president or chairman of three different organizations including the Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors, the International Association of Art/International Association of the Plastic Art, and the National Council on the Arts and Government. Before the start of World War II, Harold Weston was named the Chairman of Essex County Committee to Defend America, which argued for financial support of the allied forces in World War II. After the start of the war, he helped form the Food for Freedom movement which urged American aid for European and Asian refugees. Similarly, Weston served as Executive Secretary for the Reconstruction Service Committee which was established to assist the rebuilding of Europe.

Later in life, Weston wrote a book Freedom in the Wilds, which combined his own autobiography with a history of the Adirondack Mountain Reserve. Harold Weston died on April 10th, 1972 in New York City.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reel N69-76) including biographic notes, exhibition material, clippings, a presentation album, and commemorative stamps. Some, but not all, of these papers were included in later donations. Materials not donated remain with the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.

Syracuse University also holds circa 14 linear feet of Harold Weston's papers.
Provenance:
Harold Weston lent the Archives of American Art materials for microfilming in 1969. Faith Borton Weston, Harold Weston's widow, donated the papers in several increments between 1972-1980 and lent materials for microfilming in 1977.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Harold Weston papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Painting, Abstract -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Art and state  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Christmas cards
Notes
Etchings
Speeches
Articles
Postcards
Poems
Woodcuts
Sketches
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Glass negatives
Lantern slides
Copper plates
Citation:
Harold Weston papers, 1894-1978. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.westharo
See more items in:
Harold Weston papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-westharo
Online Media:

Jack Stewart papers

Creator:
Stewart, Jack, 1926-2005  Search this
Names:
New York City Transit Authority  Search this
World Trade Center (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Yale University -- Students  Search this
Baxter, Violet  Search this
Egan, Charles, 1911-  Search this
Gold, Nancy  Search this
Goulet, Lorrie, 1925-  Search this
Kahn, Wolf, 1927-  Search this
Romano, Clare  Search this
Thomas, Steffen, 1906-  Search this
Toney, Anthony  Search this
Townsend, Rodman  Search this
Walker, Herbert Brooks, 1927-  Search this
Weiner, Sam  Search this
Extent:
9.9 Linear feet
7.31 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Sketches
Drawings
Sound recordings
Paintings
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Illustrated letters
Interviews
Transcripts
Color slides
Video recordings
Greeting cards
Designs
Date:
1926-2010
Summary:
The Jack Stewart papers are dated 1926-2010 and measure 9.9 linear feet and 7.31 GB. A significant portion of the collection concerns Stewart's dissertation, "Subway Graffiti: An Aesthetic Study of Graffiti on the Subway" (New York University, 1989), related research, writings, and exhibitions on the subject. Biographical materials, correspondence, writings, printed and digital material, artwork, sketchbooks, and photographic materials document his career as a painter, muralist, designer, educator and administrator.
Scope and Content Note:
The Jack Stewart papers are dated 1926-2010 and measure 9.9 linear feet and 7.31 GB. A significant portion of the collection concerns Stewart's dissertation, "Subway Graffiti: An Aesthetic Study of Graffiti on the Subway" (New York University, 1989), related research, writings, and exhibitions on the subject. Biographical materials, correspondence, writings, printed and digital material, artwork, sketchbooks, and photographic materials document his career as a painter, muralist, designer, educator and administrator.

Biographical materials include a "Video Archive" in digital format, consisting mainly of Jack Stewart being interviewed on several occasions by Nancy Gold for her television show, "What It Takes." In addition to discussions about Stewart's career, the shows include examples of his paintings and murals along with views of him at work.

Correspondence mostly documents Stewart's artistic career and work as an educator and administrator; there is some personal correspondence, as well. Of particular note are letters to Rodman Townsend who commissioned a mural about the human brain; they discuss the details of the project and its evolution, brain research, and subsequent exhibitions of related paintings. Illustrated letters and greeting cards with original artwork are from Violet Baxter, Lorrie Goulet, Wolf Kahn, Clare Romano, Anthony Toney, and Sam Weiner. Herbert Brooks Walker sent several pieces of mail art and, while in Italy, collected graffiti information for Stewart. Letters Stewart wrote to his mother span decades; the best represented periods are the years he served in the U.S. Army and studied at Yale University.

Writings and notes consist of Stewart's dissertation ("Subway Graffiti: An Aesthetic Study of Graffiti on the Subway"), miscellaneous writings and notes, and art and architecture notebooks. Dissertation documentation includes the manuscript, drafts, and related records. Among the miscellaneous writings and notes - published and unpublished - are shorter pieces, articles, student papers, and teaching notes. Of particular interest are notes/instructions for a performance piece titled "Endless Subway," "Memories of Steffan Thomas" and "My Recollection of Charles Egan." Also found are minutes of Cooper Union adjunct faculty meetings (1965-1966), and reports written when provost of the Rhode Island School of Design. Art and architecture notebooks (5 volumes) were compiled while at Yale University.

Research files on graffiti contain many sound recordings and some transcripts of interviews with graffiti writers, voluminous lists of graffiti writers' names/tags, correspondence, notes, photographs, and a wide variety of printed material. Some of the material is in digital format. Stewart began collecting these materials as his interest in graffiti developed. They were used for his dissertation and material continued to be added after the dissertation was completed.

Printed material mentioning Stewart or containing reproductions of his work includes exhibition catalogs, posters, and newsletters.

Artwork by Jack Stewart consists of drawings, paintings, and one etching; also found are designs and plans for tables, murals, and other projects. Drawings include figure studies, heads, and landscapes; most are in pencil and some in ink. The small number of paintings are oil on canvas (removed from stretchers), and gouache on paper and board. Sketchbooks (44 volumes) contain mostly pencil drawings and sketches, and a few studies for paintings and murals. Two volumes include writings about travels and events; of particular interest are "Notes on Kline's funeral May 1962," "Visit to Roman Bronze Art Foundry," and "Notes on My Development."

Photographic materials consist mainly photographs, but also include digital images and 35-mm color slides. Images of Stewart include views of him with paintings and working in his studio. Identified individuals with whom he appears are: Regina Stewart (wife), Brandon Stewart (son), Lil Stewart (mother), Ninalee Craig, Irving Sandler, and students in Urbino, Italy. Photographs of artwork document murals such as Raw Material (composed of shirt labels), and Versailles Hotel in Miami Beach; among the paintings documented are State of the Union, Icons of Western Art and Revelation XVI-16 (both with keys to individuals portrayed). Exhibition openings and installations are shown in photographs, color slides, and video recordings. Also found are photographs of the World Trade Center site taken by Stewart in December 2001.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 9 series:

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1926-circa 2009 (Boxes 1,11; 0.6 linear foot, ER01-ER02, 3.92 GB)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1944-2009 (Boxes 1-2; 0.7 linear foot)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, circa 1947-2003 (Boxes 2-5; 3.1 linear foot)

Series 4: Research Files on Graffiti, 1972-2010 (Boxes 5-7,11; 2.8 linear foot, ER03-ER05, 3.18 GB)

Series 5: Printed Material, circa 1945-2002 (Boxes 8, 11, OV 13; 0.7 linear foot)

Series 6: Scrapbooks, circa 1990-2003 (Box 8; 0.2 linear foot)

Series 7: Artwork, 1946-2000 (Boxes 8, 11, OV 12; 0.3 linear foot)

Series 8: Sketchbooks, 1951-2004 (Boxes 8-9; 1.3 linear foot)

Series 9: Photographic Materials, circa 1950s-2010 (Boxes 10-11; 0.4 linear foot, ER06-ER07, 0.208 GB)
Biographical Note:
Jack Stewart (1926-2005) was a painter, muralist, designer, educator and administrator in New York City. After developing an interest in graffiti in the 1970s, Stewart eventually wrote a dissertation on the subject, "Subway Graffiti: An Aesthetic Study of Graffiti on the Subway" (New York University, 1989) and was recognized as an expert on mass transit art.

