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Special Assistant Project Files

Topic:
The Educated eye (sound recording): a guide for collectors
Gender perspectives: essays on women in museums (Monograph)
Museums and community (Video recording : 1988)
Museum careers (Video recording : 1982)
Museums: a place to work: planning museum careers (Monograph)
Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Office of the Provost  Search this
Extent:
23 cu. ft. (23 record storage boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Books
Brochures
Clippings
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Motion pictures (visual works)
Audiotapes
Videotapes
Date:
1975-1996
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of records created by Jane R. Glaser during her tenure as Director of the Office of Museum Programs (OMP), 1976-1989, and as Special Assistant in the offices of the Assistant Secretary for the Arts and Humanities, 1989-1994, the Assistant Provost for the Arts and Humanities, 1994-1996, and the Provost, 1996. Glaser retired from the Smithsonian Institution (SI) at the end of April 1996. The bulk of the records document the organizations, projects, and activities that Glaser was involved in as OMP Director, and the projects she worked on as Special Assistant.

Many of the files concern OMP's use of a large grant from the Kellogg Foundation, known as the Kellogg Project. The video "Museum and Community," made under the auspices of the project, is particularly well documented, and the records contain the program itself in several formats. The master videotape of the program is in the possession of the American Association of Museums, which sells copies and shares some of the proceeds with the Smithsonian.

The files also contain documentation and copies of the audiocassette and booklet package "The Educated Eye," which was published by Smithsonian/Folkways Recordings in February 1995, and which grew out of a series of courses that were held by the Resident Associate Program and cosponsored by OMP. The records also contain different versions and formats of the program "Museum Careers," which includes interviews with Smithsonian staff such as Joshua Taylor and Roger Kennedy.

The records also contain documentation and recordings of a seminar on gender held at the Smithsonian in 1986. The 1990 OMP seminar "Gender Perspectives" is well documented through memoranda, correspondence, photographs, and recordings. This seminar resulted in a book of the same name published by the Smithsonian Institution Press in April 1994, a copy of which is included. The records also document the work of Glaser and her assistant, Museum Associate Artemis Zenetou, on planning and writing the book Museums: A Place to Work, which was published in February 1996.

These files also document Glaser's work with several professional organizations, such as the American Association of Museums (AAM); the International Committee for the Training of Personnel (ICTOP) of the International Council of Museums (ICOM); and the International Research and Exchanges Board (IREX). The records also contain files on Glaser's overseas consulting work, such as the Peace Memorial Museum in Caen, 1988-1989.
Topic:
Museums -- Educational aspects  Search this
Genre/Form:
Books
Brochures
Clippings
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Motion pictures (visual works)
Audiotapes
Videotapes
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 96-069, Smithsonian Institution, Office of the Provost, Special Assistant Project Files
Identifier:
Accession 96-069
See more items in:
Special Assistant Project Files
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa96-069

Recordings

Topic:
Radio Smithsonian (Radio program)
Creator::
Smithsonian Associates. Office of Public Affairs  Search this
Extent:
3 cu. ft. (3 record storage boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Video recordings
Date:
1984-1999
Descriptive Entry:
This accessions of records that document events and programs created and sponsored by the Smithsonian Associates (TSA). Both audio and videotapes are contained in the collection. The bulk of the recordings were made by entities other than the Smithsonian, i.e., CBS, NBC affiliates; and the U.S. Information Agency (USIA) for broadcast purposes. A copy was made and forwarded to the TSA, Office of Public Affairs. A brief synopsis of the activities represented in the collection can be found in the Smithsonian Associate magazine. Additionally, Smithsonian Productions made some of the audiotapes for broadcast over Radio Smithsonian.

The events represented in the collection are many and varied including the annual Kite Festival, film festivals, speakers and interviews, and other program highlights.

Materials include audiocassettes and videotapes in the following formats: VHS or 3/4 inch U-Matic.
Topic:
Publicity  Search this
Museums -- Public relations  Search this
Museums -- Educational aspects  Search this
Media programs (Education)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Video recordings
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 01-127, Smithsonian Associates, Office of Public Affairs, Recordings
Identifier:
Accession 01-127
See more items in:
Recordings
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa01-127

Tape 1 Interview with Dr. Charles Blitzer, Director of Education and Training, Smithsonian Institution, by Rosalind Downs, November 15, 1966

Collection Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Assistant Secretary for History and Art  Search this
Container:
Box 48 of 48
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 281, Smithsonian Institution, Asbsistant Secretary for History and Art, Records
See more items in:
Records
Records / Series 5: Director of Education and Training, 1966-1968 / Box 48
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0281-refidd1e11826

