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Inspiring STEM Pathways: Jim West

Creator:
Lemelson Center, National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
Interviews
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2023-01-24T20:49:39.000Z
YouTube Category:
Science & Technology  Search this
Topic:
American History  Search this
See more by:
LemelsonCenter
Data Source:
Lemelson Center, National Museum of American History
YouTube Channel:
LemelsonCenter
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_WWK44VLogHM

Layqa Nuna Yawar, Pandemic Oral History Project, Archives of American Art, 2020

Creator:
Archives of American Art  Search this
Type:
Interviews
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2021-01-11T18:33:49.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianAAA
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianAAA
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_MDCHbF8TNlw

Ben Shahn papers

Creator:
Shahn, Ben, 1898-1969  Search this
Names:
Baskin, Leonard, 1922-2000  Search this
Delano, Jack  Search this
Evans, Walker, 1903-1975  Search this
Osborn, Robert Chesley, 1904-1994  Search this
Rivera, Diego, 1886-1957  Search this
Robbins, Jerome  Search this
Soyer, Raphael, 1899-1987  Search this
Extent:
25.1 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Motion pictures (visual works)
Sketchbooks
Video recordings
Drawings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1879-1990
bulk 1933-1970
Summary:
The papers of social realist painter, photographer, printmaker, and teacher Ben Shahn (1898-1969) measure 25.1 linear feet and date from 1879-1990, with the bulk of the material dating from 1933-1970. The bulk of the collection consists of over 14 linear feet of incoming letters from artists, writers, colleagues, publishers, art organizations, galleries, and universities and colleges. Also found are biographical materials, project and source files, printed material, artwork by Shahn and others, photographs taken of and by Shahn, interview transcripts, sound recordings of interviews and a motion picture film.
Scope and Contents note:
The papers of social realist painter, photographer, illustrator, printmaker, and teacher Ben Shahn (1898-1969) measure 25.1 linear feet and date from 1879-1990, with the bulk of the material dating from 1933-1970. The bulk of the collection consists of over 14 linear feet of incoming letters from artists, writers, colleagues, publishers, art organizations, galleries, and universities and colleges. Also found are biographical materials, project and source files, printed material, artwork by Shahn and others, photographs taken of and by Shahn, interview transcripts, sound recordings of interviews and a motion picture film.

Biographical material and family records include a 1924 passport for Shahn and his first wife, Tillie, biographical sketches of Shahn, and award certificates received by him.

Letters are primarily written to Shahn from family members, artists, writers, colleagues, publishers, art organizations, galleries, and universities and colleges. Notable correspondents include Leonard Baskin, Alexander Calder, Dorothea Lange, Walker Evans, Joseph Hirsch, Leo Lionni, John Bartlow Martin, George and Marian Nakashima, Clifford Odets, Charles Olson, Robert Osborn, Diego Rivera, Jerome Robbins, Selden Rodman, James Thrall Soby, Raphael Soyer, and William Carlos Williams. A small number of scattered letters from Shahn can also be found throughout the series.

Project files document approximately twenty-one of Shahn's commissions, including murals for the community center at Jersey Homesteads, the Bronx Central Annex Post Office, the Social Security Building in Washington D.C. , and the William E. Grady Vocational High School. The files also document his involvement in the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial in Roosevelt, in addition to projects for schools, temples and private homes.

Financial and legal records include consignment records, loan agreements, royalty statements and receipts for artwork sold.

Notes and writings are by Shahn and others including Alan Dugan, W. H. Ferry, Theodore Gusten, and John Bartlow Martin. They include lists of artwork, many of which are annotated.

Artwork includes a sketchbook and several unbound sketches and lettering by Shahn, in addition to drawings and prints by others including Shahn's children, Mario Casetta and Stefan Martin.

Source files contain printed material and photographs relating to topics depicted by Shahn in his artwork such as children, dams, farming, houses, industry, mines and miners, slums, war and workers. These files also contain scattered photographic prints by FSA and OWI photographers including Shahn, Jack Delano, Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Russell Lee, Carl Mydans, Marion Post Wolcott, Arthur Rothstein, and John Vachon.

Printed material includes news clippings covering Shahn and his career as well as subjects of interest to Shahn. Also found are exhibition catalogs and announcements for exhibitions for Shahn and others, and reproductions of Shahn's artwork including publications illustrated by him.

Photographs are of Shahn, his family and friends and colleagues including Alexander Calder, Jerome Robbins, Charles Sheeler, David Smith and William Zorach. Also included are photographs taken by Shahn of New York City and for the FSA in the 1930s, as well as photographs of artwork by Shahn. Photographs by others include one photo each by Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Russell Lee and Arthur Rothstein.

The collection also contains transcripts of eight radio, television and motion picture interviews of Shahn and a reel of 16mm motion picture film from the BBC-TV program "Monitor," in addition to sound recordings of interviews of Shahn by Tony Schwartz and Arlene Francis. Artifacts include a Christmas greeting in the form of a sock.
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged as 12 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical and Family Records, 1879-1984 (Box 1, OV 36; 0.2 linear ft.)

Series 2: Letters, 1929-1990 (Boxes 1-25, 35, 43, OVs 36-38; 14.5 linear ft.)

Series 3: Project Files, 1933-1975 (Boxes 25-26; OVs 36-37; 1.03 linear ft.)

Series 4: Financial and Legal Records, 1934-1988 (Boxes 26-27, 35; 0.81 linear ft.)

Series 5: Notes and Writings, circa 1933-1988 (Boxes 27-28, 43; 1.72 linear ft.)

Series 6: Artwork, circa 1930s-1965 (Boxes 28, 35; 11 folders)

Series 7: Source Files, circa 1900s-1960s (Boxes 28-30, 35; 1.81 linear ft.)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1912-1988 (Boxes 30-33, 35, OV 39; 3.22 linear ft.)

Series 9: Photographs, circa 1900-1969 (Boxes 33-35; 0.86 linear ft.)

Series 10: Interview Transcripts, 1943-1968 (Box 34; 0.25 linear ft.)

Series 11: Audio and Video Recordings, 1959-1968 (Box 34; 0.25 linear ft.)

Series 12: Artifacts, circa 1930s-circa 1960s (Box 34; 2 items)
Biographical/Historical note:
Ben Shahn (1898-1969) was a social realist painter, muralist, printmaker, photographer, illustrator, and educator who worked primarily in Brooklyn, New York and New Jersey. He was most active in the 1930s through the 1950s and worked on several federally funded arts projects, including the Farm Security Administration's photographic documentation project of rural America during the Depression.

Ben Shahn was born in Kovno, Lithuania and immigrated with his family to the United States in 1906 where he settled in Brooklyn, and later Roosevelt, New Jersey, after becoming a naturalized citizen in 1918.

Following an apprenticeship as a lithographer from 1913-1917, Shahn studied at New York University, the City College of New York, and the National Academy of Design from 1919-1922. He married Tillie Goldstein in 1922 and they had two children, Judith and Ezra.

Two years after Shahn's first solo exhibition at the Downtown Gallery in 1930, his Passion of Sacco and Vanzetti, a series of 23 gouaches about the Sacco and Vanzetti trial of the 1920s, was exhibited at the Downtown Gallery to critical and public acclaim. The exhibition marked the beginning of Shahn's reputation as one of the most important social realist painters in America. Shahn's commitment to social and political justice found a natural outlet in mural painting when, in 1933, he was hired to assist Diego Rivera on the labor and industry mural Man at the Crossroads, for New York City's Rockefeller Center. The mural was destroyed amid controversy in 1933 before it was completed, but Shahn had learned much about the art of fresco painting during the project and was inspired by the potential of the mural as a unique art form for presenting life's struggles and stories to a large public audience. Between 1933 and 1937 Shahn worked on various murals for other buildings, including New York's Central Park Casino (circa 1934) and Riker's Island Prison (1934), none of which saw completion. In 1937, however, the Farm Security Administration (FSA) commissioned Shahn to execute a mural for the Community Center in the town of Jersey Homesteads, later Roosevelt, New Jersey, which Shahn completed in 1938. Shahn settled in Jersey Homesteads the following year and remained there for the rest of his life. Other important mural commissions followed for the Bronx Central Post office (1939) and the Social Security Building in Washington DC (1942).

One of Shahn's assistants on the Jersey Homesteads mural was Bernarda Bryson, whom he had met in 1933 when she came to New York to interview Rivera about the Rockefeller Center mural controversy for an Ohio newspaper. Shahn and Bryson became lifetime companions and had three children, Susanna, Jonathan and Abigail, although they did not marry until shortly before Shahn's death in 1969. Shahn and Tillie Goldstein were divorced in 1944.

Shahn had enrolled with the federal Public Works of Art Project in 1934, and between 1935 and 1938 he and Bryson travelled across country as Shahn photographed poverty-stricken areas and documented rural life for the Farm Security Administration (FSA) and the Resettlement Agency. Shahn's interest in photography developed in the early 1930s when, encouraged by his friendship with Walker Evans, he began photographing street scenes and people in New York City. He later used the images as the basis for many of his prints and paintings.

In 1942 Shahn began working for the Office of War Information (OWI) and was instructed to produce posters and pamphlets explaining to citizens the necessities of wartime, such as the need for secrecy and food rationing. Ultimately, only two of Shahn's posters were ever used; the rest were rejected as being too harsh for their intended audience. Shahn later worked for the Congress of Industrial Organization Political Action Committee (CIO-PAC), producing posters for the 1944 campaign to re-elect Roosevelt, who he believed in deeply. He was promoted to director of the CIO's Graphic Arts Division for the 1946 congressional campaign following Roosevelt's death, but that job ended when the election went poorly for the Democratic party.

Shahn returned increasingly to painting and a retrospective of his work was held at the Museum of Modern Art in 1947. He also became more active in academia as an accomplished writer, teacher and lecturer. He received honorary doctorates from Princeton University and Harvard University, and become the Charles Eliot Norton professor at Harvard in 1956. Shahn's Norton lectures were collected and published as the influential The Shape of Content in 1957. He also began to work as a commercial artist for a variety of companies and publications including CBS, Time, Harper's, and the Container Corporation of America. Shahn believed, however, that the artist's ideas and integrity must always be reflected in his commercial art. He refused to compromise on this point and was very selective in his choice of commercial commissions. Shahn illustrated many books and articles, designed sets for stage productions such as New York Export: Opus Jazz, choreographed by Jerome Robbins, and designed mural mosaics for synagogues, universities and private homes.

Since the 1930s Shahn had been represented by Edith Halpert at the Downtown Gallery, but his relationship with her was always contentious on the subject of payments Shahn received for commercial work, and became increasingly so as his income from such sources increased. Finally, in 1968, Shahn wrote to Halpert telling her that after ten years of "an accumulation of ill-feeling, discomfort and recrimination between us" he felt compelled to end their dealer-artist relationship.

By the time of Shahn's break with Halpert his health had begun to fail. He died of a heart attack following surgery in a New York City hospital on March 14, 1969.
Related Archival Materials note:
The Archives of American Art holds four oral history interviews with Ben Shahn: 1964 Apr. 14 interview conducted by Richard K. Doud for the Archives of American Art New Deal and the Arts Project in which Shahn speaks of his travels and work for the Farm Security Administration (FSA) and the American image as portrayed by FSA; 1965 Jan. 17 interview; 1965 Oct. 3. interview conducted by Harlan Phillips for the Archives of American Art New Deal and the Arts Project; and 1968 Sept. 27 interview conducted by Forrest Selvig. Most of these interviews have transcripts available online.

The Archives also holds the Bernarda Bryson Shahn papers, circa 1947-2005, and two oral history interviews with Bernarda Bryson Shahn: 1983 Apr. 29 and 1995 July 3.
Separated Materials note:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reel N70-6) including addresses and essays by Shahn, seven royalty statements, and three letters from publishers. Many of the writings found on this reel were included in subsequent donations. All other lent material was returned to the lender and is not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
The Ben Shahn papers were donated to the Archives of American Art in several installments between 1967-1991 by Shahn's widow, Bernarda Bryson Shahn who also lent materials for microfilming in 1969. Jean Shahn, Ben Shahn's daughter-in-law and estate representative, donated additional material in 2018 and 2021.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New Jersey -- Roosevelt  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- Brooklyn  Search this
Photographers -- New York (State) -- Brooklyn  Search this
Photographers -- New Jersey -- Roosevelt  Search this
Printmakers -- New Jersey -- Roosevelt  Search this
Printmakers -- New York (State) -- Brooklyn  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- Brooklyn  Search this
Educators -- New Jersey -- Roosevelt  Search this
Muralists -- New York (State) -- Brooklyn  Search this
Muralists -- New Jersey -- Roosevelt  Search this
Topic:
Social realism  Search this
Genre/Form:
Motion pictures (visual works)
Sketchbooks
Video recordings
Drawings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Ben Shahn papers, 1879-1990, bulk 1933-1970. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.shahben
See more items in:
Ben Shahn papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw983b06d9b-dd51-45bc-9b11-09b06a88f6c6
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-shahben
Online Media:

Kimberly Camp papers, 1970-2016

Creator:
Camp, Kimberly, 1956-  Search this
Subject:
Barnes Foundation  Search this
Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sketchbooks
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Kimberly Camp papers, 1970-2016. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Theme:
African American  Search this
Art organizations  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)17357
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)380896
AAA_collcode_campkimb
Theme:
African American
Art organizations
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_380896

Nina Howell Starr papers

Creator:
Starr, Nina Howell, 1903-2000  Search this
Names:
International Women's Art Festival  Search this
Museum of American Folk Art  Search this
Photographic Historical Society of New York  Search this
Professional Women's Photographers, Inc.  Search this
Sharon Arts Center  Search this
Southern Regional Council  Search this
Brandt, Helene, 1936-  Search this
Cohen, Stephenie  Search this
Coke, Van Deren, 1921-  Search this
Connor, Linda  Search this
Daitz, Evelyne Z.  Search this
DiSpirito, Henry, 1898-1995  Search this
Evans, Minnie, 1892-  Search this
Evans, Walker, 1903-1975  Search this
Ghent, Henri, 1926-  Search this
Kanaga, Consuelo, 1894-  Search this
Kernan, Margo, 1927-  Search this
Kruger, Louise, 1924-  Search this
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Macdonald-Wright, Stanton, 1890-1973  Search this
Mainardi, Patricia  Search this
Morgan, Barbara Brooks, 1900-1992  Search this
Putnam, Wallace, 1899-1989  Search this
Ringgold, Faith  Search this
Rose, Ruth Starr, 1887-1965  Search this
Savage, Naomi, 1927-2005  Search this
Sherwood, Maggie, 1922-1984  Search this
Siskind, Aaron  Search this
Strand, Paul, 1890-1976  Search this
Szarwarski, John  Search this
Uelsmann, Jerry, 1934-  Search this
Extent:
21.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Interviews
Drawings
Sketches
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Prints
Date:
circa 1933-1996
Summary:
The papers of photographer and art historian Nina Howell Starr measure 21.2 linear feet and date from circa 1933 to 1996. The papers contain research files about various art historical topics, museums and galleries, photography, and artists. There are extensive files documenting Starr's relationship as researcher, dealer, and friend of folk painter Minnie Evans. Additionally, the papers include biographical materials, writings, speeches, project files, printed material collected or authored by Starr, and hundreds of artistic and documentary photographs and negatives created by Starr depicting her travels, Minnie Evans' paintings, roadside folk art, and other topics.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of photographer and art historian Nina Howell Starr measure 21.2 linear feet and date from circa 1933 to 1996. The papers contain research files about various art historical topics, museums and galleries, photography, and artists. There are extensive files documenting Starr's relationship as researcher, dealer, and friend of folk painter Minnie Evans. Additionally, the papers include biographical materials, writings, speeches, project files, printed material collected or authored by Starr, and hundreds of artistic and documentary photographs and negatives created by Starr depicting her travels, Minnie Evans' paintings, roadside folk art, and other topics.

Biographical materials are scattered and include grant and publication applications, curriculum vitae, lists of artwork, and miscellany.

Starr's lectures, writings, and project files are arranged into one series. They include Starr's student writings, a notebook about Civil Rights, files documenting her work on a Florida public housing project, the Southern Regional Council, and the League of Women Voters. A few files of general writings and lectures mostly concern folk artist Minnie Evans and the exhibition Women Photograph Men, held at the International Women's Arts Festival in 1976.

Subject files on artists, art history topics, photographers and photography (including Starr's work), and on folk artist and friend Minne Evans comprise the bulk of the collection. The files are a mix of collated materials and primary sources created by Starr and others and many contain correspondence, notes, photographs, and a few sketches and orginal prints. Also included are materials related to professional and organizational groups in which Starr was involved, including the Professional Women's Photographers, Inc., the Photographic Historical Society of New York, and the Museum of American Folk Art; files on several of Starr's exhibitions; and files on artists that contain printed materials, correspondence, and photographs. The file on Ruth Starr Rose contains prints and drawings. There are also photographs taken by Stephanie Cohen. Particularly rich files are found for Stephanie Cohen; Van Deren Coke, Director of the George Eastman Company; Evelyn Daitz, Director of the Witkin Gallery; Henry DiSpirito; Walker Evans; the Fotofolio printing company; curator Henri Ghent; photographer Consuelo Kanaga and husband Wallace Putnam; Margot Starr Kernan; Lucy Lippard; Stanton Mac-Donald Wright; Sharon Arts Center; photographer Paul Strand; curator John Szarwarski; and photographer Jerry Uelsman.

The collection also documents the friendship between painter Minnie Evans and Starr, and Starr's business dealings on Evans' behalf. There is correspondence about and with Evans, several sound recordings of interviews conducted by Starr and others with Evans, many with transcripts, financial documents, publications about Evans including exhibition catalogs, clippings, journal articles and monographs, two posters, a scrapbook, and one sketch by Evans.

Printed material includes published articles, exhibition catalogs and announcements, and clippings about Starr.

Photographic materials are extensive and include photographs and slides taken by Starr of friends, family, artwork by Minnie Evans, events, exhibition openings, world travels, and folk art, especially roadside. Prominent artists and art historians photographed include: photographers Maggie Sherwood, Naomi Savage, Barbara Morgan, Linda Connor, Aaron Siskind, Consuelo Kanaga, Faith Ringgold, and Walker Evans; sculptors Louise Kruger and Helene Brandt; feminist and art historian Pat Mainardi; and curators Henri Ghent and John Szarkowski. Starr's artistic photographic work is also represented, and includes two silver gelatin prints of Minnie Evans, and subject studies on hands, people, and nature, among others.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 6 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical material, 1954-circa 1990 (8 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Writings, Speeches and Projects, 1933-1995 (1.1 linear feet; Boxes 1-2)

Series 3: Subject Files, circa 1939-1996 (8.3 linear feet; Boxes 2-10)

Series 4: Minnie Evans, 1962-1996 (3.7 linear feet; Boxes 10-13, 23, OV 24)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1936-1995 (2.7 linear feet; Boxes 13-16, 23)

Series 6: Photographic Material, circa 1939-1993 (5.4 linear feet; Boxes 16-23, OV 24)
Biographical / Historical:
Nina Howell Starr (1903-2000) was a photographer, art dealer, and art historian who worked primarily in New York City. Born in Newark, New Jersey in 1903 as Cornelia Margaret Howell, Starr attended Wellesley College and graduated from Barnard in 1926. Also in 1926, she married Nathan Comfort Starr, an English professor, and, over the years the couple lived in Massachusetts, Maryland, Florida, and New York City.

In 1963, at the age of 60, Starr received the first M.F.A. in photography granted by the University of Florida. Starr exhibited widely in both solo and group exhibitions, including Magic Lantern (Photographer's Gallery, London, 1976), and the Strength of Women (Witken Gallery, 1991), and numerous shows featuring photographs of outsider art. Her "New Yorker" project became an exhibition in 2016. Her work is owned by several prominent museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the George Eastman House International Museum of Photography.

As art historian, self-proclaimed critic, and civil rights and feminist advocate, Starr lectured widely, wrote articles and letters to editors, and corresponded with many notable art world figures. She became especially interested in outsider and folk art. Starr met outsider artist Minnie Evans in 1962 and became Evans' lifelong friend, advocate, and representative dealer. She wrote about Evans and introduced Evans' works to galleries and other exhibition spaces in New York, including the Whitney Museum, where she guest-curated an exhibition of Evans' work in 1975.

Starr was an active member of professional organizations including the Photographic Historical Society of New York, Professional Women's Photographers, Inc., and the Museum of American Folk Art where she served on the Advisory Committee.

Nina Howell Starr died in 2000 in Connecticut at the age of 97.
Provenance:
The Nina Howell Starr papers were donated by Nina Howell Starr in 1996.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Photographers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Folk art  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
African American art  Search this
Folk art -- Photographs  Search this
Women photographers  Search this
Photography  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Interviews
Drawings
Sketches
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Prints
Citation:
Nina Howell Starr papers, circa 1933-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.starnina
See more items in:
Nina Howell Starr papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9dccd352c-b391-49d6-ae20-8b00e1e280d3
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-starnina
Online Media:

Reuben Kadish papers

Creator:
Kadish, Reuben, 1913-1992  Search this
Names:
Ashton, Dore  Search this
Cherry, Herman  Search this
Conant, Howard  Search this
De Kooning, Willem, 1904-1997  Search this
Guston, Philip, 1913-1980  Search this
Hiler, Hilaire, 1898-1966  Search this
Langsner, Jules, 1911-1967  Search this
Neininger, Urban  Search this
O'Keeffe, Georgia, 1887-1986  Search this
Pollock, Charles C.  Search this
Pollock, Jackson, 1912-1956  Search this
Siqueiros, David Alfaro  Search this
Tully, Judd  Search this
Extent:
7.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Photographs
Date:
1851-1995
bulk 1913-1995
Summary:
This collection, which measures 7.9 linear feet and dates from 1851 to 1995 (bulk 1913-1995), documents the life and career of muralist, sculptor, and educator Reuben Kadish. The papers contain biographical material, letters, personal business records, an exhibition file, notes, writings, artwork, printed material, photographs, and artifacts.
Scope and Content Note:
The Reuben Kadish papers measure 7.9 linear feet and date from 1851 to 1995 with the bulk of the material dating from 1913 to 1995. The collection documents the life and career of muralist, sculptor, and educator Reuben Kadish and contains biographical material, letters, personal business records, an exhibition file, notes, writings, artwork, printed material, photographs, and artifacts.

Biographical material, 1938-1992, includes résumés and personal identification items. Letters are from friends and colleagues including Herman Cherry, Philip Guston, Hilaire Hiler, Jules Langsner, Urban Neininger, Charles Pollock, and Jackson Pollock. One letter from the Leonard Stark family contains a small photograph of Georgia O'Keeffe.

Personal business records, 1952-1995, consist of legal documents, including estate papers for Ida and Reuben Kadish, and financial records. The only specific exhibition file documents the 1990 exhibition Reuben Kadish: Works from 1930 to the Present at the New Jersey State Museum in 1990.

Notes include unbound notes on mural painting, printmaking, sculpture, and other art-related topics, and handwritten translations by William H. Thomson of thirty classic texts by Homer, Horace, and Demosthenes. Writings, 1975-1992, consist of an autobiographical manuscript by Kadish, and typescripts concerning Kadish and other art-related topics by other authors including Dore Ashton, Herman Cherry, Howard Conant, and Judd Tully.

Artwork, undated and 1981-1992, includes a hundred sketches and seventeen watercolors by Kadish, and a drawing for DIG (Archeology) by Barbara Kadish. Printed material relates primarily to exhibitions for Kadish and others but also includes a baseball program autographed by Darryl Strawberry. Photographs include prints of Kadish and other artists working on murals, and photographs picturing family and friends.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into ten series, based on type of material. Although acquired as a gift before the rest of the collection was loaned to the Archives of American Art in 1998, eight photographs are described in Series 9: Photographs, with those included in the 1998 loan.

Each series is arranged chronologically, except Series 2: Letters and Series 6: Writings, which are arranged alphabetically according to the surname of the writer.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1938-1992 (box 1, 3 folders)

Series 2: Letters, 1934-1995, undated (boxes 1-3, 2.5 linear ft.)

Series 3: Personal Business Records, 1952-1995 (boxes 3-4, 37 folders)

Series 4: Exhibition File, 1989-1991 (box 4, 1 folder)

Series 5: Notes, 1851-1853, 1937-1992, undated (boxes 4-5, 35 folders)

Series 6: Writings, 1963-1992, undated (box 5, 14 folders)

Series 7: Artwork, 1981-1992, undated (boxes 5, 10, 8 folders)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1934-1993, undated (boxes 5-7, 76 folders)

Series 9: Photographs, 1913-1992, undated (boxes 7-9, sol 10, 2.0 linear ft.)

Series 10: Artifacts, undated (box 9, 1 folder)
Biographical Note:
Reuben Kadish was born in Chicago on January 29, 1913. His father and mother were from Latvia and the Ukraine respectively.

In 1921, the family moved to East Los Angeles, California, where Kadish studied painting under Lorser Feitelson. During this time, he befriended Jackson Pollock and Philip Guston, who attended the Manual Arts High School.

During a trip to New York City in 1930, Kadish was impressed with the modern art, especially the work of the Surrealists, which he saw there. Upon his return to Los Angeles the following year, Kadish attended the Otis Art School, the Stickney School of Art in Pasadena, and Los Angeles City College. He also shared a studio with Philip Guston.

In 1933, Kadish, Guston and Jules Langsner were apprenticed to Mexican muralist, David Alfaro Siqueiros. Their most notable work being the mural "Triumph of Good Over Evil", at the University of Morelia in Mexico. During the next three years, the three young artists collaborated on painting murals in California and Mexico. After another visit to New York, Kadish was invited to San Francisco by Bill Gaskin to head the art division of the WPA project there, a position he occupied until 1940.

From 1940, Kadish worked as a coppersmith and welder at the Bethlehem Steel Works in San Francisco until 1942, when he joined the Army as a member of the War Artist Unit, serving in India and Southeast Asia during World War II. In 1944, he rejoined his wife Barbara in the Bay Area, but they soon returned to New York City, where Kadish worked for Stanley William Hayter at Atelier 17. In the summer of 1945, the Kadish painted with Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner in a shared Long Island house on Slow's Point in Amagansett.

In 1946, the Kadishes moved to a dairy farm in Vernon, New Jersey, where they supported themselves by farming until 1957. A catastrophic fire in the studio destroyed most of Kadish's paintings in 1947, causing him to turn his interest to creating sculpture.

After teaching art and design at the Newark School of Fine and Industrial Art in 1957, Kadish taught sculpture at the Brooklyn Museum Art School from 1958-1959. In 1960, he began his thirty-year teaching career at Cooper Union, which ended only a few months before his death on September 20, 1992 in Manhattan.
Related Material:
Other resources relating to Reuben Kadish in the Archives of American Art include an oral history interview with Kadish, April 15, 1992.
Provenance:
The eight photographs on Reel 5660 were donated to the Archives of American Art in 1984 by Reuben Kadish. The other material on Reels 5655-5660 was lent for filming in 1998 by Morris and Ruth Kadish, brother and sister-in-law of Reuben Kadish, and executors of his estate, and subsequently donated to the Archives of American Art in 2002.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment. Microfilmed portion must be consulted on microfilm.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Muralists -- California  Search this
Sculptors -- California  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Photographs
Citation:
Reuben Kadish papers, 1851-1995, bulk 1913-1995. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.kadireub
See more items in:
Reuben Kadish papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw974482335-aae0-4e72-8e41-8c2fb3fe28f8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kadireub
Online Media:

Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt papers

Creator:
Smithson, Robert  Search this
Names:
Dwan Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Holt, Nancy, 1938-2014  Search this
Insley, Will, 1929-2011  Search this
Johnson, Ray, 1927-  Search this
Kepes, Gyorgy, 1906-2001  Search this
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Extent:
67.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Moving images
Documentary films
Date:
1905-1987
bulk 1952-1987
Summary:
The papers of sculptor, painter, and author Robert Smithson and sculptor, filmmaker, and earthworks artist Nancy Holt measure 18.9 linear feet and date from 1905 to 1987, with the bulk of the material dating from 1952 to 1987. Also included is Smithson's personal library of books, vinyl records, and magazine, measuring 48.4 linear feet. The papers consist of Smithson's biographical material; business and personal correspondence, much of it with artists; interview transcripts; extensive writings and project files; financial records; printed material; a scrapbook of clippings; holiday cards with original prints and sketches; photographic material; and artifacts. Also found are project files related to Nancy Holt's motion picture film Pine Barrens and her seminal environmental work of art Sun Tunnels, including a video documentary about Sun Tunnels.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of sculptor, painter, and author Robert Smithson and sculptor, filmmaker, and earthworks artist Nancy Holt measure 18.9 linear feet and date from 1905 to 1987, with the bulk of the material dating from 1952 to 1987. Also included is Smithson's personal library of books, vinyl records, and magazine, measuring 48.4 linear feet. The papers consist of Smithson's biographical material; business and personal correspondence, much of it with artists; interview transcripts; extensive writings and project files; financial records; printed material; a scrapbook of clippings; holiday cards with original prints and sketches; photographic material; and artifacts. Also found are project files related to Nancy Holt's film Pine Barrens and her seminal environmental work of art Sun Tunnels, including a video documentary about Sun Tunnels.