Jack Stewart began studying art at the High Museum School in his hometown of Atlanta when he was 10 years old. At age 14, he began a 4 year apprenticeship with painter and sculptor Steffen Thomas. After serving in World War II, he enrolled at Yale University (B.F.A. 1951) as a sculpture student, but soon switched to the painting department where he studied with Josef Albers and Willem de Kooning. After graduation, Stewart began receiving mural commissions and enrolled in classes at Columbia University School of Architecture (1951-1953). His interest in architecture was tied to understanding how to work effectively with architects on mural projects. Later, Stewart developed an interest in graffiti which he pursued through graduate study at New York University (M.A., 1975 and Ph.D., 1989).

Stewart created murals in ceramic tile, mixed media and stained glass. In addition to mosaic murals, he designed tables with mosaic tops. As an outgrowth of his mosaic work, Stewart developed a technique for laminating stained glass onto plate glass that, by eliminating the need for lead, opened new design possibilities. Mural commissions included work for Hamilton Hotel in Chicago, Versailles Hotel in Miami Beach, Public School 28 in New York City, and several ocean liners. The most unusual mural, Raw Material commissioned by Cluett Peabody and Company, was composed of shirt labels embedded in acrylic.

Beginning in 1950 Stewart participated regularly in group shows and enjoyed solo exhibitions mainly in the New York City area. He also showed in Philadelphia, Georgia, Rhode Island, Mexico and Italy, and was included in exhibitions circulated by the American Federation of Arts.

Stewart taught at the college level for nearly thirty years, including: The New School (art and architecture, 1953-1958); Pratt Institute (interior architectural design, 1955-1960); The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art (painting, drawing, human anatomy, art history, 1960-1976; Art Department Chairman, 1971-1976); International Center of Mythymna, American Division, Lesbos, Greece (summer school, 1962-1965); Columbia University (M.F.A. program instructor, 1966-1976); and New York University (drawing, 1967-1975). In 1976 he was appointed Vice President and Provost of the Rhode Island School of Design.

Stewart was active in several professional organizations. He served as New York Artists Equity Association Secretary (1986-1987) and President (1987-1989); President of the National Society of Mural Painters (1996-2000); member of the advisory board of the Steffen Thomas Museum and Archives, Buckhead, GA (1997- 2000s); and President of the Fine Arts Federation of New York (2003-2004). The National Academy of Design elected Jack Stewart an Academician in 1995.

Jack Stewart and Margot Schwarzhaupt, an artist, were married in 1947; they had one son, Brandon. Painter and arts administrator, Regina Serniak, became Jack Stewart's wife in 1976.

Jack Stewart died in New York City in 2005.
Provenance:
Donated in 2010 by Regina Stewart, widow of Jack Stewart.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. This collection is copyright restricted.
Rights:
The Jack Stewart papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Street art  Search this
Muralists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Mail art  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Graffiti  Search this
Graffiti artists  Search this
Arts administrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Designers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketches
Drawings
Sound recordings
Paintings
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Illustrated letters
Interviews
Transcripts
Color slides
Video recordings
Greeting cards
Designs
Citation:
Jack Stewart papers, 1926-2010. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.stewjack
See more items in:
Jack Stewart papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-stewjack

Xanthus Smith diaries

Creator:
Smith, Xanthus, 1839-1929  Search this
Names:
Smith, Russell, 1812-1896  Search this
Extent:
2 Volumes ((on partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Volumes
Date:
1883-1892
Scope and Contents:
Handwritten diary, January 1-December 31, 1883, and July 1, 1891-May 14, 1892. The entries detail the daily events of Smith, who painted in his studio almost every day, usually finishing a painting in one to three days. The entries also record his domestic life, living with his wife, children, and father, painter Russell Smith, outside of Philadelphia, Pa. He writes of his numerous paintings, often referring to his materials and techniques; of trading pictures for frames; critiques an exhibition of etchings in Philadelphia in 1883; records his investments in stocks and bonds, transactions with his dealers Haseltine and Davis & Harvey; paintings on sea shells that he sold in Atlantic City; photographing of outdoor scenes that he later used as subjects for his paintings; developing photographs; making prints; family illnesses and visits from Dr. Paxton; use of Devoe paints and canvas; a trip to Southwest Harbor, Maine, in 1883, where he made numerous outdoor studies and sketches; and numerous and futile attempts to color glass lantern slides. [This reel is mislabeled Russell Smith].
Biographical / Historical:
Marine and landscape painter, photographer; Philadelphia, Pa.
Provenance:
Microfilmed by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania for the Archives of American Art, 1955.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Painters -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Photographers -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Topic:
Painting, Modern -- 19th century -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Photography -- History -- 19th century  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.smitxant
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-smitxant

Mary Margaret Sittig research material on Louis Prang

Creator:
Sittig, Mary Margaret  Search this
Names:
L. Prang & Co.  Search this
Heinzen, Rosa Prang  Search this
Prang, Louis, 1824-1909  Search this
Extent:
3.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Watercolors
Prints
Etchings
Paintings
Drawings
Photographs
Date:
1860-1978
Summary:
Art historian Mary Margaret Sittig's research material on Louis Prang dates from 1860 to 1978 and measures 3.5 linear feet. Found within the papers are biographical material for Louis Prang and for Mary Margaret Sittig, collected letters from various members of the Prang family, and scattered letters to Sittig from friends. Additional collected research materials include scattered personal business records for Louis Prang and his wife, notes and writings, art work, printed material, and photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
Art historian Mary Margaret Sittig's research material on Louis Prang dates from 1860 to 1978 and measures 3.5 linear feet. Found within the papers are biographical material for Louis Prang and for Mary Margaret Sittig, collected letters from various members of the Prang family, and scattered letters to Sittig from friends. Additional collected research materials include scattered personal business records for Louis Prang and his wife, notes and writings, art work, printed material, and photographs.

Biographical material concerning Louis Prang includes a record book and genealogy listing Prang family members, ephemera, and scattered family papers. Biographical material concerning Mary Margaret Sittig includes resumes, a photograph of Sitting, and scattered ephemera. Letters primarily consist of scattered communications between miscellaneous Prang family members, and a few business-related letters. Letters to Mary Margaret Sittig are primarily from friends and discuss her research activities. Personal business records consist of an account book for Louis Prang's wife, Rosa, and miscellaneous receipts for Louis Prang.

Notes and writings primarily consist of photocopies of research material on Louis Prang collected by Mary Margaret Sittig and include a typescript of her thesis L. Prang and Company, Fine Art Publishers. Art work consists of ink drawings, watercolor sketches, an etching, a block print, and an oil painting on fabric.

Printed material concerning Louis Prang includes clippings, commercial lithographs of book illustrations, chromolithographs of ceramics from the Walters Collection, and printed reproductions of work by others.

Photographs are of Louis Prang, his wives Rosa Prang and Mary Dana Hicks Prang, miscellaneous Prang family members, and of scattered art work. There is also the Prang Family Photograph Album that contains annotations, but no photographs.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 7 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1881-1973 (Box 1; 10 folders)

Series 2: Letters, 1864-1974 (Box 1; 23 folders)

Series 3: Personal Business Records, 1875-1917 (Box 1; 2 folders)

Series 4: Notes and Writings, 1890-1978 (Box 1; 16 folders)

Series 5: Art Work, circa 1880 (Box 1; 9 folders)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1866-1972 (Box 1-8; 2.5 linear feet)

Series 7: Photographs, 1860-1957 (Box 3, 7; 6 folders)
Biographical Note:
Mary Margaret Sittig was a doctoral student at George Washington University in Washington D.C. working on a dissertation about the life and work of Boston lithographer Louis Prang (1824-1909), often referred to as the "father of the American Christmas card." Sittig completed her Master's theses L. Prang and Company, Fine Art Publishers in 1970, but died before completing her doctoral dissertation.