Exhibition Records

Creator::
National Museum of American History. Division of Cultural History  Search this
Extent:
10 cu. ft. (10 record storage boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Clippings
Brochures
Transcripts
Floppy disks
Electronic records
Floor plans
Color photographs
Black-and-white photographs
Color negatives
Color transparencies
Audiotapes
Videotapes
Date:
1981-2004
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of the records of Susan Ostroff, Museum Specialist, documenting her exhibition activities in the Division of Cultural History and, prior to joining that Division, as museum specialist in the Collections Support Office at the National Museum of American History (NMAH). Ostroff participated in exhibition planning teams and at times either served as research assistant or project manager for exhibitions at NMAH. Also represented in these records are Division of Cultural History curators Richard E. Ahlborn and Charles McGovern, who, before that Division was created, were curators in the Division of Community Life. Documented are the following exhibitions, some of which are proposals: Rock 'n' Soul: Social Crossroads; Spirit of America; American Voices: Music at the Smithsonian which was presented by Discover Card and accompanied the traveling America's Smithsonian exhibition; This is your Childhood, Charlie Brown: Children and American Culture, 1948-1968; 1848: New Border, New Nation; American Encounters; A Community between Two Worlds: Arab Americans in Greater Detroit; The Segesser Hide Paintings; The American Experience: Contemporary Immigrant Artists; and How We Discover.

Materials include correspondence, memoranda, and notes; exhibition proposals; planning and design information; scripts; budget summaries; meeting agendas and minutes; floor plans; photographs, negatives, and slides; loan information; brochures; press releases; fund raising information; collection policies; audiotapes and videotapes; contractual agreements; interview transcripts; clippings; and reports. Some materials are in electronic format.
Rights:
Restricted for 15 years, until Jan-01-2020; Transferring office; 10/9/2012 memorandum, Johnstone to Rogers; Contact reference staff for details.
Topic:
Museum curators  Search this
Museums -- Educational aspects  Search this
Music -- History  Search this
Politics and culture  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Contracts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Clippings
Brochures
Transcripts
Floppy disks
Electronic records
Floor plans
Color photographs
Black-and-white photographs
Color negatives
Color transparencies
Audiotapes
Videotapes
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 13-007, National Museum of American History. Division of Cultural History, Exhibition Records
Identifier:
Accession 13-007
See more items in:
Exhibition Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa13-007

Frank C. Whitmore Oral History Interviews

Creator::
Whitmore, Frank C., interviewee  Search this
Extent:
2 audiotapes (Reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Date:
1989
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Frank C. Whitmore, Jr., was interviewed for the Oral History Collection by Cain because of his involvement with the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology from its inception to the late 1930s.
Descriptive Entry:
The Frank C. Whitmore, Jr., Interview was conducted in 1989 by Smithsonian Archives visiting fellow, Joseph A. Cain, as part of a research project on the history of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology. Cain was a graduate student in history of science at the University of Maryland. The interview consists of 2.0 hours of audiotape and 55 pages of transcript. The Frank C. Whitmore, Jr., Interview discusses his education and career as a vertebrate paleontologist, especially his recollections of the founding of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, reminiscences of colleagues such as Alfred Sherwood Romer and William Berryman Scott, and reflections on the history of the field of vertebrate paleontology in the United States in the twentieth century.
Historical Note:
Frank C. Whitmore, Jr. (1915-2012), research geologist for the United States Geological Survey (USGS), specialized in the systematics of fossil mammals. Born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on November 17, 1915, he received the A.B. from Amherst College in 1938. He was awarded the M.S. in invertebrate paleontology in 1939 from Pennsylvania State University. He completed his graduate training in vertebrate paleontology at Harvard University, under Alfred Sherwood Romer, receiving the A.M. in 1941 and Ph.D. in 1942. In 1939, he married Martha Burling Kremers, and they had four children, Geoffrey Mason, John Kremers, Katherine Burling and Susan Hale Whitmore.

After graduation, Whitmore taught geology at Rhode Island State College from 1942 to 1944. He was appointed a Geologist at the USGS in 1944, but was detailed as a scientific consultant to the U.S. Army in the Philippines, Japan and Korea from 1945 to 1946. In 1946, he became Chief of the Military Geology Branch of the USGS, a position he held through 1959. He then transferred to the USGS Paleontology and Stratigraphy located in the Natural History Building (NHB) where he worked as a research geologist on the systematics of fossil mammals, especially Tertiary Cetacea. His field work focused on the Atlantic and Gulf Coast Plain, Panama, Kentucky and Alaska. He was also appointed a research associate of the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) during his tenure in the museum.

An active member of the paleontological community since the 1930s, Whitmore joined the Geological Society of America (GSA) while a graduate student, serving as vertebrate paleontology section chair in 1972. He was present at the formative meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology (SVP) in 1938 and remained active in that society, as well as the Paleontological Society (PS), the Geological Society of Washington, as President in 1970, and the Paleontological Society of Washington, as President in 1950.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Geologists  Search this
Paleontology  Search this
Geology  Search this
Records of meetings, organizations, and professional societies  Search this
Cetaceans  Search this
Vertebrate paleontology  Search this
Geology, Stratigraphic$yTertiary  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9557, Frank C. Whitmore Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9557
See more items in:
Frank C. Whitmore Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9557

Reminiscences of J. Jefferson Miller, II, discuss his education at Winterthur and career at NMAH, including: his training at Winterthur for a museum career; his appointment as Assistant Curator of Ceramics and Glass in 1962; the structure and function ...