Biographical material includes Robert Smithson's curriculum vitae, personal identification and medical documents, eight engagement/day planners Smithson and Holt maintained from 1966 to 1973, and Smithson's funeral register.

Correspondence is primarily with Smithson's family, friends, fellow artists, and business associates discussing personal relationships, proposed art projects, and exhibitions. Correspondents of note include Carl Andre, the Dwan Gallery (Virginia Dwan), Dan Graham, Will Insley, Ray Johnson, Gyorgy Kepes, Sol Lewitt, Lucy Lippard, and Dennis Wheeler. There is also substantial correspondence received by Holt upon Smithson's death in 1973, and between Holt and the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art regarding Smithson's retrospective exhibition in 1982.

There are nine interview transcripts with Smithson discussing his works and his general philosophy on art, and one transcript of the Andrew Dickson White Museum's Earth Art Symposium (1969) featuring the following artists: Mike Hiezer, Dennis Oppenheim, Robert Smithson, Neil Jenney, Gunther Uecker, Jan Dibbets, Richard Long, and Hans Haacke.

Writings are substantial and include 73 drafts of published and unpublished essays by Smithson on art, artists, and works in progress. The series also includes poems by Smithson, six notebooks containing notes and sketches by Smithson, and drafts of writings sent to Smithson and Holt by friends and colleagues, including Carl Andre, Terry Atkinson, Dan Flavin, Dan Graham, and Jack Thibeau.

Project files contain correspondence, project instructions, diagrams and sketches, research materials, photographic material, and maps related to over 50 of Smithson's artworks. These include concepts, proposed projects, sculptures, non-sites, and earthwork projects, including Spiral Jetty, Broken Circle, and Spiral Hill.

Personal business records include gallery related loan arrangements and receipts for miscellaneous art supplies. Financial records include tax forms and preparation documents, including cancelled checks, receipts, statements, and related correspondence.

Printed materials include books, clippings, and periodicals related to Smithson, either containing writings or sketches by him, or containing articles reviewing his work. There are also exhibition announcements and catalogs of Smithson's group and solo shows from 1959 to 1985.

The scrapbook contains clippings of Smithson's published articles from 1966 to 1973 with annotated shorthand notes.

Artwork consists of Christmas cards collaged by Smithson, and sketches by Smithson and Leo Valledor.

Photographic materials include prints and negatives of Smithson with friends, promotional Hollywood movie stills, and original prints and copyprints of other artists' artwork.

Artifacts consist of a paper bag silkscreened with a Campbell's soup can (Warhol), promotional buttons (N.E. Thing Co.), various organic materials, and two art kits.

Nancy Holt's papers consist of correspondence, a grant application, printed materials, and project files and audio visual material related to her motion picture film Pine Barrens (1975) and her seminal environmental work of art Sun Tunnels (1975).
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 14 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1905-1974 (Box 1; 14 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1959-1987 (Boxes 1-2, OV 21; 1.7 linear feet)

Series 3: Interview Transcripts, 1966-1973 (Box 2; 11 folders)

Series 4: Writings, 1959-1975 (Boxes 2-3; 1.1 linear feet)

Series 5: Project Files, circa 1950s-1982 (Boxes 4-5, Boxes 17-18, OV 20, OV 22-26, OV 36, RD 28-30, RD 32-35; 6.5 linear feet)

Series 6: Personal Business Records, circa 1967-1970s (Box 5; 4 folders)

Series 7: Financial Records, 1962-1972 (Box 6-7; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1955-1985 (Boxes 7-11, Box 18, RD 31; 5.6 linear feet)

Series 9: Scrapbook, 1966-1973 (Box 11, Box 16; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 10: Artwork, circa 1950s-1970s (Box 11; 4 folders)

Series 11: Photographs, circa 1950s-1970s (Box 11, Box 18; 5 folders)

Series 12: Artifacts, circa 1950s-1970s (Box 11, Box 14, OV 19; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 13: Nancy Holt Papers, circa 1960s-1980s (Box 12-13, 15, OV 27, FC 37-38; 1.9 linear feet)

Series 14: Robert Smithson Personal Library (Boxes 39-87; 48.4 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Robert Smithson (1938-1973) was a sculptor, painter, author, and lecturer who was known as a pioneer of land and earthworks art, based primarily in New York City. Nancy Holt (1938-2014) was a land artist, conceptual artist, and filmmaker. Smithson and Holt were married from 1963 until Smithson's death in 1973.

Born in Passaic, New Jersey, Smithson expressed an early interest in art, enrolling in classes at the Brooklyn Museum School and the Art Student's League in New York while still attending high school. Smithson's early works were primarily paintings, drawings, and collages. In 1959, he exhibited his first solo show of paintings at the Artists' Gallery in New York and had his first solo international show in Rome with the Galleria George Lester in 1961.

During the early to mid-1960s, Smithson was perhaps better known as a writer and art critic, writing numerous essays and reviews for Arts Magazine and Artforum. He became affiliated with artists who were identified with the minimalist movement, such as Carl Andre, Donald Judd, Nancy Holt, Sol LeWitt, Robert Morris and others. In 1963, Smithson married sculptor and filmmaker Nancy Holt and a year later started to create his first sculptural works. In 1966, Smithson joined the Dwan Gallery, whose owner Virginia Dwan was an enthusiastic supporter of his work.

Smithson's interest in land art began in the late 1960s while exploring industrial and quarry sites and observing the movement of earth and rocks. This resulted in a series of sculptures called "non-sites" consisting of earth and rocks collected from a specific site and installed in gallery space, often combined with photographs, maps, mirrors, or found materials. In September 1968, Smithson published the essay "A Sedimentation of the Mind: Earth Projects" in Artforum that promoted the work of the first wave of land art artists. Soon thereafter, he began creating his own large scale land art and earthworks.

From 1967 to 1973, Smithson's productivity was constant as he wrote, lectured, and participated in several solo and group shows a year, both at home and abroad. He explored narrative art as essay in "The Monuments of Passaic" and fully committed to his idea of visiting sites and using them as the basis for creating non-sites, Non-Site, Pine Barrens, (1968); incorporated and documented the use of mirrors at sites in Mirror Displacement, Cayuga Salt Mine Project (1968-1969); and created his first site-specific works through liquid pours of mud, asphalt, and concrete, including Asphalt Rundown (1969). In 1969, he also completed his first earth pour at Kent State University with his project Partially Buried Woodshed. Later that year, he created the sculptural artwork for which he is best known, Spiral Jetty (1969) on the Great Salt Lake in Utah. This was the first of his pieces to require the acquisition of land rights and earthmoving equipment, and would be followed two years later by Broken Circle and Spiral Hill in 1971.

On July 20, 1973, while surveying sites in Texas for the proposed Amarillo Ramp, Smithson died in a plane crash at the age of 35. Despite his early death, Smithson's writings and artwork had a major impact on many contemporary artists.

Nancy Holt began her career as a photographer and video artist. Today, Holt is most widely known for her large-scale environmental works, Sun Tunnels and Dark Star Park. Holt has also made a number of films and videos since the late 1960s, including Mono Lake (1968), East Coast, West Coast (1969), and Swamp (1971) in collaboration with her late husband Robert Smithson. Points of View: Clocktower (1974) features conversations between Lucy Lippard and Richard Serra, Liza Bear and Klaus Kertess, Carl Andre and Ruth Kligman and Bruce Brice and Tina Girouard. In 1978, she produced a film about her seminal work Sun Tunnels.
Related Material:
The Archives also holds several collections related to Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt, including an oral history interview with Robert Smithson conducted by Paul Cummings in 1972; an interview with Robert Smithson conducted by Tony Robbin in 1968; Robert Smithson letters to George B. Lester, 1960-1963; an oral history interviews with Nancy Holt conducted by Scott Gutterman in 1992 and Joyce Pomeroy Schwartz in 1993; and the Nancy Holt Estate records, circa 1960-2001.
Provenance:
The papers of Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt were donated by Nancy Holt in several accretions between 1986 and 2011.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, holds the intellectual property rights, including copyright, to all materials created by Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt with the exception of the following items: two holiday cards found in box 11, folders 22-23. For these two items, copyright held by Holt/Smithson Foundation / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Requests for permission to reproduce should be submitted to ARS.
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Conceptual artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Earthworks (Art)  Search this
Filmmakers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women filmmakers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Moving images
Documentary films
Citation:
Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt papers, 1905-1987. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.smitrobe
See more items in:
Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw96b7b3eff-59b4-4fed-a5db-394ea8d534bf
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-smitrobe
Online Media:

Hugo Gellert papers

Creator:
Gellert, Hugo, 1892-1985  Search this
Names:
American Artists' Congress  Search this
Art of Today Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Artist's Committee of Action (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Artists Coordination Committee (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Artists Council  Search this
Artists for Victory, Inc.  Search this
Committee to Defend V.J. Jerome  Search this
Hungarian Word, Inc.  Search this
National Society of Mural Painters (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Derkovits, Gyula, 1894-1934  Search this
Evergood, Philip, 1901-1973  Search this
Fast, Howard, 1914-2003  Search this
Fiene, Ernest, 1894-  Search this
Gellert, Ernest  Search this
Gellert, Lawrence, 1898-1979  Search this
Gottlieb, Harry, 1895-  Search this
Gropper, William, 1897-1977  Search this
Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971  Search this
Lie, Jonas, 1880-1940  Search this
Refregier, Anton, 1905-  Search this
Reisman, Philip, 1904-  Search this
Sequenzia, Sofia  Search this
Extent:
6.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Photographs
Date:
1916-1986
Summary:
The papers of graphic artist, muralist, and activist Hugo Gellert measure 6.9 linear feet and date from 1916 to 1986. They document his career as an artist and organizer for the radical political left through an interview, legal papers, financial records, family papers, artifacts, correspondence, writings, organizational records, extensive printed materials (many of them illustrated by Gellert), photographs, and artwork.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of graphic artist, muralist, and activist Hugo Gellert measure 6.9 linear feet and date from 1916 to 1986. They document his career as an artist and organizer for the radical left through an oral interview conducted by Sofia Sequenzia, legal papers, financial records, family papers, artifacts, correspondence, writings, organizational records, clippings, exhibition catalogs, various printed materials illustrated by Gellert, pamphlets, periodicals, mass mailings, photographs, and artwork.

Biographical Material includes an audio interview with Gellert; official documents related to memberships, property, and legal matters; financial documents that include bills, receipts, and contracts related to professional activities; papers of Gellert's brothers, Lawrence and Ernest; and artifacts. Correspondence is with other artists, writers, publishers, activists, friends, and family, including Ernest Fiene, Rockwell Kent, Harry Gottlieb, William Gropper, Philip Evergood, Howard Fast, and Jonas Lie. Writings include essays, book projects, notes, and notebooks written by Gellert; and stories and articles by other authors, including typescripts of early twentieth-century Hungarian short stories collected by Gellert.

Organizational Records are related to political and art organizations in which Gellert was an active organizer, officer, and in some cases, a founder. Because of his central role in many of these organizations, records often contain unique documentation of their activities. Records are found for the American Artists Congress, the Art of Today Gallery, the Artists Committee of Action, the Artists Coordination Committee, the Artists Council, Artists for Victory, Inc., the Committee to Defend V.J. Jerome, Hungarian Word, Inc., the National Society of Mural Painters, and other organizations.

Printed materials include a variety of political publications and periodicals with illustrations by Gellert, including New Masses, Art Front, Magyar Szo, and American Dialog; clippings related to his career, exhibition catalogs, political pamphlets, Hungarian literature, and mass mailings received from political organizations. Photographs contain a few personal photographs but are mostly news and publicity photographs, many of which depict prominent Communists and other newsmakers. Artwork includes sketches, drawings, designs, prints, and production elements for Gellert's artwork, as well as prints and drawings by Philip Reisman, Gyula Derkovits, and Anton Refregier.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 7 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1917-1982 (Box 1 and OV 9; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1920-1986 (Boxes 1-2, 8; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1916-1970 (Boxes 2 and 8; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 4: Organizational Records, circa 1920-1977 (Boxes 3, 8, and OV 9; 1 linear foot)

Series 5: Printed Materials, circa 1920-1986 (Boxes 4-6, 8, and OV 9; 3 linear feet)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1920-1959 (Boxes 6-7; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 7: Artwork, 1927-1981 (Box 7, OV 10; 0.4 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Graphic artist, muralist, and activist Hugo Gellert was born Hugo Grünbaum in Budapest, Hungary in 1892, the oldest of six children. His family immigrated to New York City in 1906, eventually changing their family name to Gellert.

Gellert attended art school at Cooper Union and the National Academy of Design. As a student, he designed posters for movies and theater, and also worked for Tiffany Studios. A number of student art prizes with cash awards enabled him to travel to Europe in the summer of 1914, where he witnessed the outbreak of World War I, an experience which helped shape his political beliefs. Aesthetically, he was also influenced by a folk revival among Hungarian artists at the time of his trip, and was more impressed, he later said, with the street advertising in Paris than he was with the cubism he saw in the Louvre.

Returning to the United States, Gellert became involved in the Hungarian-American workers' movement, and contributed drawings to its newspaper, Elöre (Forward). He remained involved in Hungarian-American art and activism throughout his life, including membership in the anti-fascist group, the Anti-Horthy League. When members of the fascist Horthy government unveiled a statue of a Hungarian hero in New York in 1928, Gellert hired a pilot and dropped leaflets on the group, a stunt for which he was arrested. In the 1950s, Gellert served as director of Hungarian Word, Inc., a Hungarian-language publisher in New York.

Gellert's political commitment and art remained deeply intertwined throughout his life, as he continually sought to integrate his commitment to Communism, his hatred of fascism, and his dedication to civil liberties. Throughout the 1910s and 1920s, he contributed artwork to several magazines of the radical left, including Masses and its successors Liberator and New Masses, both of which featured Gellert's artwork on their inaugural issue. Through Masses, he came to know other radicals such as Mike Gold, John Reed, Louise Bryant, Max Eastman, Floyd Dell, Anton Refregier, William Gropper, Harry Gottlieb, Bob Minor, and Art Young, and with them he followed the events of the Bolshevik revolution in Russia with sympathy and growing political fervor.

His brother, Ernest Gellert, also a socialist and activist, was drafted into the military but refused to serve. He died of a gunshot wound under suspicious circumstances while imprisoned at Fort Hancock, New Jersey, as a conscientious objector. Traumatized by this event, Gellert fled to Mexico to avoid conscription. In 1920 to 1922, he taught art at the Stelton School in New Jersey, a radical, utopian community school. He participated in the cultural scene of Greenwich Village, working on set designs, publications, and graphic art for political productions. He founded the first John Reed Club in 1929 with a group of Communist artists and writers including Anton Refregier, Louis Lozowick, and William Gropper. Initially, the group held classes and exhibitions, and provided services for strikes and other working-class activism. Later, John Reed Clubs formed around the country and became a formal arm of the United States Communist Party (CPUSA).

In the late 1920s, Gellert became a member of the National Society of Mural Painters (which, partly due to Gellert's activism in the group, became the Mural Artists' Guild local 829 of the United Scenic Artists Union of the AFL-CIO in 1937. Other members included Rockwell Kent, Anton Refregier, Arshile Gorky, and Marion Greenwood). In 1928, he created a mural for the Worker's Cafeteria in Union Square, NY. Later murals include the Center Theater in Rockefeller Center, the National Maritime Union Headquarters, the Hotel and Restaurant Workers' Union Building, NYC, the interior of the Communications Building at the 1939 World's Fair, and the Seward Park Housing Project in 1961.

In 1932, Gellert was invited to participate in a mural exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, and submitted a political mural about the robber barons of contemporary American politics and industry called Us Fellas Gotta Stick Together - Al Capone. The museum attempted to censor the mural, along with the murals of William Gropper and Ben Shahn. Other artists threatened to boycott the exhibition over the censorship and were successful in restoring them to the show.

The cooperation of artists in this controversy foreshadowed a larger protest in 1934, organized by Gellert, Saul Belman, Stuart Davis, and Zoltan Hecht, when Diego Rivera's pro-labor mural was destroyed at Rockefeller Center. After the incident, the group formed the Artists' Committee of Action and continued to fight censorship and advocate for artists' interests and welfare. They also co-published the magazine Art Front with the Artists' Union, a labor organization. Gellert served for a time as editor of Art Front, and chairman of the Artists' Committee of Action.

Gellert was active in producing both art and strategic policy for the cultural arm of the CPUSA, and he worked to mobilize the non-communist left, often referred to as the Popular Front. In 1933 he illustrated Karl Marx's Capital in Lithographs, and in 1935, he wrote a Marxist, illustrated satire called Comrade Gulliver, An Illustrated Account of Travel into that Strange Country the United States of America. Other published graphic works include Aesop Said So (1936) and a portfolio of silkscreen prints entitled Century of the Common Man (1943).

Other artist groups he helped to found and/or run include the American Artist's Congress, a Communist organization founded with Max Weber, Margaret Bourke-White, Stuart Davis, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Harry Sternberg, and others, which held symposia and exhibitions between 1936 and 1942; the Artists' Coordination Committee, an umbrella group of national organizations which sought protections for federally-employed and unionized artists; Artists for Victory, Inc., which formed in 1942 to mobilize artists in support of the war effort; and the Artists' Council, formed after the war to advocate for artists' welfare and employment.

Gellert maintained his loyalty to the Communist party throughout the post-war period despite growing disillusionment in the Popular Front over the actions of Josef Stalin, and despite the intense anti-communist crusades in the late 1940s and 1950s. He was investigated by the House of Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) and was nearly deported. He spent a number of years during this period in his wife's native Australia. Returning to the United States in the early 1950s, he threw his efforts into the defense of others who faced prison, deportation, and the blacklist following the HUAC hearings. He established The Committee to Defend V.J. Jerome in 1951 when Jerome, the cultural commissioner of CPUSA, was convicted under the Smith Act. The writer Dorothy Parker was the group's treasurer.

In 1954, Gellert established the Art of Today Gallery in New York City with Rockwell Kent and Charles White to provide an exhibition venue for blacklisted artists. Exhibitions included Maurice Becker, Henry Glintenkamp, Harry Gottlieb, Kay Harris, and Rockwell Kent. Gellert served as the gallery's secretary until it closed in 1957.

In the 1960s until his death in 1985, Gellert continued his activism through involvement in grassroots political organizations. Unlike many of his radical contemporaries, Gellert lived to see the revival of some of the ideas of the progressive era of the thirties in the countercultural years of the late 1960s and early 1970s. There were retrospectives of his work in Moscow in 1967 and in his native Budapest in 1968, and he appeared in Warren Beatty's film Reds in 1981.

Sources used for this essay include James Wechsler's 2003 dissertation "The Art and Activism of Hugo Gellert: Embracing the Spectre of Communism," his essay "From World War I to the Popular Front: The Art and Activism of Hugo Gellert," ( Journal of Decorative and Propaganda Arts number 24, Spring 2002), and Jeff Kisseloff's biographical essay for the 1986 Hugo Gellert exhibition at the Mary Ryan Gallery.
Related Material:
Among the holdings of the Archives of American Art are an oral history with Hugo Gellert from 1984, a recording of a lecture Gellert gave at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1985, and additional records of Artists for Victory, Inc., 1942-1946.

The Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives at New York University holds additional papers of Hugo Gellert.
Provenance:
A portion of the papers were donated in 1970 by Hugo Gellert. Additional papers were donated by Gellert and his wife, Livia Cinquegrana, in 1983 and 1986.
Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Artists' writings  Search this
Politics in art  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Muralists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Graphic artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Illustrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Photographs
Citation:
Hugo Gellert papers, 1916-1986. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.gellhugo
See more items in:
Hugo Gellert papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9eb96ed42-b751-47f6-a0ca-038014c8800e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gellhugo
Online Media:

Cleve Gray papers

Creator:
Gray, Cleve  Search this
Names:
Berry-Hill Galleries  Search this
Betty Parsons Gallery  Search this
Connecticut. Commission on Arts, Tourism, Culture, History and Film  Search this
Jacques Seligmann & Co  Search this
Neuberger Museum of Art  Search this
Pratt Institute  Search this
Princeton University  Search this
Rhode Island School of Design  Search this
Barzun, Jacques, 1907-  Search this
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Davis, Jim, 1901-1974  Search this
Dillenberger, Jane  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Ernst, Jimmy, 1920-1984  Search this
Gabo, Naum, 1890-1977  Search this
Grace, Louise N.  Search this
Gray, Francine du Plessix  Search this
Lipchitz, Jacques, 1891-1973  Search this
Marin, John, 1870-1953  Search this
Pollock, Jackson, 1912-1956  Search this
Richter, Hans, 1888-1976  Search this
Smith, David, 1906-1965  Search this
Villon, Jacques, 1875-1963  Search this
Weber, Nicholas Fox, 1947-  Search this
Extent:
9.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Poems
Articles
Photographs
Reviews (documents)
Notes
Illustrations
Notebooks
Sketches
Drafts (documents)
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Manuscripts
Paintings
Prints
Watercolors
Drawings
Lectures
Date:
1933-2005
Summary:
The Cleve Gray papers, 1933-2005, measure 9.2 linear feet. Papers include biographical material, alphabetical files, writings, artwork, audio/visual records, artifacts, printed material, and photographs. Extensive alphabetical files contain personal and professional correspondence as well as subject files relating to projects and interests. Especially well-documented are: Gray's involvement with the Vietnam protest movement; and Threnody, his best-known work composed of fourteen large panels lamenting the dead of both sides sides in Vietnam, commissioned by the Neuberger Museum of Art.
Scope and Content Note:
The Cleve Gray papers, 1933-2005, measure 9.2 linear feet. Papers include biographical material, alphabetical files, writings, artwork, audio/visual records, artifacts, printed material, and photographs. Extensive alphabetical files contain personal and professional correspondence as well as subject files relating to projects and interests. Especially well-documented are: Gray's involvement with the Vietnam movement; and Threnody, his best-known work composed of fourteen large panels lamenting the dead of both sides sides in Vietnam, commissioned by the Neuberger Museum of Art.

Among the biographical material are award and membership certificates, biographical notes, and personal documentation.

The alphabetical files contain Cleve Gray's personal and professional correspondence, as well as subject files relating to projects and interests. Correspondence is with friends and family, colleagues, publishers, museum curators and directors, art dealers, collectors, and fans. Among the correspondents of note are: Jacques Barzun, James E. Davis, Naum Gabo, Louise N. Grace, Hans and Fridel Richter, and Jacques and Gaby Villon. Other substantial correspondence includes: Berry-Hill Galleries, Betty Parsons Gallery, Connecticut Commission on the Arts, Jacques Seligmann and Co., Neuberger Museum of Art, Pratt Institute, Princeton University, and Rhode Island School of Design. Subject files mostly consist of correspondence, but include printed material and some photographs. Among the subject files are: Art Collection of Cleve and Francine Gray, Artist-Dealer Consignments and Visual Artists' Rights Act of 1989, Artists' Tax Equity Act of 1979, Promised Gifts to Museums, Threnody, Vestments, and Vietnam Protest. Of particular interest are files relating to the Estate of Hans Richter (Cleve Gray, executor), and Gray's research correspondence and illustrations for his Cosmopolitan article "Women-Leaders of Modern Art."

Writings are manuscripts and drafts, research materials, notes, and miscellaneous writings by Cleve Gray and other authors. Those by Gray include articles and catalog introductions on a wide range of art-related topics, as well as book and exhibition reviews. Also found are a book proposal, texts and notes for lectures and talks, miscellaneous notes, poems, political statements, and student papers. Of particular interest are autobiographical notes in the form of a chronology that his biographer, Nicholas Fox Weber, cited as an "autochronology."

Among the writings by other authors are pieces about Cleve Gray including Nicholas Fox Weber's manuscript Cleve Gray. A significant amount of material relates to three books edited by Gray: David Smith by David Smith: Sculpture and Writings, Hans Richter, and John Marin. Research material survives for an unpublished volume, Naum Gabo. Also included are notes relating to his translation of A l'Infinitif by Marcel Duchamp. Jane Daggett Dillenberger is represented by a lecture, "The Resurrection in Art." The remaining items by other authors are unsigned; of particular interest is a small notebook of reminiscences and notes about Jackson Pollock.

Artwork by Cleve Gray consists mostly drawings and sketches, and a small number of paintings, prints, and watercolors. Works by other artists consist are an unsigned mobile of paper cut-outs, possibly by Alexander Calder, and a pencil drawing signed Dick (probably Richard Avedon).

Audio recordings are a radio broadcast featuring Cleve Gray, several lectures by Gray on John Marin, and a lecture titled "Meaning in the Visual Arts." Other recordings are of Hans Richter and an interview with Jimmy Ernst conducted by Francine du Plessix Gray. Also found is a videocassette of "Glenville School Students at SUNY (Lincoln Center Activity)."

Artifacts are a Chinese scroll representative of those that hung in Cleve Gray's studio, two of his paintbrushes, Aberdeen-Angus Breeders' Association blue ribbon, and Neuberger Museum of Art Lifetime Achievement Award.

The vast majority of printed material - articles, clippings, exhibition catalogs and announcements, reproductions of art work, etc. - are about or by Cleve Gray. Miscellaneous items and publications mentioning Gray consist of annual reports, brochures, calendars, newsletters, programs, etc. Clippings about Vietnam and Vietnam protest memorabilia reflect his passionate involvement in the anti-war movement; a small number of these items mention Gray or were written by him.

Photographs are of artwork, events, people, places, and miscellaneous subjects. Most of the art work appearing in the photographs is by Cleve Gray and includes images of destroyed paintings. Also found is an original print of Photo Abstraction by Gray, circa 1934. Of particular note are photographs of Threnody, among them preparatory drawings and views of the work in progress. Photographs of artwork by other artists include Louise N. Grace, Jacques Lipchitz, John Marin, Hans Richter, and Jacques Villon.

Photographs of people are mainly portraits of Gray, and views of him with his wife and sons. Other individuals appearing in photographs are Hans Richter and some of Richter's descendants. Pictures of places consist of Gray's studio.

Events are an unidentified exhibition opening. Miscellaneous subjects are mostly exhibition installations. Illustrations consist of photographs published in David Smith by David Smith: Sculpture and Writings. Also found are small number of negatives and color transparencies.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into 8 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1943-circa 2001 (Box 1; 0.1 linear ft.)

Series 2: Alphabetical Files, 1936-2005 (Boxes 1-5, 9; 4.3 linear ft.)

Series 3: Writings, 1935-2000 (Boxes 5-6; 0.85 linear ft.)

Series 4: Artwork, circa 1933-1987 (Boxes 6, 9, OV 12; 0.45 linear ft.)

Series 5: Audio/Visual Records, 1971-1989 (Box 6; 0.25 linear ft.)

Series 6: Artifacts, 1957-1999 (Box 6, RD 11; 0.45 linear ft.)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1933-2005 (Boxes 7-8; 1.25 linear ft.)

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1934-2002 (Boxes 8-10; 1.15 linear ft.)
Biographical Note:
Abstract Expressionist painter, sculptor, and writer Cleve Gray (1918-2004) lived and worked in Connecticut where he was politically active in the Vietnam protest movement and other liberal causes.

Born Cleve Ginsberg in New York City (the family changed its name to Gray in 1936), he attended the Ethical Culture School and at a young age developed a fascination with color and paint. At the urging of friends, Cleve's parents allowed him to accompany a school friend for lessons with George Bellows' student Antonia Nell. She encouraged and inspired the young artist, and a still life he painted in her class was shown at the National Academy of Design's 1932 annual exhibition. Miss Nell also introduced him to Louise N. Grace, an artist who became a good friend and had a lasting influence on him. While a student at Phillips Academy, Cleve studied painting with Bartlett Hayes and aspired to paint in France. Upon his graduation in 1936, he was awarded the Samuel F. B. Morse Prize for most promising art student.

Gray's mother was always supportive of his career choice. His businessman father, who didn't understand his son's desire to be an artist, insisted on a college education. Cleve chose Princeton, where he majored in art and archaeology, and studied painting with James E. Davis. His senior thesis was on Chinese landscape painting; both Eastern philosophy and art were long-term influences on Gray's work and outlook. He graduated summa cum laude in 1940, and then spent several months painting while living at the farm of a family friend in Mendham, New Jersey.

When a doctor suggeted that a dry climate might relieve sinus and asthma problems, Gray moved to Tucson, Arizona. Once settled in the desert, he contacted Louise N. Grace, whom he had met as a young teenager through his art instructor. Miss Grace, an artist and daughter of the founder of W. R. Grace and Co., was a highly cultured and independent woman older than his parents. The summer before Gray entered Phillips Academy, she had hired him to brush ground color onto canvases for murals she was painting for "Eleven Arches," her home in Tuscon then under construction. Miss Grace invited Gray to visit "Eleven Arches" to see the completed murals, and despite the substantial age difference, their friendship deepened; Gray found in her intellectual and spiritual guidance that was lacking in his own family. He remained in Tucson until enlisting in the U. S. Army in 1942, and they corresponded frequently during the the war. When a stroke in 1948 prevented Miss Grace from participating in the extensive tour of Europe she was arranging for a small group of friends, including Gray, she provided sufficient funds and insisted he make the trip on his own. Another stroke, suffered while Gray was traveling, left her in a coma; he was not permitted to see her again. Upon her death in 1954, Gray inherited "Eleven Arches."

