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Masters of the Building Arts

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
From the soaring skyscrapers of New York City to the adobe churches of New Mexico, from the sturdy stone walls of New England to the majestic monuments of the nation's capital, master craftworkers in the building arts have brought enduring beauty to our built environment. Working in wood, stone, brick, and metal, in plaster, paint, glass, and clay, they transform designs on paper into three-dimensional works of art. Much depends on their workmanship and skill: on their deep understanding of raw materials, their careful selection and use of tools, their mastery of technique. The final product is the result not only of their knowledge and abilities, but also their creativity and care - their will to excellence.

Artisans in the building trades share a deep appreciation for the aesthetic value and expressive power of technical perfection. They delight in skill and find meaning and pleasure in the poetic qualities of workmanship - in their ability to craft objects of beauty and strength through their special touch. Their great pride and creative spirit, their love for their work, and their commitment to excellence are manifested in a lasting legacy of architectural achievement left behind for generations to come.

The 2000 Festival program celebrated the extraordinary artistry of craftspeople in the building arts and explored the many challenges they face today as they work to preserve our nation's past and build for the future. The Festival brought together a selection of master artisans - stone carvers, masons, carpenters, terra cotta artisans, plasterers, blacksmiths, stained glass artisans, and adobe builders - who have enriched our world with the work of their hands, and who educated and informed Festival visitors not only with their skills but also with their knowledge and lore.

Marjorie Hunt was Curator and James Deutsch was Program Coordinator; Betty Belanus was Education Specialist and Family Activity Guide Coordinator. An Advisory Committee included: J. Bryan Blundell, Kurt Dewhurst, William Dupont, Cynthia Field, Henry Glassie, Norman Koonce, Betty Monkman, Peter Nabokov, Joanna Reagan, Rex Scouten, William Seale, Chris Sturbaum, John Michael Vlach, and Ed Worthy.

The program was produced in collaboration with the International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers and the International Masonry Institute, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the National Building Museum, the American Institute of Architects, and the Preservation Trades Network. Major funding was provided by Homestore.com, the Marble Institute of America, Allied Stone Industries, the Building Stone Institute, the Indiana Limestone Institute, and the National Building Granite Quarries Association. Major contributors included Target Stores, the Associated General Contractors of America, the National Association of Realtors, and the Smithsonian Women's Committee. Additional donors included the School of the Building Arts, Duron, Inc., the Brick Industry Association, the Laborers' International Union of North America, the Smithsonian Educational Outreach Fund, and the Copper Development Association, Inc.
Researchers:
Jane Beck, Betty Belanus, Ray Brassieur, Amanda Dargan, James Deutsch, Kurt Dewhurst, Karen Duffy, Lynn Martin Graton, Dwight Pauahi Kauahikaua, Winnie Lambrecht, Tim Lloyd, Gregory Sharrow, Gary Stanton, David Taylor, Elaine Thatcher, John Michael Vlach
Presenters:
Betty Belanus, Barry Bergey, Ray Brassieur, Olivia Cadaval, Amanda Dargan, William Dupont, Brian Finnegan, Lynn Martin Graton, Tim Lloyd, Philip "Pete" Pederson, Clift Seferlis, Peter Seitel, Gregory Sharrow, Angelo Simone, Nick Spitzer, Gary Stanton, David Taylor, Elaine Thatcher, Cynthia Vidaurri, John Michael Vlach
Participants:
David Adams, historic preservation specialist, Portsmouth, New Hampshire

Robert Alger, stone carver, sculptor, Spencerville, Maryland

Joseph Alonso, stone mason, Vienna, Virginia

Onofre Anguiano, terra cotta hand presser, mold maker, Lincoln, Calif.