Collection Creator::
Association of Curators Project (National Museum of American History)  Search this
Container:
Interviews
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Rights:
Restricted. Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9522, Association of Curators Project Oral History Interviews
See more items in:
Association of Curators Project Oral History Interviews
Association of Curators Project Oral History Interviews / Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru9522-refidd1e342

Covers his education, career, the SVP, colleagues, and the field of vertebrate paleontology, c. 1930-1989, including: 1938 meeting of the section of vertebrate paleontology of the PS; relationships of graduate students to older generation of paleontolo...

Collection Creator::
Whitmore, Frank C., interviewee  Search this
Container:
Interviews
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9557, Frank C. Whitmore Oral History Interviews
See more items in:
Frank C. Whitmore Oral History Interviews
Frank C. Whitmore Oral History Interviews / Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru9557-refidd1e246

George C. Wheeler Oral History Interviews

Topic:
The Ants of North Dakota (Monograph : 1963)
The Ants of Deep Canyopn (Monograph : 1973)
The Ants of Nevada (Monograph : 1986)
Creator::
Wheeler, George C. (George Carlos), 1897-1991, interviewee  Search this
Extent:
1 audiotape (Reference copies). 2 digital .mp3 files (Reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Place:
Panama
Date:
1989
Introduction:
The Oral History Project is part of the Smithsonian Institution Archives. The purpose of the project is to conduct interviews with current and retired members of the Smithsonian staff who have made significant contributions, administrative and scholarly, to the Institution. The project's goal is to supplement the published record and manuscript collections in the Archives, focusing on the history of the Institution and contributions to the increase and diffusion of knowledge made by its scholars.

Wheeler was interviewed for the Oral History Collection because of his early visit to Barro Colorado Island shortly after creation of the research station and his friendship with many of the scientists who worked there. Additional information about the Canal Zone Biological Area can be found in the Records Relating to the Canal Zone Biological Area, Office of the Secretary, 1912-1965, and the Canal Zone Biological Area, Records, 1918-1964, also housed in Smithsonian Archives. The Oral History Project also has other audio and videotaped interviews on the history of the research station.
Descriptive Entry:
The George Carlos Wheeler Interview was conducted for Smithsonian Archives on June 7, 1989 by Joel B. Hagen, a Smithsonian postdoctoral fellow, as part of his research on the history of the Canal Zone Biological Area. The interview discusses Wheeler's education at the Rice Institute and Bussey Institution of Harvard University and his career as a professor of biology at the University of North Dakota, but focuses on his visit to the CZBA in 1924, shortly after it was founded. Wheeler reminisces about Barro Colorado Island and its denizens, including Nathan Banks, Graham Bell Fairchild, William Morton Wheeler, and James Zetek, and reads from his journal of his visit to the island. The interview consists of 1.0 hour of tape and 17 pages of transcript.
Historical Note:
George Carlos Wheeler (1897-1991) was an entomologist specializing in the morphology and taxonomy of ants, especially ant larvae. He received the A.B. from the William M. Rice Institute in Texas in 1918, working under Julian Sorell Huxley and Hermann J. Muller. He continued his education at the Bussey Institution of Harvard University, studying entomology under William Morton Wheeler and Charles Thomas Brues. He received the M.S. in 1920 and the Ph.D. in 1921. From 1921 to 1926 he was an instructor and Assistant Professor of zoology at Syracuse University. In 1926, he joined the faculty of the University of North Dakota and remained there for the rest of his career, as Professor of biology from 1926 to 1965, Head of the Department of Biology from 1926 to 1963, and University Professor from 1965 to 1967. After his retirement in 1967, he was appointed University Emeritus Professor of Biology of the University of North Dakota, as well as a Research Associate of the Desert Research Institute of the University of Nevada.

Wheeler was encouraged to visit the Tropics by his advisor, William Morton Wheeler. Thus he spent the summer of 1924 studying ants at the Barro Colorado Island research station in the Panama Canal. During his long career, Wheeler concentrated his research on the morphology and taxonomy of ant larvae and on the ants of North Dakota and the desert. With his wife, Jeanette Norris Wheeler, he published numerous descriptions and monographs, including The Ants of North Dakota in 1963, The Ants of Deep Canyon in 1973, and The Ants of Nevada in 1986.

