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Writings: "What is This Thing Called Soaring", US Air Service

Collection Creator:
Junkin, Hattie Meyers, 1896-1985  Search this
Container:
Box 4, Folder 17
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
1931-11
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
See more items in:
Hattie Meyers Junkin Papers
Hattie Meyers Junkin Papers / Series 3: General materials of Hattie Meyers Junkin
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg27555f373-0faa-4727-be16-7a2237173799
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-xxxx-0171-ref130
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Henson Family Papers

Creator:
Henson family  Search this
Names:
Henson family  Search this
Henson, Tobias  Search this
Extent:
0.18 Linear feet (1 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Leaflets
Correspondence
Financial records
Newsletters
Account books
Receipts
Legal documents
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1818-1943
bulk 1830-1900
Summary:
The Henson Family papers, which date from 1818 to 1943 and measure 0.18 linear feet, document the activities of Tobias Henson and his descendants. The papers are comprised of booklets, correspondence, legal documents, and receipts.
Scope and Contents:
This collection documents the activities of Tobias Henson and his descendants between 1818 and 1943. It contains materials related to the Hensons' financial and legal activities. Included in the collection are booklets, correspondence, deeds and titles, legal documents, and receipts.

Arrangement The papers are organized into four series. The content of each series is arranged alphabetically. The series are arranged as follows:

Series I: Financial Records Series II: Legal Records Series III: Printed Materials Series IV: Miscellaneous
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged by series: 1) Financial Records, 2) Legal Records, 3) Printed Materials, 4) Miscellaneous.
Biographical/Historical note:
The history of the Hensons begins with the family's patriarch, Tobias Henson. Mr. Henson was a slave in the Washington, DC area during the 18th and 19th centuries and, given his family's history, it is apparent that he was a man with an ambitious mission: to attain the American dream. He had two tasks to accomplish if he were to see his dream realized. First he had to gain freedom for himself and his family. Second he had to purchase property upon which he could build a home, and from which he could earn a living.

He took the first step in 1813 when he purchased himself from his slave master, thus gaining his freedom. Next he purchased his wife, Elizabeth. In April of 1832 Mr. Henson purchased his daughter Matlinda Smith and her three children. In May of the following year he purchased his second daughter Mary Anderson.

With these purchases, Tobias Henson became a slaveholder, with his wife and children his slaves. Ever resourceful, Mr. Henson used this to his advantage; he rented out his daughters for income and used them as collateral for loans. With the income he generated, he purchased the freedom of his other family members. In fact, he used his daughters, Matlinda and Mary, as collateral for a loan he acquired to purchase Mary's freedom.

In addition to purchasing his freedom in 1813, Tobias Henson entered into an agreement to buy land in the Anacostia section of Washington, DC. The land, named the Ridge, consisted of twenty-four acres located in the Congress Heights section of Anacostia. He made payments on the Ridge until 1826, at which time he made the final payment and became the legal owner. Initially Mr. Henson farmed the land, but as his family grew he subdivided the acreage so that the members of his family could experience their own American dream.

Over the subsequent decades members of the Henson family continued to purchase land in the area surrounding the Ridge; at one point they were one of the largest landowners in the Anacostia section of Washington, DC. The family maintained residence on various parts of the land from the time of its purchase until the middle of the 20th century. Title records filed with the District of Columbia show that, in 1931, the portion of the Ridge that Tobias Henson gave to his grandson, Richard Smith, was still in possession of his descendants. But that was the exception. Most of the Henson family's real estate was either sold or "taken" by the government under the auspices of eminent domain. Just a decade after this title was filed, the federal government made plans to take what remained of the Ridge.

