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Francis Harper photographs from an expedition to Great Slave Lake

Photographer:
Harper, Francis, 1886-1972  Search this
Names:
Geological Survey of Canada  Search this
Extent:
46 Prints (silver gelatin)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Deh Gah Got'ine (Slavey)  Search this
Tli Cho (Dogrib/Thlingchadinne)  Search this
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Cree  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Photographs
Place:
Great Slave Lake (N.W.T.)
Saskatchewan
Alberta
Date:
1914
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs depicting Native Americans/First Nations peoples (chiefly Cree and Chipewyan) in Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Mackenzie, Canada, taken by Francis Harper on an expedition of the Geological Survey of Canada to Great Slave Lake in May-September 1914. Includes images of Cree, Ojibwa, Chipewyan, Salteaux, and Slavey people, as well as images of boats, encampments, and tea dances. Each of the photographs has an associated caption, given by either Harper or the Geological Survey of Canada.
Biographical/Historical note:
Francis Harper (1886-1972) was born in Southbridge, MA to a Canadian father and German mother. He attended Cornell University, receiving a BA in 1914 and a PhD in 1925. Harper made his first trip to northern Canada in 1914, as a zoologist for the Geological Survey of Canada. During World War I, he was stationed with the US Army 79th division in France, and then in New York and Maryland. He returned to Canada in 1920, but continued to travel throughout his life. Harper also worked to trace the travels of John and William Bertram through the American South and made numerous trips to study the people and environment of the Okefinokee Swamp.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 4606
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional photographs by Francis Harper held in the National Anthropological Archives BAE historical negatives.
The Smithsonian Institution Archives holds some of Harper's fieldbooks (SIA RU007434, SIA Acc. 12-443, SIA Acc. 12-581, and SIA Acc. 12-443).
The University of Kansas Kenneth Spencer Research Library holds the Francis Harper papers.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Reproductions of these photographs should include credit to the Geological Survey of Canada.
Topic:
Boats and boating  Search this
Dance  Search this
Camps  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 4606, Francis Harper photographs from an expedition to Great Slave Lake, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.4606
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-4606

MS 1910-g "Knife Swallowing" and "Victory Tabus"

Collector:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Names:
Knife Swallowing, Caribou eater  Search this
Victory Tabus, Caribou eater  Search this
Extent:
4 Pages
Culture:
Deh Gah Got'ine (Slavey)  Search this
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1910-g
Local Note:
Typescript document with annotations
Citation:
Manuscript 1910-g, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1910G
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1910g

MS 135 Some forms of the Chipewyan verb from Bishop Grandin

Collector:
Grandin, Bishop  Search this
Creator:
Gibbs, George, 1815-1873  Search this
Extent:
3 Pages
Culture:
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Contains some forms of the Chipewyan verb. A copy by George Gibbs.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 135
General:
Previously titled "Grammatical notes."
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 135, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS135
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms135

MS 150 Words of the Chipewyan Indians of Athabasca arranged according to Dr. Powell's Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages

Collector:
Bompas, William Carpenter  Search this
Extent:
10 Pages
Culture:
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1890
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 150
Citation:
Manuscript 150, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS150
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms150

MS 133 Chipewyan Slave Lake vocabulary

Creator:
Kennicott, Robert, 1835-1866  Search this
Extent:
5 Pages
Culture:
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
In handwriting of R. Kennicott. Also photostat copy.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 133
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 133, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS133
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms133

MS 132 Comparative vocabulary of Chipewyans of Slave Lake, Ft. Resolution

Collector:
Kennicott, Robert, 1835-1866  Search this
Creator:
Gibbs, George, 1815-1873  Search this
Extent:
24 Pages
Culture:
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1862
Scope and Contents:
(a)-Vocabulary of Indians on south shore of Slave Lake, 6 pages. Foolscap, accompanied by photostat copy. (b)-A copy of the above vocabulary, also accompanied by photostat copy. The copy is by George Gibbs and is marked "corrected by him to standard."
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 132-a-b
Local Note:
Photostat copy
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 132-a-b, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS132
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms132