The Canal Zone Biological Area (CZBA) was established in 1923 on Barro Colorado Island in the Panama Canal as a reserve for scientific study of the tropics. Originally designed as a consortium of universities and government agencies by Thomas Barbour, William Morton Wheeler, James Zetek, and others, CZBA was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution in 1946 and in 1966 was renamed the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.
Topic:
Entomologists  Search this
Ants  Search this
Entomology  Search this
Tropical biology  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9560, George C. Wheeler Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9560
See more items in:
George C. Wheeler Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9560

Tropical Rainforest Exhibit Oral History Interviews

Extent:
20 audiotapes and 1 videotape.
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Videotapes
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Date:
1992, 1994
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also reminiscences and interviews recorded by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Tropical Rainforest Exhibit Oral History Interviews were compiled to document the exhibit processes of the National Museum of Natural History.
Descriptive Entry:
Steven W. Allison, Smithsonian Predoctoral Fellow, from Cornell University, Department of Science and Technology Studies, conducted these interviews as a part of his doctoral research into the relationship between exhibition and research in natural history museums. These interviews cover the relationship between research and exhibition at the NMNH; the changes in meaning of the rainforest as it was reinterpreted for different exhibits; and the impact of trends in public education about science and the role of an icon, such as the rainforest, in discussions of the environment. Interviews of Sayre include both audiotaped and videotaped sessions and include many visuals from the exhibit.

The Tropical Rainforest Exhibit Oral History Interviews consist of 16 interview sessions, totaling approximately 18.5 hours of audiotape recordings, 0.40 hours of videotape recordings, and 313 pages of transcript.
Historical Note:
Museum exhibits are the result of a complex interplay between researchers, educators, and design specialists. These interviews focus on a case study of the evolution of a tropical rainforest life group at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) in the 1960s and 1970s, which first emerged as a Hall of Botany in 1960, was redefined as a Hall of Living Things in 1968, was eventually built for an exhibit on environmental issues called It All Depends: How Man Affects and Is Affected by His Natural Environment, in 1974, and was later moved to the Hall of South American Anthropology in the Natural History Building. The interviewees include: Stanwyn G. Shetler, Curator of Phanerogams, NMNH, member of the exhibit committee for the original Hall of Botany; Reginald "Bud" J. Sayre, Preparator, Natural History Laboratory, who participated in an expedition to Kaieteur Falls in British Guiana to collect specimens and make molds and drawings of the site for the rainforest part of the exhibit in NMNH; Sophy Burnham, former Assistant Curator of the Smithsonian Museum Service, who was instrumental in creating a film, The Leaf Thieves, which documents the creation of the exhibit; Richard Sumner Cowan, former Director, NMNH, who also participated in the Kaieteur Falls Expedition to collect materials for the original Hall of Botany; Joseph Shannon, former Designer, NMNH, who worked on the design of the Botany Hall and later the Hall of Living Things; Paul N. Perrot, former Assistant Secretary for Museum Programs, who was involved in providing support, recommendations, and facilitating the exhibit work, and who helped establish an Office of Exhibits Central at the Smithsonian; James A. Mahoney, former Chief of the Office of Exhibits Central, who worked on many aspects of the rainforest exhibit; David B. Lellinger, Curator of Ferns, NMNH, a member of the original exhibit committee and participant in several collecting field trips for the exhibit; and Thomas E. Lovejoy, III, Counselor to the Secretary for Biodiversity and Environmental Affairs, on the role of tropical rainforests as icons for the environmental movement.
Rights:
Restricted. Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission.
Topic:
Museum techniques  Search this
Tropical biology  Search this
Botany  Search this
Ecology  Search this
Conservation of natural resources  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Rain forests  Search this
Genre/Form:
Videotapes
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9565, Tropical Rainforest Exhibit Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9565
See more items in:
Tropical Rainforest Exhibit Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9565

Covers his education and career as an entomologist, focusing on his experiences in Panama and his work with other scientists affiliated with BCI, c. 1921-1989, including: Early influence of his father, David Fairchild; first trip to the tropics, 1921; ...

Collection Creator::
Fairchild, G. B. (Graham Bell), interviewee  Search this
Container:
Interviews
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Rights:
Restricted. Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9559, G. B. Fairchild Oral History Interviews
See more items in:
G. B. Fairchild Oral History Interviews
G. B. Fairchild Oral History Interviews / Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru9559-refidd1e278
Online Media:

Covers his education, career, and visit to BCI, c. 1918-1989, including: Studies at Rice Institute under Julian Sorell Huxley and Hermann J. Muller; studies at the Bussey Institution of Harvard University with William Morton Wheeler and Charles Thomas ...