The family did all they could to save the legacy of Tobias Henson. They contacted local and federal government officials in an attempt to stave off what would amount to the destruction of an important piece of black history dating from antebellum Washington, DC. When they had exhausted all of the possibilities, they made a last ditch appeal to First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt. In a 1943 letter they pleaded,

At the present there are some thirteen or fourteen families living on this land, which is still designated as the Ridge, and with only one or two exceptions, these families are the direct descendants of Tobian [sic] Henson…we do not feel that taking our homes will aid in the War Effort or in the Ideals of Democracy.

Unfortunately, their plea went unanswered; the land was taken by the government and the houses thereon where razed.
Related Materials:
Anacostia Historical Society Records.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Slavery -- United States  Search this
African American military personnel  Search this
Free blacks  Search this
African Education Society  Search this
American Colonization Society  Search this
Public housing  Search this
Eminent domain  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American families  Search this
Genre/Form:
Leaflets
Correspondence
Financial records
Newsletters
Account books
Receipts
Legal documents
Citation:
Henson family papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Dr. Myrtle Henson.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-030
See more items in:
Henson Family Papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7097e977b-a52f-4705-be73-b4e5e4c62659
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-030
Online Media:

Bristow McIntosh [Gullah informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
Georgia
United States
Date:
circa 1931-1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and of her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
Bristow McIntosh appears in the 1870 census as a 14-year old working as a farm laborer and living in the household of Martha Woodruff. According to the interview he gave to Dr. Turner in 1933, beginning in 1866, he had attended school for a few months each year and had been able to learn how to read and write.

By 1880 Bristow McIntosh was married to Nancy King Mctinosh (also known as Annie and Nannie), and they had two children and owned 20 acres of land valued at fifty dollars. The previous year his farm had produced corn, peas, and beans. Bristow also owned milk cows and chickens. The value of his production in 1879 had been $100.

During his life, Bristow worked his land, which was valued at $200 in 1930. He also, at some point, ran a store and kept a mail route. By 1930 he was already in his seventies but still working as a family servant.

Bristow and Nancy would have eleven children, and only three survived childhood. Nancy passed away in 1922 after a long illness, and two of her surviving children followed her within a few years. Leonard passed away in 1926 and James in 1928.

Bristow McIntosh was one of Dr. Turner's principal informants when he came to Harris Neck in 1933. He passed away four years later, on November 25, 1937. Thus, Bristow McIntosh was not alive when the Federal government took the land at Harris Neck through eminent domain to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Bristow (also Brister or Bristol); Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.310
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa750b90d0f-507b-42c6-8d17-5f76dc14a942
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1390

John (Johnnie) Campbell [Gullah informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
Georgia
United States
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
John Campbell was born about 1877, the son of Isaac Campbell and Rose Bacon Campbell. On December 27, 1900, John married Georgia Stevens.

The couple had at least five children but by 1910 had lost one of them. The surviving children were Ophelia, James, Agnes, and Johnnie. John was working as a boatman for the oyster industry. Georgia worked as a cook for a private family. They owned their house. After appearing in the 1910 population census, both John and Georgia disappear from the record. However, we know that Dr. Lorenzo Dow Turner interviewed John Campbell at Harris Neck in the summer of 1933.

It is possible that both John and Georgia Campbell were living when the Federal government took the land at Harris Neck through eminent domain to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Summer of 1933 Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.319
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7751b039b-58b7-4afd-8ccb-ec0fd1f9bcf3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1397

James (Napoleon) Rogers and Adeline (Annie) Rogers [Gullah informants]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
Georgia
United States
United States of America -- Georgia -- Harris Neck
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
James (Napoleon) Rogers was born in Liberty County, Georgia, around 1859. He was never able to attend school, and thus when Dr. Lorenzo Dow Turner interviewed him in the Summer of 1933 in Harris Neck, Georgia, he informed him that he could neither read nor write. Dr. Turner considered him one of his principal informants in Harris Neck.

By 1880 Rogers had moved to Harris Neck and was working as a laborer living in the household of John J. Curry. On September 30, 1905, Rogers married Adeline (also spelled as Adline) Houston. Adeline was much younger than Rogers. She was 30, being born at Ways Station, Bryan County, on March 15, 1875. Rogers was at least 46 years old. They had two children Anna Lee (also spelled as Analee and Analie) and James.