In 1864, Prang visited Europe to study the latest techniques in German lithography. He returned to Boston to create high quality reproductions of major works of art using a lithographic process he called "chromos." In 1874, he began producing greeting cards for the popular market in England and began selling the Christmas card in the United States the next year. Also in 1874, Prang began publishing books for drawing and elementary art study for public schools. This latter activity proved so successful that he formed the Prang Educational Company in 1882.
Related Material:
The Archives also holds the Louis Prang papers, 1848-1932.
Provenance:
The papers were donated by Mary Margaret Sittig's brother James C. Sittig in 2001, in memory of Charlotte, Edgar, and Mary Sittig.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Mary Margaret Sittig research material on Louis Prang is owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Lithographers  Search this
Greeting cards industry  Search this
Chromolithography  Search this
Art historians -- Pennsylvania  Search this
Lithography  Search this
Genre/Form:
Watercolors
Prints
Etchings
Paintings
Drawings
Photographs
Citation:
Mary Margaret Sittig research material on Louis Prang, 1860-1978. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.sittmary
See more items in:
Mary Margaret Sittig research material on Louis Prang
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-sittmary
Online Media:

Will Shuster papers

Creator:
Shuster, Will  Search this
Names:
Public Works of Art Project  Search this
Henri, Robert, 1865-1929  Search this
Karig, Walter, 1898-  Search this
La Farge, Oliver, 1901-1963  Search this
Nash, Willard Ayer, 1898-1943  Search this
Scott, Winfield Townley, 1910-1968  Search this
Sheridan, John E., 1880-1948  Search this
Sloan, John, 1871-1951  Search this
Wheelock, Warren, 1880-1960  Search this
Extent:
12 Reels (ca. 3000 items (on 12 microfilm reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Reels
Place:
United States -- Social conditions -- 1933-1945 -- New Mexico
Date:
[undated] and 1914-1970
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence with John Sloan and others, writings, poems, original art works, scrapbooks, photographs, and Shuster's own descriptions of his work.
Reel NDA 3: Instructions, releases, speeches, manuscripts notes, photographs of Shuster's PWAP murals in New Mexico; and a typescript of a comedy written by Shuster.
Reels 169-177: 400 letters, 1917-1968, including correspondence with Robert Henri, Edgar Varese, John S. Velie, Walter Karig, and family members. Other materials consist of diaries, 1918, 1928, 1933-1934, 1937-1962, and 1964-1969; photographs of Shuster, family, and friends, and his work; original drawings, watercolors, oils and etchings; sketchbooks; poems, lectures, and stories by Shuster; a record of his works; scrapbooks, 1920-1928, 1923-1935, and 1935-1963; and material relating to John Sloan, who was Shuster's close friend and his teacher in 1920.
Reel 277: Materials relating to John Sloan, including letters from him 1922-1951; notes by Winifield Townley Scott recording conversations with Helen Shuster and Mrs. Sloan after Sloan's death and commenting on Sloan's work, tributes by Oliver LaFarge and others, and clippings. Additional correspondents are John Sheridan, Robert Henri, Warren Wheelock, Willard Nash, and the Veterans Administration, concerning Shuster's medical disability. Also included are poems by Shuster, 1925-1939, and other Santa Fe residents, including Scott; and correspondence and printed material relating to Shuster's participation in various Santa Fe festivals.
Reel 4283: Five letters from Sloan to Shuster. Three letters are illustrated and contain detailed instructions and advice on etching technique. A fourth letter, dated Jan 2, 1922, includes a recipe for gesso preparation and an offer from Sloan to pay Shuster's entry fee to "show in the Independents." Sloan in his two page letter, dated January 3, 1947, comments on the pace of his work; his participation in a "Mr. & Mrs. Exhibition" at the Laurel Gallery; a production of Eugene O'Neill's "The Ice Man Cometh"; and the Whitney Annual.
Arrangement:
Letters arranged chronologically.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, printmaker, and writer active in Santa Fe, N.M.; b. 1893; d. 1969
Provenance:
The material borrowed from Will Shuster in October 1964 (reel NDA 3) was part of a project of AAA to document New Deal art projects throughout the U.S. The bulk of the Will Shuster papers (reels 169-177, 277) were lent by his widow, Selma Dingee Shuster. Five letters from John Sloan (Reel 4283) were lent in 1989 by her estate.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Painters  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
Topic:
Art, American -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe  Search this
Art festivals  Search this
New Deal, 1933-1939 -- New Mexico  Search this
Art and state -- New Mexico  Search this
Federal aid to the arts -- New Mexico  Search this
Mural painting and decoration -- 20th century -- New Mexico  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.shuswill
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-shuswill

Oral history interview with Margaret Elder Philbrick

Interviewee:
Philbrick, Margaret  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Extent:
30 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1971 Nov. 2
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Margaret Elder Philbrick conducted 1971 Nov. 2, by Robert Brown, for the Archives of American Art. Philbrick speaks of her childhood, the development of her interest in art, her education at the Massachusetts College of Art, her first involvement with etching, serigraphy and colograph printmaking, her theories and use of color and light, her philosophy of work, her inspirations, and issues concerning women artists.
Biographical / Historical:
Margaret Elder Philbrick (1914-1999) was a printmaker from Westwood, Mass.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 1 digital wav file. Duration is 58 min.
An unrelated interview of Arthur Polonsky (4/12/72) conducted by R. Brown is also on this tape.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript: Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Topic:
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Women artists -- Interviews  Search this
Printmakers -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.philbrm71
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-philbrm71