Collection Creator::
Wheeler, George C. (George Carlos), 1897-1991, interviewee  Search this
Container:
Interviews
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9560, George C. Wheeler Oral History Interviews
See more items in:
George C. Wheeler Oral History Interviews
George C. Wheeler Oral History Interviews / Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru9560-refidd1e300

Louise Daniel Hutchinson Oral History Interviews

Creator::
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel, interviewee  Search this
Extent:
4 audiotapes (Reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- History
Frederick Douglass National Historic Site (Washington, D.C.)
Ridge (Md.)
Date:
1987
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Hutchinson was interviewed for the Oral History Collection because of her pioneering career in black history at the National Portrait Gallery and Anacostia Neighborhood Museum. Additional information about Hutchinson can be found in the Records of the Anacostia Community Museum, which are also housed in the Smithsonian Institution Archives. Hutchinson's personal papers will be available to researchers at the Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, Alabama.
Descriptive Entry:
The Louise Daniel Hutchinson Interviews were conducted for the Smithsonian Institution Archives in January and July of 1987 by Anne McPherson Rogers, a graduate student at the University of Maryland, as part of course requirements for an oral history seminar. The interviews discuss Hutchinson's family history, youth, education, work at the NPG and Frederick Douglass Home, career at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, and reminiscences of colleagues such as John R. Kinard, S. Dillon Ripley, and Lawrence Erskine Thomas, c. 1928-1986. The interviews consist of 3.0 hours of tape and 77 pages of transcript.
Historical Note:
Louise Daniel Hutchinson (1928-2014), was Director of the Research Center at the Anacostia Museum from 1974 to 1986. Born on June 3, 1928 in Ridge, Maryland, she grew up in Washington, D.C. Her parents, Constance Eleanor Hazel and Victor Hugo Daniel, were teachers and active in African American community affairs. She attended Miner Teachers College, Prairie View Agricultural and Mechanical College, and Howard University, where she received a B.A. degree in 1951 and pursued additional graduate studies in sociology. After her marriage to Ellsworth W. Hutchinson, Jr., she taught as a substitute teacher while raising their six children.

In 1971, Hutchinson began her Smithsonian career as a researcher at the National Portrait Gallery (NPG), where she worked with the William E. Harmon and Winold Reiss collections of portraits of African Americans and on the exhibit, The Black Presence in the Era of the American Revolution. After her 1972 appointment as an Education Research Specialist, she focused on the creation of cooperative programs between the NPG and the District of Columbia Public Schools and the development of a curriculum on the history of the District of Columbia.

Hutchinson left the Smithsonian in 1973 to become an Education Research Specialist for the National Park Service at the Frederick Douglass Home in Anacostia. At the Douglass Home, she trained staff to use artifacts and historical writings to enhance interpretation of the site.

In 1974, Hutchinson was appointed Historian and Director of Research at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum [renamed Anacostia Community Museum (ACM) in 2006]. At the museum, Hutchinson was responsible for research in support of exhibits, including The Anacostia Story: 1608-1930, Out of Africa: From West African Kingdoms to Colonization, and Black Women: Achievements Against the Odds. During her tenure, Hutchinson also worked to define a mission for the ANM; increase dialogue with the museums on the Mall; build a permanent collection; establish close ties with the local community; and create exhibits which responded to community needs and the changing mission of the ANM. She developed the ANM's program of recording community history through oral history and was a catalyst in the formation of the Anacostia Historical Society. Hutchinson retired from the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum in 1986.
Rights:
Restricted. The interviews are open to researchers but may not be cited, quoted or reproduced without the permission of Louise Daniel Hutchinson prior to 2025. Contact SIHistory@si.edu for more details.
Topic:
African Americans -- History  Search this
Art  Search this
Education  Search this
African Americans -- Portraits  Search this
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Teachers  Search this
African Americans -- Social life and customs  Search this
Museums -- Educational aspects  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Museums -- Public relations  Search this
Museums -- Educational aspects  Search this
Historians  Search this
African Americans -- Portraits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9558, Louise Daniel Hutchinson Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9558
See more items in:
Louise Daniel Hutchinson Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9558

Smallpox Virus Sequencing Project Videohistory Collection

Extent:
2 videotapes (Reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Videotapes
Transcripts
Place:
Somalia
Date:
1991
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Videohistory Program, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation from 1986 until 1992, used video in historical research. Additional collections have been added since the grant project ended. Videohistory uses the video camera as a historical research tool to record moving visual information. Video works best in historical research when recording people at work in environments, explaining artifacts, demonstrating process, or in group discussion. The experimental program recorded projects that reflected the Institution's concern with the conduct of contemporary science and technology.

Smithsonian historians participated in the program to document visual aspects of their on-going historical research. Projects covered topics in the physical and biological sciences as well as in technological design and manufacture. To capture site, process, and interaction most effectively, projects were taped in offices, factories, quarries, laboratories, observatories, and museums. Resulting footage was duplicated, transcribed, and deposited in the Smithsonian Institution Archives for scholarship, education, and exhibition. The collection is open to qualified researchers.
Descriptive Entry:
Ramunas Kondratas, Curator of the Division of Medical Sciences of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History (NMAH), documented the start of the project to sequence the smallpox virus genome at the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke at the National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland. As the result of NINDS's extensive facilities for DNA sequencing, it was chosen as the site for the joint CDC-NIH project to sequence the Bangladesh 1975 strain of the virus. The session was videotaped in the instrument room, laboratory, library, and computer room of NINDS, November 21, 1991.