MS 1199 Population of the Chipewyan, Tsattine and Cree in the Athapascan region, with notes

Collector:
Ross, Roderick  Search this
Extent:
1 Page
Culture:
Dunne-za (Beaver)  Search this
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Cree  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
January 4, 1859
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1199
Topic:
Chipewyan Indians  Search this
population  Search this
Cree Indians  Search this
population -- Beaver  Search this
Tsattine Indians  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1199, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1199
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1199

Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian

Photographer:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Extent:
96 Photomechanical prints (photogravure proofs)
184 Printing plates (copper printing plates)
Culture:
Twana  Search this
Hoh  Search this
Walla Walla (Wallawalla)  Search this
Wishram  Search this
Suquamish  Search this
Skokomish  Search this
Quinault  Search this
Quileute  Search this
Apache  Search this
Tolowa  Search this
Hupa  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Squaxon  Search this
Mewuk (Miwok)  Search this
Achomawi (Pit River)  Search this
Klamath  Search this
Yurok  Search this
Kumeyaay (Diegueño)  Search this
Cayuse  Search this
Northern Paiute (Paviotso)  Search this
Santa Ysabel (Santa Isabela) Diegueño  Search this
Kalispel (Pend d'Oreilles)  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
Spokan  Search this
Yakama (Yakima)  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Sicangu Lakota (Brulé Sioux)  Search this
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
A'aninin (Gros Ventre)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Tsuu T'ina (Sarcee)  Search this
Kainai Blackfoot (Kainah/Blood)  Search this
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Cree  Search this
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo)  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Jemez Pueblo  Search this
Serrano  Search this
Washoe (Washo)  Search this
Kutzadika'a (Mono Paiute)  Search this
Kupangaxwichem (Kupa/Cupeño)  Search this
Piipaash (Maricopa)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Hualapai (Walapai)  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Tohono O'odham (Papago)  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Wichita  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Osage  Search this
Yokuts  Search this
Chukchansi Yokuts  Search this
Southern Mewuk (Southern Miwok)  Search this
Wailaki  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Wappo  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photomechanical prints
Printing plates
Photogravures
Photographs
Date:
1899-1927
circa 1980
Summary:
The Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian include photogravure printing plates and associated proofs made from Curtis photographs and used in the publication of The North American Indian volumes 1-9 and 12-19. The bulk of the images are portraits, though there are also images of everyday items, ceremonial artifacts, and camps.
Scope and Contents:
The collection comprises 183 photogravure plates (101 folio and 82 octavo) and 96 associated proofs used in the printing of The North American Indian volumes 1-9 and 12-19. The original photographs used to make the photogravures were made circa 1903-1926 and the photogravure plates were made in 1907-1930. The bulk are portraits, though there are also images of everyday items, ceremonial artifacts, and camps. About half of the proofs in the collection are originals used for Curtis's publication, though the collection also includes proofs made in the process of later publication by the Classic Gravure Company (circa 1980). Vintage proofs include handwritten notes, likely made by Curtis Studio employees in Seattle and Los Angeles. Many of the photogravure plates do not have matching proofs; in particular, there are no proofs for the octavo plates.
Arrangement:
The plates and proofs are arranged by the volume of The North American Indian in which they were published. They are described in this finding aid by the caption and plate number with which they were published.
Biographical / Historical:
Edward Sheriff Curtis (1868-1952) was an American photographer best known for his monumental and now-controversial project, the twenty-volume publication The North American Indian. Here he sought to document in words and pictures the "vanishing race" of American Indians.