Between 1943 and 1946, Gray was stationed in England, France, and Germany, serving in Army Signal Intelligence. Most of his work was performed at night, and he spent his free time drawing. While in London, Gray produced many colored pencil drawings of buildings that had been bombed. In France, a Red Cross volunteered to introduce him to Jacques Villon; although unfamiliar with the artist, Gray knew of Villon's brother, Marcel Duchamp, and accepted the invitation. Jacques and Gaby Villon lived near Gray's billet and he became a frequent visitor. Their friendship was important to his development as an artist. After being discharged from the Army in 1946, Gray remained in France to work with Villon who introduced him to the study of color and the concept of intellectual quality in painting. Gray also studied informally with André Lhote, Villon's former teacher. "American Painters in Paris," an exhibition presented in 1946 at Galerie Durand-Ruel, included work by Cleve Gray.

He returned to New York City in 1946. In the tight post-war rental market Gray managed to find a small room upstairs from a grocery store on East 106th Street for use as a studio. He commenced painting the London Ruins series based on drawings he had made during the war, and began thinking about exhibiting in New York. Gray secured introductions to Pierre Matisse, Curt Valentin, and Dorothy Miller. They encouraged him, but no opportunities came his way until Germain Seligmann, whose gallery was expanding its scope to include contemporary art, followed the advice of Curt Valentin and looked at Gray's work. Gary's first solo exhibition, held at Jacques Seligmann and Co., included selections from the London Ruins series, paintings done in Maine and Arizona, and a few portraits. The New York Times called it "an auspicious first," and one of the London Ruins series was selected by Edward Alden Jewell for the "Critic's Exhibition" at Grand Central Gallery.

Gray found New York City too frenetic. In 1949 he bought a large, old house in Warren, Connecticut, and lived and worked at "Graystones" for the remainder of his life. Half of a 6-car garage was converted to a studio; many years later, his studio moved to a barn, its renovation and design planned by sculptor and architect Tony Smith.

He married Francine du Plessix in 1957. Always interested in literature and philosophy, in the 1960s Francine du Plessix Gray began contributing articles to The New Yorker and is still affiliated with the magazine. Her reviews and articles appeared in prominent publications, and she wrote several award-winning novels and biographies. Their sons, Thaddeus and Luke (now a painter), were born in 1959 and 1961. Francine's mother, Tatiana du Plessix (the hat designer Tatiana of Saks), and step-father, the sculptor Alexander Liberman (also former art director of Vogue and later editorial director of Condé Nast publications) became Cleve Gray's closest friends.

The paintings and drawings of Cleve Gray - first consisting of figures and portraits, and then abstract compositions - were often produced in series. The earliest series, London Ruins, grew from the colored pencil drawings made while stationed in London during World War II. Travels to France, Italy, Greece, Morocco, Hawaii, Spain, Egypt, Japan, and Czechoslovakia, inspired many series, among them: Etruscan, Augury, Ceres, Demeter Landscape, Hera, Morocco, Hawaii, Ramses, Perne, Hatshepsut, Roman Walls, Zen, and Prague. His hometown, the Holocaust, and musicians inspired other series: Warren, Sleepers Awake!, Bela Bartok, and Four Heads of Anton Bruckner. Some series were works on paper, others were collage canvases, and a few series later spawned prints. Gray began using acrylics in the 1940s. Although the medium offered many benefits, he did not always like its appearance and frequently returned to oils. Around 1966 Gray was painting almost exclusively with acrylic, and eventually developed a technique of thinning the paint and applying successive layers of color (sometimes by pouring or with a sponge) on cotton duck rather than traditional canvas.

Gray was attracted to sculpture, too, working in that medium at different points in his career. His first sculpture, in plaster, was completed in 1959. In the early 1960s he visited a commercial sand-casting foundry and became excited about learning to cast in bronze. He made about a dozen sculptures to cast in sand, but due to too much undercutting, their casting became too difficult a problem. Lava flows seen while in Hawaii during 1970 and 1971 inspired a return to sculpture. This time, he used wood, papier maché, and metal. Gray then decided these pieces should be cast in bronze, and he was determined to do it himself. Friends taught him the lost wax process and he began working at the Tallix Foundry in Peekskill, New York where, over the next year, he cast about forty bronzes.

Gray's best known work is Threnody, a lament for the dead of both sides in Vietnam. In 1972, Gray received a commission to fill a very large gallery of the soon-to-open Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, College at Purchase) designed by Philip Johnson. Friends of the Neuberger Museum paid his expenses and Gray, who was enormously excited about the project he considered a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, donated his time. Developing plans for the execution of Threnody consumed most of his time during 1972 and 1973. Composed of a series of fourteen panels, each approximately twenty feet square, the piece presented a number of technical challenges. It was constructed and painted in situ during the summer and early fall of 1973. Since then, Threnody has been reinstalled at the Neuberger Museum of Art on several occasions.

Gray was commissioned to design liturgical vestments for two Episcopal churches in Connecticut in the 1970s. A chasuble, stoles, and a mitre were commissioned by the Episcopal Diocese of Connecticut in 1984.

He won the "Outdoor Art at the Station Competition," for Union Station, Hartford, Connecticut. His very large porcelain enamel tile mural, Movement in Space, was installed on the façade of the transportation center in 1988.

Gray began writing occasional articles and exhibition reviews in the late 1940s. His concern with rational structure in art led him to question Abstract Expressionism and write "Narcissus in Chaos." This article, published in 1959 by The American Scholar, drew considerable attention. In 1960, Cosmopolitan published "Women - Leaders of Modern Art" that featured Nell Blaine, Joan Brown, Elaine de Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, Sonia Gretchoff, Grace Hartigan, Ethel Magafan, Louise Nevelson, and Georgia O'Keeffe. Between 1960 and 1970, Gray was a contributing editor of Art In America, producing numerous articles (a few co-authored with Francine) and reviews for the periodical. He edited three books, David Smith by David Smith: Scupture and Writings, Hans Richter, and John Marin, all published by Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, and translated Marcel Duchamp's A l'Infinitif.

During the early 1960s, Gray became intensely focused on the situation in Vietnam. His first artistic response came in 1963 with Reverend Quan Duc, painted to commemorate a Buddhist monk who had immolated himself. Francine, too, felt strongly about the issue and over time the couple became increasingly active in the anti-war movement. They joined a number of organizations and helped to found a local chapter of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam. The years 1968 and 1969 were an especially intense and active period for the Grays. They protested, wrote and spoke out against the war, raised funds to support anti-war political candidates, and on a few occasions were arrested and jailed. Writing for Art in America, editing the book series, and anti-war activities left little time for his art. In 1970 Gray refocused his attention on painting.

Beginning in 1947, Gray was always represented by a New York Gallery: Jacques Seligmann and Co. (1947-1959), Staempfli Gallery (1960-1965), Saidenberg Gallery (1965-1968), Betty Parsons Gallery (1968-1983), Armstrong Gallery (1984-1987), and Berry-Hill Galleries (1988-2003). He was represented by galleries in other cities, as well, but not as consistently or for such long periods.

He exhibited extensively in group and solo exhibitions throughout the United States and internationally. In addition to numerous solo exhibitions presented by the dealers who represented Gray, there were retrospective exhibitions at: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Brooklyn Museum, Columbus Museum of Art, Krannert Art Museum (University of Illinois, Champaign), Princeton University Art Museum, Rhode Island School of Design, and Wadsworth Atheneum.

Many museums' permanent collections include the work of Cleve Gray, among them: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Butler Institute of American Art, Columbus Museum of Art, Neuberger Museum of Art (SUNY, College at Purchase), the Museum of Modern Art (New York), Newark Museum, Oklahoma City Museum of Art, Phillips Collection, Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery (University of Nebraska, Lincoln), Smithsonian Institution, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, and Yale University Art Gallery.

Cleve Gray served as artist-in-residence at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art in 1963 and at the Honolulu Academy of Arts in 1970, both sponsored by Ford Foundation programs. In 1980, he was appointed an artist-in-residence at the American Academy in Rome, where Francine concurrently served as a writer-in-residence; they returned for shorter periods during each of the subsequent seven years. Cleve Gray was presented the Connecticut Arts Award in 1987, and the Neuberger Museum of Art Lifetime Achievement Award in 1999. He was awarded an honorary degree by the University of Hartford in 1992, and was elected a member of The American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1998. In addition, he was a trustee of the Neuberger Museum of Art, New York Studio School, Rhode Island School of Design, and Wadsworth Atheneum.

Cleve Gray hit his head and suffered a massive subdural hematoma after falling on ice outside of his home. He died the following day, December 8, 2004.
Separated Material:
Exhibition catalogs and announcements and two scrapbooks donated to the Archives in 1967 and 1968 were microfilmed on reels D314-D315. Items on reel D315, transferred to the Smithsonian American Art Museum Library in 1975, are not described in this finding aid.
Provenance:
The Cleve Gray papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by Mr. Gray in 1967 and 1968. The bulk of the collection was given by his widow, Francine du Plessix Gray, in 2007 and 2008.
Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordigs with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Sculptors -- Connecticut  Search this
Painters -- Connecticut  Search this
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- Protest Movements -- United States  Search this
Designers  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Poems
Articles
Photographs
Reviews (documents)
Notes
Illustrations
Notebooks
Sketches
Drafts (documents)
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Manuscripts
Paintings
Prints
Watercolors
Drawings
Lectures
Citation:
Cleve Gray papers, 1933-2005. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.grayclev
See more items in:
Cleve Gray papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw92d3d47d0-baa3-4085-80f2-9b5d1730c052
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-grayclev
Online Media:

Dore Ashton papers

Creator:
Ashton, Dore  Search this
Names:
Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art -- Faculty  Search this
New School for Social Research (New York, N.Y.) -- Faculty  Search this
Yale University -- Faculty  Search this
Adams, Pat, 1928-  Search this
Adley, James, 1931-  Search this
Albee, Edward, 1928-  Search this
Albers, Josef  Search this
Arnheim, Rudolf  Search this
Avedon, Richard  Search this
Berthot, Jake, 1939-2014  Search this
Borges, Jacopo Luis  Search this
Congdon, Dennis  Search this
Cornell, Joseph  Search this
Diebenkorn, Richard, 1922-1993  Search this
Driskell, David C.  Search this
Giacometti, Alberto, 1901-1966  Search this
Guidieri, Remo  Search this
Guston, Philip, 1913-1980  Search this
Hellman, Lillian, 1905-1984  Search this
Herbert, George  Search this
Hiss, Alger  Search this
Howes, Barbara  Search this
Kaprow, Allan  Search this
Licht, Fred, 1928-  Search this
Lindner, Richard, 1901-1978  Search this
Malamud, Bernard  Search this
Miró, Joan, 1893-  Search this
Motherwell, Robert  Search this
Moy, Seong  Search this
Mumford, Lewis, 1895-1990  Search this
Oldenburg, Claes, 1929-  Search this
Reuterswärd, Carl Fredrik, 1934-  Search this
Sterne, Hedda, 1910-  Search this
Tinguely, Jean, 1925-  Search this
Tobey, Mark  Search this
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Vasilikos, Vasilēs, 1934-  Search this
Yunkers, Adja, 1900-1983  Search this
Extent:
35.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Diaries
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Transcripts
Date:
circa 1928-2014
1849
Summary:
The papers of Dore Ashton measure 35.6 linear feet and date from circa 1928-2014, with one letter in the Joseph Cornell subject file dating from 1849. The records document Dore Ashton's career as an art critic, historian and educator, with particular depth for the period of 1952 through 1990. The collection contains a small amount of biographical material, as well as correspondence, writings, subject files, printed materials, artwork, and reference photographs of artworks. An addition to the Dore Ashton papers includes biographical material, correspondence, writings, writing project and subject files, teaching files, printed material, artwork and sketchbooks, and photographic material.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Dore Ashton measure 35.6 linear feet and date from circa 1928-2014, with one letter in the Joseph Cornell subject file dating from 1849. The records document Dore Ashton's career as an art critic, historian and educator, with particular depth for the period of 1952 through 1990. The collection contains a small amount of biographical material, as well as correspondence, writings, subject files, printed materials, artwork, and reference photographs of artworks. An addition to the Dore Ashton papers includes biographical material, correspondence, writings, writing project and subject files, teaching files, printed material, artwork and sketchbooks, and photographic material.

The bulk of the collection consists of correspondence with many artists, writers and others, including Pat Adams, James Adley, Rudolf Arnheim, Jake Berthot, Dennis Congdon, George Herbert, Remo Guidieri, Barbara Howes, Fred Licht, Joan Punyet Miro, Carl Fredrik Reuterswärd, and Hedda Sterne, among others. Smaller amounts of letters are from Joseph Albers, Edward Albee, Richard Avedon, Richard Diebenkorn, David Driskell, Alberto Giacometti, Philip Guston, Lillian Hellman, Alger Hiss, Bernard Malamud, Joan Miro, Robert Motherwell, Lewis Mumford, Claes Oldenburg, and Vassilis Vassilikos.

Writings consist of transcripts of miscellaneous articles or those written for various publications. Research files include reference or research materials for books, exhibitions, individuals and various topics. Individuals and topics include Jacopo Luis Borges, Allan Kaprow, Richard Lindner, Seong Moy, Jean Tinguely, Mark Tobey, Jack Tworkov, Adja Yunkers; and Dadaism, poetry and symbolism.

The addition to the Dore Ashton papers (Series 8) includes biographical material, correspondence, writings, writing project and subject files, teaching files, printed material, artwork and sketchbooks, and photographic material. Writings make up a significant part of the addition and contain hundreds of manuscripts, as well as lectures, notes, sixty notebooks, ten diaries, and writings by others. Writing project and subject files comprise over half of the addition and encompass a large collection of alphabetical files pertaining to artists, actors, writers, thinkers, and collaborators; work projects including writings, exhibitions, panels, symposia, and lecture series; as well as various other subjects and topics. The addition also contains teaching files related to Ashton's positions at the Cooper Union, the New School for Social Research, and Yale University. The photographic material in this series is also abundant and contains hundreds of original photographs of Ashton throughout all stages of her life, many with friends and family.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1962-1978

Series 2: Correspondence, 1945-2010, undated

Series 3: Writings, 1952-1976, undated

Series 4: Research files, 1849, 1950-1984, 2009, undated

Series 5: Printed Materials, 1931-1981, undated

Series 6: Artwork, 1949, 1952, 1983, undated

Series 7: Photographs of Artwork, circa 1950-2010

Series 8: Addition to the Dore Ashton Papers, circa 1928-2013
Biographical / Historical:
Dore Ashton (1928-) is an art critic, author, and educator living in New York City. She wrote, contributed , and edited more than 30 books. Ashton was born in Newark New Jersey in 1928 and received an MA from Harvard University in 1950. Her many books and articles focus on late 19th and 20th century art and artists. Ashton was associate editor at Art Digest from 1952-1954, and critic for Arts and Architecture at the New York Times, 1955-1960. Starting in 1962 she held several lecturing posts at various institutions including the School of Visual Arts, Cooper Union, and the New School for Social Research. She was awarded a Guggenheim fellowship in 1964 and a National Endowment for the Humanities grant in 1980. Among Ashton's books are Abstract Art Before Columbus, 1956; Poets and the Past, 1959; A Joseph Cornell Album, 1974; Yes, But…A Critical Study of Philip Guston, 1976, About Rothko, 1983; The New York School: a Cultural Reckoning, 1973; Noguchi East and West, 1992; and David Rankin: The New York Years, 2013. Dore Ashton was the first critic to develop a comprehensive and eye-witness account of the history of the Abstract Expressions.

Ashton married artist Adja Yunkers (1900-1983) in 1953, and they had two daughters Alexandra (known as Sasha) and Marina. In 1985 she married writer Matti Megged (1923-2003).
Related Materials:
Among the holdings of the Archives is an oral history interview with Dore Ashton conducted November 21, 2010 by George W. Sampson, for the Archives of American Art's Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts Project.

Dore Ashton papers are also located at Emory University Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library.
Provenance:
The Dore Ashton papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by Dore Ashton May 27, 1982, May 8, 1997, June 2, 2011, and March, 25, 2016.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Women art critics  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Art criticism  Search this
Art, Modern  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Artists -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diaries
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Transcripts
Citation:
Dore Ashton papers, 1849, circa 1928-2014. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.ashtdore
See more items in:
Dore Ashton papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw96b23d022-d02d-4a06-ba62-e34c59ad25ae
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-ashtdore
Online Media:

Nancy Holt Estate records

Creator:
Holt, Nancy, 1938-2014  Search this
Names:
James Cohan Gallery  Search this
John Weber Gallery  Search this
Smithson, Robert  Search this
Extent:
circa 57.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Diaries
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Drawings
Date:
circa 1900-2014
Summary:
The Nancy Holt Estate records measure circa 57.8 linear feet and date from circa 1900-2014, with the bulk of the material dating from 1960-2000. The records include financial records, notebooks, project files including unrealized proposals, correspondence, calendars, and 9 linear feet of Holt's annotated library. Also included are the John Weber Gallery records concerning Robert Smithson that consist of the gallery's inventory and slide records of Robert Smithson's drawings and sculptures, including earthworks, and incorporate some slides from the James Cohan Gallery. James Cohan worked for John Weber before establishing his own gallery in 2001.
Scope and Contents:
The Nancy Holt Estate records measure circa 57.8 linear feet and date from circa 1900-2014, with the bulk of the material dating from 1960-2000. The records include financial records, notebooks, project files including unrealized proposals, correspondence, calendars, and 9 linear feet of Holt's annotated library. Also included are the John Weber Gallery records concerning Robert Smithson that consist of the gallery's inventory and slide records of Robert Smithson's drawings and sculptures, including earthworks. The records incorporate some slides from the James Cohan Gallery (1999-), an art gallery in Manhattan, New York, which represents the estate of Robert Smithson.
Arrangement:
The Nancy Holt Estate records are arranged as 4 series.

Series 1: Project Files, circa 1900-2014, bulk 1970-2000 (12.8 linear feet; Boxes 3-10, OVs 11-31, RDs 32-39)

Series 2: Calendars and Notebooks, circa 1970s-2013 (2 linear feet; Boxes 40-42, OVs 43-44)

Series 3: John Weber Gallery Records Concerning Robert Smithson, circa 1960-circa 2001 (2 linear feet; Boxes 1-2)

Series 4: Unprocessed Papers, circa 1960s-circa 2014 (41 linear feet; Boxes 11-30, 34-38, 43-49, 53, 63-70, OVs 71-72)
Biographical / Historical:
Nancy Holt (1938-2014) was an environmental and installation artist, sculptor, filmmaker, and photographer, based in New York, New York. She was best known for her large-scale public land art installations including her seminal work Sun Tunnels (1973-1976) located in the Great Basin Desert, Utah. Her work engaged with the natural environment and the celestial realm, tracing the rotation of the earth and the movement of the sun and stars. Holt was also fascinated by mechanical systems such as those used for heating, drainage, and ventilation, and her functional sculptural installations explored the relationship between architecture and the built environment.

Holt was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, grew up in New Jersey, and graduated from Tufts University in 1960 with a degree in biology. She moved to New York City later that year where she met the artist Robert Smithson, to whom she was married from 1963 until Smithson's death in 1973.

Holt's landmark work Sun Tunnels was executed in 1973-1976 in Utah's Great Basin Desert, where Holt and Smithson had purchased surrounding land specifically to ensure an unimpeded view of the horizon. Holt went on to produce many site-specific outdoor works including 30 Below (1980), Dark Star Park (1984), Solar Rotary (1995), and Up and Under (1998). Her exploration of what she termed Systems Works included Catch Basin (1982), Flow Ace Heating (1985), and Spinwinder (1991).

Holt's photography was essential in the development of her ideas. In Missouri Ranch Locators: Vision Encompassed (1972) she used photography in her development of "seeing devices," creating eye-level steel pipes to direct viewers to a specific site in the surrounding landscape, and developing a concept that was central to Sun Tunnels and other works. Her book Ransacked, Aunt Ethel: An Ending (1980) documented through text and photographs the abuse and theft her aunt was subjected to at the end of her life. In Time Outs (1985) Holt used photographs of football games taken from a television screen to create a book born out of her childhood love of TV sporting events.

Holt's work can be found in the collections of major institutions including the Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, the Utah Museum of Fine Arts, and the Museum für Gegenswartkunst, Germany. Her permanent installations can be found at public institutions including Miami University Art Museum, Southern Connecticut State University, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, Western Washington University, and University of South Florida.

In 2012 Nancy Holt was made a Chevalier of the of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Government. In 2013 she was presented with a Lifetime Achievement Award by the International Sculpture Center in New York. Holt received five National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, two New York Creative Artist Fellowships, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and an Honorary Doctorate from the University of South Florida, Tampa.

Holt lived in Galisteo, New Mexico, from 1995-2013. She died in New York City in 2014.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds the Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt papers, an interview with Nancy Holt conducted 1992 July 6 by Scott Gutterman for the Archives of American Art, and an interview with Nancy Holt conducted 1993 August 3 by Joyce Pomeroy Schwartz for the Archives of American Art.
Provenance:
Bequest of Nancy Holt, 2014.
Restrictions:
The bulk of this collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.

Some papers remain closed to researchers including some rolled documents in the unprocessed papers, financial files, and Nancy Holt's annotated library of books.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Items created by Nancy Holt and Robert Smithson copyright held by Holt/Smithson Foundation / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Requests for permission to reproduce should be submitted to ARS.
Occupation:
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Filmmakers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Environmental artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Installation artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Photographers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculptors -- New Mexico -- Galisteo  Search this
Installation artists -- New Mexico -- Galisteo  Search this
Environmental artists -- New Mexico -- Galisteo  Search this
Photographers -- New Mexico -- Galisteo  Search this
Filmmakers -- New Mexico -- Galisteo  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Earthworks (Art)  Search this
Women photographers  Search this
Women filmmakers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Diaries
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Drawings
Citation:
Nancy Holt Estate records, circa 1900-2014. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.holtnanc
See more items in:
Nancy Holt Estate records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw95e0b7a8b-3fdb-4cd3-91fb-a6bec00cc668
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-holtnanc
Online Media:

Projects by Name

Collection Creator:
Holt, Nancy, 1938-2014  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1900-2014
Scope and Contents:
Records include Holt's correspondence with architects, designers, project managers, local government planning and budget departments, fabricators, and others involved at all stages of her projects. Often Holt conveyed developing ideas and change details on notes written on fax cover letters which are included here. The evolution of Holt's ideas can be further traced in what are called "drawings" in the container inventory and are primarily copies of Holt's originals which may include design sketches, studies, progress prints, plan layouts, and blueprints of her evolving and final designs.

Of note is substantive documentation of two of Holt's unfinished projects: the earthwork Sky Mound which has been on hold since 1984 and was originally envisioned to revive a landfill in the New Jersey Meadowlands four miles outside of Manhattan; and Solar Web (1984-89) an open structure that tracks the motion of the sun on Santa Monica beach. Although funded and approved by the California Coastal Commission, the installation was discontinued due to one dissenting vote on the council that claimed the work would spoil ocean views.

Also particularly well documented are Holt's Arlington installation Dark Star Park, and Up and Under, an installation of carved, winding mounds of earth and tunnels in a quarry in Nokia, Finland. Included in Dark Star Park records are tape logs for and transcripts of interviews conducted by Holt at the park site and documenting people responding to the work.

In addition to land art installations, documented projects include Holt's film projects Revolve and Underscan and her book projects Ransacked: Aunt Ethel, An Ending and Time Outs. Records include interview transcripts for Revolve, and background material for Underscan and the related Ransacked, including family photos dating to circa 1900, draft manuscripts, Holt's notes on the sequence of events surrounding her aunt's demise, and transcribed letters from her aunt. Also found are text, photographs, and a mock up of the book Time Outs.

Notably absent from the series are project files for Sun Tunnels with the exception of some related printed material and some copies of plans and drawings.
Collection Restrictions:
The bulk of this collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.

Some papers remain closed to researchers including some rolled documents in the unprocessed papers, financial files, and Nancy Holt's annotated library of books.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Items created by Nancy Holt and Robert Smithson copyright held by Holt/Smithson Foundation / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Requests for permission to reproduce should be submitted to ARS.
Collection Citation:
Nancy Holt Estate records, circa 1900-2014. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.holtnanc, Subseries 1.1
See more items in:
Nancy Holt Estate records
Nancy Holt Estate records / Series 1: Project Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9c6da7ee6-356a-47ff-a9d3-1a36ffeab2e1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-holtnanc-ref153

Jane Teller papers

Creator:
Teller, Jane  Search this
Names:
Albright-Knox Art Gallery  Search this
Montclair Art Museum  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
National Council on the Aging  Search this
Newark Museum  Search this
Noyes Museum  Search this
Parma Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Princeton Gallery of Fine Art  Search this
Squibb Gallery (Princeton, N.J.)  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Brodsky, Judith K.  Search this
Caparn, Rhys, 1909-1997  Search this
Dehner, Dorothy, 1901-1994  Search this
Fuller, Sue, 1914-  Search this
Gatch, Lee, 1902-1968  Search this
Johnson, Margaret K. (Margaret Kennard)  Search this
Kadish, Reuben, 1913-1992  Search this
Lamis, Leroy, 1925-  Search this
Lassaw, Ibram, 1913-2003  Search this
Siskind, Aaron  Search this
Extent:
8.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Prints
Sketchbooks
Slides (photographs)
Motion pictures (visual works)
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Sound recordings
Date:
1911-1991
Summary:
The papers of printmaker and sculptor Jane Teller measure 8.6 linear feet and date from 1911 to 1991. The papers include biographical materials, correspondence, business records, notes, writings, three sketchbooks, sketches and prints, five scrapbooks, printed material, subject files, photographs, sound and video recordings, and motion picture film.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of printmaker and sculptor Jane Teller measure 8.6 linear feet and date from 1911 to 1991. The papers include biographical materials, correspondence, business records, notes, writings, three sketchbooks, sketches and prints, five scrapbooks, printed material, subject files, photographs, sound and video recordings, and motion picture film.

Biographical material includes a birth certificate, school work, and passports. General correspondence includes letters from several artists including Rhys Caparn, Sue Fuller and Lee Gatch, and from art galleries, including the Museum of Modern Art, Albright-Knox Art Gallery and the Whitney Museum of American Art. Additional correspondence is found in the Subject Files.

Business records include an account book, lists of expenses and prices of art works, and sales records. Notes and writings include Teller's notes about art and travel, artists' statements, autobiographical writings, and a compilation of many artists' statements regarding "The Nine Bean Question."

Artwork includes three sketchbooks, 30 sketches and three prints primarily depicting nature and sculpture designs.

Five scrapbooks contain clippings, exbition announcements and catalogs. Additional printed material includes magazines, exhibition announcements and catalogs, a booklet by Teller entitled Art, Age and the River, published posthumously by her husband, and a manuscript of Poems or Poetic Expressions of Sculptors, collected by L. Lamis.

Subject files are arranged by name or subject and may contain letters, photographs, and printed material. Many of the files focus on galleries and museums, including the Montclair Art Museum, the Newark Museum, Noyes Museum, Parma Gallery, the Princeton Gallery of Fine Art and the Squibb Gallery. There are also subject files for associations, travel, projects, and colleagues including Margaret K. Johnson, Reuben Kadish, Ibram Lassaw, Aaron Siskind and Dorothy Dehner.

Photographs and slides depict Teller, her friends, works, gallery installations, and travels. Also included are photographs of trees, bark, and other natural formations used by Teller in her work.