This collection consists of one interview session, totaling approximately 3:00 hours of video recordings and 44 pages of transcript.

For additional information on DNA Sequencing, see Record Unit 9549, DNA Sequencing, Smithsonian Videohistory Collection, in Smithsonian Institution Archives.
Historical Note:
In 1967, the World Health Organization (WHO) initiated a program of world-wide eradication of smallpox through mass immunization and vigorous containment of outbreaks. The last naturally occurring case of smallpox was identified in Somalia in 1977. After two additional years of worldwide surveillance, on October 26, 1979, WHO announced the global eradication of smallpox.

The virus remained in storage at two authorized sites--the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, and the Research Institute for Viral Preparations in Moscow, Russia. In an address to the World Health Assembly in May 1990, United States Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan stated that technological advances had made it possible to map the entire smallpox genome within three years. Scientists agreed that the preferred first step toward the destruction of the virus was to determine its complete DNA sequence and in that way retain the essential scientific information of what would become an extinct virus. At a meeting of the ad hoc WHO Committee on Orthopoxvirus Infections held in Geneva, Switzerland, in December 1990, it was agreed that all remaining stocks of the Vaccinia virus would be destroyed by December 31, 1993.

Li-Ing Liu received a B.A. in nursing from the National Taiwan University in 1979, and an M.S. in nursing from the National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, in 1983. In 1990, she was awarded a Ph.D. in physiology and biophysics from the University of Illinois, Chicago. In 1990, she joined the staff of the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as a special volunteer on the sequencing project.

Brian Wilfred John Mahy received a B.S. from the Department of Physiology and Biochemistry at the University of Southampton, England, in 1959, and a Ph.D. there in 1963. In 1965, Mahy entered the Wolfson College of the University of Cambridge, where he received an M.A. in pathology in 1966 and a Doctor of Science in virology in 1982. From September 1973 to August 1974, Mahy conducted research on RNA tumor viruses at the University of California, San Francisco. From September 1980 to August 1981, he researched coronaviruses at the Universitat Wurzburg, Germany. In 1984, he was appointed Director of the Animal Virus Research Institute, Pirbright, Surrey, England, and in 1986, became head of the Pirbright Laboratory Institute for Animal Health. In 1989, he accepted the position of Director of the Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases at the National Center for Infectious Diseases, CDC.

J. Craig Venter received a B.A. in biochemistry from the University of California, San Diego in 1972, and a Ph.D. in physiology and pharmacology in 1975. From 1976 to 1982, he served as a Professor of pharmacology and biochemistry at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo. From 1982 to 1985 he served as Associate Chief Cancer Research Scientist in the Department of Molecular Immunology at the Roswell Park Memorial Institute. In 1983 he was appointed Adjunct Professor of biochemical pharmacology at SUNY-Buffalo, and joined NIH in 1984 as Chief of the Receptor Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Section, NINDS. In 1987 he also became Co-director of the Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology at NINDS, and was appointed Director of the NINDS DNA facility.

Teresa Utterback, a medical technologist working as a sequencing technician on the smallpox project, demonstrated DNA sequencing processes; Nicolay Selivanov, an Associate Professor at the Soviet Institute of Virology working on advanced cloning and subcloning of viral genes, demonstrated his template making of the pox virus, and Anthony Kerlavage demonstrated the data processing associated with the project.
Topic:
Technology -- History  Search this
Molecular biology  Search this
Medicine  Search this
Smallpox  Search this
Virology  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Genomics  Search this
Medicine -- History  Search this
Science -- History  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Immunization  Search this
Genre/Form:
Videotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9564, Smallpox Virus Sequencing Project Videohistory Collection
Identifier:
Record Unit 9564
See more items in:
Smallpox Virus Sequencing Project Videohistory Collection
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9564

Covers her family background, early life, education, work at the NPG and Frederick Douglass Home, and her initial involvement with the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, c. 1928-1974, including: Family background; childhood in the Shaw district of Washingt...