Walter S. Arnold, stone carver, Skokie, Illinois

Sam Baca, program director, Cornerstones Community Partnerships, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Earl A. Barthe, 1932-2010, plasterer, historian and consultant, New Orleans, Louisiana

Hurchail Barthe, plasterer, New Orleans, Louisiana

Terry Barthe, plasterer, historic housing specialist, New Orleans, Louisiana

Nick Benson, stone carver, letterer, Newport, Rhode Island

Johan Bjurman, decorative painter, Cheshire, Connecticut

Anna Bowen, stone carver, letterer, Newport, Rhode Island

Dan Boyle, timber framer, Dover, New Hampshire

Rory Brennan, historic plaster specialist, Putney, Vermont

Ron Brooks, decorative painter, Rockville, Maryland

John Canning, decorative painter, Cheshire, Connecticut

Jacqueline Canning-Riccio, decorative painter, Cheshire, Connecticut

Jesus Cardenas, terra cotta modeler, mold maker, Lincoln, California

Charles Cardine, architectural blacksmith, Chantilly, Virginia

Patrick Cardine, architectural blacksmith, Chantilly, Virginia

Carson Christian, timber framer, Wooster, Ohio

Rudy Christian, timber framer, Burbank, Ohio

Peter "Billy" Cleland, 1921-2010, stone mason, Clinton, Maryland

William R. Cleland, Jr., stone mason, Dunkirk, Maryland

Rose Concha, -- enjarrodoro -- (adobe plasterer), Taos, New Mexico

Brian Cox, carpenter, Lyndhurst, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Tarrytown, New York

John Drew, carpenter, St. Leonard, Maryland

William Dupont, Graham Gund Architect of the National Trust, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Washington, D.C.

Cane Fields, Hawaiian dry stack mason, Kailua-Kana, Hawaii

Billy Fields, Hawaiian dry stack mason, Kailua-Kana, Hawaii

David Flaharty, ornamental plasterer, sculptor, Green Lane, Pennsylvania

lsidoro Flaim, stone mason, Camp Springs, Maryland

Tom Glynn, timber framer, South Berwick, Maine

Dieter Goldkuhle, 1938-2011, stained glass artisan, Reston, Virginia

Giles Harper, preservation carpenter, Lyndhurst, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Tarrytown, New York

Adam Heller, stone carver, letterer, Newport, Rhode Island

Randy Herald, sheet metal craftsperson, Bethesda, Maryland

Randy Herald, Jr., sheet metal craftsperson, Bethesda, Maryland

Hans Herr, coppersmith, Holtwood, Pennsylvania

John Paul Huguley, president, School of the Building Arts, Charleston, South Carolina

Judy Jacob, architectural conservator, National Park Service, New York, New York

Raymond Johnson, terra cotta modeler, draftsman, Lincoln, California

Dean Kalomas, decorative painter, Washington, D.C.

Vikki Keys, deputy superintendent, National Park Service, Washington, D.C.

Rick King, dry stone wall mason, Holderness, New Hampshire

Scott King, dry stone wall mason, Holderness, New Hampshire

Naomi Kroll, architectural conservator, National Park Service, New York, New York

Wade Lawrence, assistant director, Drayton Hall, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Charleston, South Carolina

Elmo Leonardelli, scaffold erector, Baltimore, Maryland

Stephen Lorenzetti, chief of resource management, National Park Service, Washington, D.C.

Amber Lucero, -- enjarrodoro -- (adobe plasterer), Taos, New Mexico

Rick Lykins, restoration carpenter, Bloomington, Indiana

George McDaniel, director, Drayton Hall, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Charleston, South Carolina

Richard Marks, architectural conservator, Charleston, South Carolina

Antonio Martinez, community leader, Upper Rociada, New Mexico

David Martinez, terra cotta draftsman, Roseville, California

David Mason, dry stone wall mason, Starksboro, Vermont

Rick Mason, dry stone wall mason, Hinesburg, Vermont

John O'Connor, engineer, Universal Builders Supply, Cheverly, Maryland

David Overholt, restoration project manager, Lyndhurst, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Tarrytown, New York

Albert D. Parra, adobe builder, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Theodore Pierre, Jr., brick mason, New Orleans, Louisiana

Konstantinos Pilarinos, Byzantine-style woodcarver, Astoria, New York

Panagiota Pylarinos, architect, Astoria, New York

Dennis Playdon, program manager, Cornerstones Community Partnerships, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Patrick Plunkett, stone carver, Takoma Park, Maryland