Born in Wisconsin in 1868, Edward Curtis grew up on his family's farm in Le Sueur County, Minnesota, from 1874 to 1887. In 1887, he and his father Johnson Curtis settled on a plot near what is now Port Orchard, Washington, and the rest of the family joined them the following year. When Johnson Curtis died within a month of the family's arrival, the burden of providing for his mother and siblings fell to 20-year-old Edward, and Edward set out to do so through his photography. In 1891, Curtis moved to the booming city of Seattle and bought into a joint photo studio with Rasmus Rothi. Less than a year later, he formed "Curtis and Guptill, Photographers and Photoengravers" with Thomas Guptill; the enterprise quickly became a premier portrait studio for Seattle's elite. In 1895, Curtis made his first "Indian photograph" depicting Princess Angeline, daughter of the chief for whom Seattle had been named. The following year he earned his first medal from the National Photographic Convention for his "genre studies."

In 1899, Edward Curtis joined the Harriman Alaska Expedition as official photographer, a position which allowed him to learn from anthropologists C. Hart Merriam and George Bird Grinnell while documenting the landscapes and peoples of the Alaskan coast. This expedition and the resulting friendship with Grinnell helped to foster Curtis's ultimate goal to "form a comprehensive and permanent record of all the important tribes of the United States and Alaska that still retain to a considerable degree their primitive customs and traditions" (General Introduction, The North American Indian). Curtis made several trips to reservations from 1900 to 1904, including a trip with Grinnell to Montana in 1900 and multiple trips to the Southwest, including the Hopi Reservation. He also hired Adolph Muhr, former assistant to Omaha photographer Frank A. Rinehart, to manage the Curtis studio in his absence, a decision which would prove more and more fruitful as Curtis spent less and less time in Seattle.

In 1906, Curtis struck a deal with financier J. P. Morgan, whereby Morgan would support a company – The North American Indian, Inc. – with $15,000 for five years, by which time the project was expected to have ended. Systematic fieldwork for the publication began in earnest that summer season, with Curtis accompanied by a team of ethnological researchers and American Indian assistants. Arguably the most important member of Curtis' field team was William Myers, a former newspaperman who collected much of the ethnological data and completed most of the writing for the project. The first volume, covering Navajo and Apache peoples, was published at the end of 1907, but already Morgan's funding was incapable of meeting Curtis's needs. Despite heaping praise from society's elite, Curtis spent much of his time struggling to find people and institutions willing to subscribe to the expensive set of volumes. After the initial five years, only eight of the proposed twenty volumes had been completed. Fieldwork and publication continued with the support of J. P. Morgan, but Curtis's home life suffered because of his prolonged absences.

In 1919, Curtis's wife Clara was awarded a divorce settlement which included the entire Curtis studio in Seattle. Exhausted and bankrupt, Edward Curtis moved with his daughter Beth Magnuson to Los Angeles, where they operated a new Curtis Studio and continued work on the volumes; volume 12 was published in 1922. The constant financial strain forced Myers to leave the North American Indian team after volume 18 (fieldwork in 1926) and Curtis made his last trip to photograph and gather data for volume 20 in 1927. After the final volumes were published in 1930, Curtis almost completely faded from public notice until his work was "rediscovered" and popularized in the 1970s.

Curtis's "salvage ethnology," as scholar Mick Gidley describes it, was mildly controversial even during his life and has become ever more so as his legacy deepens. In his quest to photograph pre-colonial Indian life through a twentieth-century lens, he often manipulated and constructed history as much as he recorded it: he staged reenactments, added props, and removed evidence of twentieth-century influences on "primitive" life. Curtis's work continues to shape popular conceptions of American Indians and so, while problematic, his legacy--his vision of American Indian life--continues to be relevant.
Related Materials:
NMAI also holds Edward Curtis photographs documenting the Harriman Expedition (1899) as well as platinum prints and photogravures of the images published in The North American Indian.

The Smithsonian Institution, National Anthropological Archives holds Edward Curtis prints submitted for copyright (Photo Lot 59) as well as many of his original negatives, photographs, and papers.