Charles H. Woodbury and Elizabeth Ward Perkins papers

Creator:
Perkins, Elizabeth Ward, 1873-1954  Search this
Woodbury, Charles H. (Charles Herbert), 1864-1940  Search this
Extent:
2.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Date:
1878-1959
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Charles H. Woodbury and Elizabeth Ward Perkins measure 2.4 linear feet and date from 1878-1959. Included are correspondence, writings, exhibition files, inventories, art work, photographs and printed material.
Correspondence includes circa 340 letters from Woodbury to Perkins written from Maine, Massachusetts, and various locales; circa 40 letters from Woodbury to his mother, mostly written from Holland with notes about the letters. Other letters are to Woodbury from Edward Filene, John B. Paine, and Thomas Allen, regarding the painting Mid-Ocean; a letter from Sam Houghton regarding his purchase of a watercolor; letters to Woodbury from William Merrit Post, Charles C. Curran (of the National Academy of Design), Benjamin Kimball, Malvina Hoffman, George W. Eggers (of the Art Institute of Chicago), and Leila Mechlin (of Southern Art Projects); letters to Woodbury from Arthur Wesley Dow, John C. Pierson, Hughes Mearns, Philip R.V. Carol, Ruth E. Hutchins, Charles W. Eliot, and Vernon M. Cady regarding Woodbury's manuscripts, "The Art of Seeing and Observation: Visual Training Through Drawing"; letters to Woodbury and Elizabeth Perkins from Charles J. Connick, various institutions, and the Assistant Secretary of State regarding Woodbury's art; legal correspondence to Perkins regarding Woodbury's estate taxes and disposition of paintings; and letters to Anna Perkins, daughter of Elizabeth Perkins, from Castano Galleries.
Writings consist of notes and essays by Woodbury on the technique and philosophy of drawing, painting and etching, and a paper by Woodbury and Perkins "The Modern School and Its Sources". Exhibition files include exhibition price lists, venue lists and typescripts of reviews for Woodbury's traveling exhibition with the Federation of Arts. Inventories consist of price lists and a card file (circa 900 cards) of watercolors and oil paintings by Woodbury, 1886-1942, containing title of the work, the date painted, the size, and the disposition of the work. Artwork includes 63 drawings (one dedicated to Perkins), two etchings, and two paintings by Woodbury. Photographs are of works of art by Woodbury.
Printed material includes a scrapbook of clippings relating to Woodbury and Perkins and the Woodbury Training School in Applied Observation and their other art education endeavors; a book, "Descendants of Alexander Robinson and Angelica Peale," owned by Perkins; exhibition price lists; venue lists and typescripts of reviews for Woodbury's traveling exhibition with the Federation of Arts.Photographs are of Woodbury's artwork.
Biographical / Historical:
Elizabeth Ward Perkins (1873-1959) was an artist and art patron who studied, worked and collaborated with Charles H. Woodbury.
Provenance:
Most of the papers were in Perkins' possession at the time of Woodbury's death. The card file on reel 2788 was donated in 1957 from the American Art Research Council, Whitney Museum of American Art, which had received it from Perkins' heirs. Material on reel 268 was owned jointly by Perkins' heirs, and donated in 1957 with the assistance of Giovanni Castano (Castano Galleries, Boston, Mass.), along with Charles C. Perkins' (Elizabeth Perkins' father-in-law) diary and art works, and Samuel Gray Ward's (her grandfather) art works and photographs, each described and housed separately. The scrapbook (unmicrofilmed) probably came at the same time. The remainder of the unmicrofilmed material was donated in 1989 by Perkins' daughters, Anna W. Perkins and Mary Perkins Ryan, in 2009 by John H. Mansfield, Perkins' grandson, and in 2018 by Maria Luisa F. Mansfield, Mansfield's wife.
Also found in the Archives are the Charles H. Woodbury papers.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Art teachers  Search this
Painters -- Massachusetts  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Technique  Search this
Function:
Art Schools -- Maine -- Ogunquit
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Identifier:
AAA.perkeliz
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-perkeliz

Peter Milton papers

Creator:
Milton, Peter, 1930-  Search this
Names:
Associated American Artists  Search this
Franz Bader Gallery  Search this
Maryland Institute, College of Art -- Faculty  Search this
Print Club (Philadelphia, Pa.)  Search this
Albers, Josef  Search this
Finkelstein, Irving L.  Search this
Hooven, Peter, 1934-  Search this
McNulty, Kneeland  Search this
Peterdi, Gabor  Search this
Extent:
1.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1962-1983
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence files, project files, teaching files, writings, biographical material, inventories, receipts and price lists of prints, and printed material document Milton's printmaking career.
Primarily correspondence (1 foot), arranged chronologically, 1963-1977, and alphabetically by gallery or organization, relating mainly to exhibitions and sales of Milton's work, with galleries, museums, art organizations, colleagues, and collectors. Contained in some files are clippings, draft replies, inventories, consignment agreements, receipts, and a few photographs. Alphabetical file titles include Alma Pelis Gallery, Associated American Artists, C. Troup Gallery, Comsky Gallery, FAR Gallery, Fein/Art, Franz Bader Gallery, Graphics Gallery, Imprint Gallery, Kneeland McNulty, Museo La Tertulia, Optik Gallery, Orr's Gallery, Gabor Peterdi, Pickard Art Galleries, Pratt Center for Contemporary Printmaking, Priscilla Hartley Gallery, Print Club, Talisman Prints, and Joan Weinberg.
Included in the chronological files are letters, some lengthy, from Peter and Coille Hooven. The McNulty file contains research material for a catalog on Milton's etchings, and includes information on Josef Albers and Gabor Peterdi.
Project files, 1969-1974, regard Irving Finkelstein's article about Milton published in "Artists Proof" in 1971, and Milton's commission for the "Jolly Corner Suite" prints to illustrate "Bartelby" by Melville for Aquarius Press. Teaching files, ca. 1962-1965, include syllabi and notes for classes taught by Milton at the Maryland Institute College of Art. Printed material, ca. 1964-1970, includes exhibition announcements and reproductions of Milton's work.
Biographical / Historical:
Printmaker, educator; New Hampshire. Studied with Josef Albers and Gabor Peterdi at Yale University, where he received a BFA (1954) and an MFA (1962). Taught at the University of Bridgeport (1959-1960), Yale University (1960-1961) and the Maryland Institute College of Art (1961-1968).
Provenance:
Donated 1988 by Peter W. Milton.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Etchers -- New Hampshire  Search this
Printmakers -- New Hampshire  Search this
Topic:
Prints -- Technique -- United States  Search this
Prints, American  Search this
Prints -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- United States
Identifier:
AAA.miltpete
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-miltpete

Reginald Marsh papers

Creator:
Marsh, Reginald, 1898-1954  Search this
Names:
Benton, William, 1900-1973  Search this
Kuniyoshi, Yasuo, 1889-1953  Search this
Marsh, Felicia Meyer, 1912-1978  Search this
Marsh, Fred Dana, 1872-1961  Search this
Powys, Llewelyn, 1884-1939  Search this
Schmidt, Katherine, 1898-1978  Search this
Woodhouse, Betty Burroughs, 1899-1988  Search this
Extent:
9.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Date:
1897-1955
Summary:
The papers of Reginald Marsh (1898-1954) measure approximately 9.3 linear feet and date from circa 1897 to 1955. The collection documents the life and work of the artist, who was best known for his paintings and illustrations depicting scenes of vaudeville, night clubs, burlesque, and New York City. Marsh was a lifelong free-lance illustrator for the New Yorker, Esquire and many other national magazines. Papers include correspondence, diaries, notebooks, sketches, scrapbooks, business and financial papers, and photographs, as well as some biographical and printed material.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of Reginald Marsh (1898-1954) measure approximately 9.3 linear feet and date from circa 1897 to 1955. The collection documents the life and work of the artist, who was best known for his paintings and illustrations depicting scenes of vaudeville, night clubs, burlesque, and New York City. Marsh was a lifelong free-lance illustrator for the New Yorker, Esquire and many other national magazines. Papers include correspondence, diaries, notebooks, sketches, scrapbooks, business and financial papers, and photographs, as well as some biographical and printed material.

Marsh's correspondence is typically with family, friends, artists, colleagues, dealers, government officials, publishers, greeting card companies, admirers and former students. Correspondence concerns both personal and professional matters, documenting his relationships with family and friends and his work on various projects ranging from book illustrations to the murals he executed as part of the Treasury Department Art Program. Diaries include those Marsh kept as an adolescent, those in which he recorded his technique and work on art, and those in which he recorded his daily engagements. Notebooks include ones on art, in which he recorded notes on particular works and on painting techniques, mediums and other processes; ones used as address books and to record notes on travel and art work; and ones on finances, in which he kept track of earnings from his stocks and art, as well as some student notebooks. Diaries and notebooks both document various practical aspects involved in the creation of Marsh's art work.

Sketches include ones on loose sheets and scraps of paper and in sketchbooks, documenting some of the sources and recurrent themes of Marsh's art work, as well as shedding light on Marsh's process of creation. Scrapbooks consist primarily of clippings (illustrations, reviews, reproductions of art work) compiled by Marsh, documenting the publication, exhibition, and reception of his art work. Business and financial papers consist of paperwork (contracts, agreements, statements, receipts, permissions) relating to business matters, practical concerns, and financial aspects involved in handling his various art projects and in exhibiting and selling his art work. Photographs include ones of Marsh's family and friends, the artist at work (sketching around Coney Island and on the streets of New York), and his art work (some of which was compiled into volumes by Marsh and some of which was compiled by Norman Sasowsky).