The audio-visual materials include several sound recordings, videocassettes and 16 mm motion picture films. The videocassettes include television programs in which Teller, printmaker Judith Brodsky and actor Harry Hamlin are interviewed, a retrospective at Skidmore College and a film featuring Teller speaking for the National Council on Aging. Sound recordings include two interviews and a "Talk on Malta" by Teller and Joan Needham. The 16 mm films are black and white footage of Teller's first Parma Gallery show.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series. Records are generally arranged by material type and chronologically thereafter.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1911-1985 (Box 1; 4 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1956-1991 (Box 1; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 3: Business Records, 1961-1990 (Box 1; 5 folders)

Series 4: Notes, 1960-1987 (Box 1; 13 folders)

Series 5: Writings, 1960-1989 (Boxes 1 and 9; 5 folders)

Series 6: Artwork, circa 1950s (Boxes 1 and 9; 6 folders)

Series 7: Scrapbooks, 1948-1990 (Boxes 1-2; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1957-1991 (Boxes 2-3 and 9; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 9: Subject Files, 1951-1990 (Boxes 3-5; 2.5 linear feet)

Series 10: Photographs, 1934-1985 (Boxes 5-9; 2.5 linear feet)

Series 11: Audio-Visual Materials, 1961-1989 (Box 8, FC 10-12; 0.6 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Jane Teller (1911-1990) worked as a printmaker and sculptor primarily in New Jersey. She specialized in working with wood and studied at the Rochester Institute of Technology, Skidmore College, and Barnard College. She also attended Federal Works Progress Administration (W.P.A.) classes in New York City, studying sculpture with Aaron J. Goodelman and wood carving with Karl Nielson. She later studied welding in the studio of Ibram Lassaw. She was also a lifelong friend of photographer Aaron Siskind. In 1960, she was awarded the Mary and Gustave Kellner Prize at the National Association of Women Artists Annual Exhibition at the National Academy of Design in New York, and in 1966 the Sculpture Prize at the Fiftieth Anniversary Exhibition, Philadelphia Art Alliance in Philadelphia. She exhibited mainly in New York and New Jersey and was married to author and editor Walter Teller.
Provenance:
The Jane Teller papers were donated by Jane Teller in 1990 and in 1991 by Walter Teller, widower of Jane Teller.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Printmakers -- New Jersey  Search this
Sculptors -- New Jersey  Search this
Topic:
Printmakers -- New Jersey  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Women printmakers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Prints
Sketchbooks
Slides (photographs)
Motion pictures (visual works)
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Sound recordings
Citation:
Jane Teller papers, 1911-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.telljane
See more items in:
Jane Teller papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw95c6d3902-ef80-4ea1-ba58-b2abe402072c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-telljane

Jacob Lawrence and Gwendolyn Knight papers, 1816, 1914-2008, bulk 1973-2001

Creator:
Knight, Gwendolyn, 1914-2005  Search this
Lawrence, Jacob, 1917-2000  Search this
Subject:
Dintenfass, Terry  Search this
Eichenberg, Fritz  Search this
Evergood, Philip  Search this
Halpert, Edith Gregor  Search this
Bearden, Romare  Search this
Bocour, Leonard  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Citation:
Jacob Lawrence and Gwendolyn Knight papers, 1816, 1914-2008, bulk 1973-2001. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
African American art -- African influences  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American painters  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Theme:
African American  Search this
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9121
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211315
AAA_collcode_lawrjaco
Theme:
African American
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211315
Online Media:

Jacob Lawrence and Gwendolyn Knight papers

Creator:
Knight, Gwendolyn  Search this
Lawrence, Jacob, 1917-2000  Search this
Names:
Bearden, Romare, 1911-1988  Search this
Bocour, Leonard, 1910-1993  Search this
Dintenfass, Terry, 1920-  Search this
Eichenberg, Fritz, 1901-1990  Search this
Evergood, Philip, 1901-1973  Search this
Halpert, Edith Gregor, 1900-1970  Search this
Extent:
25.35 Linear feet
0.001 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Photographs
Date:
1816
1914-2008
bulk 1973-2001
Summary:
The papers of African American painter and educator Jacob Lawrence and his wife, artist Gwendolyn Knight measure 25.35 linear feet and 0.001 GB date from 1914 to 2008, with one item from 1816 and the bulk of the material dating from 1973 to 2001. The collection includes biographical material; correspondence including condolence letters to Gwendolyn Knight after Jacob Lawrence's death; writings by Jacob Lawrence and others; printed and digital material; photographs; personal business records; artwork; records from the Jacob Lawrence Catalogue Raisonné Project; materials related to the Jacob and Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence Foundation; professional files; and material related to awards and honors received by Jacob Lawrence and Gwendolyn Knight.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of African American painter and educator Jacob Lawrence and his wife, artist Gwendolyn Knight measure 25.35 linear feet and 0.001 GB and date from 1914 to 2008, with one item from 1816 and the bulk of the material dating from 1973 to 2001. The collection includes biographical material; correspondence including condolence letters to Gwendolyn Knight after Jacob Lawrence's death; writings by Jacob Lawrence and others; printed and digital material; photographs; personal business records; artwork; records from the Jacob Lawrence Catalogue Raisonné Project; materials related to the Jacob and Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence Foundation; professional files; and material related to awards and honors received by Jacob Lawrence and Gwendolyn Knight.

Biographical material includes appointment and address books; education and personal identification certificates and documents; awards, certificates, curriculum vitae, and chronologies; biographical material related to other individuals, including identification documents and memorial programs; and transcripts of interviews with Jacob Lawrence and Gwendolyn Knight.

The correspondence series includes extensive personal and professional correspondence with family, friends, artists, admirers (including students in a number of elementary and middle schools), university students, government agencies, art schools, galleries, museums, publishing houses, and others. Included in this series are condolence letters received by Gwendolyn Knight after Jacob Lawrence's death in 2000.

Writings include published and unpublished writings by and about Jacob Lawrence, as well as writings by others. These writings include speeches, notes, essays, articles, lists, and short stories. Also included is a visitor comment book from the Los Angeles County Museum exhibition of Jacob Lawrence's Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass series.

Printed material includes books; brochures; business cards; clippings; exhibition and event announcements, invitations, catalogs, and programs; magazines; newsletters; posters; post cards; and press releases. Books in this collection may include illustrations by Jacob Lawrence or have personal inscriptions from the author to Jacob Lawrence and Gwendolyn Knight.

Photographs include photographs of Jacob Lawrence artwork, photographs and reproductions of Gwendolyn Knight artwork, and photographs of Jacob Lawrence, Gwendolyn Knight, and other individuals. Also included in this series are photographs and reproductions of work by others.

Personal business records include a ledger; consignment, financial, and shipping records related to the Terry Dintenfass Gallery; contracts and agreements; and estate documents.

Artwork includes sketches by Jacob Lawrence, a blank sketchbook inscribed by Jacob Lawrence to Gwendolyn Knight, and artwork by other artists.

Jacob Lawrence Catalogue Raisonné Project Records include materials generated by the Jacob Lawrence Catalogue Raisonné Project, a non-profit created with the goal of producing a catalogue raisonné (and later, a digital archive) of Jacob Lawrence's work. These records include address books and phone logs; copies of Jacob Lawrence's CV; founding documents, bylaws, and meeting minutes; correspondence; writings, including draft pages of the catalogue raisonné; business records, including employment files, contracts, invoices, insurance, and tax information; printed and digital material; and photographs and artwork.

The Jacob and Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence Foundation and Related Material series includes founding documents and foundation bylaws, correspondence, financial documents, reports, and proposals. Found within this series are materials related to the Lawrence Center for the Visual Arts, a subsidiary foundation of the Jacob and Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence Foundation.

Professional files include material related to projects and exhibitions, teaching files and inclusion in curricula, files regarding possible fake Jacob Lawrence works, and gallery files.

The honors series is divided into two subseries: awards and certificates, and government honors. Awards and certificates includes honorary degrees, arts prizes, and any other honors awarded to Jacob Lawrence or Gwendolyn Knight. Government honors include resolutions, proclamations, and keys to cities. Also included in this series are correspondence related to awards and honorary degrees, commencement programs, plaques, and medals.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in 11 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1914-2005 (Boxes 1, 11, 26, OV 10; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1943, 1952-2005 (Boxes 1-5, 12-14, 26; 7.7 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, 1954-1959, 1973-2005, undated (Boxes 5-6, 14-15; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1816, 1926, 1937, 1945-2008 (Boxes 6-9, 15-17, 26, OV 30, OV 31; 6.8 linear feet)

Series 5: Photographs, circa 1970-1997, undated (Boxes 9, 17, OV 10; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 6: Personal Business Records, 1962-2005 (Boxes 9, 17; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 7: Artwork, 1984, 1990-1994, undated (Boxes 9, 18, 26; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 8: Jacob Lawrence Catalogue Raisonne Project Records, 1982-2002 (Boxes 18-23, Box 26; 5.1 linear feet, ER01; 0.001 GB)

Series 9: Jacob and Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence Foundation and Related Material, 1997-2005 (Box 23; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 10: Professional Files, 1964-2004 (Boxes 23-24; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 11: Honors, 1948, 1966-2005 (Boxes 24-25, 27-29, OV 30; 2.3 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Modernist painter and educator Jacob Lawrence (1917-2000) was born in 1917 as Jacob Armstead Lawrence in Atlantic City, New Jersey. He began his art studies at the Utopia Children's Center in New York City's Harlem district where he studied under the painter Charles Alston. Lawrence dropped out of high school at the age of sixteen to continue his art instruction with Alston, this time at the Harlem Art Workshop, where he met several artists associated with the Harlem Renaissance including the sculptor Augusta Savage.

Gwendolyn Knight (1913-2005) was born in Barbados and moved to New York City with her adoptive parents when she was seven. She attended New York's Wadleigh High School and later Howard University in Washington, D.C. where she studied fine arts with Lois Mailou Jones and James Porter. Forced to leave her studies at Howard because of the Depression, Knight returned to Harlem and continued her artistic pursuits in Augusta Savage's workshop. In 1935, Knight joined the Harlem Mural Project of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) working under Selma Day and Charles Alston. Lawrence and Knight met in Savage's workshop and married in the summer of 1941.

During the Depression, Lawrence also joined the WPA Federal Arts Project in Harlem. Finding WPA murals overwhelming, Lawrence concentrated on traditional painting instead. He produced his first major works in the late 1930s, most notably the Toussaint L'Ouverture series, images that document the life of the revolutionary hero and Haiti's struggle for independence. Other significant works include visual narratives of the lives of abolitionists Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass. In 1940, Lawrence received the prestigious Julius Rosenwald Fellowship, which made it possible for him to purchase his first art studio on 125th Street in the heart of Harlem. He soon portrayed Harlem street life in paintings that became commentaries on the role of African Americans in United States society with highly developed themes of resistance and social opposition. That same year, Lawrence began his most celebrated series, The Migration of the American Negro, multiple tempera panels depicting the exodus of African American sharecroppers in the south to northern industrial cities in search of better employment and social opportunities. Edith Halpert exhibited the works in their entirety at her Downtown Gallery in 1941, establishing Lawrence as the first African American artist to exhibit in a top New York gallery. The following year, New York's Museum of Modern Art and the Phillips Collection in Washington, DC each bought half of the sixty panels in the series, helping to further Lawrence's career within the larger world of American art.

In the summer of 1946, the artist Joseph Albers invited Lawrence to teach at North Carolina's Black Mountain College. It was the first in a series of teaching positions in prestigious art schools including Pratt Institute (1956-1971), Brandeis University (1965), The New School (1966), the Art Students League (1967), and others. During the 1950s and 1960s, Lawrence's work continued to focus on racism and political activism but in the late 1960s shifted to themes of racial harmony.

Both Lawrence and Knight continued independent careers in art. Knight pursued her art studies at the New School in New York and the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine. In the mid-1960s, she collaborated with other female artists to form the Studio Gallery in New York City. Knight's main body of work consists of portraits and still-lifes that incorporate expressions of African sculpture, Impressionism, dance, and theater. Focusing on gesture, her art is described as light and airy with a minimum of lines allowing empty space to define the work. In 1970, Lawrence traveled to Seattle to teach as a visiting artist at the University of Washington. He was hired on a permanent basis the following year and remained on staff until his retirement in 1986.

Jacob Lawrence died June 9, 2000, in Seattle, Washington at the age of 83. Gwendolyn Knight continued to paint and exhibit her work around the country until her death on February 18, 2005 in Seattle, Washington at the age of 92.
Related Material:
Also found at the Archives of American Art are an oral history interview with Jacob Lawrence conducted by Carroll Greene (1968 October 26), interviews conducted by Avis Berman (1982 July 20-August 4), and an oral history interview with Jacob Lawrence and Gwendolyn Knight conducted by Paul Karlstrom (1998 November 18). The Archives of American Art also holds a collection of Jacob Lawrence papers, available on microfilm only, reels D286 and 4571-4573. Originals reside at Syracuse University Library, Special Collections.
Provenance:
The Jacob Lawrence and Gwendolyn Knight papers were donated to the Archives of American Art in five accretions between 1979 and 1997. Additional papers were donated in 2012 by the Jacob and Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence Foundation via Barbara Earl Thomas, representative.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Washington (State) -- Seattle  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- Washington (State) -- Seattle  Search this
Topic:
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
African American art -- African influences  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American painters  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Jacob Lawrence and Gwendolyn Knight papers, 1816, 1914-2008, bulk 1973-2001. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.lawrjaco
See more items in:
Jacob Lawrence and Gwendolyn Knight papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw97b5bfd17-13f8-4cb6-ab12-22124f7d1fee
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lawrjaco
Online Media:

Dorothy C. Miller papers

Creator:
Miller, Dorothy Canning, 1904-2003  Search this
Names:
Betty Parsons Gallery  Search this
Chase Manhattan Bank -- Art collections  Search this
Federal Art Project  Search this
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden  Search this
Mark Rothko Foundation  Search this
Municipal Art Exhibition (1st : 1934 : New York, N.Y.)  Search this
PepsiCo, Inc.  Search this
Port Authority of New York and New Jersey -- Art collections  Search this
Rockefeller University  Search this
Smith College -- Students  Search this
Smith College. Museum of Art  Search this
World Trade Center (New York, N.Y.) -- Art collections  Search this
Asher, Elise, 1914-  Search this
Barr, Alfred H., Jr., 1902-1981  Search this
Bontecou, Lee, 1931-  Search this
Byars, James Lee  Search this
Cahill, Holger, 1887-1960  Search this
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Canady, John  Search this
Charlton, Maryette  Search this
Christo, 1935-  Search this
Chryssa, 1933-  Search this
Coggeshall, Calvert, 1907-1990  Search this
Copley, Alfred L.  Search this
Davis, Stuart, 1892-1964  Search this
DeFeo, Jay, 1929-1989  Search this
Feininger, Lyonel, 1871-1956  Search this
Feitelson, Lorser, 1898-1978  Search this
Gorky, Arshile, 1904-1948  Search this
Guggenheim, Peggy, 1898-1979  Search this
Hartigan, Grace  Search this
Hicks, Edward, 1780-1849  Search this
Horwitt, Will  Search this
Johns, Jasper, 1930-  Search this
Karpel, Bernard, 1911-1986  Search this
Levy, Julien  Search this
Mather, Eleanore Price, 1910-  Search this
Matisse, Pierre, 1900-1989  Search this
Nevelson, Louise, 1899-1988  Search this
Newman, Barnett, 1905-1970  Search this
Noguchi, Isamu, 1904-1988  Search this
O'Keeffe, Georgia, 1887-1986  Search this
Pereira, I. Rice (Irene Rice), 1902-1971  Search this
Picasso, Pablo, 1881-1973  Search this
Rauschenberg, Robert, 1925-2008  Search this
Reinhardt, Ad, 1913-1967  Search this
Rockefeller, Nelson A. (Nelson Aldrich), 1908-1979 -- Art collections  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Sage, Kay  Search this
Scharf, William, 1927-  Search this
Sheeler, Charles, 1883-1965  Search this
Sterne, Hedda, 1910-2011  Search this
Still, Clyfford, 1904-1980  Search this
Extent:
34.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Sketches
Christmas cards
Drawings
Date:
1853-2013
bulk 1920-1996
Summary:
The papers of contemporary and folk art curator, historian, and consultant Dorothy C. Miller measure 34.6 linear feet and date from 1853-2013, with the bulk of the material dating from 1920 to 1996. The papers primarily concern Miller's private art consulting work outside of her curatorial work at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. Found are scattered biographical materials, extensive correspondence and subject files, and project files for her art consulting work for the Rockefeller family, Rockefeller University, Chase Manhattan Bank, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the World Trade Center, and other miscellaneous corporate and private clients. Miller's work as a trustee and committee member of various public and private boards and commissions is also represented here. Additionally, the papers contain Miller's research files on Edward Hicks and folk art, and a small number of files of her husband Holger Cahill about his work as Director of the Federal Art Project. There is a scattered documentation of Miller's early curatorial work with Holger Cahill on the First Municipal Art Exhibition (1934) held at the RCA Building in Rockefeller Center. Also found is Dorothy Miller's collection of artists' Christmas cards and photographs of Miller and others. An addition to the papers includes biographical material; family papers; correspondence; professional files; art collection and client files; printed material; and photographic material. While a small number professional files are included, the majority of the addition relates to her personal life, including correspondence with her husband Holger Cahill, and files pertaining to her personal art collection.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of contemporary and folk art curator, historian, and consultant Dorothy C. Miller measure 34.6 linear feet and date from 1853-2013, with the bulk of the material dating from 1920 to 1996. The papers primarily concern Miller's art consulting work outside of her curatorial work at the Museum of Modern Art in New York city. Found are scattered biographical materials, extensive correspondence and subject files, and project files for her art consulting work for the Rockefeller family, Rockefeller University, Chase Manhattan Bank, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, and other miscellaneous corporate and private clients. Her work as a trustee and committee member of various public and private boards and commissions is also represented here. Additionally, the papers contain Miller's research files on Edward Hicks and folk art, and a small number of files related to Miller's husband Holger Cahill and his work as Director of the Federal Art Project. There is important documentation of Miller's early curatorial work with Holger Cahill on the First Municipal Art Exhibition (1934) held at the RCA Building in Rockefeller Center. Artwork includes scattered sketches and drawings enclosed with correspondence and original Christmas cards sent to Miller by various artists. Photographs of Miller date from 1926 - circa 1950.

Scattered biographical material mostly concerns Miller's education at Smith College and awards and honorary degrees that she received. Extensive correspondence and subject files document her professional and personal relationships with family, friends, colleagues, museums, art dealers and artists, as well as her research interests. Individual files may contain a mix of correspondence with, as well as about, the person or subject, compiled research documents, printed materials, and scattered photographs. Files are found for Lewin Alcopley, Alfred Barr, Betty Parsons Gallery, Cahill family members, Lee Bontecou, James Byars, Holger Cahill, Alexander Calder, Christo, Chryssa, Calvert Coggeshall, John Canaday, Maryette Charlton, Stuart Davis, Jay DeFeo, Lorser Feitelson, Arshile Gorky, Peggy Guggenheim, Grace Hartigan, Will Horwitt, Jasper Johns, Julien Levy, Pierre Matisse, Louise Nevelson, Barnett Newman, Isamu Nauchi, Georgia O'Keeffe, Pablo Picasso, Robert Rauschenberg, Ad Reinhardt, Kay Sage, Charles Sheeler, Hedda Sterne, travel, Clyfford Still, William Scharf, among many others.

Detailed records of Miller's art consulting and advisory work for the Rockefeller family include correspondence with Nelson A. Rockefeller and David Rockefeller about building their personal collections of contemporary and folk art, meeting notes and minutes, research notes and writings, and printed materials. The largest group of records concerns the writing and publication of The Nelson A. Rockefeller Collection: Masterpieces of Modern Art. Miller's curatorial work for David Rockefeller and the Rockefeller University's Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Hall art collection is documented in Series 4 through curatorial files, correspondence, printed materials, photographs and slides, artists files, and design records.

Series 5 contains files relating to Miller's work as the first art consutant to the Chase Manhattan Bank and the building of the corporation's extensive collection of contemporary art. There is a draft of Miller's text for the bank's published catalog, Art At Work: Chase Manhattan Bank Collection. A smaller set of records is found in Series 6 documenting Miller's work on the Art Committee of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, including files about selecting artwork for the World Trade Center during the early 1970s. Files concerning Miller's advisory work with additional public and private clients, boards, and commissions are arranged in Series 7 and 8 and concern the Amstar Corporation, Fidelity International Bank, First National Bank of Tampa, First National City Bank, Inmont Corporation, Pepsico, United Mutual Savings Bank, the Empire State Plaza Art Commission, the Hancock Shaker Village, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Mark Rothko Foundation, the Museum of American Folk Art, and the Smith College Museum of Art.

Miller's papers include a small group of files relating to the WPA Federal Art Project (FAP)created by her husband Holger Cahill when he was director of the FAP, Holger Cahill. A small series is devoted to Miller's work with Eleanore Price Mather researching and writing Edward Hicks: His Peaceable Kingdom and Other Paintings. A series of general research files contain miscellaneous research notes and photographs related to Miller's interests in early American art and folk art. Series 12 contains important documentation of Miller's early curatorial work with Holger Cahill on the First Municipal Art Exhibition (1934) held at the RCA Building in Rockefeller Center.

Works of art are primarily in the form of Christmas cards sent to Miller by various artists including Elise Asher, Lyonel Feininger, Bernard Karpel, and Irene Rice Pereira. A small group of photographs includes photographs of Miller from 1926-circa 1950 and a few photographs of others.

The addition includes biographical material; family papers; correspondence; professional files; art collection and client files; printed material; and photographic material. While a small number of professional files are found here, the majority of material relates to Miller's personal life, including correspondence with her husband Holger Cahill, and files pertaining to her personal art collection. Scattered correspondence, inventories, research, and notes created by curator and donor of the papers, Wendy Jeffers, are found throughout the collection. These materials date from the 1980s-2000s.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 15 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1917-1986 (Box 1; 0.3 linear ft.)

Series 2: Correspondence and Subject Files, circa 1912-1992 (Boxes 1-8, OV 27; 7.2 linear ft.)

Series 3: Rockefeller Family Art Collections, circa 1949-1985 (Boxes 8-12, 25; 3.9 linear ft.)

Series 4: Rockefeller University Collection, 1923-1984 (Boxes 12-13, OV 27; 1.0 linear ft.)

Series 5: Chase Manhattan Bank Collection, 1959-circa 1985 (Boxes 13-14, 26; 1.4 linear ft.)

Series 6: Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Art Committee, circa 1965-1987 (Boxes 14-15, OV 27; 0.8 linear ft.)

Series 7: Other Corporate and Private Clients, 1968-1984 (Boxes 15-16; 1.3 linear ft.)

Series 8: Other Boards, Committees and Commissions, 1925, 1949-1985 (Boxes 16-20; 3.6 linear ft.)

Series 9: Works Project Administration Federal Art Project Files, 1935-1979 (Box 20, OV 27; 0.5 linear ft.)

Series 10: Edward Hicks Catalog, 1934-1984 (Boxes 20-22; 1.5 linear ft.)

Series 11: Research Files, 1930s-1980 (Boxes 22-23; 0.8 linear ft.)

Series 12: Exhibition Files, 1932-1986 (Box 23; 0.6 linear ft.)

Series 13: Works of Art, circa 1924-circa 1982 (Boxes 23-25; 1.5 linear ft.)

Series 14: Photographs, 1926-circa 1970s (Boxes 24-25; 0.3 linear ft.)

Series 15: Addition to the Dorothy C. Miller Papers, 1853-2003, bulk 1920-1996 (Boxes 28-38, OVs 39-41; 9.9 linear ft.)
Biographical Note:
Dorothy Canning Miller (1904-2003) worked in New York City as a highly influential curator of contemporary and folk art at the Museum of Modern Art and as the first curator of the museum. Later, she was the primary art consultant for Nelson A. Rockefeller, the Rockefeller family, Rockefeller University, Chase Manhattan Bank, and the Port Authority of and New Jersey. Dorothy Miller was also married to Holger Cahill, director of the WPA Federal Art Project.

Dorothy C. Miller was born in Hopedale, Massachusetts in 1904 and received her Bachelor of Arts from Smith College in 1925. She was first introduced to modern art through classes at the Newark Museum taught by John Cotton Dana and Holger Cahill. Miller joined the curatorial staff of the Newark Museum in 1926. The museum was one of the first to organize exhibitions of American folk art, American Primitives (1930-1931) and American Folk Sculpture (1931-1932). Miller worked with Cahill and others on the exhibition and developed a life-long interest in folk art.

After four years at the Newark Museum, Miller moved to New York city, hoping to get involved with the newly opened Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and, likely, to be with Holger Cahill, with whom she lived with on 8th Street prior to their marriage in 1938. Between 1930 and 1932 she took odd jobs and worked with Mrs. Henry Lang cataloging, researching and installing Lang's collection of Native American art Lang donated to the Montclair Art Museum. At the same time, Holger Cahill was serving as Acting Director of the Museum of Modern Art during an absence of Director Alfred H. Barr. In 1932, Cahill asked Miller to assist him with curating the American Painting and Sculpture, 1862-1932 exhibition at MoMA, and together they also curated the First Municipal Art Exhibition, 1934 at the Rockefeller Center.

In 1934, Barr hired Miller as his assistant and one year later appointed her as MoMA's first curator. Miller spent the next 35 years organizing many of this country's most important exhibitions of contemporary art and building personal relationships with new artists and photographers, as well as the collections of MoMA. Miller retired from MOMA in 1969 and focused more on her art consulting work begun in the late 1950s.

Dorothy Miller's most notable client was Nelson A. Rockefeller. She assisted and advised Rockefeller as he acquired a vast personal collection of modern art - some of which was later donated to MoMA. Just prior to her retirement, Miller organized a large exhibition of Rockefeller's collection. The exhibition catalog written by Miller was the basis for the book she worked on with Rockefeller up until and following his death in 1979, ultimately published as The Nelson A. Rockefeller Collection: Masterpieces of Modern Art. In the preface, Rockefeller credited Miller with being one of the four people to whom he was indebted "for the understanding and endless joy I have found in the collecting of modern art in all forms."

Miller also served as the primary art consultant for projects to furnish federal spaces, including Henry Kissinger's State Department office suite, and the official Vice-Presidential residence at the Admiral's House in Washington D.C.

In 1959 Miller was invited to join the art collection committee of the Chase Manhattan Bank and served on the committee until the mid-1980s, contributing her expertise to the development of one of this country's oldest and largest corporate collections of modern and contemporary art.

Miller was also an advisor to other members of the Rockefeller family, including David Rockefeller, and assisted with developing the art collections of Rockefeller Institute/University. From 1960 through the late 1980s Miller was a member of the art committee for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANJY) and was responsible for selecting much of the artwork for the World Trade Center in the 1970s. She served on numerous boards and commissions, including the Hancock Shaker Village, the Smithsonian Institution's Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Empire State Plaza in Albany, Smith College Museum of Art, and the Museum of American Folk Art. She also became a member of the Mark Rothko Foundation Board of Directors after the litigation following Rothko's death between Rothko's executors and his daughter.

In the mid-1970s Miller assisted the Whitney Museum of American with planning an exhibition and supporting catalog of the work of folk artist Edward Hicks. Although the exhibition and catalog were only partially realized in 1980, Miller and Eleanore Price Mather compiled and published a book on Hicks, Edward Hicks: His Peaceable Kingdoms and Other Paintings, published in 1983.

In 1982-1983 Miller received the Art Dealers Association Special Award, an honorary degree from Williams College, and the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture governor's award. In 1984 she was named honorary trustee of the Museum of Modern Art. In 1985 the Smith College Museum of Art honored her important contributions to museum connoisseurship with the exhibition Dorothy C. Miller: With An Eye to American Art.

Dorothy Miller died in 2003 at the age of 99 at her home in Greenwich, New York.
Related Material:
The Archives of American Art holds two oral history interviews with Dorothy C. Miller. The first was conducted by Paul Cummings between May 26, 1970 and September 28, 1971, and details Miller's life from childhood up to, and including, her years at the Museum of Modern Art. The second was conducted by Avis Berman on May 14, 1981 and covers Miller's relationships with Mark Rothko and Clyfford Still. Also found among the holdings of the Archives are the papers of Holger Cahill, Dorothy Miller's husband and colleague.

The Museum of Modern Art Achives holds Dorothy Miller's papers related to her curatorial work at the museum.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Dorothy C. Miller via Wendy Jeffers between 1986 and 1997, and Reid White, Executor of Miller's estate, in 2004. Two subsequent additions were donated by Wendy Jeffers in 2014 and 2015.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Art museum curators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Corporations -- Private collections  Search this
Art -- Private collections  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Women museum curators  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sketches
Christmas cards
Drawings
Citation:
Dorothy C. Miller papers, 1853-2013, bulk 1920-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.milldoro
See more items in:
Dorothy C. Miller papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9f1ed6cb6-f194-4b76-a8dd-fce3352c09b8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-milldoro
Online Media:

Kimberly Camp papers

Creator:
Camp, Kimberly  Search this
Names:
Barnes Foundation  Search this
Extent:
9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Sketchbooks
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Date:
1970-2016
Scope and Contents:
The Kimberly Camp papers measure 9.4 linear feet and date from 1970-2016. Included is biographical material, project and commission files, correspondence, writings, works of art, interviews and lectures, slides, and printed material relating to the career of Kimberly Camp as an artist and arts administrator.
Biographical material includes appointment books. Writings consist of manuscript drafts for "Defending the Dead: The Totally True Story of the Barnes Transformation" (not yet published), a Salzburg Seminar journal and notebooks and sketchbooks about Camp's art and career as an arts administrator. Audio visual material includes audio and VHS video cassettes containing interviews or lectures given by Camp as well as assorted recordings related to her work. Slides are of works of art, people and places. Printed material relates to Camp's position as an arts administrator.
Biographical / Historical:
Kimberly Camp (1956- ) is an African American painter, dollmaker, and arts administrator in Collingswood, New Jersey. Camp was executive director of the Barnes Foundation from 1999-2005.
Provenance:
Donated 2016 and 2023 by Kimberly Camp.
Restrictions:
This collection is temporarily closed to researchers due to archival processing. Contact Reference Services for more information.