James Rogers owned his farm, which was worth $500.00 in 1930. He informed Dr. Turner that he had always been a farmer, but around 1910 he was working as a carpenter. Adeline Rogers mainly took care of the family, but around 1910 she was working as a seamstress.

James Rogers passed away between 1933 when he was interviewed by Dr. Turner and 1940 when he disappeared from the record. Adeline Rogers appears in the 1940 census as a widow living with her niece Emma Tate, the cook at the local school. Adeline must have been already sick on April 12, 1940, when the census was taken. A little bit over a month later, on May 25, she passed away from heart failure due to renal and cardiovascular disease. She had gone back to live where she had been born in 1875, Ways Station (today Richmond Hill), Bryan County, Georgia. Her daughter, Anna Lee, was married and living in New York City with the married surname of Callaway and was the person who informed on her mother data for the death certificate.

Thus, neither James nor Adaline Rogers were alive when the Federal government took the land at Harris Neck through eminent domain to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Summer of 1933, Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
African American women  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.337
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7397b947e-7fac-4319-8bf6-192b8034cc85
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1399

Bristow McIntosh [Gullah Informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
United States
Georgia
Date:
circa 1931-1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and of her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
Bristow McIntosh appears in the 1870 census as a 14-year old working as a farm laborer and living in the household of Martha Woodruff. According to the interview he gave to Dr. Turner in 1933, beginning in 1866, he had attended school for a few months each year and had been able to learn how to read and write.

By 1880 Bristow McIntosh was married to Nancy King Mctinosh (also known as Annie and Nannie), and they had two children and owned 20 acres of land valued at fifty dollars. The previous year his farm had produced corn, peas, and beans. Bristow also owned milk cows and chickens. The value of his production in 1879 had been $100.

During his life, Bristow worked his land, which was valued at $200 in 1930. He also, at some point, ran a store and kept a mail route. By 1930 he was already in his seventies but still working as a family servant.

Bristow and Nancy would have eleven children, and only three survived childhood. Nancy passed away in 1922 after a long illness, and two of her surviving children followed her within a few years. Leonard passed away in 1926 and James in 1928.

Bristow McIntosh was one of Dr. Turner's principal informants when he came to Harris Neck in 1933. He passed away four years later, on November 25, 1937. Thus, Bristow McIntosh was not alive when the Federal government took the land at Harris Neck through eminent domain to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Bristow (also Brister or Bristol); Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.330
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7390c90a8-2e29-42af-95ba-b0fcafd80763
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1409

James (Napoleon) Rogers [Gullah informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
United States
Georgia
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
James (Napoleon) Rogers was born in Liberty County, Georgia, around 1859. He was never able to attend school, and thus when Dr. Lorenzo Dow Turner interviewed him in the Summer of 1933 in Harris Neck, Georgia, he informed him that he could neither read nor write. Dr. Turner considered him one of his principal informants in Harris Neck.

By 1880 Rogers had moved to Harris Neck and was working as a laborer living in the household of John J. Curry. On September 30, 1905, Rogers married Adeline (also spelled as Adline) Houston. Adeline was much younger than Rogers. She was 30, being born at Ways Station, Bryan County, on March 15, 1875. Rogers was at least 46 years old. They had two children Anna Lee (also spelled as Analee and Analie) and James.

James Rogers owned his farm, which was worth $500.00 in 1930. He informed Dr. Turner that he had always been a farmer, but around 1910 he was working as a carpenter. Adeline Rogers mainly took care of the family, but around 1910 she was working as a seamstress.