Also found are limited amounts of biographical material, including juvenilia, official documents, awards and certificates, writings, an appraisal of Marsh's estate, and catalogs of Marsh's art work, and printed material, including exhibition catalogs, clippings, and publications.
Arrangement:
The Reginald Marsh papers are arranged as 9 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1910s-1955 (boxes 1, 11; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1920-1954 (boxes 1-2, OV 12; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 3: Diaries, 1912-1954 (box 3; 1 linear foot)

Series 4: Notebooks, 1919-1954 (box 4; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 5: Sketches, 1901-1954, undated (boxes 4-5, OV 12-21; 1.4 linear feet)

Series 6: Scrapbooks, 1901-1954, undated (boxes 6, 9-11; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 7: Business and Financial Papers, 1923-1954 (box 6; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1897-1908, 1920-1952 (boxes 6-8, 10; 1.3 linear feet)

Series 9: Printed Material, 1931-1955 (boxes 8, 10; 0.2 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Reginald Marsh was born in Paris on March 14, 1898. His father, Fred Dana Marsh, was a well-known muralist, and his mother, Alice Randall Marsh, was also an artist who painted miniature watercolors. Marsh returned with his family to the United States in 1900 and grew up in Nutley, New Jersey.

After graduating from Yale University in 1920, Marsh moved to New York, where he worked as an illustrator for the New York Evening Post and Herald, Vanity Fair and Harper's Bazaar. Beginning in 1922, he worked as staff artist at the New York Daily News doing a cartoon review of vaudeville and burlesque. During the 1920s, he designed theater curtains for the Greenwich Village Follies and other theater productions, and became one of the original cartoonists at The New Yorker after it was founded in 1925, actively working for the magazine until 1931 and regularly contributing drawings from time to time after that.

In 1923, Marsh married Betty Burroughs, who was the daughter of the curator of painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and herself a sculptor. They divorced in 1933, and he married his second wife, Felicia Meyer, a landscape painter, in 1934.

In the early 1920s, Marsh began to study painting and attended classes taught by John Sloan and Kenneth Hayes Miller, among others, at the Art Students League in New York. He made several trips to Europe, once in 1925-1926 and again in 1928, to study the old masters in the museums. In 1929, he began to paint in egg tempera. He also worked in watercolor, painting several large compositions in 1939-1940. In the 1940s, he studied the "Maroger medium" with Jacques Maroger and began to use this emulsion technique in his paintings. In addition to painting, he also worked in lithography, etching, and engraving.

Marsh had his first one-man show of oils and watercolors at the Whitney Studio Club in 1924 and another show of lithographs there in 1928. He had one-man shows of his watercolors at the Valentine Dudensing Galleries in 1927, the Weyhe Gallery in 1928, and the Marie Sterner Galleries in 1929. In 1930, he had his first show of paintings at the Rehn Galleries, where he regularly exhibited for the next two decades.

In 1935 and 1937 respectively, Marsh was commissioned by the Treasury Department Art Program to paint two murals in the Post Office Department Building in Washington, D.C. and a series of murals in the rotunda of the Customs House in New York. Beginning in 1935, Marsh taught drawing and painting at the Art Students League. In the summer of 1946, he was guest instructor at Mills College, Oakland, California, for six weeks. In 1949, he was appointed head of the Department of Paintings at Moore Institute of Art, Science, and Industry, Philadelphia and taught advanced painting there in 1953-1954.

Beginning in the mid-1930s, some of Marsh's art work began to be reproduced on greeting cards issued by the American Artists Group and Living American Art, Inc. He also did illustrations for editions of Theodore Dreiser's Sister Carrie (1938), John Dos Passos's USA (1945) and Adventures of a Young Man (1946), and Mark Twain's The Prince and the Pauper (1946), among others. He continued to do freelance illustrations for magazines, including Esquire, Fortune, and Life. Notably, he served as an artist correspondent for Life during the Second World War, and traveled to Brazil in 1943 to draw the army installations there.

Marsh was the recipient of various awards throughout his career, including the M. V. Kohnstamm Prize from the Art Institute of Chicago in 1931, the First W. A. Clark Prize and Corcoran Gold Medal from the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., in 1945, and the Gold Medal for Graphic Arts of the National Institute of Arts and Letters in 1954.

Marsh died of a heart attack in Dorset, Vermont on July 3, 1954.

This biographical note draws heavily from information originally printed in the catalogue of the Reginald Marsh Retrospective Exhibition organized by the Whitney Museum in 1955.
Related Material:
The Archives holds several collections of different provenance that relate to Reginald Marsh, including Felicia Meyer Marsh and Meyer Family Papers (available on reels 2082, 2087-2090, and 4474-4475), Fred Dana Marsh illustrated letters (available on reel 3134), Norman Sasowsky Research Material on Reginald Marsh (partially available on reels 1195 and 1463-1464), and Reginald Marsh Printed Material, consisting of two yearbooks from Lawrenceville School donated by Alvin Macauley who was a classmate of Marsh (not available on microfilm). In addition, a portion of the materials loaned and microfilmed in 1963 on reel NRM 19, including several small paintings, are housed in the Pierpont Morgan Library.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming. Some of the material loaned for microfilming in 1963, including the bulk of Marsh's sketchbooks and some anatomy sketches, was subsequently donated to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Public Library, and Whitney Museum of American Art. Other loaned material, including several small paintings, was from the Pierpont Morgan Library. Most of the files of clippings that were donated to AAA with Marsh's papers were transferred to the Smithsonian American Art Museum and National Portrait Gallery Library in 1979. Even though this material is not technically part of the collection housed in AAA, copies are available on microfilm reels NRM3-NRM17 (sketchbooks and sketches), NRM 19 (material from the Pierpont Morgan Library), NRM 20 (small paintings), and 2233-2234 (clippings). A portion of the material donated to AAA with the Reginald Marsh papers has been separated to create a new collection of Felicia Meyer Marsh and Marsh Family papers. Loaned and transferred material is not described in this finding aid.
Provenance:
A large portion of the Reginald Marsh papers, including diaries, notebooks, sketchbooks, and photograph albums, was lent for microfilming in 1963 by Marsh's wife, Felicia Meyer Marsh. Some, but not all, of this material was subsequently donated to AAA in 1979, after the death of Mrs. Marsh, along with some additional material, including notebooks, scrapbooks, biographical and printed material. Another portion of the collection, comprised mainly of correspondence and a catalog of Marsh's art work, was donated in 1964. Three items of Marsh juvenilia were donated in 1984 by Alice Heffernan. Sketches that Mrs. Marsh bequeathed to the Whitney Museum were donated to AAA by the museum in 1987, along with 5 sketchbooks previously lent. Later gift portions were microfilmed.
Restrictions:
The bulk of the collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website. Use of material not digitized requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Reginald Marsh papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Etchers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Muralists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Illustrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Philosophy  Search this
Painting, American  Search this
Painting -- Technique  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Citation:
Reginald Marsh papers, 1897-1955. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.marsregi
See more items in:
Reginald Marsh papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-marsregi
Online Media:

Little Egypt Enterprises records

Creator:
Little Egypt Enterprises (Lithographic printers: Houston, Tx.)  Search this
Names:
Folkman, David, 1938-  Search this
Extent:
300 Items ((on 2 microfilm reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1965-1979
Scope and Contents:
Working files of Little Egypt Enterprises: artists' files, including correspondence, business records, photographs, sketches and printed material pertaining to exhibitions at Little Egypt Enterprises; and a resume and other papers of owner David Folkman, the owner of Little Egypt Enterprises. Artists include Jack Boynton, Robert Camblin, Patty Beck, Frank Freed, Lamar Briggs, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Lithography, etching, and printing studio, founded in 1972 by David Folkman in Murphysboro, Illinois and subsequently moved to Houston, Tx. in 1974. The studio has additional space for exhibitions and shows. David Folkman is a master printer and lithographer.
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming 1979 by Little Egypt Enterprises.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Lithographers  Search this
Printers  Search this
Topic:
Lithography  Search this
Commercial art -- Printing  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Function:
Artists' studios -- Texas -- Houston
Identifier:
AAA.littegyp
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-littegyp

John Paul Jones papers

Creator:
Jones, John Paul, 1924-  Search this
Extent:
8.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1924-1999
Scope and Contents:
Personal and business correspondence (1951-1998); teaching records (1953-1956); printed and handwritten material on printmaking methods; inventory of Jones' prints (1963-1973); professional records (1960-1990s); clippings (1948-1998); personal items (e.g., cards and letters from his children, awards certificates, diplomas, photographs of his family, exhibition catalogs [1947-1990]); 8 notebooks containing 8" x 10" black and white glossy prints; 1 notebook of black and white negatives; slides and transparencies, and original etchings.
Biographical / Historical:
Printmaker, painter, sculptor, educator; Los Angeles, Calif.; Ashland, Ore. Died 1999. Jones was a greatly admired figurative painter/printmaker and teacher at UCLA (1953-1963) and UC Irvine, from where he retired in 1990 and settled permanently in Ashland, Ore. Born in Iowa, Jones studied art with Mauricio Lasansky at University of Iowa, Iowa City (B.F.A., 1949). His thesis (M.F.A., 1951) on printmaking was done under the direction of Lasansky. After teaching at the University of Oklahoma and Iowa State University he joined the faculty at UCLA where he established the printmaking department. Although best known for his graphics, Jones also worked as a sculptor in bronze in the 1960s and in wood starting in 1978. Between 1951 and 1997 he had numerous solo exhibitions and participated in over one hundred group shows.
Provenance:
Donated 2000 by Suzanne Nestory.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Printmakers -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Painters -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Sculptors -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Topic:
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.jonejohp
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-jonejohp

William Langson Lathrop papers

Creator:
Lathrop, William Langson, 1859-1938  Search this
Names:
Bauhan, William Lathrop  Search this
Clements, George H., 1854-1935  Search this
Extent:
1 Volume ((on partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Volumes
Date:
1864-1938
Scope and Contents:
One large scrapbook compiled by Lathrop's grandson William Lathrop Bauhan containing: correspondence; photographs of Lathrop, his home, a painting by him and a painting by Annie B. Lathrop; a tempera cartoon by George Clements, ca.1897; exhibition catalogs and announcements; and clippings.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, etcher; born New Hope, Pa.
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming by William Lathrop Bauhan.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Etchers  Search this
Painters  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
Topic:
Painting  Search this
Etching  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.lathwill
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lathwill

Blanche Lazzell papers

Creator:
Lazzell, Blanche, 1878-1956  Search this
Names:
Chaffee, Oliver Newberry, 1881-1944  Search this
Dasburg, Andrew, 1887-1979  Search this
Gleizes, Albert, 1881-1953  Search this
Henri, Robert, 1865-1929  Search this
O'Connor, John  Search this
Pearson, Ralph M., 1883-1958  Search this
Extent:
4.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketches
Photographs
Visitors' books
Drawings
Diaries
Date:
1893-1986
bulk 1901-1940
Summary:
The papers of printmaker, etcher, and painter Blanche Lazzell (1878-1956) measure 4.6 linear feet and date from 1893 to 1986, with the bulk of the material dating from 1901 to 1940. Found within the papers are biographical materials; correspondence with family, friends, and colleagues; writings; five diaries; scattered personal business records; printed material; artwork; photographs; and artifacts.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of printmaker, etcher, and painter Blanche Lazzell (1878-1956) measure 4.6 linear feet and date from 1893 to 1986, with the bulk of the material dating from 1901 to 1940. Found within the papers are biographical materials; correspondence with family, friends, and colleagues; writings; five diaries; scattered personal business records; printed material; artwork; photographs; and artifacts.

Biographical material includes school report cards, address books, obituaries, membership certificates, and travel documents from Blanche Lazzell's travels abroad in Europe.

Correspondence is with family, friends, and colleagues. Family correspondence is predominately with Lazzell's sisters, and a lesser amount with her brother Rufus and other relatives. Well over one-half of the correspondence is with friends and colleagues, including Arthur Lee Post and John O' Connor, and one or more letters from Oliver Chaffee, Andrew Dasburg, Robert Henri, and Ralph M. Pearson, among others.

Writings include notebooks, essays, and notes. Notebooks are primarily class notes, including one from Lazzells's studies in France during her second trip to Europe, and another maintained as a record of artwork. Also found are essays,including one about Provincetown; notes; biographical sketches; and lists of exhibitions and artwork. Five diaries document the late 1890s and Lazzell's trips to Europe in 1912-1913 and 1923-1924.

Scattered personal business records consist of 3 expense account ledgers and one sales ledger. Printed Material includes guest books, news clippings, exhibition catalogs, exhibition announcements, magazines, brochures, and newsletters. Artwork includes pencil drawings and sketches, mostly from studies with the artist Albert Gleizes in Paris. Photographic material consists of photographs, slides, and one lantern slide. The photographs are of Blanche Lazzell with artists and friends, her studio and the harbor in Provincetown, artwork, and travels in Italy.

Artifacts include 2 metal signs and 1 paint palette in a metal case.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 9 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1894-1970 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1897-1965 (1.2 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 3: Writings, 1893-1969 (1.2 linear feet; Box 2-3)

Series 4: Diaries, 1896-1924 (0.1 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 5: Personal Business Records, 1894-1916 (0.1 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1899-1986 (1 linear feet; Box 3-4)

Series 7: Artwork, 1924-circa 1940 (0.1 linear feet; Box 4)

Series 8: Photographic Material, 1897-1956 (0.5 linear feet; Box 5-6)

Series 9: Artifacts, circa 1910-1956 (0.1 linear feet; Box 6)
Biographical / Historical:
Blanche Lazzell (1878-1956) was a printmaker, etcher, painter, and rug designer who worked primarily in Provincetown, Massachusetts and Morgantwon, West Virginia.

Nettie Blanche Lazzell was born in Maidsville, West Virginia, in 1878, the daughter of Mary Prudence Pope and Cornelius Carhart Lazzell. At some point during her childhood, Lazzell became partially deaf. When Lazzell was fifteen, she enrolled in the West Virginia Conference Seminary, now West Virginia Wesleyan College and graduated in 1898.

In 1899, Lazzell continued her studies at the South Carolina Co-educational Institute and graduated that same year. She later matriculated into the West Virginia University (1901-1905) where she took drawing and art history classes with William J. Leonard and earned a degree in fine arts. After graduation, Lazzell periodically studied at the university until 1909. Lazzell moved to New York City in 1907 and enrolled in the Art Students League of New York in 1908 where she studied under William Merritt Chase.

Lazzell travelled to Europe during the summer of 1912. After visiting several cities, Lazzell went to Paris and stayed beyond the tour to attend classes at the Académie Julian and the Académie Moderne where she studied with painter Charles Guérin. Lazzell returned to the United States in the fall of 1913 and stayed in West Virginia with her sister Bessie. She held a solo exhibition of her sketches and paintings in 1914. Lazzell moved to the thriving art colony at Provincetown, Massachusetts in 1915. There, she studied with Charles Webster Hawthorne, who founded the Cape Cod School of Art, and Oliver Chaffee, who taught her the technique for white-line woodcuts. Lazzell quickly adopted and excelled at making white-line woodblock prints, joined the Provincetown Printers, an art collective, and regularly exhibited with them.

n 1918, Lazzell converted an "old fish house" overlooking the Provincetown harbor into her studio and summer home. She planted a lush garden that became a tourist attraction where she often hosted teas and taught classes on painting and woodblock printing. The studio became her primary summer residence, though she often returned to Morgantown, West Virginia. Lazzell also visited other artist colonies during this time, including one in Woodstock, New York where she studied with Andrew Dasburg.