Manuscript drafts for Defending the Dead: The Totally True Story of the Barnes Transformation; specified illustrated journals, notebooks and sketches and Salzburg Seminar journal are ACCESS RESTRICTED; written permission is required. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The donor has retained all intellectual property rights, including copyright, that they may own.
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Arts administrators -- New Jersey  Search this
Dollmakers -- New Jersey  Search this
Painters -- New Jersey  Search this
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sketchbooks
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Identifier:
AAA.campkimb
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw93cae9342-ebd2-4fd6-96ed-16273bd1927f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-campkimb

Grayce Uyehara Papers

Topic:
Social Justice
Creator:
Uyehara, Grayce  Search this
Names:
Japanese American Citizens' League  Search this
Donor:
Uyehara, Paul M.  Search this
Extent:
18 Cubic feet (18 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Articles
Audio cassettes
Awards
Compact discs
Letters (correspondence)
Memoranda
Minutes
Newsclippings
Newsletters
Oral history
Pamphlets
Photographs
Reports
Slides
Speeches
Videocassettes
Date:
1929-2008
Summary:
The papers document the life and activism of Grayce Uyehara who was a pivotal figure within the Redress Movement and sought reparations for the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II.
Content Description:
The papers document the life and activism of Grayce Uyehara who was a pivotal figure within the Redress Movement and sought reparations for the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II. The collection materials span different social justice topics that Uyehara was involved with outside of Japanese American communities. Geographically, the materials are primarily from her time in Stockton, California; Rohwer, Arkansas; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Washington, D.C., as well as other places.

The papers include materials relating to Uyehara's own incarceration; her lobbying work with the Japanese American Citizens League; other activism and grass roots activities; speeches; campaign materials; articles; memos; financial reports; work journals; photographs of the Uyeharas; community newspapers; film slides of redress; personal letters; internal correspondence; leadership conference notes; educational materials; interviews; awards; student theses; pamphlets; booklets; oral histories; maps; meeting minutes; newsletters; directories; and congressional records.
Arrangement:
The collection is unarranged.
Biographical:
Grayce Uyehara was a social worker and pivotal Redress Movement activist who helped lead the reparations campaign for the wrongful incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II. Uyehara was born Ritsuko Kaneda on July 4th, 1919, in Stockton, California. Her parents named her Ritsu, which roughly translates to notions of law and independence, informed by their understanding of the significance of Independence Day. Her father, Tsuyanoshi Kaneda, worked in agriculture and business and performed domestic tasks. Through this, he developed a reliable business working for lawyers, doctors, and school administrators. Her mother, Tome Kaneda, raised their children. Her mother was strict but also encouraged her children to excel at whatever they did. She enrolled them in Japanese and music classes and expected them to help out at church and in the community. Uyehara was the second of seven children, and as the eldest daughter was expected to be a role model for her younger siblings.

In high school, Uyehara belonged to a Japanese student club, excelled in her schoolwork, and was part of the marching band, playing the bassoon. She also played piano for Sunday school at church, which had both English and Japanese services. She became involved in the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL), participating in its oratorical contests. Because of her community service, the elders and her peers in the Japanese American community respected Uyehara.

Uyehara majored in music at the University of the Pacific. She believed music would allow her to start a career as a local Japanese American piano teacher and church organist. She worked many jobs to pay for tuition while her parents helped cover her costs. While in college, she became involved in the Japanese American Young People's Christian Conference (YPCC) in Northern California. Uyehara continued to be recognized for her leadership and competence by becoming the chairperson of the Sacramento YPCC as a college senior.

In January 1942, after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Uyehara was asked by the university president to become an instructor to teach Japanese to young men in military service at the local army base. Citing her patriotic duty, she accepted the position. She was able to finish school before being incarcerated, partly because her mother pushed her to do well and to stay in school. When the Uyehara family prepared to leave their home in April, one of her professors offered to hold their household belongings. Although she satisfied her graduation requirements, she received her degree in absentia. Two of her siblings were also in college when their academic careers were interrupted. She was very upset that her parents did not get to see her graduate because they had sacrificed so much.

The Kaneda family was forcibly relocated to the Stockton Temporary Detention Center in May 1942. At the Stockton Center, she put her service skills to work and assisted other Nisei inmates in organizing a makeshift school for Japanese American youth. Located on the site of the county fairgrounds, the school was forced to hold classes in the grandstands. Through one of her father's contacts, she was able to secure a donation of books, and she became the supervisor in charge of elementary education. Some of the young soldiers that she taught at the base also came to visit her. She spent four months there, and in September of 1942, her family was notified that they would be forcibly moved to Rohwer, Arkansas. While her family traveled ahead, she stayed behind to help close the Stockton Temporary Detention Center.

At Rohwer, Uyehara remained active and continued to hone her leadership and organizational skills. She helped create church services for young people, played the piano at various events, and taught music in junior high-level classes. During this time, she realized that her previous career path as a piano teacher was not realistic. She discovered that the Minnesota State Teachers College was offering scholarships to eligible camp inmates and decided to pursue the opportunity. She left the camp in January 1943 with three other young Nisei. She lived at a boarding house with another Nisei student from the Tule Lake incarceration camp. She had an active social life but found the classes to be unchallenging. During the summer in St. Paul, she stayed with a woman who was active with the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, a liberal group who spoke out against war. Unsure of what to do next, she then returned to Rohwer where she worked at the camp hospital, continually checking for jobs. She found a job listing in Virginia where one of her younger sisters was attending school, and she left Rohwer for the last time. In Virginia, she worked as an editorial secretary. She was grateful that it was not a service job, which was the norm for young Japanese American women. Uyehara's brother, Ben, was attending Temple University in Philadelphia during this time. He assured her that the Quakers would help the Kaneda family with moving from the camp. Convinced, she packed up again and moved further north.

In Philadelphia, Uyehara found an apartment in the Fellowship House, an organization providing workshops on race relations in the city. She began working for Family Services, a social service agency in the Germantown area of Philadelphia as a receptionist and typist, but she also conducted intake interviews with the clients of the agency. She further continued her role as a community leader by becoming involved with the International Institute which assisted immigrants settling in Philadelphia, and became concerned with the needs of the Japanese American population moving in. Working closely with the Institute, she helped form the Philadelphia Nisei Council, which coordinated with the War Relocation Authority. She was the Nikkei representative of the Philadelphia Committee of Social Service Agencies whose role was to assist with relocation problems. Uyehara developed a handbook that detailed practical issues such as the cost of living in the city, how to rent an apartment, and where to find jobs. The Council began a newsletter, so the community could be aware of new people moving in to the area and of community events. She also started youth groups to provide activities and social interaction for high school and college-age youth coming out of the camp experience.

In Philadelphia, Uyehara became re-acquainted with Hiroshi Uyehara, whose mother knew Grayce's mother. They briefly met in Rohwer. He worked at a nearby Westinghouse factory as a draftsman. He had to receive an Army and Navy clearance, and during the wait went on strike. He became a volunteer at the International Institute where they reconnected. They married in 1946. Later, she and her husband were among those who formed the Philadelphia Chapter of the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL) to influence more people on social issues affecting Japanese Americans in a national context. Afterwards, the director of the International Institute arranged for the board to pay her graduate school tuition at the University of Pennsylvania while she worked as a social worker for the agency. She graduated in 1947 with a Masters in Social Work. Within two years of working in the community, she was asked to serve on the Philadelphia Fellowship Commission. She used this opportunity to highlight the perspectives of Japanese Americans.

The Uyehara's first son, Chris, was born in May of 1948. In 1950, they had a second child, Lisa. The International Institute asked her to return as a volunteer, and she started a program to help American servicemen and Japanese brides returning from Japan to adjust to a new life. She worked directly with Japanese women in teaching American customs, including etiquette and cooking lessons. She also provided individual counseling. She was very active with the local Parent Teacher Association (PTA) and became president, creating parent education programs and raising funds for the local school library. Uyehara was also very active in the National Association of Social Workers, the Cub Scouts, the local Presbyterian church, the West Chester Human Relationships Council, and the League of Women Voters. Later, she had two more children, Larry, in 1952, and Paul, in 1955. During this time, she was asked to help in establishing the first day care center for working mothers in West Chester. Despite the low pay, she was instrumental in establishing the center. In addition, she got involved in civil rights issues for African Americans, especially for school desegregation and upgrading placement rates for African American students.

In 1972, Uyehara served as the governor for the Eastern District Council of the JACL. She was on the National Board, and was the vice-president for General Operations, Chapter President, the National Civil Rights Committee, and the National Scholarship Committee. In 1974, Uyehara was the first woman to hold a JACL elected office. From 1973 to 1974, she was on the National Education Committee. She used her organizational skills to rearrange some existing educational programs so that the history of Japanese Americans could become more well known throughout the country. She also prioritized projects within the committee to make the programs more attractive to potential funders. Her ability to effectively organize with the JACL was influenced by the lessons learned in reading Years of Infamy by Michi Weglyn, and in the organizing lessons within African American communities after Brown v. Board of Education was passed.

In 1978, Uyehara was present at the 1978 Salt Lake City Convention when JACL decided to pursue redress, and was asked to be on the National Committee for Redress. Using her experience in improving school districts for African Americans, she worked hard to generate educational materials, bombard congressional offices and speak at various events and community organizations. She was also effective in gaining support from the Presbyterian Church and Jewish organizations. By 1985 she devised a plan to reach people on the East Coast, since there weren't many JACL chapters in major cities there. She retired from her job as a school social worker in order to help the JACL achieve redress. In the spring, she transferred to the Legislative Education Committee (LEC). Her philosophy was "If you're going to do it, you do it right. You just don't talk about it".

Uyehara did a lot of traveling between Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. Her husband was very supportive during this time. The leadership in Washington consisted of JACL officials and four Nikkei congressmen, who recognized Uyehara's work in coalition building and developing political relationships. Whenever a new member of Congress signed on to the Civil Liberties Act, she would send out a press statement, and any significant chapter events would be announced through her "Action Alerts." She also led congressional meetings with people like Senator Inouye, Ralph Neas, and Mike Masaoka because she was very familiar with the legislative process.

Uyehara sent information "vernaculars" to newspapers and newsletter organizations in New York and Los Angeles as well as the Pacific Citizen, so that people could see progress taking place within the redress effort. She urged people to initiate contacts in states like Florida and North Carolina to ensure votes were not lost. If an area had lower numbers of Japanese American constituents, she would ask different contacts to support the redress effort and lobby congress to vote for it. She also used her existing relationships with the American Friends Service Committee, American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), Jewish war veterans, the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) of B'nai B'irth and the American Jewish Committee. Greatly aided by her efforts, the Civil Liberties Act of 1988 was passed. It issued a formal apology from the government and $20,000 to each surviving incarceree. This act also required monuments, museums, and classrooms to teach the history of Japanese American incarceration so similar discrimination would never happen again to others.

After redress was passed, Uyehara was still actively involved in community organizing. She chaired the JACL Legacy Fund campaign, which raised over $5 million to support other JACL programs. She engaged with the Japanese House and Garden in Philadelphia's Fairmount Park, speaking at educational engagements about redress and organizing efforts for residents in her retirement community through the Diversity Committee and the Mental Health Committee. She was a passionate advocate for Japanese Canadian redress. She also helped coordinate the Philadelphia area fundraising effort for the National Japanese American Memorial Foundation. In addition, she enjoyed spending more time with family, gardening, and playing the piano.

In 2014, Uyehara was honored by Asian Americans United with its Standing Up for Justice Award. Uyehara passed away on June 22, 2014, at Virtual Memorial Hospital in Mount Holly, New Jersey. Japanese Americans remember Uyehara for her effectiveness and dedication as an activist, community leader, and the mother of Redress. Her experiences of being discriminated against and having to work to support the family at a young age sensitized her to the plight of working women and the economically disadvantaged. This greatly informed her service not only for Japanese Americans, but for all communities in America.

Sources

Susan Nakaoka. "Nisei Political Activists: The Stories of Five Japanese American Women Master of Arts., (University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), 1999) found in Grayce Uyehara Papers, Box 1, Folder N, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.

Gammage, Jeff. "Grayce Uyehara, fought for interned Japanese-Americans." The Philadelphia Inquirer, https://www.inquirer.com/philly/obituaries/20140624_Grayce_Uyehara fought_for_interned_Japanese-Americans.html June 23, 2014. Last Accessed March 18, 2019.
Provenance:
Collection donated to the Archives Center in 2019 by Paul M. Uyehara.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Civil rights movements  Search this
Concentration camps -- United States  Search this
Japanese Americans -- Forced removal and internment -- 1942-1945  Search this
Newspapers -- 20th century  Search this
Reparations for historical injustices  Search this
Genre/Form:
Articles -- 20th century
Audio cassettes
Awards
Compact discs
Letters (correspondence) -- 20th century.
Memoranda
Minutes
Newsclippings
Newsletters
Oral history
Pamphlets
Photographs
Reports -- 20th century
Slides
Speeches -- 20th century
Videocassettes
Citation:
Grayce Uyehara Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1480
See more items in:
Grayce Uyehara Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8cd36d3c8-cbfb-481d-ac04-3890beb7b807
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1480
Online Media:

Porter A. McCray papers

Creator:
McCray, Porter A., 1908-2000  Search this
Names:
Asia Society  Search this
Byrd Hoffman Foundation  Search this
Cathedral of St. John the Divine (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Cunningham Dance Foundation  Search this
International Council of the Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Japan Society (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Society of Architectural Historians  Search this
UNESCO  Search this
United States. Foreign Service  Search this
Cutting, Brock  Search this
Humphrey, Hubert H. (Hubert Horatio), 1911-1978  Search this
Kazuko Oshima  Search this
Morley, Grace, 1900-1985  Search this
Paik, Nam June, 1932-2006  Search this
Richie, Donald, 1924-2013  Search this
Rockefeller, John D., 1906-  Search this
Sherfield, Roger Mellor Makins, Baron, 1904-1996  Search this
Thetong, Tenzin  Search this
Extent:
12.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Lectures
Interviews
Paintings
Transcripts
Date:
1936-1989
Summary:
The papers of New York City arts administrator Porter A. McCray measure 12.3 linear feet and date from 1936 to 1989. The papers include scattered biographical materials, correspondence, and writings and notes. The bulk of the collection consists of professional files documenting his advisory and consulting work for museums, institutions, organizations, and foundations. Also found within the collection are printed materials and photographs of McCray and artwork.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York City arts administrator Porter A. McCray measure 12.3 linear feet and date from 1936 to 1989. The papers include scattered biographical materials, correspondence, and writings and notes. The bulk of the collection consists of professional files documenting his advisory and consulting work for museums, institutions, organizations, and foundations. Also found within the collection are printed materials and photographs of McCray and artwork.

Scattered biographical materials include appointment books, curricula vitae, a transcript of an interview conducted by McCray with Dr. Grace Morley, and an unsigned painting.

Found within the general correspondence are letters that relate to his work as an arts advisor and consultant, but which appear to be more personal in nature. The bulk of correspondence related to specific projects is found within the professional files. Correspondents include Hubert Humphrey, Mrs. John Lockwood, Grace Morely, Kazuko Oshima, Donald Richie, John D. Rockefeller III, and Tenzin Thetong among others.

Writings and notes include lectures by McCray and writings by others including Brock Cutting, Lord Sherfield, and Nam June Paik. Also found are travel notes for McCray's travels throughout Asia, Europe, and the Middle East.

Professional files document McCray's work as an arts advisor and consultant for numerous museums, foundations, organizations, foundations, and special committees, as well as his membership in various arts committees and boards. Files document McCray's work for and/or membership in the Asia Society, Asian Cultural Program of Cultural Exchange, Byrd Hoffman Foundation, Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine, Cunningham Dance Foundation, Indo-United States committees, International Council of Museums, Japan Society, John D. Rockefeller 3rd Fund, Museum of Modern Art, Society of Architectural Historians, UNESCO, and the United States Foreign Service.

Printed materials include clippings and articles, a Drawing and Architecture exhibition catalog, and a book by Robert Wilson. Photographs include personal photographs and oversized photographs of sculptures by an unknown artist.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 6 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1959-1982 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1959-1986 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1960-1983 (1.5 linear feet; Box 2-3)

Series 4: Professional Files, 1936-1987 (8.2 linear feet; Box 3-11, OVS 12-13)

Series 5: Printed Materials, 1965-1989 (0.5 linear feet; Box 11, OV 14)

Series 6: Photographs, 1945-1980s (0.2 linear feet; Box 11, OV 15)
Biographical / Historical:
Porter A. McCray (1908-2000) was an arts administrator working in New York City, New York.

Born in Clarksburg, West Virginia in 1908, McCray recieved a degree in English literature from the Virginia Military Institute in 1930, and a degree in architecture from Yale University in 1941. McCray traveled extensively throughout Europe, Asia, and the Middle East, developing relationships with individuals and organizations across the world.

In 1941, McCray worked as an exhibition specialist in the Office of the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs and collaborated with the Museum of Modern Art on an American exhibition at the Guatemala National Fair. After serving as an ambulance driver in World War II, he was employed by the architectural firm of Harrison and Abramovitz where he worked on some preliminary designs of the present site of the United Nations.

While working for Harrison, McCray met Nelson Rockefeller, who was chairman of the board of the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA). In 1947, Rockefeller asked McCray to serve as the director of circulating exhibitions at MOMA and be responsible for the Museum's national and international traveling exhibition program. McCray accepted and remained at MOMA until 1961. The following year, he orchestrated the preparation of a MOMA exhibition of Mark Rothko's work in Paris in 1962. In 1963, McCray became the executive director of the JDR 3rd Fund, a non-profit started by John D. Rockefeller III to promote artistic and cultural exchanges between the United States and Asia. McCray also worked as a consultant for the Japan Society's visual arts programs, the Asian Cultural Council, for the dean of the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine's visual and performing arts program, and for MOMA's International Program after retiring.

McCray died in 2000 in Hightstown, New Jersey.
Related Materials:
Also found at the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview of Porter A. McCray conducted by Paul Cummings from September 17 to October 4, 1977.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in 1994 by Porter McCray.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Arts administrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Arts boards  Search this
Cultural relations  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Lectures
Interviews
Paintings
Transcripts
Citation:
Porter A. McCray Papers, 1936-1989. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.mccrport
See more items in:
Porter A. McCray papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw908b878b0-26c0-42f5-8de4-defe9950f12e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mccrport
Online Media:

Harriet Green Kopp Papers

Creator:
Kopp, Harriet Green, 1917-  Search this
Extent:
4.75 Cubic feet (16 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Lantern slides
Lecture notes
Date:
1930-1950
Scope and Contents:
These papers relate to Kopp's work in visible speech technology, especially a project to develop a machine that would enable the deaf to understand the spoken voice; including biographical materials, research notes, lecture notes, spectrograms, research reports, log books, correspondence, slides and photographs, books, and documentation of grants for research projects.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 6 series.

Series 1: Documents

Series 2: Books

Series 3: Photographs

Series 4: Slides

Series 5: Books

Series 6: Documents
Biographical / Historical:
Harriet Green Kopp was born on June 18, 1917 in New York City. She earned a Master of Arts fom Brooklyn College, 1939; diploma in education of deaf, Columbia University, 1939; and Doctor of Philosophy, Columbia University, 1962. Kopp was a professor in the School of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at San Diego State University. She died on February 11, 2007.
Kopp Names and Organizations:
Kopp Names

Adams, George F. -- region superintendent that signed off on HGK's request for an extension of leave from Detroit Day School for the Deaf (9/29/1972). See: Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970)

Adkins, Millie -- ranked No. 13 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966; Female Test Subject; 10/14/1966; Grade 4, Test 6 - Part A. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Test Results and Charts (October 1966)

Adkins, Judy Lee -- grade 4, in Higgins's homeroom class; ranked No. 23 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience; Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968 . See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Adkins, Amelia -- Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968 . See: Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Ahern, Patrick (Pat) -- ranked No. 11 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966; Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Alcord, Miss -- Maine School, Mass. Private. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Aler, Miss -- Motor Coordination - Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program; administered test of coordination. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Alexander, C. -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Library Research. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Altman, Silver -- in Jacobs's class; labelled Sp. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Alvarez, Jose (Joe) -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring and fall 1976, spring and fall 1977 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Alvarez, Christo -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Ames, Miss -- Deaf school teacher, N.J. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Ames, September -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Amrheim -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Anderson, Helene -- Co-wrote report on vocal therapy with George Kopp. See: Case Report by George Kopp and Helene Anderson on Vocal Therapy for Dysphonia Plicae Ventricularis (c. 1965)

Anderson, Dr. Irving -- Associate Professor of Speech Education, U. Michigan (1947); member of Visible Speech advisory committee; attended V.S. research committee meetings on 5/1/1947, 5/29/1947, 6/28/1947, 11/7/1947. See: Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); Information on Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program - U.Mich. (5/28/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947)

Anderson, Dr. Tom -- Texas School for the Deaf. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Anderson, Dr. William S. -- member of the committee on Adolescent Deaf of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf in March 1970. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Anderson -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Guidance and Personnel. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Anderson, Kenneth -- on clinic's spring 1975 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Anderson, Kathy -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Angelocci, Dr. Angelo A. -- Speech and Hearing Clinician, Rehabilitation Institutes, Metropolitan Detroit; born 10/16/1926, married with 4 children; B.S., Speech and English, Michigan State College (1950); M.A., Speech and Speech Correction, University of Michigan, 1954; speech teacher in Birmingham, MI for 6 years; doctoral student, Speech Pathology and Audiology, Wayne State University (1955); Research Associate during RD-526 project; budgeted for expenditures in grant proposal for project RD-526; Held copyright along with Harriet G. Kopp and Dr. George Kopp; taught the first experimental class for the RD-526 project and prepared material for the Visible Speech Manual. See: Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960); Early Draft of Final Report of Grant No. RD-526 (1963); Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Visible Speech Manual Original - to copy; Visible Speech Manual with Chapter Divisions (product of Contract No. RD-526); Visible Speech Manual with Chapter Divisions (product of Contract No. RD-526)

Arnold, Joyce -- 9 years old; Group 1 of exploratory program; congenitally deaf, severely hypacaustic, part of experimental study for Visible Speech Research at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947), experiment subject in U Mich study; scored for intelligibility in experiment 1 (1947); performance in Visible Speech Experiment #2 evaluated 1948. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Logistics for Operation of Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/25/1947-6/2/1947); Supplement to Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Pattern Recognition Charts - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Intelligibility Scores and Graphs (April-Dec. 1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Avery, Miss Charlotte -- speech teacher, translator in U Mich study; performed Visible Speech Experiment #4 at the Rackham School (March 1947); limited training in visible speech. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45); Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Proposed Visible Speech Program for the Rackham School (summer 1948); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Aviles, Irma -- on clinic's spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Ayres -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Bachman, Mrs. Dorothy L. -- experienced teacher of the deaf, Translator Project III; taught Group 2A, Experimenter in U Mich study, no training in visible speech; performed Visible Speech experiment #3 in March 1947; terminated her employment at the Rackham School at the end of the 1947 summer session. See: Logistics for Operation of Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/25/1947-6/2/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Proposed Visible Speech Program for the Rackham School (summer 1948); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Baker, George H. -- Executive Administrative Assistant, Dept. of Personnel, Detroit Public Schools; wrote HGK regarding administrative aspects of her new post at the Detroit Day School of the Deaf on 7/7/1958 and 10/15/1958. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Balbach -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Baldwin, Rev. DeWitt -- See: Dialogue between Martin Buber and Carl Rogers (4/18/1957)

Banks -- taught students at Detroit Day School; students labelled Sp. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Banton, James (Jim) -- Subject #18 in 1965 tests; grade 7, Steffens's homeroom class; noted as being involved in original project; ranked No. 35 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 9 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects, marked original project; Male Test Subject; 10/13/1966; Grade 9, Test 6 - Part A. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Test Results and Charts (October 1966)

Baozhong, Dr. Tu -- Deputy Secretary General and member of the Board of Trustees, Chinese Medical Association; in charge of medical education intern program. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Barberi -- new worker at Bell Labs. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Barlow, Susan -- in Jacobs's class; labelled Sp. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Barnes, Dr. -- Sweden; came for instruction and demonstration of University of Michigan study, 3/17/1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Barney, Harold L. -- worked at Bell Telephone Laboratories; sent letter 11/1/1954 to Harriet and George Kopp. See: correspondence from Harold Barney to George and Harriet Kopp (11/1/1954)

Bastiau -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Bauer, Marvin G. -- taught HGK at Brooklyn College - Advanced Discussion, Classical Rhetoric, & British and American Rhetorical Theory. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Bayones, David -- grade 4, in Higgins's homeroom class; ranked No. 30 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 6 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Beekman, Marvin E. -- Director of Special Education, Michigan Dept. of Education; sent congratulatory letter to HGK on the dedication of the new school building on 6/3/1970. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Behrens, Dr. Thomas R. -- member of the Chairmen of the Working Groups of the National Advisory Committee on the Education of the Deaf with HGK on 7/24/1969. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Belheimer -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 12/06/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Bell, Mr. -- Bell Labs demonstration 12/12/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Benjamin -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Fundamentals of Electricity. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Bennett, Jeffrey (Jeff) -- ranked No. 38 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 5 (1966-1967 school year). See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Bennett -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Benya, Jr., John J. -- salary as Research Asst. budgeted for Project No. RD-1483-S (1966). See: Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1966)

Bierlin, Ruth -- Observed UMich demonstrations, special class of hard of hearing children . See: How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947)

Biller, Mary E. -- Newark, NJ, Bell Labs demonstration participant 03/21/1945

Bint, Linda -- ranked No. 22 overall in spring 1966 tests; 5th grade (1966-1967 school year). See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Bitter, Colleen -- grade 4, in Higgins's homeroom class; ranked No. 18 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience . See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Black, Melissa -- grade 4, in Higgins's homeroom class; HGK noted check vision on roster; ranked No. 44 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 6 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Blair, Miss -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 10/24/1946. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947)

Bloom, Jr., Edgar -- signed front of Visible Speech. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Bloomer, Dr. Harlan H. -- Director of Speech Clinic, Associate Prof. of Speech, University of Michigan (1947); discussed visible speech research program with Ralph K. Potter on 4/18/1946 and 3/13/1947; member of Visual Speech advisory committee; attended V.S. research committee meetings on 1/5/1947, 2/12/1947, 2/21/1947, 3/3/1947, 5/1/1947, 5/29/1947, 6/28/1947, 11/7/1947; George Kopp requested a clerical assistant for Harriet Green and a graduate laboratory assistant from Bloomer on 2/2/5/1947; sent George Kopp notes on a proposed article on visible speech on 6/24/1947; highlighted in News and Notes article (Oct. 1947); requested that students doing research with the sound spectrograph be encouraged to publish (Aug. 1948). See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45); Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); Proposed Outline: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/3/1947); Information on Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program - U.Mich. (5/28/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); News and Notes (9/22/1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Bloomquist, Betty -- Other Research Participant at University of Michigan during Kopp's study; completed Master's thesis on Diadochokinetic movements of children in May 1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Blost, Phyllis E. -- Evaluation section, Dept. of Management and Budget; received letter from HGK about the delay of her retirement settlement on 9/11/1981. See: Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970)

Boatner -- Hartford School. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Bobb, David -- on clinic's fall 1975, spring and fall 1976, spring and fall 1977 lists . See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Bock, N.B. -- authored Correcting the Spoken English of Chinese and Japanese. See: Information on Phonetics and Dialects (6/6/1949-1/26/1950)

Boggs, Barbara -- grade 8, Schmitz's homeroom class; crossed off roster; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked 4 days. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Bohman, Dr. George -- Chairman, Dept of Speech, Wayne State University; associated with the George A. Kopp Memorial fund

Boldt, Jan -- on clinic's spring 1975, fall 1976, fall 1977 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Boody, Barbara -- recorded spectrograms with cleft palate 4/4/1947. See: Sound Spectrograph results (1945-48)

Borst, John M. -- Some Experiments on the Perception of Synthetic Speech (Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 24, No. 6, Nov. 1952); The Interconversion of Audible and Visible Patterns as a Basis for Research in Perception of Speech (from the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 37, No. 5, May 1951). See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Boskovich, James (Jim) -- Subject #6 in 1965 tests; grade 5, in Gardiner's homeroom class; ranked Bo. 43 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Bowen, Mr. -- Holmdel. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Bowen, Miss -- Skidmore. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Bowman, George -- Ohio State?. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Boyd -- Bell Labs Notebook - lunch 12/31/1945

Bozorgi, Farid -- ranked No. 37 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 8 (1966-1967 school year); sent thank you letter to HGK on 2/23/1971 regarding her help with his education; received letter back from her 3/10/1971. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Braboy, Gayle Lynn -- ranked No. 40 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 5 (1966-1967 school year); Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966);Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Braswell, Shelly -- grade 4, in Higgins's homeroom class; ranked No. 26 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 6 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Bratsch, Don -- on clinic's spring 1975 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Breading, C.M. -- representing Central Press Clipping Service, soliciting business to review public relations of the Rackham School of Special Education. See: Correspondence to George A. Kopp from C.M. Breading of the Central Press Clipping Service (9/3/1947)