James Rogers passed away between 1933 when he was interviewed by Dr. Turner and 1940 when he disappeared from the record. Adeline Rogers appears in the 1940 census as a widow living with her niece Emma Tate, the cook at the local school. Adeline must have been already sick on April 12, 1940, when the census was taken. A little bit over a month later, on May 25, she passed away from heart failure due to renal and cardiovascular disease. She had gone back to live where she had been born in 1875, Ways Station (today Richmond Hill), Bryan County, Georgia. Her daughter, Anna Lee, was married and living in New York City with the married surname of Callaway and was the person who informed on her mother data for the death certificate.

Thus, neither James nor Adaline Rogers were alive when the Federal government took the land at Harris Neck through eminent domain to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Summer of 1933, Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.342
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa77c70db42-73d8-42c7-bc78-b081e8cdc382
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1420

James (Napoleon) Rogers [Gullah informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
United States
Georgia
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
James (Napoleon) Rogers was born in Liberty County, Georgia, around 1859. He was never able to attend school, and thus when Dr. Lorenzo Dow Turner interviewed him in the Summer of 1933 in Harris Neck, Georgia, he informed him that he could neither read nor write. Dr. Turner considered him one of his principal informants in Harris Neck.

By 1880 Rogers had moved to Harris Neck and was working as a laborer living in the household of John J. Curry. On September 30, 1905, Rogers married Adeline (also spelled as Adline) Houston. Adeline was much younger than Rogers. She was 30, being born at Ways Station, Bryan County, on March 15, 1875. Rogers was at least 46 years old. They had two children Anna Lee (also spelled as Analee and Analie) and James.

James Rogers owned his farm, which was worth $500.00 in 1930. He informed Dr. Turner that he had always been a farmer, but around 1910 he was working as a carpenter. Adeline Rogers mainly took care of the family, but around 1910 she was working as a seamstress.

James Rogers passed away between 1933 when he was interviewed by Dr. Turner and 1940 when he disappeared from the record. Adeline Rogers appears in the 1940 census as a widow living with her niece Emma Tate, the cook at the local school. Adeline must have been already sick on April 12, 1940, when the census was taken. A little bit over a month later, on May 25, she passed away from heart failure due to renal and cardiovascular disease. She had gone back to live where she had been born in 1875, Ways Station (today Richmond Hill), Bryan County, Georgia. Her daughter, Anna Lee, was married and living in New York City with the married surname of Callaway and was the person who informed on her mother data for the death certificate.

Thus, neither James nor Adaline Rogers were alive when the Federal government took the land at Harris Neck through eminent domain to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.346
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7986ba023-d0c2-4d6b-a0c3-287879fd48f9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1424

James (Napoleon) Rogers [Gullah informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
United States
Georgia
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
James (Napoleon) Rogers was born in Liberty County, Georgia, around 1859. He was never able to attend school, and thus when Dr. Lorenzo Dow Turner interviewed him in the Summer of 1933 in Harris Neck, Georgia, he informed him that he could neither read nor write. Dr. Turner considered him one of his principal informants in Harris Neck.

By 1880 Rogers had moved to Harris Neck and was working as a laborer living in the household of John J. Curry. On September 30, 1905, Rogers married Adeline (also spelled as Adline) Houston. Adeline was much younger than Rogers. She was 30, being born at Ways Station, Bryan County, on March 15, 1875. Rogers was at least 46 years old. They had two children Anna Lee (also spelled as Analee and Analie) and James.

James Rogers owned his farm, which was worth $500.00 in 1930. He informed Dr. Turner that he had always been a farmer, but around 1910 he was working as a carpenter. Adeline Rogers mainly took care of the family, but around 1910 she was working as a seamstress.

James Rogers passed away between 1933 when he was interviewed by Dr. Turner and 1940 when he disappeared from the record. Adeline Rogers appears in the 1940 census as a widow living with her niece Emma Tate, the cook at the local school. Adeline must have been already sick on April 12, 1940, when the census was taken. A little bit over a month later, on May 25, she passed away from heart failure due to renal and cardiovascular disease. She had gone back to live where she had been born in 1875, Ways Station (today Richmond Hill), Bryan County, Georgia. Her daughter, Anna Lee, was married and living in New York City with the married surname of Callaway and was the person who informed on her mother data for the death certificate.