Collection Creator::
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel, interviewee  Search this
Container:
Interviews
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Rights:
Restricted. The interviews are open to researchers but may not be cited, quoted or reproduced without the permission of Louise Daniel Hutchinson prior to 2025. Contact SIHistory@si.edu for more details.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9558, Louise Daniel Hutchinson Oral History Interviews
See more items in:
Louise Daniel Hutchinson Oral History Interviews
Louise Daniel Hutchinson Oral History Interviews / Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru9558-refidd1e361
Online Media:

Dyar Family Oral History Interviews

Extent:
5 audiotapes (Reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Place:
Skyland (Va.)
Shenandoah National Park (Va.)
Washington (D.C.) -- Social life and customs
Date:
1993, 1999
Descriptive Entry:
These interviews of Dyar family members by Marc E. Epstein, Department of Entomology, National Museum of Natural History, and Pamela M. Henson, Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Institution Archives, covers their family; youth; education in Washington, D.C.; careers; collecting interests; reminiscences of their parents and grandparents, including Harrison Gray Dyar's entomological research at the Division of Insects, United States National Museum, his tunnel digging hobby, their involvement in the Baha'i faith; and the Pollock family's role in the development of Skyland resort and kindergartens in the United States. This collection consists of 4.5 hours of audiotape recordings and c. 165 pages of transcript.
Rights:
Restricted. Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission.
Topic:
Entomology  Search this
Conservation of natural resources  Search this
Education  Search this
Religion  Search this
Kindergarten -- United States -- History  Search this
Stamp collectors  Search this
Entomologists  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9570, Dyar Family Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9570
See more items in:
Dyar Family Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9570

George V. Barton Reminiscences

Creator::
Barton, George V.  Search this
Extent:
18 audiotapes (Reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Place:
Las Cruces (N.M.)
Olifantsfontein (South Africa)
San Fernando (Spain)
Villa Dolores (Córdoba, Argentina)
Naini Tal (India)
Date:
1982-1983
Descriptive Entry:
The Olga Zatorsky Hirshhorn Interviews were conducted during nine sessions between 1986 and 1998. Judith Zilzcer of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden and Pamela M. Henson of the Smithsonian Institution Archives conducted the first eight interviews between 1986 and 1988. An additional interview was conducted by Sidney S. Lawrence, III, Head of Public Affairs, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden and Judith K. Zilczer, Curator, Hirshhorn Museum in 1998. The interviews consist of approximately 13.5 hours of audiotape recordings, 474 pages of transcript, and occupy 1.00 cubic feet of shelf space.

These interviews of Olga Hirshhorn by Judith K. Zilczer, Curator, Hirshhorn Museum, and Pamela M. Henson, Smithsonian Institution Archives, discuss her youth; education; child-rearing years; careers in day care and business services; marriage to Joseph H. Hirshhorn; their travels; art collecting; meetings with S. Dillon Ripley; and the decision to donate the collection to the Smithsonian. Included are reminiscences of such art figures as Willem de Kooning, Henry Moore, Pablo Picasso, and Man Ray. The interview of Hirshhorn by Sidney S. Lawrence, III, Judith K. Zilczer, and Meghan Tierney, Intern, discusses a photograph collection of portraits collected by Olga Hishhorn and includes reminiscences of artists and other important figures in the art world. Appended to the interviews is Hirshhorn's 1986 lecture entitled, "My Life with Joe." Box 1 contains transcripts of the interviews and cassette copies of the original recordings, which are in security storage.
Topic:
Astrophysics  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Sputnik satellites  Search this
Astronomy  Search this
Observatories  Search this
Scientific apparatus and instruments  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9556, George V. Barton Reminiscences
Identifier:
Record Unit 9556
See more items in:
George V. Barton Reminiscences
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9566

Dorothy Graham Edson Oral History Interviews

Creator::
Edson, Dorothy Graham, interviewee  Search this
Extent:
22 audiotapes (Originals). 8 audiotapes (Reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Place:
China -- Description and travel
China -- Social life and customs
Chengdu (China)
Yibin Shi (China)
Date:
1993
Descriptive Entry:
In 1993, William W. Moss, director, and Pamela M. Henson, historian, at Smithsonian Institution Archives conducted four interviews of Dorothy Graham Edson, who was writing a biography of her father using resources in Smithsonian Institution Archives. These interviews of Dorothy Graham Edson and reminiscences of family members and friends cover their family; youth; education in China; careers; David Crockett Graham's collecting interests; reminiscences of their parents, and the challenges of a missionary life abroad. The collection includes four interviews of Edson, three reminiscence sessions with the five Graham sisters, two reminiscence sessions with the sisters and friends I. McConnell, G. and W. McIntyre, and Betty Jean and Dick Barker, remiscences of Cesare Santucci, the Margaret Graham Memorial service and the music recording. The collection contains 19.5 hours of audio recordings and 243 pages of transcript.
Rights:
Restricted. Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission.
Topic:
Museum of Art, Archeology, and Ethnology (Yibin Shi, China)  Search this
Anthropology  Search this
Religion -- China  Search this
Natural history  Search this
Collectors and collecting  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Missionaries  Search this
Miao (Chinese people)  Search this
Music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9571, Dorothy Graham Edson Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9571
See more items in:
Dorothy Graham Edson Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9571

Covers his early life, education, life-long work in folklore, career at the Smithsonian, and the development of the Festival of American Folklife, c. 1934-1993, including: Early life and schooling at Swarthmore College; introduction to folk music, incl...