Brendle, Terry -- in Banks's class; labelled Sp. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Brent, Billy -- ranked No. 12 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966)

Brice, Arlene -- charted with other female test subjects. See: Charts and Spectrograph Results (female test subjects)

Brock, Christopher -- student at Detroit Day School shown in newspaper photograph. See: Clipping from The Detroit News (2/13/1966)

Brock, James T. -- wrote article on the Detroit Day School entitled: A War on Silence: Detroit Day School for Deaf Presents Students the Gifts of Speed, 'Hearing' . See: Clipping from The Detroit News (2/13/1966)

Broomfield, William S. -- Member of Congress, 18th District of Michigan; sent HGK a congratulatory letter on her reappointment to the National Advisory Committee on Education of the Deaf on 8/6/1970. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Brown, Richard -- replaced Loveel as engineer in charge of servicing the visible speech equipment in 1948. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44), Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Brownell, Dr. Samuel Miller -- Superintendent of Detroit Public Schools - offered HGK job as principal for the West Side School for the Deaf on 10/3/1958; received her acceptance letter sent 10/8/1958; recognized HGK's acceptance of the principal position on 10/14/1958; later assocatiated with Yale University Institute of Social Science; offered to write HGK a recommendation letter 11/26/1969; Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960); received memo on the reorganization of the education of the deaf and hard of hearing from HGK on 6/14/1961; allowed research for project RD-526 to be conducted at the Detroit Day School for the Deaf; received letter 1/27/1960 about approval of a grant for Harriet and George Kopp's research. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970); Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971); Early draft of the final report of Grant No. RD-526 (1963); Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960)

Bruner -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Educational Foundations. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Brunstetter, Prof. Max -- asked to review manuscript by GAK on 8/13/1941. See: Original Manuscript of and comments on George A. Kopp's elementary opus (8/3/1941)

Brust -- re: Kopp- Ohio 12/28/45. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Buber, Martin -- famous German philosopher. See: Dialogue between Martin Buber and Carl Rogers (4/18/1957)

Buckley, Dr. Oliver E. -- President of Bell Telephone Laboratories; received reports from Chao on use of spectrograph for the study and teaching of Chinese; issues certificates recognizing contribution to war effort; discussed possibility of using voice print technology in crime-fighting. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (11/26/1943-6/10/1944); Certificate WWII, BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Buckner, Jim -- grade 5, in Simmons's class, on list of students now using the machine; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Buli, Mable -- charted with other female test subjects. See: Charts and Spectrograph Results (female test subjects)

Bumingham, Ann -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Burge, Linda -- ranked No. 52 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 5; Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Burrows, Dr. Harold -- Vice President - Administration, Parke Davis & Company; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Bush, Dr. -- OSRD - interview. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Campbell, Janet C. -- secretary to B.R. Wolfram, M.D., president of Educational Media, Inc.; sent HGK invoices for her signature on 1/27/1970. See: Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971)

Carlson, Beverly -- grade 9, in Martyka's class, on list of students now using the machine; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Carter, C.W. -- wrote report on Chao's testing of the Chinese language with the spectrograph. See: Memo on Visible Speech testing of Chinese langauage (4/17/1944)

Caswell, Prof. Hollis L. -- asked to review manuscript by GAK on 8/13/1941. See: Original Manuscript of and comments on George A. Kopp's elementary opus (8/3/1941); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Caufield, Colonel Norton -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Chang, Dr. -- Director, Maternal and Ob.Gyn. Hospital (associated with China Welfare Institute), Shanghai. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Chao, Jo -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Chao, Dr. Y.R. -- professor at Harvard University; provided Chinese samples to visible speech testing. See: Memo on Visible Speech testing of Chinese langauage (4/17/1944); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); Research report by Y.R. Chao on Chinese recordings (11/21/1944-2/17/1945)

Chapman -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Chase, Jeffrey -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Chelfant?, Jerme -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Cheng, Dr. -- Deputy Director, Head of Nursing Dept., Maternal and Ob.Gyn. Hospital (associated with the China Welfare Institute), Shanghai. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Cheng, Dr. -- Neurologist, Shanghai Medical College. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Chinitz, Ben S. -- Region One Superintendent, Detroit Public Schools; sent HGK a congratulatory letter on 6/1/1970. See: Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970)

Chou, Dr. -- Shanghai Medical College. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Christensen -- rep of Michigan Bell Telephone publications dept.; 10/10/1946 conference . See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Christopher, Harold M. -- signed front of Visible Speech. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Cirker, Mr. -- See: Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974)

Clark, A.N. -- Editor, D. Van Nostrand Company, Inc.(published Visible Speech); received letter from George Kopp on 8/8/1947 expressing a need for new books in the field of speech correction. See: Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947)

Clark, Mr. -- Cleary Oral School, Bell Labs demonstration participant 03/07/1946. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Clark, Marla -- grade 5, in Gardiner's homeroom class; ranked No. 48 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Clark, Ross -- on clinic's spring 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Cleary, Miss -- Cleary Oral School, Bell Labs demonstration participant 03/07/1946. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Clement -- 6th and 9th grade teacher, Detroit Day School; 5 students in spring 1966 9th grade class. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966)

Clemente, Mr. Joseph -- left position to join Project No. RD-1483-S on 2/1/1965; worked full time until Aug. 1965; resigned due to personal problems in Sept. 1965; budgeted salary as Research Assistant for Project No. RD-1483-S (1966). See: Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1966); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Cohen, Marsha -- teacher at Detroit Day School; shown in newspaper photograph teaching 4-year-olds. See: Clipping from The Detroit News (2/13/1966)

Cole, Samantha -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Coleman, David -- Experiment subject in U Mich Study; performance in Visible Speech Experiment #4 evaluated 1948. See: How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Collins, Kenneth M. (Ken; KC) -- signed front of Visible Speech. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Colpitts, Frank -- received Visible Speech Research Project Progress Report concerning plans for producting the testing-instruction materials on 10/17/1966; met with the General Film Lab., Co., Detroit about the creation of slides of spectrographic patterns; Research Associate for Visible Speech for the Deaf, worked part time starting September 1966 until the end of the project; mailed GAK the summary of the spring 1967 research study on 6/25/1968. See: Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Correspondence from Frank Colpetts to George A. Kopp (6/26/1968)

Comover, Donald -- on clinic's spring 1975, fall 1976 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Connor, Leo E. -- member of the Editorial Policies Committee of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf in March 1970. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Connors, Kevin -- grade 5, in Gardiner's homeroom class; ranked No. 24 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5; marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Conroy, Colleen -- on clinic's spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Cooper, Dr. Franklin S. -- NDRC demo; worked at Haskins Laboratories, NY, wrote Some Instrumental Aids to Research on Speech; Some Experiments on the Perception of Synthetic Speech (Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 24, No. 6, Nov. 1952); Guidance Devices for the Blind (Physics Today, Vol. 3, No. 7, July 1950); Spectrum Analysis (Journal of Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 22, No. 6, Nov. 1950); The Interconversion of Audible and Visible Patterns as a Basis for Research in Perception of Speech (from the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 37, No. 5, May 1951). See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); Articles and Research Materials (1950-1957)

Cooper, Eugene B. -- Executive Secretary - Sensory Study Section; Department of Health, Education, and Welfare: Vocal Rehabilitation Administration. See: Information Concerning the Termination of Grant Project No. RD-1483-S (1963-1968)

Costello -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Costello, Mary Rose -- member of Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc. Editorial Politicies Committee (3/1/1970). See: Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971)

Coulton, Thomas -- taught HGK at Brooklyn College - History of Oratory. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Cox, Admiral -- assistant Surgeon General, D.C. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Cox, Mr. -- of the Keystone Co. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Craig, Mary V. -- authored German Dialect. See: Information on Phonetics and Dialects (6/6/1949-1/26/1950)

Crile, Nick -- grade 5, in Simmons's class, on list of students now using the machine; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Cronon, Detective -- technician, Department of Research, New York Police Department; approached Dr. Buckley about using voice print identification in fighting crime. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (11/26/1943-6/10/1944)

Cross, Dwayne -- on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Croushore, Dr. James -- Head, Dept. of Otolaryngology at Wayne State University medical School; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Cruickshank, Kathy (Kate) -- Subject #19 in 1965 tests; grade 7, Steffens's homeroom class; noted as being involved in original project; ranked No. 15 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 9 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects, marked as original project; Female Test Subject; 10/11/1966; Grade 9B, Test 2. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Test Results and Charts (October 1966)

Curran, Kathleen -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring 1976 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Curtis, Dr. Jack F. -- Member of the staff of the Detroit Day School for the Deaf who served in the maintenance and operation of all equipment. See: Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

David, Dr. E.E. -- Director, Acoustic and Visual Research, Bell Telephone Laboratories; provided GAK and HGK technical assistance with the translator. See: Early Draft of Final Report of Grant No. RD-526 (1963)

David, Dr. -- worked at Bell Labs, referenced in letter from M.R. Schroeder as showing continued interest in Kopp's research. See: Correspondence from M.R. Schroeder to Dr. George A. Kopp (3/25/1965)

David, Dr. E.E. -- Executive Director - Research Communications Systems Divison . Developed the transistorized visible speech translator and provided and experimental model of the equipment for use in the last year of the research project for Visible Speech. See: Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Davis -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

De Lair, Truman -- Subject #10 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Kane's homeroom class; noted as being a child with some introduction; ranked No. 3 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966; on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Dean, M.D., C. Robert -- Director of the Rehabilitation Institute of Metropolitan Detroit; confirmed HGK's appointment as Clinical Director of Speech and Hearing on 5/18/1955. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Delattre, Pierre C. -- wrote The Physiological Interpretation of Sound Spectrograms (Publications of The Modern Language Association of America, Vol. 66, No. 5, Sept. 1951) and Some Experiments on the Perception of Synthetic Speech Sounds (Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 24, No. 6, Nov. 1952). See: Articles and Research Materials 91950-1957)

Delikta, Donna -- Subject #21 in 1965 tests; grade 7, Steffens's homeroom class; ranked No. 12 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 9 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Dellas, Nick G. -- Subject #32 in 1965 tests; grade 6, in Clement's homeroom class; ranked No. 45 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 8 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience; Male Test Subject; 10/13/1966; Grade 8, Test 6 - Part A. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Test Results and Charts (October 1966)

Denes, Dr. P.B. -- Head of Speech and Communication Research Department. Developed the transistorized visible speech translator and provided and experimental model of the equipment for use in the last year of the research project for Visible Speech. See: Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Densmore, G.E. -- member of Dept of Speech, U.Mich.?; asked Dean Lloyd Woodburne to reimburse George Kopp's expenses accrued when presenting at the convention of the Association of American Instructors of the Deaf on 5/29/1947. See: Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947)

Denton, Evelyn Louise -- Other Research Participant at University of Michigan during Kopp's study; completed Master's thesis on frequency range and the principal zone of energy in May 1947. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Derderian, Gary -- Subject #7 in 1965 tests; grade 5, in Gardiner's homeroom class; ranked No. 17 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Deshon -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Di Franco, Franco -- in Banks's class; labelled Sp.; noted as being involved in original project. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Dincen, Miss -- 1/25/1946. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Dobler -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Doerfler, Leo G. -- member of Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc. Editorial Politicies Committee (3/1/1970). See: Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971); Actvities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Donahue, Dr. -- Psychology Bureau; saw spectrograph demonstration on 12/12/1946. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Drachler, Dr. Norman -- Superintendent of Detroit Public Schools who continued the opportunity to conduct the research in the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Draper, Lora -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Dreher, John J. -- Other Research Participant at University of Michigan during Kopp's study; Ph.D. thesis on differences in melody of Chinese speaking acquired English and vice versa - in progress Aug 1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Drennen, Genevieve J. -- speech teacher, teacher of deaf, experimenter in U Mich study; performed Visible Speech Experiment #5 at the Rackham School in March 1947. See: Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Propsed Visible Speech Program for the Rackham School (summer 1948); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Dudley, Homer -- signed front of Visible Speech. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (11/26/1943-6/10/1944); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Dunigan, Kathy -- grade 9, in Martyka's class, on list of students now using the machine; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Dunigan, Tanya -- grade 4, in Higgins's homeroom class; ranked No. 32 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 6 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Dupree, Richard (Ritchie) -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring and fall 1976 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Dworkin, Doris -- served as family representative on George A. Kopp Memorial Fund advisory board; received correspondence from HGK 1/25/1971. See: George Kopp Memorial Scholarship Fund (1964-1973)

Eames, Mr. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Ebbinger -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Edwards -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Eisonson, Jon -- taught HGK at Brooklyn College - Psychology of Speech. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948); Lectures and Seminar Notes(1957-1966)

Eliseou? -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Ellis, Miss -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Elsner, Todd -- on clinic's fall 1976, spring 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Elstadt -- Gallaudet, Bell Labs demonstration participant 03/08/46

Emmens -- rep of Michigan Bell Telephone publications dept.; 10/10/1946 conference . See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Enkvist, Nils Erik -- Other Research Participant at University of Michigan during Kopp's study; proposed thesis to GAK on 10/8/1947 on transitions to and from vowels i and u - approved 10/13/1947; Master's thesis completed May 1948. See: Thesis Proposals by George Kopp's Students (10/8/1947-3/1/1948); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Essig, Mr. Robert D. -- Technical services, hired for machine maintenance at the recommendation of Lewis Holland and Paul Geiger; found by Dr. Francis Lord to serve as electronic technician (11/24/1946); saw the translator for the first time on 1/22/1947; received memo about delayed payment from Dr. Lord on 5/19/1947; associated with spectrogram of indirect recording?. See: Sound Spectrograph results (1945-48); Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947)

Etkie, Dorothy -- ranked No. 6 overall in spring 1966 tests. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966)

Evans, Miss -- Scranton School for Deaf. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Evendon -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Professional Education of Teachers. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Everingham, Patti -- on clinic's spring 1975 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Fairbanks -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Fairbanks, Grant -- Speech Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana; wrote Test of Phonemic Differentiation: The Rhyme Test (Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 30, No. 7, Jul. 1958). See: Article in the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America on Rhyme Testing (July 1958)

Falk, Dr. Mervyn -- Director of the Speech and Hearing Center, Wayne State University; Head of Communication Disorders and Sciences, Wayne State University; chosen to serve on the George A. Kopp Memorial Fund advisory board; wrote HGK concerning fund details on 7/26/1973. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970); George Kopp Memorial Scholarship Fund (1964-1973)

Featherstone, Richard K. -- planned photographs for Birmingham Plan of Testing Hearing and Vision pamphlet. See: The Birmingham Plan of Testing Hearing and Vision (1951)

Fein, Miss Judith G. -- representative of the Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare to the Working Groups of the National Advisory Council on the Education of the Deaf on 7/24/1969. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Fellendorf, George W. -- member of Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc. Editorial Politicies Committee (3/1/1970). See: Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971)

Felne? -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Fernandez, Mr. -- Spanish Teacher. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Findlay -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Fischer, Leonard (Len) -- President, Trax Softworks, Inc., Culver City, CA; showed interest in borrowing Visible Speech Manual from her; sent HGK a pre-addressed Federal Express airbill for use in sending the Visible Speech Manual to him 10/29/1991. See: Correspondence between Harriet Kopp and Len Fischer (10/29/1991)

Flanagan, Dr. J.L. -- Head of Acoustics Research Department of the Bell Telephone Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey. Developed the transistorized visible speech translator and provided and experimental model of the equipment for use in the last year of the research project for Visible Speech. See: Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Fleets -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Fletcher -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Forsythe, Mrs. Patria G. -- Executive Secretary, National Advisory Committee on Education of the Deaf; representative of the Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare to the Working Groups of the NACED on 7/24/1969; thanked HGK on her participation in the Invitational Conference on Personnel Education in the Area of the Deaf on 10/27/1969; member of the Committee on the Adolescent Deaf of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf in March 1970. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Fowler, Dr. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Frampton -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Survey, education of handicapped. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Freese, Mrs. Gertrude -- NY Telephone, Bell Labs demonstration participant 01/24/1946. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

French, Norman G. -- signed front of Visible Speech. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Frisina, Dr. -- discussed Farid Bozorgi and his future at the National Technical Institute with HGK. See: Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971)

Fry -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Gaeth, Dr. John H. -- Prof. of Audiology, Director of Audiology, Wayne State University; Professor of Audiology; Director of Hearing Clinic; B.S. Midland College and University of Nebraska (1940); M.A. University of Nebraska (1942); Ph.D. Northwestern University (1948); married with 2 children; specialization: teaching audiology, training teachers of the deaf, administration and research in audiology; Chairman of the American Speech and Hearing Association Committee on Standards in Hearing; Advanced Certification in Hearing in ASHACSH; budgeted for expenditures in grant proposal for project RD-526; Grad Asst, University of Nebraska (Sept 1942-Feb 1944); Officer, U.S.N.R. (1944-1946); Grad Asst, Northwestern University (1946-1948); Asst. Professor, University of Denver (1948-1949); Assoc. Prof. Northwestern University (1949-1957); Professor of Audiology, Wayne State University (1957-?); wrote HGK a letter about RD-526 funding on 10/26/1959; salary as consultant budgeted for Project No. RD-1483-S (1963, 1966); member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960); Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1966); Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Gallagher -- PS 47, Bell Labs demonstration participant 02/14/1946

Galloway, Victor H. -- member of the Chairmen of the Working Groups of the National Advisory Committee on the Education of the Deaf with HGK on 7/24/1969. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Gamache, Keith -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Garcia, Danny -- on clinic's fall 1976, spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Gardella, Bonnie -- on clinic's fall 1976, spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Gardiner, Ray -- 5th grade teacher, Detroit Day School; 9 students in spring 1966 class; Member of the staff for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf, taught experimental classes with the translator from 1966-1968. See: Test Subjects (1965); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Garrett, James F. -- Assistant Commissioner of Research and Training, Dept of Health, Education, and Welfare - Vocational Rehabilitation Adminstration; Assistant Director - informed Thomas & Kopp about receipt of grant on 10/20/1959; contacted Van Buskirk about continuation of grant for Visible Speech for the Deaf on 5/31/1966. See: Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960); Financial Information on the Continuation of the Federal Grant for Project RD-1483-S-66-C2 (May 1966)

Garwood, V.P. -- Other Research Participant at University of Michigan during Kopp's study; proposed thesis to GAK on visula discrimination of amplitude variations on sound spectrograms; completed Master's thesis May, 1948. See: Thesis Proposals by George Kopp's Students (10/8/1947-3/1/1948); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Gates, Miss -- Motor Coordination - Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program. See: How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947)

Gawlik, Rev. Rudolph E. -- served as an interpreter for the Working Groups of the National Advisory Committee on the Education of the Deaf on 7/24/1969. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Gayda, Tonia -- on clinic's spring 1975 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Geiger, Dr. Paul -- recommended Robert Essig for employment. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Geles -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Gelnak, Barbara -- Subject #16 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Kane's homeroom class; noted as being involved in original project; ranked No. 14 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked original project. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Gerstman, Louis J. -- Some Experiments on the Perception of Synthetic Speech (Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 24, No. 6, Nov. 1952). See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Gertz -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Gibson -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Glover, Evelyn -- grade 9, in Martyka's class, on list of students now using the machine; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Goddu -- member of Editorial Committee of NACED that submitted recommendations on 10/16/1969. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Gore, Sue -- Subject #28 in 1965 tests; grade 4, in Higgins's homeroom class; ranked No. 13 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 6 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5; Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966);Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Gorman -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Gosen, John -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring 1976, fall 1977 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Graber -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Graham, Dr. A. Bruce -- Senior Audiologist, Henry Ford Hospital; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Graham, Craig -- ranked No. 47 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 5 (1966-1967 school year); Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Grant, Margaret J. -- member of the committee on Adolescent Deaf of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf in March 1970. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Gray, Mr. Charles H.G. (CHG) -- signed front of Visible Speech; received information on voiceprint method of identifying individuals. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45); Research Report by Y.R. Chao on Chinese recordings (11/21/1944-2/17/1945); Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (11/26/1943-6/10/1944)

Green, M.L. -- speech 01/26/1946. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Green (Kopp), Harriet Clara (HCG) -- B.A. Brooklyn College (1937); M.A. Brooklyn College (1938); Ph.D. Columbia University (?); Assistant and Instructor at Brooklyn College (1936-1939); Teacher at Lexington School for the Deaf (1939-1940); Instructor at Indiana University (1940-1941); Grad. Asst. Teachers College, Columbia University (1941-1943); Member of Technical Staff, Bell Telephone Laboratories (1943-1946); Assistant Professor, University of Michigan (1943-46); Assoc. Prof. of Special Education, Michigan State Normal College (1947) and Research Assistant, University of Michigan (1947); performed Visible Speech Experiments #2, 6, 7 at the Rackham School for Special Education (associated with U.Mich.) (March 1947); mentioned in article in News and Notes (Oct. 1947); Public School Speech Correctionalist, Birmingham, MI (1948-1956); taught Visible Speech Program at Rackham School, summer 1948; Director, Speech and Hearing Division, Rehabilitation Institute of Metropolitan Detroit (1956-1959); specialties: teacher training, administration and research; Associate Editor of the Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders; holder of Advanced Certification in Hearing in the American Speech and Hearing Association; Associate Professor of Special Education - Michigan State Normal College, Research Assistant - U. Mich.; carried out experimental training program of visible speech; co-wrote article on visible speech for educators of the deaf, c. 1947; attended meetings of the visible speech research committee on 1/8/1947, 2/12/1947, 2/21/1947, 3/3/1947, 5/1/1947, 5/29/1947, 6/28/1947, 11/7/1947; co-wrote report on Visible Speech Educational Research Program, 6/7/1947; wrote text for Birmingham Plan of Testing Hearing and Vision pamphlet; budgeted for expenditures in grant proposal for project RD-526; received letter from John H. Gaeth on 10/26/1959; Director of Speech and Hearing at the Rehabilitation Institute of Metropolitan Detroit; wrote S.M. Brownell on 1/27/1960 about the approval of a grant for research using the cathode ray tube translator; Project Co-Director of Grant RD-526, evaluating usefulness of the visible speech cathode ray tube translator as a supplement to the oral method of teaching speech to deaf and severly deafened children (1963); prepared Progress Report for Project No. RD-1483-S in Feb. 1965, 3/1/1965, and Feb. 1966; salary as consultant budgeted for Project No. RD-1483-S (1963, 1966); member of the Chairmen of the Working Groups of the National Advisory Committee on the Education of the Deaf with HGK on 7/24/1969; Retirement Papers form the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970); Chairman of the committees on adolescent deaf and editorial policies of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc. (3/1/1970); applied for extension of leave of absence from Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1972); Professor in the Dept. of Speech Pathology and Audiology, San Diego State College; Acting Dean of the College of Human Services at San Diego State University (7/6/1982); ; Chairman, Dept. of Speech Pathology, Audiology and Education of the Deaf, SDSC (9/4/1974); charted with female subjects. See: Visual Telephony Conferences (10/14/1943-2/23/1944); Voiceprint Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (11/26/1943-6/10/1944); transcript from Teachers College, Columbia University (3/15/1946); Spectrograms and Charted Results (11/17/1943); Research Report by Y.R. Chao on Chinese recordings (11/21/1944-2/17/1945); University of Michigan Project (July 1945-1948); Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Progress Report Presented at American Speech Correction Conference, Chicago - U.Mich. (12/31/1946); Article on Visible Speech for Educators of the Deaf by George A. Kopp and Harriet C. Green - U.Mich. (c. 1947); Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Proposed Outline: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/3/1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948); Logistics for Operation of Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/25/1947-6/2/1947); Supplement to Progress Reports #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Pattern Recognition Charts - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Report on Visible Speech Educational Research Program by George A. Kopp and Harriet C. Green - U.Mich. (6/7/1947); Information on Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program - U.Mich. (5/28/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947); Intelligibility Scores and Graphs (April-Dec. 1947); Newspaper clipping: Visible Speech: Teaching Deaf Children to Hear (July 1947); Advance Advertisement for Visible Speech (5/28/1947); News and Notes (9/22/1947); Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948); Papers and Charts on Frequency Ranges and Principle Zones of Energy (Feb. 1948); Proposed Visible Speech Program for the Rackham School (summer 1948); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (8/13/1948); Information on Phonetics and Dialects (6/6/1949-1/26/1950); The Birmingham Plan of Testing Hearing and Vision (1951); Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970); Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960); Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971); early Draft of Final Report of Grant No. RD-526 (1963); Description of Detroit School for the Deaf (2/26/1963); Rough Draft - Visible Speech Report (3/13/1963); Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1965); George Kopp Memorial Scholarship Fund (1964-1973); Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960); Information Concerning the Termination of Grant Project No. RD-1483-S (1963-1968); Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manuscript for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (hand-written) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Correspondence to George and Harriet Kopp from C.Van Riper (9/11/1968-9/26/1968); Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970); Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970); Correspondence between Harriet Hopp and Bernard O'Donnell (7/6/1982); Correspondence between Mara Mills and H. Kopp (1/4/2006); Visible Speech Manual Original - to copy; Visible Speech Manual with Chapter Divisions (product of Contract No. RD-526); charts and spectrograph results (female test subjects)

Grindem, Mark -- grade 4, in Higgins's homeroom class; ranked No. 42 overall in spring 1966 tests; list on Prospective subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Groht -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 11/29/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Gruenz, Jr., Otto O. -- attended conference about the translator on 12/31/1945; signed front of Visible Speech; member of Bell Telephone Laboratories, came to Detroit to fix the Translator after its move to the Detroit Day School from Wayne State University. See: Visible Speech Manual with Chapter Divisions (product of Contract No. RD-526); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Hafer, Sarah -- on clinic's fall 1976 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Hall, Dr. Roy M. -- Assistant Commissioner for Research with Cooperative Research Division of the US Office of Education. See: Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960)

Hamilton, Mr. -- Saskatechewan Deaf school, Bell Labs demonstration participant 02/21/1946 . See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Hammond, Richard -- Subject #5 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Kane's homeroom class; noted as being involved in original project; ranked No. 4 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked original project. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Hardy, Miriam Pauls -- member of the Editorial Policies Committee of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf in March 1970. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Harlan, Tom -- Subject #34 in 1965 tests; grade 6, in Clement's homeroom class; ranked No. 11 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 8 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Harnish, Mike -- Subject #33 in 1965 tests; grade 6, in Clement's homeroom class; noted as being involved in original project; ranked No. 8 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 8 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5, marked original project. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Harrington, Dr. -- Winnetka Schools; came for instruction and demonstration of U Mich Study, 11/10/1947. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Harris -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 11/29/1945, Comparative Linguistics 12/11/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Harris, Chris -- on clinic's spring 1975 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Hartin, Frank -- Employee of Customer Service - Dover Press; New York, NY. See: Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974)

Hartley -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Hasbrouck -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Hatchett, Jeanette -- in Jacobs's class; labelled Sp. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Hazelwood, Cheryl -- grade 9, in Martyka's class, on list of students now using the machine; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Hedstrom, Mr. -- copied on announcement of grant continuation for Visible Speech for the Deaf (5/31/1966). See: Financial Information on the Continuation of the Federal Grant for Project RD-1483-S-66-C2 (May 1966)

Heggie, Don -- grade 9, in Martyka's class, on list of students now using the machine; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Heggie, Patricia (Pat) -- Subject #26 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Schmitz's homeroom class; ranked No.2 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Heinrichs -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Henselmeier, Cindy -- on clinic's fall 1975, spring and fall 1976, spring and fall 1977 lists . See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Herkimer, Katherine -- 14 years old; Group 1 of exploratory program; congenitally deaf, severly hypacaustic, part of experimental study for Visible Speech Research at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947), experiment subject in U Mich study; scored for intelligibility in experiment 1 (1947); performance in Visible Speech Experiment #2 evaluated 1948. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); Logistics for Operation of Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/25/1947-6/2/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Supplement to Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Pattern Recognition Charts - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Intelligibility Scores and Graphs (April-Dec. 1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Herold, Timothy (Tim) -- Subject #20 in 1965 tests; grade 7, Steffens's homeroom class; ranked No. 1 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966; on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Hertz, Dr. Richard C. -- Temple Beth El. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Hesson, Gary -- Proposed Experiment subject in Ypsilanti Study; scored for intelligibility in experiment 3 (1947); subject in experimental U. Michigan study with the Rackham School (3/25/1947), aged 10 yrs, 8 months; congenitally deaf and severely hypacusic. See: Logistics for Operation of Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/25/1947-6/2/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Intelligibility Scores and Graphs (April-Dec. 1947)

Hester, Mrs. -- Functional test of vision- telebinocular. See: How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947)

Hewitt, Barnard -- taught HGK at Brooklyn College - History of Modern Theatre, History of Ancient Theatre, & Studies in Play Production

Hewittson, Dr. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Hibbit, George -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Hicks, (William) Billy -- grade 5, in Gardiner's homeroom class; HGK noted get to wear glasses on roster; ranked No. 53 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Higgins -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Higgins -- 4th grade teacher, Detroit day School; 9 students in Spring 1966 class . See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966)