Thus, neither James nor Adaline Rogers were alive when the Federal government took the land at Harris Neck through eminent domain to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Summer of 1933, Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.348
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7796cbf95-0ba4-4ea0-a184-7c0d18b5d819
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1426

Community Forum: The New Eminent Domain: Federal Use of Land East of the River

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (DAT)
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2008
Scope and Contents:
This program looks at federal land use decisions, their continuing influence on life in the east of the river neighborhoods, and future initiatives. Representatives include Andrew Stevens, Historian, Bolling AFB; Tim Dennée, DC Historic Preservation Office; Chris Carew, DC Dept. of the Environment; Dawud Abdur-Rahman, GSA-St. Elizabeth's Project; Sandra Seegers, ANC Commissioner; and John Imparato, Naval District Washington. Moderator: Gail Lowe.
Forum. Sound only. Part of the East of the River forum series. Related to 'East of the River: Continuity and Change' exhibition. Dated 20080408.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV005088_A

ACMA AV005088_B

ACMA AV005089
General:
Title created by ACM staff based on transcription from physical asset and contents of recording - the event title.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
Land use  Search this
Eminent domain  Search this
Community development, Urban  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
The New Eminent Domain: Federal Use of Land East of the River, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-052, Item ACMA AV005077
See more items in:
East of the River: Continuity and Change Exhibition Records
East of the River: Continuity and Change Exhibition Records / Series 3: Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7f750bd52-7671-42a0-a69a-dffc4708531a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-052-ref542

Minutes

Extent:
8.70 cu. ft. (9 document boxes) (7 12x17 boxes) (1 16x20 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
1846-1995
Descriptive Entry:
These records are the official minutes of the Board. They are compiled at the direction of the Secretary of the Smithsonian, who is also secretary to the Board, after approval by the Regents' Executive Committee and by the Regents themselves. The minutes are edited, not a verbatim account of proceedings. For reasons unknown, there are no manuscript minutes for the period from 1857 through 1890; and researchers must rely on printed minutes published in the Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution instead. Minutes are transferred regularly from the Secretary's Office to the Archives. Minutes less than 15 years old are closed to researchers. Indexes exist for the period from 1907 to 1946 and can be useful.
Historical Note:
The Smithsonian Institution was created by authority of an Act of Congress approved August 10, 1846. The Act entrusted direction of the Smithsonian to a body called the Establishment, composed of the President; the Vice President; the Chief Justice of the United States; the secretaries of State, War, Navy, Interior, and Agriculture; the Attorney General; and the Postmaster General. In fact, however, the Establishment last met in 1877, and control of the Smithsonian has always been exercised by its Board of Regents. The membership of the Regents consists of the Vice President and the Chief Justice of the United States; three members each of the Senate and House of Representatives; two citizens of the District of Columbia; and seven citizens of the several states, no two from the same state. (Prior to 1970 the category of Citizen Regents not residents of Washington consisted of four members). By custom the Chief Justice is Chancellor. The office was at first held by the Vice President. However, when Millard Fillmore succeeded to the presidency on the death of Zachary Taylor in 1851, Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney was chosen in his stead. The office has always been filled by the Chief Justice since that time.

The Regents of the Smithsonian have included distinguished Americans from many walks of life. Ex officio members (Vice President) have been: Spiro T. Agnew, Chester A. Arthur, Allen W. Barkley, John C. Breckenridge, George Bush, Schuyler Colfax, Calvin Coolidge, Charles Curtis, George M. Dallas, Charles G. Dawes, Charles W. Fairbanks, Millard Fillmore, Gerald R. Ford, John N. Garner, Hannibal Hamlin, Thomas A. Hendricks, Garret A. Hobart, Hubert H. Humphrey, Andrew Johnson, Lyndon B. Johnson, William R. King, Thomas R. Marshall, Walter F. Mondale, Levi P. Morton, Richard M. Nixon, Nelson A. Rockefeller, Theodore Roosevelt, James S. Sherman, Adlai E. Stevenson, Harry S. Truman, Henry A. Wallace, William A. Wheeler, Henry Wilson.