Collection Creator::
Rinzler, Ralph, interviewee  Search this
Container:
Interviews
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9569, Ralph Rinzler Oral History Interview
See more items in:
Ralph Rinzler Oral History Interview
Ralph Rinzler Oral History Interview / Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru9569-refidd1e317

Theodore H. Reed Oral History Interviews

Creator::
Reed, Theodore H., interviewee  Search this
Extent:
5.38 cu. ft. processed holdings.
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Videotapes
Motion pictures (visual works)
Date:
1989-1994
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Reed was interviewed for the Oral History Collection because of his distinguished veterinary and management career, contributions as a Smithsonian administrator, and long tenure as director of the National Zoological Park. Additional information about Reed can be found in the Records of the National Zoological Park which are also housed in Smithsonian Archives.
Descriptive Entry:
These interviews of Reed by Pamela M. Henson discuss his youth; education; veterinary practice; experiences at the Portland Zoo; and career at the NZP, including his tenure as Veterinarian and achievements as Director, especially renovation and modernization of facilities, development of the Cap-Chur Gun, acquisition of such animals as the Giant Pandas, Komodo dragon, and white tigers, development of research and educational programs, creation of an endangered species program and the CRC, participation in the Species Survival Program, his role in the American Association of Zoological Parks and Aquariums and the International Union of Directors of Zoological Gardens; and reminiscences of such colleagues as William Mann, John Perry, and Leonard Carmichael. An additional interview of Reed by Pamela M. Henson, Historian, Smithsonian Institution Archives, and Caroline Winslow, Graphics Department, National Zoological Department was conducted in 1992. Reed was interviewed about the 1958 Safety Brochure that was created by the Zoo in response to the death a little girl by a lion at NZP. The collection consists of 13 interviews totaling 31.5 hours of audio recordings and 790 pages of transcript.
Historical Note:
Theodore H. Reed (1922- ), veterinarian and zoo administrator, received the D.V.M. in 1945 from the School of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State College. From 1946 to 1955, he practiced as a veterinarian in Oregon and Idaho. He gained experience with exotic animals while serving as a veterinarian to the Portland Zoological Park from 1951 to 1955. In 1955, Reed was appointed Veterinarian at the National Zoological Park (NZP). In 1956, he was named Acting Director after the retirement of William M. Mann, and in 1958, he advanced to Director. During his tenure, Reed oversaw a capital renovation of the NZP; development of the Conservation and Research Center (CRC) in Front Royal, Virginia, in 1974; a transition from display of exotic specimens to breeding of endangered species; and many advances in exotic animal care and medicine. Reed retired from administration in 1983 and from the NZP in 1984.
Topic:
Cap-Chur Gun  Search this
Zoos  Search this
Records of meetings, organizations, and professional societies  Search this
Conservation of natural resources  Search this
Giant panda  Search this
Komodo dragon  Search this
Tigers  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Veterinarians  Search this
Zoo directors  Search this
Endangered species  Search this
Genre/Form:
Videotapes
Motion pictures (visual works)
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9568, Theodore H. Reed Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9568
See more items in:
Theodore H. Reed Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9568

Meredith Leam Jones Oral History Interview

Creator::
Jones, Meredith L., interviewee  Search this
Extent:
6 audiotapes (Reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Date:
1990
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives’ record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Jones was interviewed for the Oral History Collection because of his long association with the NMNH and outstanding research career in invertebrate zoology.
Descriptive Entry:
Jones was interviewed by Pamela M. Henson on October 23, 1990 at his home in Washington State. This interview discusses his education, his years at Florida State University and AMNH, his career at the NMNH, research on polycheate worms, especially the eastern Pacific hydrothermal rift fauna of giant tube worms, field work, and reminiscences of colleagues. The collection consists of 5.5 hours of audiotape recording and 186 pages of transcript.
Historical Note:
Meredith Leam Jones (1926-1996), invertebrate zoologist, received the B.A. in 1948, M.S. in 1952, and Ph.D. in 1956 from the University of California at Berkeley. From 1957 to 1960, he was an Assistant Professor at Florida State University. From 1960 to 1964, he was Assistant Curator in the Department of Living Invertebrates at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York City. In 1964, he accepted a position as Associate Curator in the Department of Invertebrate Zoology of the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). In 1970, he advanced to Curator in the Division of Worms, Department of Invertebrate Zoology, a position he held until his retirement in 1989. Jones' research focused on systematics of polycheate worms, especially those found at the hydrothermal vents in the eastern Pacific.
Rights:
Restricted. Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission.
Topic:
Museum curators -- United States -- Interviews  Search this
Hydrothermal vents  Search this
Invertebrate zoology  Search this
Oceanography  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Tube worms  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9573, Meredith L. Jones Oral History Interview
Identifier:
Record Unit 9573
See more items in:
Meredith Leam Jones Oral History Interview
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9573

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