In 1919 Lazzell was featured in an exhibition at Touchstone Gallery in New York City. Later that year, the Provincetown Printers were featured at the Detroit Institute of Arts exhibition "Wood Block Prints in Color by American Artists". That show included Lazzell's depiction of the Monongahela River in Morgantown.

From 1923 to 1924, Lazzell travelled again to Europe and studied with Fernand Legér, André Lhote, and Albert Gleizes in Paris. Lazzell studied Cubism and took a class with Gleizes and her work became more abstract. When she returned to Provincetown, she had her studio rebuilt so it was more comfortable during the winter. She continued to teach art at her studio and participate in exhibitions.

In addition to her woodblock prints, Lazzell also worked with batik, rug design, and hand-painted china. She was a member of numerous arts organizations such as the Société Anonyme, New York Society of Women Artists, Provincetown Art Association, the Sail Loft Club (a Provincetown women's art club), and the Society of Independent Artists. In 1934, Lazzell received a Federal Art Project grant through the Works Progress Administration and created a mural titled Justice for the Morgantown courthouse.

Lazzell died in Morgantown, West Virginia in 1956.
Separated Materials:
The papers were originally loaned for microfilming on reels 2988-2991 and most of them, but not all, were included in a later donation. The papers not included in the later donation are only available on microfilm.
Portions of the microfilmed material were retained by the donor.
Provenance:
The Blanche Lazzell papers were anonymously donated to the Archives of American Art in 1987, including most of the materials that had been earlier loaned for microfilming in 1983.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Blanche Lazzell papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Painters  Search this
Topic:
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Etchers  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Painting -- Massachusetts -- Provincetown  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
Etching -- Massachusetts -- Provincetown  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketches
Photographs
Visitors' books
Drawings
Diaries
Citation:
Blanche Lazzell papers, 1893-1986, bulk 1901-1940. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.lazzblan
See more items in:
Blanche Lazzell papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lazzblan
Online Media:

Richard Lahey papers

Creator:
Lahey, Richard, b. 1893  Search this
Extent:
120 Items ((microfilmed on 2 reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1919-1970
Scope and Contents:
A letter; postcard; illustrated notes; photographs; exhibition announcements; drawings; watercolors; lithographs; catalogs; and clippings.
REEL 284: Original works, including drawings, watercolors, lithographs and charcoal and wash drawing; photographs of Lahey and his work; catalogs; and clippings.
REEL 378: One letter and one postcard from Robert Henri, 1927, commending a Lahey etching and describing his own studio; illustrated notes from Lahey and his wife, artist Carlotta Gonzales, to her mother; Lahey's recollections of Kenneth Hayes Miller and Edward Hopper; photographs of Lahey with Robert Laurent, cartoonists Cliff Sterret and Rudolf Dirks, with Art Students League members, and of Miller in class and at work; exhibition announcements; a design for ship camouflage, with a clipping on World War I camouflage; and six drawings.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, printmaker, lecturer; Washington, D.C.; b. 1893; d. 1979
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming 1972 by Richard Lahey.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Painters -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Printmakers -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Topic:
Painting, American  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.laherich
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-laherich

Winslow Homer collection

Creator:
Homer, Winslow, 1836-1910  Search this
Names:
Clarke, Thomas B. (Thomas Benedict), 1848-1931  Search this
Prang, Louis, 1824-1909  Search this
Salinger, Emil  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1863, 1877-1945
Summary:
The Winslow Homer collection measures 0.2 linear feet with material from 1863 and 1877 to 1945. The collection documents Homer's career as a painter and lithographer through letters, printed material, family records, and photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
The Winslow Homer collection measures 0.2 linear feet with material that dates from 1863 and 1877 to 1945. The collection documents Homer's career as a painter and lithographer through letters, printed material, family records, and photographs.

Letters in the collection primarily document Homer's later career between 1890 and 1909. Included are an illustrated letter to the art collector George G. Briggs concerning frames, and twenty-six letters to art collector and friend, Thomas B. Clarke, discussing Homer's artwork, exhibitions, sale of his work, and his family. Many of the Clarke letters are transcribed. Also found are twelve letters to Louis Prang, a friend and successful chromolithographer, concerning Homer's drawing techniques and making drawings for Prang's use. Miscellaneous letters include a letter to cellist Emil Salinger, art editor Florence Fuller, and others, discussing his artwork. Marie "Midie" W. Blanchard was Homer's cousin and the folder of her letters includes a letter from Homer to her, and two letters from her to others about Homer.

This collection also contains photograph copies of four pages from the "Family Record" in the Homer family Bible, which records births, deaths, marriages, and locations of family members. The "Century Loan Exhibition" catalog is annotated throughout with notes regarding the exhibition and contains an introduction by Booth Tarkington. Also found is a newspaper clipping about Homer's artwork. Photographs include twenty albumen and cyanotype photographs, on two pages from a photo album, of Winslow Homer and family in various activities.
Arrangement:
Due to the small size of this collection, items are categorized into one series consisting of twelve folders. Items are arranged chronologically within each folder.
Biographical Note:
Winslow Homer was born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1836. He was raised in Cambridge, where he developed a love of art and the outdoors. At the age of 19 he began his career as an illustrator, apprenticing at the J.H. Bufford lithographic firm in Boston. He then decided to become a freelance illustrator. In 1859 Homer moved to New York to work for Harper's Weekly, serving as artist-correspondent for the magazine during the Civil War. After taking some art classes at the National Academy of Design, he decided to focus on oil painting. He quickly gained international recognition as a painter, and in 1866 made his first trip to Europe. In 1873 he decided to work in watercolor and found great success in his experimentation with light and color in this medium. In the mid-1880s Homer moved permanently to Prout's Neck, Maine, an isolated area where he built a studio and focused his paintings on man's struggle with nature. Also during the 1880s he worked on a series of etchings based on his paintings. Homer continued to paint for the next twenty years, vacationing summers in places such as the Adirondacks and the Bahamas to capture varied landscapes, until his death in 1910.
Related Material:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are the Winslow Homer letters to M. Knoedler & Company, 1900-1904.
Provenance:
Items in this collection are gifts of various donors. The exhibition catalog was donated by Lawrence Fleischman in 1954, the photographs donated by Dorothy Adlow in 1961, and the Marie Blanchard letters and news clipping donated by Carlotta Claflin in 1976. Other letters were donated by Charles Feinberg in 1959, Joyce Tyler in 1979, Lawrence Fleischman in 1959, Jean Meissner and William T. Campbell in 1966, Katherine H. Coudon in 1989, and Edgar Salinger in 1961. The bible pages were a 1977 anonymous donation. Items were microfilmed shortly after receipt.
Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Rights:
The Winslow Homer collection is owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Painting, American  Search this
Painters -- Maine  Search this
Citation:
Winslow Homer collection, 1863, 1877-1945. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.homewinl
See more items in:
Winslow Homer collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-homewinl
Online Media:

Ellen Hale and Hale Family papers

Creator:
Hale, Ellen Day, 1855-1940  Search this
Names:
Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909  Search this
Hale, Emily P.  Search this
Hale, Herbert Dudley, 1866-1909  Search this
Hale, Lilian Westcott, 1880-1963  Search this
Hale, Robert Beverly, 1901-1985  Search this
Hale, Susan, 1833-1910  Search this
Extent:
3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Diaries
Sketches
Date:
circa 1860-1952
Summary:
The Ellen Hale and Hale family papers measure 3 linear feet and date from circa 1860 to 1952. Found within the papers are biographical material for Ellen Day and Edward Everett Hale; personal correspondence from Ellen Day and Lillian Westcott Hale; diaries by Ellen Day and Susan Hale; an appraisal of the Hale estate and personal business records for Ellen Day and Edward Everett Hale; printed material; sketchbooks and sketches by Ellen Day and Herbert Dudley Hale; and travel photographs of the Hale family.
Scope and Contents:
The Ellen Hale and Hale family papers measure 3 linear feet and date from circa 1860 to 1952. Found within the papers are biographical material for Ellen Day and Edward Everett Hale; personal correspondence from Ellen Day and Lillian Westcott Hale; diaries by Ellen Day and Susan Hale; an appraisal of the Hale estate and personal business records for Ellen Day and Edward Everett Hale; printed material; sketchbooks and sketches by Ellen Day and Herbert Dudley Hale; and travel photographs of the Hale family.

Biographical materials consist of publications related to Edward Everett Hale's 80th birthday celebration; Ellen Day Hale's calling cards, calendar, and engagement books; and Robert Beverly Hale's calendar.

Correspondence is primarily Ellen Day Hale's and Lillian Westcott Hale's personal and business correspondence, and a letter from Margaret C. Hale to Arthur Hale.

Writings include 9 diaries by Ellen Day Hale, 1 diary by Emily P. Hale, and 19 diaries by Susan Hale; an essay by Arthur Hale; Herbert Dudley Hale's word game book; Susan Hale's travel instructions to a niece; and a notebook listing the likes and dislikes of various Hale family members.

Personal business records consist of Edward Everett and Emily P. Hale's account and tax records; Ellen Day Hale's art supply receipts, royalty statements, tax records, and a check register; Lillian Westcott Hale's receipts; and Susan Hale's notes on an appraisal of the Hale estate.

Printed material includes various clippings, invitations, and programs kept by the Hale family, and Ellen Day Hale's travel postcards.

Artwork includes 22 sketchbooks by Ellen Day Hale, 5 sketchbooks by Herbert Dudley Hale; and 7 sketchbooks by other artists.

Photographs are travel snapshots taken during travels in Mexico.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 7 series.

Series 1: Biographical materials, circa 1875-1925 (6 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1861-1951 (4 folders; Box 1)

Series 3: Writings, 1878-1933 (0.9 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 4: Personal business records, 1909-1952 (8 folders; Box 2)

Series 5: Printed material, 1862-1933 (5 folders; Box 2)

Series 6: Artwork, circa 1860-1925 (1.5 linear feet; Box 2-3)

Series 7: Photographs, circa 1890-1901 (1 folder; Box 3)
Biographical / Historical:
Writer, publisher, and clergyman Edward Everett Hale (1822-1909) and his wife, Emily Perkins Hale, were well regarded members of Boston society. After graduating from Boston Latin School at age 13, Hale enrolled directly into Harvard University and graduated second in his class in 1839. He became a licensed Unitarian minister in 1842 and was a church pastor from 1846 to 1899. In the 1860s, Hale began publishing short stories in the Atlantic Monthly, Harper's New Monthly Magazine, and other periodicals. In 1869, he co-founded the Christian Examiner, which later merged with Scribner's Magazine in 1875, and founded Lend a Hand in 1886. He and his wife had one daughter and eight sons. Three of those sons died in childhood, and a fourth, Robert Beverly Hale, died as a young adult.

Writer and artist Susan Hale (1833-1910) was schooled at home by tutors before enrolling in George B. Emerson's school. She was a self-taught artist who learned to paint and draw early in life. In 1872, she traveled to Europe to pursue formal art instruction and, upon her return to Boston, began giving lessons in watercolors. From 1873 to 1885, she maintained a studio at the Boston Art Club, wrote articles for Boston papers, edited literary collections for fundraisers, lectured on popular fiction, and eventually became a literary celebrity. Beginning in the mid-1880s, Hale began traveling the country and abroad giving lectures in the winter and visiting Edward Everett's family in Matunuck, Rhode Island in the summer. In between her travels, she continued to publish books, including a traveling series for young readers, and an instruction book on painting techniques.

Artist and teacher Ellen Day Hale (1854-1939) was the eldest of the Hale children. She received her early art training from her aunt, Susan Hale, and received formal art training from Boston artists William Rimmer, William Morris Hunt, and Helen Knowlton. Hale continued her education at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and in 1877, opened a portrait studio where she taught private students. In the early 1880s, Hale traveled through Europe before settling in Paris to study at the Académie Julian for three years. In 1883, she met fellow artist and lifelong companion Gabrielle de Veaux Clements. In 1893, they purchased a home near Gloucester, Massachusetts named "The Thickets," where they opened their studio to women artists and taught various painting, printing, and etching techniques. After the death of her mother, from 1904 to 1909, Hale moved to Washington, D.C. to act as hostess for her father, who had been appointed Chaplain of the U.S. Senate. After her father's death, Hale continued to produce paintings, and together with Clements, summered at the artists' colony at Folly Cove on Cape Ann, Massachusetts, and frequently traveled abroad in the winters.

Arthur Hale (1859-1939) was a general agent for the American Railway Association and an employee of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. In 1899, he married Camilla Conner, with whom he had one daughter.

Architect Herbert Dudley Hale (1866-1908) graduated from Harvard in 1888 and studied architecture abroad at the École des Beaux Art in Paris, where he graduated among the first in his class. After his return to Boston around the turn of the century, Hale married Margaret Marquand, with whom he had five children, and established the architecture firm Hale and Rogers with James Gamble Rogers.

Writer Robert Beverly Hale (1869-1895) graduated from Harvard in 1892 and published numerous stories and articles in the Atlantic Monthly, Harper's Weekly, and Youth's Companion. Elsie and Other Poems was published in 1894, and Six Stories and Some Verses was published posthumously after Hale's death in 1895.

Artist Lillian Westcott Hale (1881-1963) was the wife of fellow artist Philip Leslie Hale, the third eldest of the Hale children. Hale received a scholarship to attend the Boston Museum School of Fine Arts, where she met Philip and married him halfway through her studies. Hale held her first solo show in 1908, the same year her daughter was born, and continued to produce work for exhibitions through the 1920s. She was the recipient of the 1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition gold medal, the National Academy's Shaw Memorial Prize (1915), and the National Academy of Design's Altman Prize (1927). She continued producing works until her death in 1963.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds two collections related to the Hale family, including the Philip Leslie Hale papers and the Edward Everett Hale letter to an unidentified person. Smith College's Sophia Smith Collection also holds papers of the Hale family, including Nathan, Sr., and Sarah Preston Everett Hale; Edward Everett and Emily Perkins Hale; Ellen Day Hale; and Philip and Lilian Westcott Hale. .
Separated Materials:
Printed books and monographs in the collection were transferred to the National Portrait Gallery Library in 1978.
Provenance:
The Ellen Hale and Hale family papers were donated in 1978 and 1984 by Nancy Hale Bowers, the niece of Ellen Day Hale, and the grand-daughter of Edward Everett and Emily P. Hale.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Ellen Hale and Hale family papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Painters  Search this
Topic:
Women painters -- Massachusetts  Search this
Artists -- Massachusetts  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Watercolorists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Diaries
Sketches
Citation:
Ellen Hale and Hale family papers, circa 1860-1952. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.halefami
See more items in:
Ellen Hale and Hale Family papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-halefami

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