Ex officio members (Chief Justice) have been: Roger B. Taney, Salmon P. Chase, Nathan Clifford, Morrison R. Waite, Samuel F. Miller, Melville W. Fuller, Edward D. White, William Howard Taft, Charles Evans Hughes, Harlan F. Stone, Fred M. Vinson, Earl Warren, Warren E. Burger.

Regents on the part of the Senate have been: Clinton P. Anderson, Newton Booth, Sidney Breese, Lewis Cass, Robert Milledge Charlton, Bennet Champ Clark, Francis M. Cockrell, Shelby Moore Cullom, Garrett Davis, Jefferson Davis, George Franklin Edmunds, George Evans, Edwin J. Garn, Walter F. George, Barry Goldwater, George Gray, Hannibal Hamlin, Nathaniel Peter Hill, George Frisbie Hoar, Henry French Hollis, Henry M. Jackson, William Lindsay, Henry Cabot Lodge, Medill McCormick, James Murray Mason, Samuel Bell Maxey, Robert B. Morgan, Frank E. Moss, Claiborne Pell, George Wharton Pepper, David A. Reed, Leverett Saltonstall, Hugh Scott, Alexander H. Smith, Robert A. Taft, Lyman Trumbull, Wallace H. White, Jr., Robert Enoch Withers.

Regents on the part of the House of Representatives have included: Edward P. Boland, Frank T. Bow, William Campbell Breckenridge, Overton Brooks, Benjamin Butterworth, Clarence Cannon, Lucius Cartrell, Hiester Clymer, William Colcock, William P. Cole, Jr., Maurice Connolly, Silvio O. Conte, Edward E. Cox, Edward H. Crump, John Dalzell, Nathaniel Deering, Hugh A. Dinsmore, William English, John Farnsworth, Scott Ferris, Graham Fitch, James Garfield, Charles L. Gifford, T. Alan Goldsborough, Frank L. Greene, Gerry Hazleton, Benjamin Hill, Henry Hilliard, Ebenezer Hoar, William Hough, William M. Howard, Albert Johnson, Leroy Johnson, Joseph Johnston, Michael Kirwan, James T. Lloyd, Robert Luce, Robert McClelland, Samuel K. McConnell, Jr., George H. Mahon, George McCrary, Edward McPherson, James R. Mann, George Perkins Marsh, Norman Y. Mineta, A. J. Monteague, R. Walton Moore, Walter H. Newton, Robert Dale Owen, James Patterson, William Phelps, Luke Poland, John Van Schaick Lansing Pruyn, B. Carroll Reece, Ernest W. Roberts, Otho Robards Singleton, Frank Thompson, Jr., John M. Vorys, Hiram Warner, Joseph Wheeler.