Hill, James E. -- Ed.D. degree; permanent replacement for J. Clemente in work for the RD-1483-S project; hired due to a background of training and experience in both electrical engineering and speech; salary as a consultant budgeted for Project No. RD-1483-S (1963, 1966); informally met with Mr. Powles of the General Film Lab., Co. concerning the creation of slides of spectrographic patterns (10/17/1966); assistant to GAK at Wayne State University; Background in speech and electrical engineering. Worked on Visible Speech project until 1966. See: Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Financial Information on the Continuation of the Federal Grant for Project RD-1483-S-66-C2 (May 1966); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Hoe, Dr. -- staff, Steel Complex Hospital, Nanking area. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Hoekstra, Dr. Marvin -- Wayne State University Electrical Engineering Dept. staff member; added to the RD-1483-S project staff on 1/27/1966 as a consultant in equipment maintenance; salary as Research Asst & Electronic Technician budgeted for Project No. RD-1483-S (1966); Employee of the Wayne State University Electrical Engineering Department. In January 1966 was appointed as a consultant in maintenance of equipment. Assisted Dr. Jack Curtis of the Speech and Hearing Center until the termination of the contract. See: Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1966); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Hoemann, Rev. Harry W. -- served as an interpreter for the Working Groups of the National Advisory Committee on the Education of the Deaf on 7/24/1969. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Hoerr, III, Chris R. -- member of the Editorial Policies Committee of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf in March 1970. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Hograth -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Hoit-Dalgaard, Jeannette -- co-authored Voice Onset Time Production and Perception in Apraxic Subjects with HGK in Brain and Language (Vol. 20, 1983, p. 329-339); affiliated with VA Medical Center, San Diego. See: Correspondence between Mara Mills and H. Kopp (1/4/2006)

Holbrook, Dr. Anthony -- specialties: training teachers of speech correction and research in Speech Science; Asst. Prof. of Speech, Wayne State University Speech and Hearing Clinic; married with 3 children; B.S. Speech Correction, University of California Santa Barabara (1951); M.A. Speech Pathology, University of Hawaii (1953); Ph.D. in Speech Science, Correction and Audiology, University of Illinois (1958); served as technical assistant in the maintenance and operation of equipment during research for project RD-526. See: Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960); Early Draft of Final Report of Grant No. RD-526 (1963); Visible Speech Manual with Chapter Divisions (product of Contract No. RD-526)

Holland, David -- test subjects, Translator Project I, 8 years old; Group 2A of exploratory program; congenitally deaf with slight residual hearing, Experiment subject in U Mich Study with Rackham School; scored for intelligibility in experiment 1 & 3 (1947); performance in Visible Speech Experiment #4 evaluated 1948. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); Logistics for Operation of Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/25/1947-6/2/1947); Intelligibility Scores and Graphs (April-Dec. 1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Holland, Prof. Lewis -- recommended Robert Essig for employment. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947)

Honamen -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Hoth -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Howell, Louise -- worker at Cleveland State Hospital; George Kopp responded to her query about the visible speech research on 8/8/1947. See: Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947)

Howell, Jay -- on clinic's spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Huang, Mr. -- staff, Steel Complex Hospital, Nanking area. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Hudgins, Dr. Clarence V. -- Director of Research, Experimental Phonetics, Clarke School for the Deaf, Northampton, Mass.; worked on rhythm and stress; colleagues with Dr. G.E. Peterson at Harvard University during World War II; Special Consultant to the Visible Speech Advisory project (1947); attended a meeting of the Visible SPeech Research Committee on 5/1/1947; submitted report to the Advisory Committe of the Visible Speech Research Project, Institute for Human Adjustment, U.Mich. on 6/10/1947; the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc. Editorial Policies Committee discussed publishing his articles and papers on 3/1/1970. See: Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); Information on Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program - U.Mich. (5/28/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948); Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971)

Hudson, Richard (Dick) -- 10 years old; Group 1 of exploratory program; congenitally deaf, severly hypacaustic, part of experimental study for Visible Speech Research at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947), experiment subject in U Mich study; scored for intelligibility in experiment 1 (1947); performance in Visible Speech Experiment #2 evaluated 1948. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); Logistics for Operation of Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/25/1947-6/2/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); ;Supplement to Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Pattern Recognition Charts - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Intelligibility Scores and Graphs (April-Dec. 1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Humes, Larry E. -- co-authored Recognition of Synthetic Speech by Hearing-Impaired Elderly Listeners in the Journal of Speech and Hearing Research (vol. 34, Oct. 1991, p. 1180-84). See: Excerpt from the Journal of Speech and Hearing Research (Oct. 1991)

Hurst, Marlene -- Employee of Xerox- University Microfilms catalogs of Wayne State University Press. See: Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974)

Hutchkins -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Hyde, Timothy -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring 1976, spring 1977 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Hykes, John -- member of Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc. Editorial Politicies Committee (3/1/1970). See: Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971)

Ickes, James (Jim) -- Subject #31 in 1965 tests; grade 6, in Clement's homeroom class; ranked No. 34 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 8 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Ireland, Dwight B. -- Superintendant of Birmingham, MI public schools; wrote HGK a congratulatory letter on her new post at the Rehabilitation Institute on 11/6/1958. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Irwin, David -- test subjects, Translator Project I, 8 years old; Group 2A of exploratory program; congenitally deaf with slight residual hearing, Experiment subject in U Mich Study with Rackham School; scored for intelligibility in experiment 1 & 3 (1947); performance in Visible Speech Experiment #4 evaluated 1948. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); Logistics for Operation of Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/25/1947-6/2/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Intelligibility Scores and Graphs (April-Dec. 1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Jackson -- Comparative linguistics 12/11/945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Jacobs -- See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (11/26/1943-6/10/1944); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Jacobs -- taught students at Detroit Day School; students labelled Sp. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Jacobs, Henry -- in Banks's class; labelled Sp. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Jeffries, Charles -- in Banks's class; labelled Sp. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Jersild, A. -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Child Psychology. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Johnson, Miss -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Johnson, Dr. Kenneth O. -- Executive Secretary at the American Speech and Hearing Association; sent material from the Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare in the Office of Education to encourage increased activity with the Cooperative Research Division on 1/4/1959. See: Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960)

Johnson, T. Earle -- authored Southern Dialects. See: Information on Phonetics and Dialects (6/6/1949-1/26/1950)

Johnson, Michael (Mike) -- Subject #1 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Schmitz's homeroom class; noted as being involved in original project; ranked No. 2 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked original project. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Jones, Lloyd -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Guidance and Personnel. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Jones, Miss -- Teacher, Bell Labs demonstration participant 03/21/45. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Jones, Michael (Mike) -- Subject #35 in 1965 tests; grade 6, in Clement's homeroom class; ranked No. 9 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Joos, Prof. -- professor at U.Mich. at the Linguistic Institute; received permission from Harlan Bloomer to use the spectrograph for linguistics research on 2/26/1947 . See: Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947)

Kaczerowski, Janet -- marked off of clinic's fall 1976 list; on spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Kandel -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Educational Foundations. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Kane, Mr. Ronald -- 7th and 8th grade teacher, Detroit Day School; 7 students in spring 1966 7th grade class; realeased half time to work on Project No. RD-1483-S in Oct. 1964; salary as Research Asst. in budget for Project No. RD-1483-S (1966); received Visible Speech Research Project Progress Report concerning plans for producting the testing-instruction materials on 10/17/1966; Member of the staff of the Detroit Day School for the Deaf, taught experimental classes with the translator from 1965-1967. See: Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1966); Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Karpel, Miss -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Kavosi, Janice -- Subject #13 in 1965 tests; grade 7, Steffens's homeroom class; ranked No. 16 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Ke Ju, Dr. Cheng -- from Capital Med. Corp.; of the Chinese Medical Association. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Keilman, Joanne -- severly hypacaustic, experiment subject in U Mich study. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Keitz, Christine -- grade 5, in Simmons's class, on list of students now using the machine; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); ; Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Keller, Miss -- Bell labs demonstration participant 10/24/1946. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947)

Kelley -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Kelly, Joe (Joey) -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring and fall 1976, spring and fall 1977 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Kennedy, Miss Rosemary J. -- Bell Labs secretary; signed front of Visible Speech. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Kennedy, Louise -- taught HGK at Brooklyn College - Speech Pathology. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Kerps -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Kersta, Mr. -- U Mich Study; serviced sound spectrograph equipment 7/16/1948. See: Sound Spectrograph results (1945-48); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Kerster -- re: specs 01/16/46. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Kester, Miss -- audited V.S. training course part time

King, Mr. -- Bell labs demonstration 12/12/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Kinney, Richard -- Production Manager and Associate Director of Wayne State University Press . See: Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974)

Knott, John -- University of Iowa; saw demonstration of spectrograph on 6/12/1946. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Koeing, Jr., Wallace -- signed front of Visible Speech. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Kohr, Margaret -- charted with other female test subjects. See: Charts and Spectrograph Results (female test subjects)

Kolbusz, Gerald (Gerry) -- Grade 4, in Simmons's class, on list of students now using the machine; ranked No. 4 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966; crossed off grade 8 list (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Kopp, George A. (GAK) -- specialities: training teachers in speech pathology and audiology, research in speech science, correction, audiology, and administration; Presidnet of American Speech and Hearing Association; held Advanced Certification in Speech in the ASHA; consultant on the staff of Sinai Hospital and the Rehabilitation Institute of Metropolitan Detroit; B.A. from Monmouth College, Manmouth, IL (1926); M.S. Speech Correction, University of Wisconsin (1930); Ph.D. Speech Pathology and Medical Science, University of Wisconsin (1933); Chairman, Dept. of Speech, Jamestown College, Jamestown ND (1926-1928); Instructor in Speech, University of Wisconsin (1928-1931); Asst. Prof. of Speech, University of Wisconsin (1931-1936); Asst. Prof. of Speech, Director of Speech and Hearing Clinic, Columbia University (1939-1943); taught course on Sppech Correction at Columbia in 1941; Associate Prof. of Speech at Teachers College, Columbia University; Consultant to Bell Labs on technical speech problems(Member of Technical Staff Bell Telephone Laboratories, NY (1943-1946)); Research Associate, U.Mich. (c. 1947); presented with John Steinberg at the 1945 American Speech Correction Conference, Columbus, OH, on the development of Visible Speech; presented a progress report at the American Speech Correction Conference, Chicago on 12/31/1946; wrote report on Visible Speech Educational Research Program with Harriet Green, 6/7/1947; co-wrote Article on Visible Speech for Educators of the Deaf, c. 1947; attended meetings of the Visible Speech research committee on 1/8/1947, 2/12/1947, 2/21/1947, 3/3/1947, 5/1/1947, 5/29/1947, 6/28/1947, 11/7/1947; requested clerical assistant for Harriet Green and graduate laboratory assistant from Harlan Bloomer on 2/25/1947; received comments on a proposed article on visible speech in the Volta Review from Clark Tibbitts on 5/31/1947 and Harlan Bloomer on 6/24/1947; Research in visible speech: Associate Professor of Speech and Research Associate, University of Michigan and Director of Visible Speech Research (1946-1948); sent letter to A.N. Clark on 8/8/1947 expressing a need for new books in the speech correction field; highlighted in an article in News and Notes (Oct. 1947); Prof. of Speech, Director, Speech and Hearing Clinic, Wayne State University (1948-?); director of 5-year cooperative research project with Bell Telephone Laboratories, University of Michigan, and Michigan State Normal College; responsible for phonetic organization of visible speech; taught HGK at Teachers College - Voice Science, Psychology of Speech, Research in Speech Education, Speech Pathology; signed front of Visible Speech; filled out Application for Research or Demonstration Grant with the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare on 8/19/1959; salary as Director budgeted in grant proposal for project RD-526 (1959, 1963, 1966); Project Co-Director of Grant RD-526, evaluating usefulness of the visible speech cathode ray tube translator as a supplement to the oral method of teaching speech to deaf and severly deafened children (1963). Social Security No. 127-05-4264; copied on announcement of grant continuation for Visible Speech for the Deaf; prepared Progress Report for Project No. RD-1483-S in Feb. 1965, 3/1/1965, and Feb. 1966; part of application for the continuation of grant for Project No. RD-1483-S (9/26/1963; 2/10/1966); received Visible Speech Research Project Progress Report concerning plans for producting the testing-instruction materials on 10/17/1966; member of Editorial Committee of NACED that submitted recommendations on 10/16/1969; wrote Meeting Speech Needs of Elementary School Children while an assoc. prof. at Columbia. See: Syllabus for Speech Correction - Education 261K, Teachers College, Columbia University (1941); Original Manuscript of and comments on George A. Kopp's elementary opus (8/3/1941); Visual Telephony Conferences (10/14/1943-2/23/1944); Voiceprint Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (11/26/1943-6/10/1944); Research report by Y.R. Chao on Chinese recordings (11/21/1944-2/17/1945); University of Michigan Project (July 1945-1948); Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Progress Report Presented at American Speech Correction Conference, Chicago - U.Mich. (12/31/1946); Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Information on Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program - U.Mich. (5/28/1947); Correspondence form Adrian Leon y Marquez to George Kopp (3/14/1947); Newspaper clipping: Visible Speech: Teaching Deaf Children to Hear (July 1947); Correspondence to George A. Kopp from C.M. Breading of the Central Press Clipping Service (9/3/1947); News and Notes (9/22/1947); Advance Advertisement for Visible Speech (c. 1947); Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); Article on Visible Speech for Educators of the Deaf by George A. Kopp and Harriet C. Green - U.Mich. (c. 1947); Proposed Outline: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/3/1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948); Logistics for Operation of Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/25/1947-6/2/1947); Supplement to Progress Reports #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Pattern Recognition Charts - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Report on Visible Speech Educational Research Program by George A. Kopp and Harriet C. Green - U.Mich. (6/7/1947); Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948); Papers and Charts on Frequency Ranges and Principle Zones of Energy (Feb. 1948); Final Report of Visible SPeech Educational Evaluation Research Program (8/13/1948); Lectures and Seminar Notes(1957-1966); Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960); early Draft of Final Report of Grant No. RD-526 (1963); Description of Detroit School for the Deaf (2/26/1963); Rough Draft - Visible Speech Report (3/13/1963); Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1966); George Kopp Memorial Scholarship Fund (1964-1973); Case Report by George Kopp and Helene Anderson on Vocal Therapy for Dysphonia Plicae Ventricularis (c. 1965); Correspondence from M.R. Schroeder to Dr. George A. Kopp (3/25/1965); Financial Information on the Continuation of the Federal Grant for Project RD-1483-S-66-C2 (May 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information Concerning the Termination of Grant Project No. RD-1483-S (1963-1968); Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manuscript for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (hand-written) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Correspondence to George and Harriet Kopp from C.Van Riper (9/11/1968-9/26/1968); Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970); Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963); Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980); Visible Speech Manual Original - to copy; Visible Speech Manual with Chapter Divisions (product of Contract No. RD-526); Manuscript of Meeting Speech Needs of Elementary School Children by George A. Kopp; How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947); Seminar Notes of George A. Kopp - Speech 337

Kopp, Dr. Joseph B. -- George Kopp's son; designated to serve on the George A. Kopp Memorial Fund advisory board. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Koren, Mr. Norman -- appointed to temporarily replace J. Clemente in work on Project No. RD-1483-S from Sept to Jan, 1965; Temporary worker on the Visible Speech project ending December 1965. See: Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S; Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Kornacki, Kathryn -- 4-year-old student at Detroit Day School; shown in newspaper photograph . See: Clipping from The Detroit News (2/13/1966)

Koskos -- [n/a]

Kosztowny, Alan -- Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968 . See: Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Kovack, Joanne -- test subject - class 3B, age 10. See: Lip Reading Study (10/5/1943); Students' Spectrograms (fall 1943)

Kower? -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Kramer, Magalene -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Research in Speech Education; Chairman of the Department of the Teaching of Speech at Columbia University, noted in the acknowledgements page of Harriet Kopp's doctoral dissertation for her interest and help. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948); Harriet Kopp's Doctoral Dissertation (1962)

Kramer -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Krieger, Connie -- produced sound spectrograms with cleft palate on 4/4/1947. See: Sound Spectrograph results (1945-48)

Kroll, Geraldine -- ranked No. 10 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966)

Kroll, Gary -- Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968 . See: Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Krug -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Kubitsky, Eleanor -- age 10 (1947); Substitute for J. Keilman in U Mich study ; performance in Visible Speech Experiment #5 evaluated 1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Kuezela -- recorder 01/16/46. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Kuplicki, Paul -- grade 4, in Higgins's homeroom class; ranked No. 36 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 6 (1966-67 school year); on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience; Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Kurath, Prof. Hans -- Director of the Linguistic Institute, University of Michigan; received memo from Harland Bloomer on 2/26/1947 about use of the spectrograph during the summer of 1947 for linguistic research; recorded spectrograms in German 5/15/1947. See: Sound Spectrograph results (1945-48); Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947)

Kuzda -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Kuzela, Mr. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Lacey, Wendy -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, fall 1977 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Lage, Larry -- severly hypacaustic, experiment subject in U Mich study. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Lahera, Omar -- on clinic's spring 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Lassman, Frank M. -- member of Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc. Editorial Politicies Committee (3/1/1970). See: Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971); Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Le Clerc, Sherry -- Subject #23 in 1965 tests; grade 7, Steffens's homeroom class; noted as being involved in original project; ranked No. 29 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 9 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects, marked original project. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Lee, John J. -- Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Department of Special Education and Vocational Rehabilitation, Wayne State University; wrote HGK a congratulatory letter on her new post at the Detroit Day School on 11/4/1958; Chairman, Special Education, Wayne State University (1963); member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf; wrote HGK a recommendation letter 7/31/1969

Lee, Mike -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Leon y Marquez, Adrian -- suggested Spanish words for Visible Speech tracings. See: Correspondence form Adrian Leon y Marquez to George Kopp (3/14/1947)

Leone, Berta -- drew illustrations for Birmingham Plan of Testing Hearing and Vision pamphlet. See: The Birmingham Plan of Testing Hearing and Vision (1951)

Lepre, Michael -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring and fall 1976 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Levine, Mrs. -- Bell Labs secretary, Bell Labs demonstration participant 11/29/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Lewis, Mrs. E. -- Associate Editor Tide Magazine. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Leyland -- Bell Labs secretary. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Liberman, Alvin M. -- worked at Haskins Laboratories, NY, and University of Connecticut, Storrs; wrote Some Experiments on the Perception of Synthetic Speech (Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 24, No. 6, Nov. 1952); Some Results of Research on Speech Perception (Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 29, No. 1, Jan. 1957); The Interconversion of Audible and Visible Patterns as a Basis for Research in Perception of Speech (from the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 37, No. 5, May 1951) . See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Loertet, C.M. -- taught HGK at Indiana University - Psychological Testing. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Lorbaugh, Dr. -- NYU. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Lord, Dr. Francis E. -- Director of Rackam School of Special Education and Professor of Speech and Special Education, Michigan State Normal College; worked in conjunction with Clark Tibbitts on the visible speech research project at U.Mich.; received letter from Tibbitts about the research program on 11/27/1946; attended meetings of the Visible Speech Research committee on 1/8/1947, 2/12/1947, 2/21/1947, 3/3/1947, 5/1/1947, 5/29/1947, 6/28/1947, 11/7/1947; send Robert Essig a memo about delayed payment on 5/19/1947; mentioned in article in News and Notes, Oct. 1947. See: Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); Proposed Outline: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/3/1947); Proposed Outline: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/3/1947); Information on Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program - U.Mich. (5/28/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); News and Notes (9/22/1947)

Lorge, Irving -- Noted in the acknowledgements page of Harriet Kopp's doctoral dissertation for her interest and help in the project. See: Harriet Kopp's Doctoral Dissertation (1962)

Lovato, Joseph -- on clinic's spring 1975 list

Lovell, James -- student engineer in charge of servicing equipment in U Mich study; worked on sound spectrograph on Jan 13-15, 1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Lowell, Edgar L. -- member of the Editorial Policies Committee of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf in March 1970. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Lynch, Jennifer -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Lyons -- Western Electric. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

MacGinitie, Walter H. -- Member of Harriet Kopp's dissertation committee at Columbia University . See: Harriet Kopp's Doctoral Dissertation (1962)

Macoule, Mrs. -- Mentioned in a letter from Frank to Dr. Kopp regarding the index on 1/23/1968. See: Correspondence between Frank and George Kopp re. index of Visible Speech Research Materials (1/23/1968)

Madden, Shannon -- Subject #22 in 1965 tests; grade 7, Steffens's homeroom class; ranked No. 25 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 9 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Madson, Miss -- recorded spectrograms on 11/12/1946 of phrase This is the house that Jack built. See: Sound Spectrograph results (1945-1948)

MaGee, Harley W. -- Assistant to the Editor of Science Illustrated; requested pictures to go along with an up-coming Visible Speech story. See: Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947)

Magill, Dorothy -- charted with other female test subjects. See: Charts and Spectrograph Results (female test subjects)

Mahoney, Danny -- test subjects, Translator Project I, 12 years old; Group 1 of exploratory program; congenitally deaf, severly hypacaustic, part of experimental study for Visible Speech Research at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947); experiment subject in U Mich study; scored for intelligibility in experiment 1 (1947); performance in Visible Speech Experiment #2 evaluated 1948. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); Logistics for Operation of Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/25/1947-6/2/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947); Supplement to Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Pattern Recognition Charts - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Intelligibility Scores and Graphs (April-Dec. 1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Majerowski, Michael (Mike) -- Subject #9 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Kane's homeroom class; noted as being a child with some introduction; ranked No. 7 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Mallory -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 12/21/1945

Manning, Dr. J.J. -- physicist, Research Department of New York Police Department; approached Dr. Buckley about using voice print identification in fighting crime. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (11/26/1943-6/10/1944)

Mao, Mrs. -- HGK interviewed her about the commune primary school. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Marcus, Robert -- Subject #11 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Kane's homeroom class; noted as being a child with some introduction; ranked No. 21 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Marge, Michael -- Coordinator Unit on Speech and Hearing Programs, Division of Training Programs, Bureau of Education for the Handicapped; Department of Health, Education, and Welfare- Office of Education. See: Information Concerning the Termination of Grant Project No. RD-1483-S (1963-1968)

Markel, Norman N. -- co-authored Judging Personality from Voice Quality in Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology (Vol. 64, No. 4, Oct. 1964). See: Markel and Meisels - Judging Personality from Voice Quality (Oct. 1964) [large sleeve]

Marrison -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Marshall, Steve -- ranked No. 8 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966; Male Test Subject; 12/13/1966; Grade 4, Test S-D. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Test Results and Charts (October 1966)

Martimer, Dr. Edgar -- Chief of Pediatrics, Harper Hospital; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Martin, Miss -- Manhasset Public School, Bell Labs demonstration participant 03/07/46

Martin, Fred -- Official from Detroit Public Schools who signed off on HGK's application for an extension of leave (9/29/1972). See: Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970)

Martin, Paul -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Martinez, Alfredo -- on list of Prospective Subjects, marked 5 exp. See: Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Martyka, Emilia -- staff member at the Detroit Day School for the Deaf; taught experimental classes with the Translator from 1964-1968; taught 9th grade students at the Detroit Day School already using the machine; 7 students in spring 1966 class. See: Early Draft of Final Report of Grant No. RD-526 (1963); Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968): Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Mase, Darrel -- Teachers College, Newark, NJ; 10/28/1946 demonstration. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947)

Matthes -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Matthews, Mrs. M.G. -- Principal, Kennedy School; sent complimentary letter to HGK on 5/14/1970 . See: Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970)

May, Merri (Merrie) -- on clinic's fall 1976, spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Mayes, Thomas A. -- director of the Regional Conference for Coordinating Rehabilitation and Education Services for the Deaf on Oct 26-28, 1970; sent HGK an invitation to the conference on 10/12/1970

McCarthy, Julia M. -- Deputy Superintendent, Detroit Public Schools; sent HGK a congratulatory letter on 6/1/1970. See: Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970)

McCrystal -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

McDonald, Henry S. -- member of Bell Telephone Labs engineering staff, came to Detroit to fix Translator after its move to the Detroit Day School from Wayne State University. See: Visible Speech Manual with Chapter Divisions (product of Contract No. RD-526)

McGrew, Professor J. Fred -- Fresno State College. See: University of Michigan Project (July 1945-1948)

McLoughlin -- lunch 12/11/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

McManus, Kathy -- on clinic's spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Mealy -- (Meaghly)

Meisels, Murray -- co-authored Judging Personality from Voice Quality in Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology (Vol. 64, No. 4, Oct. 1964). See: Markel and Meisels - Judging Personality from Voice Quality (Oct. 1964) [large sleeve]

Melby, Dean -- Dean of NYU. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Merrill, Jr., Edward C. -- President of Gallaudet College; offered HGK a a position as Dean of Pre-College Programs and Directory of the Model Secondary School for the Deaf, 3/14/1970; HGK turned down this position 4/15/1970. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Meyer, Dr. John Stirling -- Head, Dept. of Neurology, Wayne State University Medical School; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Meyerson, Dr. Lee -- Vassar College; came for Instruction and Demonstration in U Mich Study, 9/22/1947. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Miguel, David -- on clinic's fall 1975, spring 1976 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Miller, Ed.D., June -- President, Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc.; asked HGK to continue serving as Chairman of the Editorial Policies on 9/10/1970. See: Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970)

Milligan, Tony -- on clinic's spring 1976 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Mills, Mara -- Ph.D. Candidate at Harvard University; Instructor at Brown University; contacted HGK on 1/4/2006 to request an interview for more information on her research. See: Correspondence between Mara Mills and H. Kopp (1/4/2006)

Mock, Terri -- on clinic's spring 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Mohan, Mr. -- teacher from Rackham School of Education; training for Visual Speech. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Monroe, Thomas -- Superintendent of Region Two, Detroit Public Schools; wrote HGK informing her of his resignation 7/3/1969; wrote HGK a recommendation letter 8/6/1969 . See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Moore, Anthony -- ranked No. 7 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966)

Moore, Paul -- co-authored Comments on Physiology of Hoarseness in Archives of Otolaryngology (Vol. 81, Jan. 1965). See: Moore and Thompson - Comments on Physiology of Hoarseness (Jan. 1965) [large sleeve]

Moore, Tony Loviece -- Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968 . See: Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Morison, Dr. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Morley, D.E. -- Other Research Participant at University of Michigan during Kopp's study; Ph.D. thesis on comparative study of visible speech patterns as transmitted by several hearing aids - in progress, Aug. 1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Morris, Dr. -- Psychology Bureau; conference. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Morrisett -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Moss, Arnold -- taught HGK at Brooklyn College - Comparative Phonetics. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Mulgrave, Dr. Dorothy -- NYU, Bell Labs demonstration participant 01/24/1946

Mulholland, K. -- taught HGK at Brooklyn College - Theories of Oral Reading. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Munson, Mr. -- President, Michigan State Normal College; came for instruction and demonstration of U Mich study, 3/10/1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Murry, Thomas -- co-authored Voice Onset Time Production and Perception in Apraxic Subjects with HGK in Brain and Language (Vol. 20, 1983, p. 329-339); affiliated with VA Medical Center, San Diego. See: Correspondence between Mara Mills and H. Kopp (1/4/2006)

Myers -- Ac. Society. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Mysak, Edward D. -- Member of Harriet Kopp's dissertation committee at Columbia University . See: Harriet Kopp's Doctoral Dissertation (1962)

Nace, Dr. John G. -- member of the Chairmen of the Working Groups of the National Advisory Committee on the Education of the Deaf with HGK on 7/24/1969. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Nakaji, Daniel (Danny) -- on clinic's fall 1975, spring and fall 1976, spring and fall 1977 lists . See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Nelson, Kathleen J. -- co-authored Recognition of Synthetic Speech by Hearing-Impaired Elderly Listeners in the Journal of Speech and Hearing Research (vol. 34, Oct. 1991, p. 1180-84). See: Excerpt from the Journal of Speech and Hearing Research (Oct. 1991)

Nelson, Max -- Other Research Participant at University of Michigan during Kopp's study; proposed thesis to GAK on 3/4/1947 on articulatory constancy - approved 3/6/1947; Master's thesis on articulatory constancy in May 1947. See: Thesis Proposals by George Kopp's Students (10/8/1947-3/1/1948); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

New -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 11/29/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Nicholls, Dorren -- age 13 (1947); severly hypacaustic, experiment subject in U Mich study; performance in Visible Speech Experiment #5 evaluated 1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Nio, Dr. -- pediatrician, Maternal and Ob.Gyn Hosptial (attached to the China Welfare Institute), Shanghai. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Nordstrom, Pat -- Aztec Shops Bookstore. See: Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974)

Norton -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Educational Foundations. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Norvoine -- 1/22/1946. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Nouhan, Eleanor -- Subject #8 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Schmitz's homeroom class; ranked No. 5 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Nuccio, Philip -- grade 5, in Gardiner's homeroom class; ranked No. 19 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Nyquist -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

O'Connor, A. -- Bell Labs secretary, Bell Labs demonstration participant 11/29/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

O'Connor, C.D. -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Special methods in Teaching the Deaf & Practice Teaching Deaf. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

O'Connor, Mary New -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Teaching Speech to Deaf. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

O'Dell, Barbara -- on list of Prospective Students. See: Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

O'Donnell, Bernard -- Director, ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center) Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills; sent a letter to HGK concerning the inclusion of one of her documents in the ERIC system (7/6/1982). See: Correspondence between Harriet Kopp and Bernard O'Donnell (7/6/1982)