Joseph Pringle, blacksmith, Charleston, South Carolina

Nol Putnam, artist blacksmith, The Plains, Virginia

Clay Raley, restoration carpenter, Norman, Indiana

Brad Robinson, architectural blacksmith, Chantilly, Virginia

Steve Roy, historic preservation specialist, Portsmouth, New Hampshire

Brett Rugo, president, Rugo & Carosi, Woodbridge, Virginia

Laura Saeger, timber framer, Burbank, Ohio

George Salvador, restoration crew leader, Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico

Eduardo Seara, vice-president, Lorton Contracting Company, Lorton, Virginia

Manuel Seara, president, Lorton Contracting Company, Lorton, Virginia

Tony Segreti, architect, Bethesda, Maryland

Carlton Simmons, blacksmith, Charleston, South Carolina

Philip Simmons, 1912-2009, blacksmith, Charleston, South Carolina

Louis Soublet, plasterer, New Orleans, Louisiana

Larry E. Stearns, coppersmith, Westford, Vermont

Ben Sturbaum, restoration carpenter, Owensburg, Indiana

Chris Sturbaum, restoration carpenter, Bloomington, Indiana

Arran Sturgis, timber framer, Eliot, Maine

Daniel Szwed, construction manager, Waldorf, Maryland

Mark Tamara, structural engineer, James Madison Cutts, Washington, D.C.

Lonn Taylor, historian, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

Lloyd Tortalita, Adult, Higher Education director, former governor, Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico

Roman Troyer, timber framer, Wooster, Ohio

Dexter Trujillo, adobe builder, mud preserver, Abiquiu, New Mexico

Mark Tsirigos, president, Universal Builders Supply, Cheverly, Maryland

George Void, masonry crew, Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C.

Chuck Wagner, owner, Wagner Roofing Company, Hyattsville, Maryland

Sheila Wagner, owner, Wagner Roofing Company, Hyattsville, Maryland

Tom Weddle, restoration carpenter, Bloomington, Indiana

Bob Wooldridge, slater, Mercersburg, Pennsylvania

Jeff Wooldridge, slater, project manager, Bethesda, Maryland

Bill Yeingst, curator, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

Pauli Zmolek, decorative painter, Takoma Park, Maryland

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF BRICKLAYERS AND ALLIED CRAFTWORKERS (BAC), INTERNATIONAL MASONRY INSTITUTE (IMI)

Frank Baiocchi, marble mason, Mt. Airy, Maryland

Ed Bellucci, IMI deputy director of Apprenticeship and Training, Jefferson, Maryland

Robert Bernardon, marble mason, Suitland, Maryland

Lewis Carrara, mosaic worker, Fortville, Indiana

Raoul Cervantes, bricklayer, Claremont, California

Kurt Colo, bricklayer, New Baltimore, Michigan

Laird Donaldson, IMI regional director, Auburn, Washington

James Farris, stone mason, Stafford, Virginia

Richard Francescon, marble mason, South Easton, Massachusetts

Greg Hartseil, IMI Job Corps regional director, Lorida, Florida

Dennis Holloway, IMI Scola Training Center director, West Babylon, New York

Mike Kassman, IMI pointing, cleaning, and caulking instructor, Waynesboro, Pennsylvania

Tony Kassman, IMI National Safety, pointing, cleaning, and caulking coordinator, Tonawanda, New York

John Kitchen, bricklayer apprentice, Dryden, New York

Frank Koletar, refractory bricklayer, Orchard Park, New York

Annette Ludwig, tile layer, Bellevue, Washington

Nelson McMath, BAC Local 9 Michigan field representative, Saline, Michigan

Tom McQuaid, BAC Local 1 DC, MONA secretary, treasurer, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Steve Martini, IMI Strategic Programs director, Cascade, Maryland

Steve Mason, terrazzo apprentice, Washington, D.C.