Citizen Regents have been: David C. Acheson, Louis Agassiz, James B. Angell, Anne L. Armstrong, William Backhouse Astor, J. Paul Austin, Alexander Dallas Bache, George Edmund Badger, George Bancroft, Alexander Graham Bell, James Gabriel Berrett, John McPherson Berrien, Robert W. Bingham, Sayles Jenks Bowen, William G. Bowen, Robert S. Brookings, John Nicholas Brown, William A. M. Burden, Vannevar Bush, Charles F. Choate, Jr., Rufus Choate, Arthur H. Compton, Henry David Cooke, Henry Coppee, Samuel Sullivan Cox, Edward H. Crump, James Dwight Dana, Harvey N. Davis, William Lewis Dayton, Everette Lee Degolyer, Richard Delafield, Frederic A. Delano, Charles Devens, Matthew Gault Emery, Cornelius Conway Felton, Robert V. Fleming, Murray Gell-Mann, Robert F. Goheen, Asa Gray, George Gray, Crawford Hallock Greenwalt, Nancy Hanks, Caryl Parker Haskins, Gideon Hawley, John B. Henderson, John B. Henderson, Jr., A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., Gardner Greene Hubbard, Charles Evans Hughes, Carlisle H. Humelsine, Jerome C. Hunsaker, William Preston Johnston, Irwin B. Laughlin, Walter Lenox, Augustus P. Loring, John Maclean, William Beans Magruder, John Walker Maury, Montgomery Cunningham Meigs, John C. Merriam, R. Walton Moore, Roland S. Morris, Dwight W. Morrow, Richard Olney, Peter Parker, Noah Porter, William Campbell Preston, Owen Josephus Roberts, Richard Rush, William Winston Seaton, Alexander Roby Shepherd, William Tecumseh Sherman, Otho Robards Singleton, Joseph Gilbert Totten, John Thomas Towers, Frederic C. Walcott, Richard Wallach, Thomas J. Watson, Jr., James E. Webb, James Clarke Welling, Andrew Dickson White, Henry White, Theodore Dwight Woolsey.
Topic:
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Museum trustees  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 1, Smithsonian Institution, Board of Regents, Minutes
Identifier:
Record Unit 1
See more items in:
Minutes
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0001
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Oral History Interview with Linda Lee

Interviewer:
Chen, Yi  Search this
Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (QuickTime Movie)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Place:
Chinatown (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
2016 November 11
Scope and Contents:
Interview created as part of the research for the Anacostia Community Museum's "A Right to the City" exhibition.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Restaurants -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Eminent domain  Search this
Neighborhoods -- Washington, D.C. -- History  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews -- 21st century
Citation:
Interview with Linda Lee, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
A Right to the City Exhibition Records
A Right to the City Exhibition Records / Series I: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7f41164fe-bc36-4239-bced-8e226e86e8de
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-119-ref90

Letter to Berdis Baldwin from James Baldwin

Written by:
James Baldwin, American, 1924 - 1987  Search this
Received by:
Berdis Baldwin, American  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper (fiber product)
Dimensions:
H x W: 11 1/2 x 8 1/4 in. (29.2 x 21 cm)
Type:
letters (correspondence)
Date:
January 19, 1977
Topic:
African American  Search this
Communication  Search this
Literature  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of The Baldwin Family
Object number:
2011.99.22
Restrictions & Rights:
© James Baldwin Estate
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Documents and Published Materials
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd538c97636-f4f7-4010-af8d-ffd3a17d5221
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2011.99.22
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  • View Letter to Berdis Baldwin from James Baldwin digital asset number 1

N

Type:
Archival materials
Date:
Jan.–June 1868
Collection Restrictions:
Freedmen's Bureau Digital Collection, 1865–1872, is a product of and owned by the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution. Copyright for digital images is retained by the donor, FamilySearch International; permission for commercial use of the digital images may be requested from FamilySearch International, Intellectual Property Office, at: cor-intellectualproperty@ldschurch.org.
Collection Citation:
Courtesy of the U. S. National Archives and Records Administration, FamilySearch International, and the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.
Identifier:
NMAAHC.FB.M752, File 2.12.14
See more items in:
Registers and Letters Received by the Commissioner of the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, 1865–1872
Registers and Letters Received by the Commissioner of the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, 1865–1872 / Series 2: Letters Received / 2.12: Entered in Register 12
Archival Repository:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/io34d46f463-d632-4113-89e3-239191089e68
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmaahc-fb-m752-ref264
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  • View N digital asset number 1
  • View N digital asset number 2