Steve Kern donated photogravure plates to the Center for Creative Photography and the Seattle Art Museum at the same time that he donated this set to MAI.
Provenance:
This collection was donated by Steven and Arlene Kern to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, in 1984.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Pictorial works  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photogravures
Photographs
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.080
See more items in:
Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-080
Online Media:

Volume 18

Collection Photographer:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Extent:
14 Printing plates
12 Photomechanical prints
Container:
Box 8vo20
Box F43-F48
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Printing plates
Photomechanical prints
Date:
1926
Scope and Contents:
This series includes twelve folio plates and two octavo plates showing portraits of Denésoliné (Chipewyan), Cree, Tsuu T'ina (Sarcee), and Kainai Blackfoot (Kainah/Blood) men and women. It also includes twelve proofs made by the North American Indian, Inc. One plate is covered by a black substance which obscurs the image.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.080, Series 16
See more items in:
Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-080-ref21

MS 147 Letters from George Gibbs to F.L.O. Roehrig regarding preparation of vocabularies for publication

Collector:
Gibbs, George, 1815-1873  Search this
Creator:
Roehrig, F. L. O. (Frederic Louis Otto), 1819-1908  Search this
Extent:
20 Pages
Culture:
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
March 6, 25, 1872; January 20, 1873
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 147
General:
Previously titled "Correspondence regarding preparation of vocabularies for publication."
Citation:
Manuscript 147, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS147
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms147

Donald A. Cadzow photograph collection

Creator:
Cadzow, Donald A., 1894-1960  Search this
Cadzow, Daniel  Search this
Extent:
8 Photographic prints (black & white)
322 Negatives (photographic)
Culture:
Western Subarctic  Search this
Inuit (Canadian Eskimo)  Search this
Plains Cree (Prairie Cree)  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Plains Ojibwa (Bungi)  Search this
Bush or Western Woods Cree  Search this
Copper Inuit (Copper Eskimo)  Search this
Deh Gah Got'ine (Slavey)  Search this
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Gwich'in (Kutchin)  Search this
Inuvialuit Inupiaq (Mackenzie Delta Eskimo)  Search this
Kainai Blackfoot (Kainah/Blood)  Search this
Kaska Dena  Search this
Pikuni (Piegan) [Blackfeet Nation, Browning, Montana]  Search this
T'atsaot'ine (Tatsanottine/Yellowknife)  Search this
Apatohsipipiikani (Northern Piegan) [Piikani Reserve, Brocket, Alberta]  Search this
Dunne-za (Beaver)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Negatives (photographic)
Negatives
Place:
Alaska
New Mexico
Alberta
Manitoba
Yukon
Northwest Territories
Saskatchewan
Date:
1882-1919
Summary:
Images are of the following tribes: Assiniboine, Beaver (Tsattine), Blackfoot (Piegan), Bungi (Older Ojibwa), Chippewa (Older Ojibwa), Cree (Bush, Prairie, Wood, Woodland), Eskimo, Eskimo (Copper River), Kainah (Blood), Loucheux (Gwich'in), Zuni, Slavey (Dene Thá), Yellowknife (Ahtena).
Biographical/Historical note:
Donald A. Cadzow worked on expeditions and archeological excavations for George Gustav Heye and the Museum of the American Indian from 1916 until 1927. Between 1917 and 1919, Cadzow, collected artifacts and archaeological materials from the Copper and Kogmollok Eskimo, the Loucheux, Slavey, and Woodland Cree of Alberta, Canada. In 1919, Cadzow assisted Alanson Skinner on an archeological excavation in Cayuga County, New York. Cadzow next worked with Mark Harrington: excavating a site on Staten Island, New York in 1920; on the Hawikku expedition to study Zuni Indian culture in McKinley County, New Mexico in 1921; and to Arkansas and Missouri in 1922. In 1924 and 1925 he conducted an expedition to a prehistoric Algonkian burial site on Frontenac Island, Cayuga Lake, in New York; traveled to the Bungi tribe in Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, and the Prairie Cree in Saskatchewan, Canada. He continued this work in 1926 again visiting the Prairie Cree and also the Bush Cree in Saskatchewan, the Assiniboin in Saskatchewan and Alberta; the Iroquois and the Northern Piegan (Blackfoot) in Alberta. In 1927, the last year that Cadzow worked for Heye, he assisted George P. Putnam on an expedition to Baffin Island and the Hudson Bay district to visit the Sikosuilarmiut, Akuliarmiut, and Quaumauangmiut Eskimos.Donald A. Cadzow, the son of Hugh and Nellie Cadzow, was born in Auburn, New York in 1894. In 1911, at the age of 17, he traveled to the far Canadian Northwest to live with his uncle Daniel Cadzow at the Rampart House, a Hudson Bay Company trading post on the Alaska-Yukon boundary line. After five years there, Cadzow returned to the United States. He began working for George Gustav Heye in the fall of 1916, but enlisted as seaman in the U.S.N.R.F. on January 20, 1918, only to be released from service on December 22 that same year. He returned to work for Heye at the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation on January 1, 1919, and worked there until 1928. In May of 1928 he took a job in the Bond Department of Lage & Co., a brokerage company in New York City. He was state archeologist for the Pennsylvania Historical Commission from circa 1929-39; and executive secretary from 1939-45. He was also treasurer of the Eastern States Archeological Federation from 1940-42. In 1945 he was named executive director of the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission and held the position until 1956. He died on February 9, 1960, in Pennsylvania. During his career Cadzow gave a number of lectures and radio talk programs, and published extensively in Indian Notes (Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, New York), for the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, in a variety of publications, and several books.
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Photographic prints
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.004
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-004