Antoine Matthews, bricklayer, Baltimore, Maryland

Michael Menegazzi, IMI terrazzo instructor, South Gate, California

Bob Mion, IMI tile, marble, and terrazzo instructor, Binghamton, New York

Guillermo Moreno, stone mason, Hyattsville, Maryland

Colleen Muldoon, coordinator of Education Programs, bricklayer, Baltimore, Maryland

Clarence Nichols, IMI deputy director of Apprenticeship and Training, Cumberland, Maryland

Angela Olszewski, tile layer, Jersey City, New Jersey

Lester Parnell, bricklayer, Detroit, Michigan

Bob Perry, IMI regional director, Culver City, California

Darren Raines, tile layer, Chicago, Illinois

Matthew Redabaugh, IMI coordinator of Special Projects, Cascade, Maryland

Butch Rovder, BAC stone craft director, South Riding, Virginia

Joe Stewart, BAC pointing, cleaning, and caulking craft director, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Gene Stinner, IMI director of Apprenticeship and Training, Cascade, Maryland

Dennis Studley, IMI Job Corps regional director, Yucaipa, California

Harold Sugg, refractory bricklayer, West Seneca, New York

Jimmy Ternent, marble mason, Westminster, Maryland

John Totten, IMI plaster instructor, Clintondale, New York

Drew Vecchione, IMI stone instructor, Flourtown, Pennsylvania

Battista Yon, bricklayer, Hyattsville, Maryland
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2001, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2001-ref26

Festival Recordings: Building with Stone Hawaii and Vermont, other Crafts

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2001 July 1
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2001, Item FP-2001-CT-0295
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 3: Masters of the Building Arts / 3.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2001-ref658

Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar and Ukelele

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 July 03
Scope and Contents:
Mark Puryear (presenter); Ledward Kaapana; Judy Barrett ;NEA National Heritage Fellow Ledward Led  Kaapana is a master of the Hawaiian ukulele and ki ho'alu , the slack-key guitar a finger-style guitar art form that originated in Hawaii. This talent, combined with his vocal skills in the baritone and leo ki`eki`e (falsetto) range, have made him a legendary performer who has been entertaining audiences in Hawaii and abroad for more than forty years. Kaapana grew up in Kalapana in the southernmost district of Hawaii Island in a family of musicians. His teachers included his mother, Mama Tina Kaapana, from whom he learned to sing leo ki'eki'e, and his uncle, Fred Punahoa. Over the course of his career, Kaapana has dedicated himself to perpetuating the traditional style and repertoire of his Hawaiian home village, as well as engaging in innovative performances with virtuoso performers from other American traditions.
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0703_Circus_Arts_Jubilee_Stage_0002
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 4: On The Move / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref957

Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar and Ukelele

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 July 03
Scope and Contents:
Mark Puryear (presenter); Ledward Kaapana ;NEA National Heritage Fellow Ledward Led  Kaapana is a master of the Hawaiian ukulele and ki ho'alu , the slack-key guitar a finger-style guitar art form that originated in Hawaii. This talent, combined with his vocal skills in the baritone and leo ki`eki`e (falsetto) range, have made him a legendary performer who has been entertaining audiences in Hawaii and abroad for more than forty years. Kaapana grew up in Kalapana in the southernmost district of Hawaii Island in a family of musicians. His teachers included his mother, Mama Tina Kaapana, from whom he learned to sing leo ki'eki'e, and his uncle, Fred Punahoa. Over the course of his career, Kaapana has dedicated himself to perpetuating the traditional style and repertoire of his Hawaiian home village, as well as engaging in innovative performances with virtuoso performers from other American traditions.
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0703_OTM_Story_Circle_0007
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 4: On The Move / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref965

Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar and Ukelele

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 July 04
Scope and Contents:
Mark Puryear (presenter); Ledward Kaapana; Judy Barrett ;NEA National Heritage Fellow Ledward "Led" Kaapana is a master of the Hawaiian ukulele and ki ho'alu, the slack-key guitar—a finger-style guitar art form that originated in Hawaii. This talent, combined with his vocal skills in the baritone and leo ki`eki`e (falsetto) range, have made him a legendary performer who has been entertaining audiences in Hawaii and abroad for more than forty years. Kaapana grew up in Kalapana in the southernmost district of Hawaii Island in a family of musicians. His teachers included his mother, Mama Tina Kaapana, from whom he learned to sing leo ki'eki'e, and his uncle, Fred Punahoa. Over the course of his career, Kaapana has dedicated himself to perpetuating the traditional style and repertoire of his Hawaiian home village, as well as engaging in innovative performances with virtuoso performers from other American traditions.
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0704_Circus_Arts_Jubilee_Stage_0006
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 4: On The Move / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref969

Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar and Ukelele

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 July 04
Scope and Contents:
Theo Gonzalez (presenter); Leonard Kaapana; Judy Barry ;NEA National Heritage Fellow Ledward "Led" Kaapana is a master of the Hawaiian ukulele and ki ho'alu, the slack-key guitar—a finger-style guitar art form that originated in Hawaii. This talent, combined with his vocal skills in the baritone and leo ki`eki`e (falsetto) range, have made him a legendary performer who has been entertaining audiences in Hawaii and abroad for more than forty years. Kaapana grew up in Kalapana in the southernmost district of Hawaii Island in a family of musicians. His teachers included his mother, Mama Tina Kaapana, from whom he learned to sing leo ki'eki'e, and his uncle, Fred Punahoa. Over the course of his career, Kaapana has dedicated himself to perpetuating the traditional style and repertoire of his Hawaiian home village, as well as engaging in innovative performances with virtuoso performers from other American
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0704_OTM_Story_Circle_0002
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 4: On The Move / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref971

The Attack on Pearl Harbor

Creator:
National Air and Space Museum  Search this
Type:
Lesson Plans
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-09-12T19:00:03.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Aeronautics;Flight;Space Sciences  Search this
See more by:
airandspace
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
YouTube Channel:
airandspace
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_DNV8enpVwok

National Zoo Department of Reproductive Sciences Internship

Creator:
National Zoo  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2009-12-01T22:06:59.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Zoology;Animals;Veterinary medicine;Animal health  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNZP
Data Source:
National Zoo
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNZP
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_tMBsrgPKYm0

Look & Listen: Yumi Kurosawa, koto, with Sonia Coman-Ernstoff

Creator:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-06-24T20:00:13.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, Asian  Search this
See more by:
FreerSackler
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
YouTube Channel:
FreerSackler
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_D0FaIZCmE7E

Musical Meetings on the Silk Road

Creator:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-03-21T18:16:18.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, Asian  Search this
See more by:
FreerSackler
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
YouTube Channel:
FreerSackler
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_vLsEGJBEBkk

Look & Listen: Chinese Art and Music, Gao Hong, pipa, with Jan Stuart

Creator:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-09-24T22:00:12.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, Asian  Search this
See more by:
FreerSackler
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
YouTube Channel:
FreerSackler
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_xN85NxiVP2M

ECHO Native American Storytellers

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2011-02-25T20:29:32.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianVideos
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianVideos
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_hWJ3g-igHTw

Historic footage of Paniolo cowboys in Hawaii, ca. 1937

Creator:
Human Studies Film Archives  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
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2012-01-17T15:37:30.000Z
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Looking to the Future 5: Manley Begay

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National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
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2014-05-27T15:59:37.000Z
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Imamsuat (People of the Sea) Supiaq Dance Group

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2013-01-28T15:23:59.000Z
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Halau Ho'omau I ka Wai Ola O Hawai'i - Hawaiian Dance

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National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
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2013-02-14T14:44:26.000Z
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Looking to the Future 12: Nainoa Thompson

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2014-05-27T15:59:37.000Z
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Looking to the Future 4: Regis Pecos

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2014-05-27T15:59:36.000Z
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Hawaii Festival 2016 - Hālau Hoʻomau I ka Wai Ola O Hawaiʻi

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2016-06-07T18:14:56.000Z
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Hawaiian Sovereignty Symposium 2: Williamson Chang

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National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
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2016-02-19T16:16:19.000Z
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