H

Type:
Archival materials
Date:
Oct. 1865–Feb. 1866
Collection Restrictions:
Freedmen's Bureau Digital Collection, 1865–1872, is a product of and owned by the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution. Copyright for digital images is retained by the donor, FamilySearch International; permission for commercial use of the digital images may be requested from FamilySearch International, Intellectual Property Office, at: cor-intellectualproperty@ldschurch.org.
Collection Citation:
Courtesy of the U. S. National Archives and Records Administration, FamilySearch International, and the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.
Identifier:
NMAAHC.FB.M752, File 2.2.8
See more items in:
Registers and Letters Received by the Commissioner of the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, 1865–1872
Registers and Letters Received by the Commissioner of the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, 1865–1872 / Series 2: Letters Received / 2.2: Entered in Register 2
Archival Repository:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/io319c4b56f-0133-46f7-923e-3f296b7478f3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmaahc-fb-m752-ref99
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  • View H digital asset number 1
  • View H digital asset number 2

Correspondence

Collection Creator:
La Flesche, Francis, 1857-1932  Search this
Fletcher, Alice C. (Alice Cunningham), 1838-1923  Search this
Container:
Box 2
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1884, 1886-1887
Scope and Contents:
Select itemized correspondence:

1884: Putnam, F. W.; June 7.

1886: Teller, Mrs.; May 1.

1890: Morgan, General [T. J.]; May 26.

1890: Idem.; n.d.

1891: Allen, Mr.; Apr. 27.

1891: Morgan, General and Mrs. [T. J.]; July 11, Oct. 26, Nov. 2.

1892: Morgan, General and Mrs. [T. J.]; May 12.

1892: "My Dear Friends"; May 31.
Collection Restrictions:
The Alice Cunningham Fletcher and Francis La Flesche papers are open for research.

Access to the Alice Cunningham Fletcher and Francis La Flesche papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 4558 Alice Cunningham Fletcher and Francis La Flesche papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 4558 Alice Cunningham Fletcher and Francis La Flesche papers
MS 4558 Alice Cunningham Fletcher and Francis La Flesche papers / Series 1: Alice Cunningham Fletcher papers / 1.2: Outgoing correspondence
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw31a9cbdd1-c649-46c2-8d42-f7f639c01282
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms4558-ref53
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Mexico at the bar of public opinion; a survey of editorial opinion in newspapers of the western hemisphere, by Burt M. McConnell ..

Author:
McConnell, Burt M (Burt Morton) 1888-1960  Search this
Physical description:
viii, 320 p. illus. 24 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Mexico
United States
Date:
1939
Topic:
Eminent domain  Search this
Propaganda, Mexican  Search this
Press  Search this
Public opinion  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_747217

Mexicos̕ agrarian laws : how the titles to lands owned by the Americans are affected and their right to acquire lands restricted- expropriation authorized / Association of American Owners of Land in Mexico

Author:
Association of American Owners of Land in Mexico  Search this
Physical description:
22 p. ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Mexico
Date:
1921
[1921?]
Topic:
Land titles  Search this
Eminent domain  Search this
Call number:
HD1265.M6 A84 1921
HD1265.M6A84 1921
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_384552

Toxic communities : environmental racism, industrial pollution, and residential mobility / Dorceta E. Taylor

Author:
Taylor, Dorceta E  Search this
Physical description:
xii, 343 pages ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
Date:
2014
Topic:
Environmental justice  Search this
Hazardous waste sites--Social aspects  Search this
Hazardous waste sites--Location  Search this
Environmental conditions  Search this
Social aspects  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1046469

Mexicos̕ agrarian laws : how the titles to lands owned by the Americans are affected and their right to acquire lands restricted- expropriation authorized / Association of American Owners of Land in Mexico

Author:
Association of American Owners of Land in Mexico  Search this
Physical description:
22 p. ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Mexico
Date:
1921
[1921?]
Topic:
Land titles  Search this
Eminent domain  Search this
Call number:
HD1265.M6 A84 1921
HD1265.M6A84 1921
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_383846

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