MS 172 An account of the Montagnais or Chippewayans

Collector:
Petitot, Emile Fortune Stanislas Joseph  Search this
Extent:
3 Pages
Culture:
Montagnais Innu  Search this
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
October 11, 1865
Scope and Contents:
Contains information on their habitat, and division into nations and tribes. The second and third pages contain a short vocabulary of words.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 172
Topic:
Social structure -- Montagnais  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 172, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS172
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms172

MS 2932 Notes on sign language and miscellaneous ethnographic notes on Plains Indians

Creator:
Scott, Hugh Lenox, 1853-1934  Search this
Dunbar, John Brown, 1841-1914  Search this
He Dog  Search this
Red Feather  Search this
Whirling  Search this
Addressee:
Wissler, Clark, 1870-1947  Search this
Names:
United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs  Search this
Bruguiere, Johnnie, 1849-1898  Search this
Petalesharo, 1797-1836  Search this
Extent:
4 Boxes
2,736 Items (2,736 pages)
Culture:
Sioux  Search this
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Paiute  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
A'aninin (Gros Ventre)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Wichita  Search this
Osage  Search this
Apache  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Minitari (Hidatsa)  Search this
Cree  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Bannock  Search this
Ute  Search this
Chaticks Si Chaticks (Pawnee)  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Slave  Search this
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Caddo  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Sarsi Indians  Search this
Plains Apache (Kiowa Apache)  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Ponca  Search this
White River Ute (Yampa)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Northwest Coast  Search this
Kootenai (Kutenai)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1934
Scope and Contents:
Much of this material is relevant to the Dakotas. Includes: miscellaneous notes on Dakota history, bands, and sign for "Dakota," Autograph Document. Approximately 100 pages. (Box 2); account of the Battle of Little Big Horn by He Dog, Red Feather, and Whirling, Autograph Document. 7 pages. (Box 3); "The Custer Battle with the Sioux, Autograph Document. 10 pages. (Box 3); notes on sign language in general, its history and distribution, Autograph and Typescript Document, 1 box (Box 4).
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2932
Local Note:
manuscript document
Topic:
Dakota Indians  Search this
Sign language  Search this
Marriage and family -- Berdache  Search this
Weapons -- bow  Search this
Dance -- calumet  Search this
American Indian  Search this
Rituals, formulas and ceremonies  Search this
Zoology -- Buffalo  Search this
Dance -- grass  Search this
War -- Battle of Little Bighorn  Search this
Medicine  Search this
Names, place  Search this
Dance -- Ghost dance  Search this
Religion -- soul, concept of  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Navaho  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Ute  Search this
White River (Parusanuch and Yampa)  Search this
Lenape  Search this
Assiniboin  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Plains Apache  Search this
Blackfoot  Search this
Sarcee  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Kootenai  Search this
Kutenai  Search this
Blackfeet  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2932, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2932
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2932
Online Media:

MS 227 Vocabularies of Indians of Washington Territory

Creator:
Gibbs, George, 1815-1873  Search this
Annotator:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Informant:
Capt Stewart Bellabella  Search this
Kwee-tah-lich-kan Saamena  Search this
Pandosy, Charles Marie, 1824-1891  Search this
Sam Okinagan  Search this
Spokane Gerry  Search this
Te-o-sa-luk Saamena  Search this
Yahotowit (Klikitat)  Search this
Extent:
230 Pages
1 Volume
Culture:
Stl'atl'imx (Lillooet)  Search this
Saamena  Search this
Nlaka'pamux (Thompson River Salish)  Search this
Saamena -- names for salmon  Search this
Yuki  Search this
Stó:lo (Lower Fraser River Salish)  Search this
Yupu -- vocabulary  Search this
Coast Salish [Chilliwack]  Search this
Heiltsuk (Bella Bella)  Search this
Nuxalk (Bellacoola)  Search this
Okanagan  Search this
Yakama (Yakima)  Search this
Winatsha -- vocabulary  Search this
Klikitat  Search this
Shuswap  Search this
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Kalispel (Pend d'Oreilles)  Search this
Kootenai (Kutenai)  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
Nooksack  Search this
Sumass  Search this
Chinook  Search this
Cowlitz  Search this
Twana  Search this
Chehalis  Search this
Skagit -- vocabulary  Search this
Coast Salish  Search this
Nisqually  Search this
Cree  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Northwest Coast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Cowichan  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Volumes
Date:
1853-1860
Scope and Contents:
1. Lillooet ("Lilowat") vocabulary. March 16, 1859. 8 pages in notebook. Note on page 3: "The Lilowat is spoken on the river which feeds Harrison's Lake, a branch of Fraser River. The vocabulary was obtained from the chief of a village at the mouth through Skehukl, the Soomass [Sumass: dialect of Cowichan group of Coast Salish], and may be relied on as tolerably accurate." The Lillooet River feeds into Harrison Lake. The Interior Salish dialect for west British Columbia is referred to as "Lillooet" in Handbook of American Indians, page 417.

2. "Saamena"vocabularies. 1858 and no date. 10 pages in notebook. Two vocabularies: Vocabulary of the "Saamena or as it is called by the Canadians, "Couteau," was obtained at Fort Hope, Mch. 4, 1858 from Kwee-tah-lich-kan, son of Pa-haa-luk, the Chief of the Kletch-ah-meh'h village at Forks of Fraser & Thompson's Rivers." 7 pages. Includes names for varieties of salmon in "Soomass" (Sumass) and Saamena. pages 12-19. Vocabulary obtained from Te-o-sa-luk, a Saamena of the Chileweyech [--?--]," no date. 3 pages. On page 1 note in Mooney's hand: "alias Nientemewh." Page 11 marked "copied".

3. "Yukeh" vocabulary. No place or date recorded. 3 pages in notebook. The word "Ross" follows the name "Yukeh." This refers to note on page iv: Mr Edward Ross says that the Yukehs have no numerals above five; thus they would say o'-pe mahote, twice five, for ten."

4. "Tai-eet vocabulary. Fort Hope, 1850. 10 pages in notebook. "The following vocabulary of the Tai-eet was obtained at Fort Hope, Sept. 25, 1850 from two men and a woman. It is the dialect intervening between the Kwantlen and the Saamena on Fraser River." page 25.

5. "Nevada or Yuba (Ross)" vocabulary. No date. 2 pages in notebook, pages 35-36. Possibly copied from Ross (?).