Olds, Mrs. -- administered test of visual acuity. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947)

Olinger, Kenneth -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

O'Neil -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 12/21/1945

O'Neill, James M. -- taught HGK at Brooklyn College - Seminar in Speech & Current Trends in Speech. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Ostrow, Dr. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Overall, Natalie -- Subject #27 in 1965 tests; grade 5, in Gardiner's homeroom class; ranked No. 41 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5; Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Page (Paige), Mrs. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Paloheimo, Lily -- recorded spectrograms on 5/2/1947; charted with other female subjects. See: Spectrograms for Lily Paloheimo (5/2/1947); Charts and Spectrograph Results (female test subjects)

Parral, Ricky -- on clinic's spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Pate, Aaron -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Patterson, W. Calvin -- Vice President, Public Relations, Michigan Bell Telephone Company; public relations to maintain interest in the program; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947); Newspaper clipping: Visible Speech: Teaching Deaf Children to Hear (July 1947); Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Pauls -- Navy, Philadelphia Hospital. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Pease, Gloria -- test subject - class 3B, age 10. See: Lip Reading Study (10/5/1943); Students' Spectrograms (fall 1943)

Peckham, Mr. Ralf A. -- authorized state agency official representing the Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare in George A. Kopp's grant application; copied on announcement of grant continuation for Visible Speech for the Deaf (5/31/1966); acknowledged receipt of application for continuation of grant RD-1483-S. See: Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960); Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1966); Financial Information on the Continuation of the Federal Grant for Project RD-1483-S-66-C2 (May 1966)

Peet, Miss Martha -- speech teacher, instructor in U Mich Study; performed Visible Speech Experiment #6 on congenitally deaf nursery school children at the Rackham School, March 1947; teacher, Visible Speech Program at the Rackham School, summer 1948. See: Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947); Proposed Visible Speech Program for the Rackham School (summer 1948); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Pegram -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Penn, John -- authored Scandinavian Dialect. See: Information on Phonetics and Dialects (6/6/1949-1/26/1950)

Peterson, Dr. Gordon E. -- staffer at Bell Telephone Laboratories; sent by Potter to Ypsilanti with a modified Sound Mirror the week of 4/28/1947; worked in speech correction; colleagues with Clarence Hudgins at Harvard University during World War II; sat in at conference at U.Mich. on 4/28/1947; Evaluation program, serviced spectrograph in U Mich study on Jan. 10-11, 1948; signed front of Visible Speech. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45); Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Peterson, Christine -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring 1976 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Petrie, Prof. -- from Lansing; at lab for cleft palate research 2/16/1947; produced spectrograms of phrase buy me one shoe. See: Sound Spectrograph results (1945-1948)

Piel, Ordway F. -- Other Research Participant at University of Michigan during Kopp's study; proposed thesis to GAK on 3/1/1948 on visible speech reference patterns of 9- and 10-year-old boys - approved 3/9/1948; Master's thesis completed May 1948. See: Thesis Proposals by George Kopp's Students (10/8/1947-3/1/1948); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Pierce, Nancy -- in Jacobs's class; labelled Sp. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Pike, Professor -- University of Michigan; came for instruction and demonstration of U Mich study, 2/6/1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Pintner -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Psychology of Handicapped. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Pisoni, David B. -- co-authored Recognition of Synthetic Speech by Hearing-Impaired Elderly Listeners in the Journal of Speech and Hearing Research (vol. 34, Oct. 1991, p. 1180-84). See: Excerpt from the Journal of Speech and Hearing Research (Oct. 1991)

Pittman -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Poleski, Olivia -- aided in the preparation for the publication of the Visible Speech Manual . See: Visible Speech Manual with Chapter Divisions (product of Contract No. RD-526)

Pompeo, Harry -- on clinic's spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Poparad, Gayle -- on clinic's fall 1975 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Popp, Kimberly (Kim) Marie -- ranked No. 39 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 5 (1966-1967 school year); Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Potter, Dr. Ralph K -- Director of Transmission Research, Bell Telephone Laboratories; Approved 5 year research program at U. Mich; wrote Visible Patterns of Sound in Science magazine; received Y.R. Chao's report on using the sound spectrograh with Chinese recordings; originated visible speech and supervised its development; signed front of Visible Speech; Special Consultant to Visible Speech Research project (1947); discussed visible speech research program at the University of Michigan with Dr. Harlan Bloomer on 4/18/1946 and 3/13/1947; discussed visible speech research project with Clark Tibbitts on 4/17/1947; decided on Feb. 26-27, 1948 to send the sound spectrograph back to Bell Labs for servicing. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (11/26/1943-6/10/1944); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); Science Magazine with Ralph Potter article (Visible Patterns of Sound) (11/9/1945); Research Report by Y.R. Chao on Chinese recordings (11/21/1944-2/17/1945); Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Advance Advertisement for Visible Speech (c. 1947); Proposed Outline: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/3/1947); Information on Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program - U.Mich. (5/28/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948); Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Visible Speech Manual Original - to copy; Visible Speech Manual with Chapter Divisions (product of Contract No. RD-526)

Powles, Edward -- President and General Manager of General Film Laboratory, Inc.; also related administratively to the Dynamic Film Co.; provided quote to GAK for the production of 13/35mm black and white single frame filmstrips; contact person for the project. See: Financial Information on the Continuation of the Federal Grant for Project RD-1483-S-66-C2 (May 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Proctor, Wanda Jean -- ranked No. 20 overall in spring 1966 tests; Female Test Subject; 10/17/1966; Grade 7, Test 6 - Part A. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Test Results and Charts (October 1966)

Provenzano, Vincent -- on clinic's fall 1975, spring 1977 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Pry, Jamie -- ranked No. 9 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966)

Purnell, Mrs. Catherine C. -- representative of the Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare at the Working Groups of the National Advisory on the Education of the Deaf on 7/24/1969; member of Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc. Editorial Politicies Committee (3/1/1970. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Quigley, Dr. Stephen P. -- member of the Chairmen of the Working Groups of the National Advisory Committee on the Education of the Deaf with HGK on 7/24/1969; served as committee chairman. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Raedler, Miss -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Rambeau, Jeremy -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring 1976 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Raubicheck, Lettitia -- NYC, Bell Labs demonstration participant 01/24/46

Reed, L. Deno -- Executive Secretary - Sensory Study Section; Department of Health, Education, and Welfare: Social and Rehabilitation Service. See: Information Concerning the Termination of Grant Project No. RD-1483-S (1963-1968)

Reese -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Reissner -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Educational Foundations. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Reuther, Roy -- Director of Citizenship Dept., U.A.W.; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Reynolds, William -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 03/18/1946

Richardson, Elliot Lee -- Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare; on 8/5/1970, invited HGK to serve on the NACED from 7/1/1970 to 6/31/1974. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Richardson, Eugene -- Consultant for Higher Education and Certification for Michigan Dept. of Public Instruction; contacted HGK regarding the status of her elementary and secondary permanent certificates on 3/20/1951. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Riddell, Wendy -- on clinic's spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Riesz, Dr. Robert R. (Bob) -- Bell Telephone Labs employee; installed spectrograph equipment at the Speech Clinic, Institute of Human Adjustment, U.Michigan on 9/24/1946 and repaired in on10/30/1946; signed front of Visible Speech; sent George Kopp bulletins to be attached to the cathode ray translator maintenance notes (2/20/1947) delivered a replacement transformer for the spectrograph during the U.Mich. Study (Oct. 31, 1947). See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45); Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Robbins, Dr. -- NATS

Robertson, Scott -- on clinic's fall 1976, spring 1977 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Robinson, Luther D. -- member of the committee on Adolescent Deaf of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf in March 1970. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Robinson, Cindy -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring 1976, fall 1977 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Rogers, Carl -- professor of psychology and Executive Secretary of the Counseling Center, University of Chicago. See: Dialogue between Martin Buber and Carl Rogers (4/18/1957)

Rondut -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 12/06/1945

Rooney -- PS 47, Bell Labs demonstration participant 02/14/1946. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Rosario, Bill -- on clinic's spring 1975 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Rosenstein, Dr. Joseph -- representative of the Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare at the Working Groups of the National Advisory on the Education of the Deaf on 7/24/1969; member of Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc. Editorial Politicies Committee (3/1/1970). See: Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971); Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Rowell, Sartorious -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Guidance of Handicapped. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Ruppel, Alfred E. -- signed front of Visible Speech. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (11/26/1943-6/10/1944); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Rutland, Darryl -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Saenz, Raul -- grade 4, in Higgins's homeroom class; HGK noted slow on roster; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Samuelson -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Teaching Lip Reading. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Samuelson, Miss Estelle -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 02/21/1946. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Sandlin, R. -- Author of An Analysis of the Intelligibility of Twenty-Six Selected Sentences Spoken by Four Deaf Individuals Before and After a Period of Instruction Using the Visible Speech Translator. M.A. Thesis, Wayne State University Speech and Hearing Clinic (1953). See: Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Saunders, M.D., William H -- author of The Larynx pamphlet. See: William H. Saunders, M.D. - The Larynx (1964) [large sleeve]

Sawyer, Dean -- Dean, University of Michigan graduate school; 11/26/1946 demonstration . See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947)

Schiappacasse, Ed -- Subject #14 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Kane's homeroom class; noted as being a child with some introduction; ranked No. 28 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Schlagter, Charles -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring 1976, spring and fall 1977 lists . See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Schmitz -- 6th and 8th grade teacher, Detroit Day School; 9 students in spring 1966 6th grade class. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966)

Schott, Dr. Lionel -- worked in Bell Labs; installed spectrograph equipment at the Speech Clinic, Institute of Human Adjustment, U.Michigan on 9/24/1946; wrote report on Chao's testing of the Chinese language with the spectrograph; signed front of Visible Speech. See: Memo on Visible Speech testing of Chinese langauage (4/17/1944); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45); Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Schroeder, M.R. -- Director, Acoustics, Speech and Mechanics Research Laboratory at Bell Telephone Labs; offered a new transistorized translator for Kopp's research . See: Correspondence from M.R. Schroeder to Dr. George A. Kopp (3/25/1965)

Scott, Jean -- Subject #2 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Schmitz's homeroom class; HGK noted check for glasses on roster; noted as being involved in original project; ranked No. 31 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked original project. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Scott, Pam -- grade 9, in Martyka's class, on list of students now using the machine; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Scouten, Edward L. -- Prinicipal of the Florida School for the Deaf and Blind; sent an article entitled A.G. Bell, a friend of deaf people to Mrs. Ester M. Stoval on 12/9/1969. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Searcella, Vera -- on clinic's spring 1975 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Seater -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Seawell, Miss -- re: Visible Speech 01/10/1946. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Secord -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 12/21/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Shaffer, Laurance F. -- Chairman of the dissertation committee for Harriet Kopp's doctoral dissertation, submitted to Columbia University in 1962. See: Harriet Kopp's Doctoral Dissertation (1962)

Sharkey, Dixie -- on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Sheridan, Miss -- Teacher, Bell Labs demonstration participant 03/21/45

Sheridan -- Western Electric. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Shi, Mrs. -- Directress of Workers Commune (Workers New Liang Quarters). See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Shirk, Richard -- Executed Photographs for Birmingham Plan of Testing Hearing and Vision pamphlet. See: The Birmingham Plan of Testing Hearing and Vision (1951)

Shohara, Dr. Hide -- Dept. of Languages; made some japanese spectograms; 12/13/1946 conference . See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Siegenthaler, Bruce -- Other Research Participant at University of Michigan during Kopp's study; completed Master's thesis on relationship between measured hearing loss and the intelligibility of selected words in May 1948; first student to research with sound spectrograph to submit his study for publication. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Silverman, S. Richard (Dick) -- Director, Central Institute for the Deaf, St. Louis, MO; sent HGK congratulatory letter on 11/3/1958 about new post; Chairman of the Working Groups of the National Advisory Committee on the Education of the Deaf on 7/24/1969; member of Editorial Committee of NACED that submitted recommendations on 10/16/1969; agreed to write a recommendation letter for HGK on 11/24/1969. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970); Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Silverstein, Miss -- NAPTSD Publicity Agent, Bell Labs demonstration participant 03/08/1946

Simmons, Michael -- staff member at the Detroit Day School for the Deaf; taught experimental classes with the Translator. See: Early Draft of Final Report of Grant No. RD-526 (1963)

Simmons -- teacher of 4th and 5th grade students at the Detroit Day School already using the machine. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Simon, Mr. Frank -- photographer with the Dynamic Film Co., Detroit; making slides of spectrographic patterns (10/17/1966). See: Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Simpson, Ruth -- charted with other female test subjects. See: Charts and Spectrograph Results (female test subjects)

Simson, Dr. Clyde B. -- Chief of Children's Services, Lafayette Clinic; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Sirois, Steve -- Grade 4, in Simmons's class, on list of students now using the machine; ranked No. 5 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Slater -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Smartwood, Miss -- audited V.S. training course part time

Smith, Mrs. -- recorded sound spectrograph in Jackson, MI on 12/9/1947. See: Sound Spectrograph results (1945-48)

Smith, M. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Smith, M. -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Research in Speech Education. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Snodgrass -- Western Electric. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Sonnenstrahl, Alfred -- test subject - class 3B, age 10. See: Lip Reading Study (10/5/1943); Students' Spectrograms (fall 1943)

Sperling -- charted with other female test subjects. See: Charts and Spectrograph Results (female test subjects)

Spishak, Joel -- Subject #29 in 1965 tests; grade 6, in Clement's homeroom class; ranked No. 1 in spring 1966 tests; grade 9 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Pictographic Tests; Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Spriestersbach, D -- Author of An Exploratory Study of the Motility of the Peripheral Oral Structures in Relation to Defective and Superior Consonant Articulation, Mentioned in Harriet Kopp's Doctoral Dissertation. See: Harriet Kopp's Doctoral Dissertation (1962)

Star, Miss -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Stark, Miss -- From Coronet, interview 01/28/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Steffen, Bonnie -- on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Steffens -- 7th and 8th grade teacher, Detroit Day School; 7 students in spring 1966 8th grade class. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966)

Steinberg, Dr. John C. -- U Mich Study, Supervisor in Transmission Research, Bell Telephone Laboratories; signed front of Visible Speech; presented with George Kopp at the 1945 American Speech Correction Conference in Columbus, Ohio on the development of visible speech; Special Consultant to the Visible Speech Research Project (1947); attended meetings of the Visible Speech Research Committee on 5/1/1947, 6/28/1947; planned to sit in at conference at the Institute of Human Adjustment, U.Mich., on 4/28/1947; decided on Feb 26-27, 1948 to send the sound spectrograph back to Bell Labs for servicing. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45) Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Progress Report Presented at American Speech Correction Conference, Chicago - U.Mich. (12/31/1946); Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); Information on Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program - U.Mich. (5/28/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evalution Research Program (8/13/1948)

Steinberg, Naomi -- test subject - class 6; age 13. See: Lip Reading Study (10/5/1943); Students' Spectrograms (fall 1943)

Steris, David -- made recording, station WPAG of all the children in the visible speech research program. See: Supplement to Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (4/21/1947)

Stewart, Mr. -- See: Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960)

Stewart, Glen -- Subject #4 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Schmitz's homeroom class; ranked No. 52 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Stockbold, Mrs. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Stocker, Dr. Harold -- employed part-time on Project RD-1483-S to carry out satistical evaluations as data was compiled; Appointed in September 1966 to work part time for the Visible Speech project. See: Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1966); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Stoval(l), Esther M. -- worked for the Volta Bureau, Washington, DC; received letter from Ed Scouten on 12/9/1969; member of Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc. Editorial Politicies Committee (3/1/1970). See: Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971)

Strang -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Guidance and Personnel. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Subrezi -- mechanic?. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Sumwolt, Dina -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Sunday, Richard -- Director, Detroit's Multi-Faceted Special Education Project in Detroit Public Schools; sent HGK a congratulatory letter 6/9/1970. See: Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970)

Tactile -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Tapley, Terry -- Subject #30 in 1965 tests; grade 6, in Clement's homeroom class; on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Taylor -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 11/29/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Temple -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 12/21/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Tenny, Dr. John -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 10/24/1946; associated with the George A. Kopp Memorial Fund. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947); Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Tepoorton, Randy -- Other Research Participant at University of Michigan during Kopp's study; Master's thesis on degrees of nasality - in progress in Aug 1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Thayer -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Therman, Miss -- University publications department; 12/19/1946 conference. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Thomas, Dr. Olin E. -- Vice President and Treasurer, Wayne State University; filled out Application for Research or Demonstration Grant with the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare on 8/19/1959; received letter from James F. Garrett on 10/20/1959 about the receipt of a grant for research with the cathode ray tube translator; copied on announcement of grant continuation for Visible Speech for the Deaf (5/31/1966); part of an application for the continuation of the grant for Project No. RD-1483-S (9/25/1963, 2/10/1966) . See: Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960); Research Information About Project No. RD-14-83-S (1964-1966); Financial Information on the Continuation of the Federal Grant for Project RD-1483-S-66-C2 (May 1966)

Thompson -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Thompson, Carl L. -- co-authored Comments on Physiology of Hoarseness in Archives of Otolaryngology (Vol. 81, Jan. 1965). See: Moore and Thompson - Comments on Physiology of Hoarseness (Jan. 1965) [large sleeve]

Thompson, Richard E. -- member of the committee on Adolescent Deaf of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf in March 1970. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Thompson, Robert H. -- Business Manager - Wayne State University Press. See: Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974)

Thorndike -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Descriptive Statistics. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Thorpe, Leonard -- Subject #25 in 1965 tests; grade 5, in Gardiner's homeroom class; ranked No. 50 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5; Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Thoubboron -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Tibbitts, Mr. Clark -- Director of University of Michigan Institute of Human Adjustment; worked in conjunction with Dr. Francis Lord of the Rackham School of Special Education on the visible speech research project; sent Dr. Lord letter 11/27/1946; called meeting of the visible speech committee on 1/8/1947; attended meetings of the Visible Speech research committee on 1/8/1947, 2/12/1947, 2/21/1947, 3/3/1947, 5/1/1947, 5/29/1947, 6/28/1947, 11/7/1947; discussed visible speech research project with Ralph K. Potter on 4/17/1947; sent George Kopp comments on a proposed visible speech article on 5/31/1947 . See: Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); Proposed Outline: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/3/1947); Information on Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program - U.Mich. (5/28/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947)

Tiffany, Bernard -- severly hypacaustic, experiment subject in U Mich study. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Tiffin, Jos. -- taught HGK at Brooklyn College - Experimental Phonetics. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Toliver, Linda -- Grade 4, in Simmons's class, on list of students now using the machine; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Toppin, Terrence (Terry) -- Subject #3 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Kane's homeroom class; noted as being involved in original project; ranked No.3 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked original project. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Trabman, Bernice -- staff member at the Detroit Day School for the Deaf; taught experimental classes with the Translator from 1964-1965. See: Early Draft of Final Report of Grant No. RD-526 (1963); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Trayner, Larry -- ranked No. 6 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966; Male Test Subject; 10/14/1966; Grade 4, Test 6 - Part 6; Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project# RD-1483-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test# 1 on 6/18/1968; Male Test Subject; 12/13/1966; Grade 4, Test S-D; Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project# RD-1483-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test Film Strip #1on 6/18/1968. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Test Results and Charts (October 1966); Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Provect #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Truex -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Tuarter? -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Turner, Jimmy -- on clinic's spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Tweet, Cathy (Kathy) -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring and fall 1976, spring and fall 1977 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Twiner, James -- on clinic's fall 1976 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Upham, Jennifer -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Usdane, William M. -- Chief, Division of Research and Demonstrations: Department of Health, Education, and Welfare - Social and Rehabilitation Service. See: Information Concerning the Termination of Grant Project No. RD-1483-S (1963-1968)

Vadersen, Charles W. -- learn to use recorder 04/11/1946; signed front of Visible Speech. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Van Adestine, Elizabeth -- first principal of Detroit Day School for the Deaf in 1898. See: Description of Detroit School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Van Adestine, Dr. Gertrude -- principal of Detroit Day School for the Deaf in 1924

Van Brie -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Van Buskirk, Mr. Clifford M. -- Grant and Contract Officer, Wayne State University; contacted about the grant continutation for Visible Speech for the Deaf on 5/31/1966; signed Application for Continuation of Grant for Project No. RD-1483-S (9/25/1963, 2/10/1966); worked on the George A. Kopp Memorial Fund in Dept. of Grants and Contracts, Wayne State University; received letter from HGK concerning the advisory board on 11/3/1969 and one from George Bohman on 11/17/1969 . See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970); Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1966); Financial Information on the Continuation of the Federal Grant for Project RD-1483-S-66-C2 (May 1966)

Van Horn -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Van Riper, C. -- worked in the Western Michigan University Dept. of Speech Pathology and Audiology; contacted GAK about his research in stuttering on 9/11/1968; sent condolences on the death of George to HGK on 9/26/1968. See: Correspondence to George and Harriet Kopp from C.Van Riper (9/11/1968-9/26/1968)

Velazquez, Carlos -- Subject #12 in 1965 tests; grade 6, in Clement's homeroom class; ranked No. 27 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 8 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5; Male Test Subject; 10/12/1966; Grade 8B, Test 2. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Test Results and Charts (October 1966)

Vollmer, Alice -- charted with other female test subjects. See: Charts and Spectrograph Results (female test subjects)

Waddle (Waddell) -- Photog. 01/14/46. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Waisenen, Eva -- severly hypacaustic, experiment subject in U Mich study. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Walker, Alice -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Statistics of Inference. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Walker, Elizabeth Prescott -- Junior League of Detroit; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Walker, Ginger -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Wallace. Jr., R.L. -- Worker at Bell labs starting 03/20/1945; signed front of Visible Speech . See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Ward, Iva -- London, England; came for instruction and demonstration on U Mich study, 2/6/1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Washington -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Watkins, Stanley -- signed front of Visible Speech. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Weare, Christopher (Chris) -- on clinic's spring 1975 last; marked as dropped on fall 1975 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Weaver -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Webber, Ernie -- charted with female test subjects. See: Charts and Spectrograph Results (female test subjects)

Wedal, Norm -- in Wayne State University's accounting department; send memo to GAK regarding balance of Account 303-2911 (VRA grant) on 6/10/1966. See: Financial Information on the Continuation of the Federal Grant for Project RD-1483-S-66-C2 (May 1966)

Weekes -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Weill, Hannah W. -- Secretary for Harriet Green Kopp, Chairman, Department of Speech Pathology, Audiology & Education of the Deaf. See: Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974)

Weinberg, Dr. Sal -- Philadelphia. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Weinberger, Caspar W. -- invited HGK to serve on the National Advisory Committee on the Handicapped of the Office of Education for a term lasting Oct 1973-June 1974. See: Correspondence from Caspar W. Weinberger to Harriet Kopp (10/11/1973)

Weiner, Milton -- Director, ACSW, Dept. of School Social Work; sent congratulatory letter to HGK on 5/26/1970. See: Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970)

Wertzel, Mike -- on clinic's spring 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Westerman, Mr. S. -- District Supervisor, Office of Vocational Rehabilitation; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Westerwick, Robyn -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

White, Marian L. -- Author of Mental Age Norms for Vocabulary Scores in the 1937 Stanford-Binet - The Psychological Record Vol. 5, No. 5. Pamphlet included in Harriet Kopp's Masters Thesis. See: Harriet Kopp's Masters Thesis (April 1940)

Whitton, Harold -- Headmaster, Royal Schools for the Deaf (Manchester); sent a note HGK on 3/30/1969 thanking her for her hospitality in showing him her school and sharing her home. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Wildgen, Tommy -- severly hypacaustic, experiment subject in U Mich study. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Williams, Miss E. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Williams, T.W. -- Asst. Pres of NY Telephone Bell Labs, demonstration participant 1/24/1946

Williams, Maureen -- ranked No. 14 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966)

Williams, Pat -- Subject #24 in 1965 tests; grade 5, in Gardiner's homeroom class; on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Williams, Maureen -- Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968 . See: Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Williams -- rep of Michigan Bell Telephone publications dept.; 10/10/1946 conference . See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Wilson -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Win -- Columbia Institute Deaf - Washington, DC. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Wishart, Dr. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Witts -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Wojnarowski, Janice -- Subject #15 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Kane's homeroom class; noted as being a child with some introduction; ranked No. 10 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Wojnarowski, Joanne -- Subject #17 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Schmitz's homeroom class; ranked No. 49 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospetive Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Wolfe, Charles J. -- Executive Deputy Superintendent, Detroit Public Schools; sent HGK a congratulatory letter on 5/26/1970. See: Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970)

Wolfram, Dr. B.R. -- president of Educational Media, Inc. See: Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971)

Woodburne, Dr. Lloyd S -- Associate Dean, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, University of Michigan; asked by G.E. Densmore on 5/29/1947 to defray costs to reimburse George Kopp's expenses accrued by presenting to a convention of the Association of American Instructors of the Deaf. See: Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947)

Wooden, Dr. -- 10/24/1946 demonstration. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947)

Woods, Morris Wistar -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Wunsch, Ernest -- University of Detroit Law School Faculty; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Xu(a), Dr. Ma (Shuh) -- President, Peking/Beijing Medical College. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Yates -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Yost, Janet -- age 16 (1947); severly hypacaustic, experiment subject in U Mich study; performance in Visible Speech Experiment #5 evaluated 1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Zeilauf, Donald (Don) -- test subject - class 3B, age 10. See: Lip Reading Study (10/5/1943); Students' Spectrograms (fall 1943)

Zhoc, Dr. Gian -- Deputy Director of Foreign Relations, Assoc. Professor of Surgery, Beiging Medical College. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Zimmerman, Jane Dorsay -- Noted in the acknowledgements page of Harriet Kopp's doctoral dissertation for her interest and help in the project. See: Harriet Kopp's Doctoral Dissertation (1962)

Zisler, Janice -- ranked No. 33 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 5 (1966-1967 school year). See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Zulczyk, Martin -- ranked No. 46 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 5 (1966-1967 school year). See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Kopp Organizations

American Association of University Women -- Important Demonstration in U Mich Study, 11/18/1947. See: Bell Laboratories Notebook 1 (Box 2, Folder 8), Visible Speech Research Program (Box 3, Folder 11)

American Speech Correction Conference, Chicago -- 12/31/46 progress report. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13)

ASH of H Convention -- See: Bell Laboratories Notebook 1 (Box 2, Folder 8)

Bruce School for the Deaf -- See: Bell Laboratories Notebook 2 (Box 2, Folder 11)

Hallowel Central Institute -- See: Bell Laboratories Notebook 2 (Box 2, Folder 11)

Horace H. Rackham School of Special Education -- University of Michigan Study Site. See: Proposed Visible Speech Program for the Rackham School (Box 3, Folder 18)

Lansing teachers -- 10/30/46 demonstration. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13)

University of Michigan Hospital Group -- Important Demonstration in University of Michigan Study (10/15/1947). See: How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (Box 3, Folder 1)

Michigan State School of the Deaf -- demonstration. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13)

National Association for the Deaf -- Austin, TX. See: Bell Laboratories Notebook 2 (Box 2, Folder 11)

Pi Lamda Theta -- 12/11/46 illustrated talk. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13)

Royal Canadian Commission of Education -- 1/22/47 demonstration. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13), How Funding Continued the Program at Ypsilanti (Box 3, Folder 1)

St. Joseph's School of Nursing -- 10/24/46 demonstration. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13), How Funding Continued the Program at Ypsilanti (Box 3, Folder 1)

St. Oln -- See: Bell Laboratories Notebook 1 (Box 2, Folder 8)

University of Michigan School of Nursing -- 11/20/46 demonstration. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13)

University of Michigan Speech Staff -- 12/6/46 demonstration. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13)

Empire State Association of the Deaf -- See: Bell Laboratories Notebook 2 (Box 2, Folder 11)

Union League of the Deaf -- 711 Eighth Avenue. See: Bell Laboratories Notebook 2 (Box 2, Folder 11)

Wayne County Health Guild -- 11/7/46 demonstration. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13), How Funding Continued the Program at Ypsilanti (Box 3, Folder 1)

Women's Research Club -- University of Michigan; 1/6/47 illustrated talk. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13), How Funding Continued the Program at Ypsilanti (Box 3, Folder 1)

Ypsilanti -- See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13), How Funding Continued the Program at Ypsilanti (Box 3, Folder 1)

D. Van Nostrand Co. -- New York - Publisher of Visible Speech. See: Bell Laboratories Notebook 2 (Box 2, Folder 11)

Rackham School of Special Education at Michigan Normal -- housed spectrograph at the University Institute of Human Relations' speech clinic. See: Proposed Visible Speech Program for the Rackham School (Box 3, Folder 18)

Office of Vocational Rehabilitation, Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare -- grant that supported RD-526 research. See: Progress Report for Grant #RD-526 (Box 3, Folder 30)
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Kathy Green and Philip Green in 2008.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Books  Search this
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Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Lantern slides
Lecture notes
Citation:
Harriet Green Kopp Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1130
See more items in:
Harriet Green Kopp Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8dc0d1a78-6a18-452f-af90-7bf3b0b537e7
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1130
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