6. "Chilowhe'huk (Chilliwack) vocabulary. 4 pages in notebook, pages 36-39. No date. "Not completed as it does not differ sufficiently from the Kwantlen & neighboring dialects in Fraser River to make it an object." Chilliwack belongs to the Cowichan group of Coast dialects, Handbook of American Indians, page 417.

7. "Hailt-zuk or Belbella" vocabulary" obtained at Victoria, April 26, 1859, from Capt. Stewart." 10 pages in notebook, pages 40-42, 44, 46, 48, 50, 52, 54. Note on page 40: "...obtained at Victoria, April 26, 1859, from "Capt. Stewart" and Indian of the tribe through the medium of Frederic Minni, a Canadian, who partially spoke the language. It is generally reliable...." Page 41 marked "copied;" Another copy by Gibbs of this vocabulary in Ms. Number.

8. "Bel-le-whil-la or Bel'hoo-la" vocabulary. Victoria. 1859. 10 pages in notebook, pages 41, 43, 45, 47, 49, 51, 53, 55, 56. Note on page 56: "The vocabulary of the Belhoola was obtained from a woman of that tribe with the assistance of the Indian Stewart through the means of the Belbella vocabulary (cf. 277, part 7). With the exception of a very few words, my rendering of the latter [Belbella] was perfectly intelligible to her. The principal difficulty experienced in this was the excessively gutteral pronounciation of the language. I have classed this without hesitation among the Flathead languages from its obvious analogies. Some words, identical with those of the Belbella are marked with an asterisk. These are probably borrowed the one from the other, or perhaps were given by the woman from having mixed with the Belbellas." Page 41 marked "copied." 8-a Words obtained by Mackenzie at "Friendly Village," page 57.

9-10. Vocabularies of the "Okina'kane (O-Kin-ah-kehn[=Okinagan]) & Similkameen." 1853 & 1859. 17 pages in notebook, pages 58-74. "The incomplete vocabulary of the Okinakane was obtained in 1853. That of the Similkameen in 1859 and the latter is to be retained in place of the first as much more reliable. Given by "Sam" the guide employed by the N.W.B.S." The contents at the beginning of this volume has penciled note indicating that "Okinakane" and "Similkameen" are two dialects of one language.--page 1, note in hand of Mooney.

11. "Additional forms in Yakima," from Rev Marie Charles Pandosy, No date. 1 page in notebook, page 75.

12. "Piskwowse or Winatsha" vocabulary obtained 1853 and revised in 1860. 14 pages in notebook, pages 76-90, & 201. Note on page 76: "Revised at Ft. Colville, March 1860, by the assistance of Lahome's daughter. I have not however confidence in its being entirely correct. There may have been a difference in dialect between her and the first interpreter." Marked "copied" on page 76. Originally a Salish tribe, "Gibbs states that by 1853 they were so largely intermarried with the Yakima as to have almost lost their identity." page 264 of Handbook of American Indians. Page 201 has list of Winatsha Indians in 1853.

13. Vocabulary obtained from Spokane Gerry in 1854. 13 pages in notebook, pages 91-104. Marked "copied" on page 91.

14. Klikatat vocabulary obtained from Yahotowit in 1854. Copy by Gibbs of his original vocabulary, 15 pages in notebook, pages 105-119 and 222. Note in Gibbs' hand: "I am not certain that this is unmixed with the Yakama, as it resembles more closely two vocabularies of that dialect which I obtained then I have been led to expect. It was received from Ya-ho-tow-it." Apparently a copy by Gibbs from his original in Manuscript Number 671. Another copy by Gibbs is cataloged as Manuscript Number 693.

14. "Klikatat" vocabulary, copied from (?) "Tolmie." No date. 1 page in notebook, page 222. 15 Kalispel or Pend Oreille vocabulary, 1860. 15 pages in notebook, pages 119-133. "...vocabulary of the Kalispelm or Pend Oreille obtained from a man at Colville Depot, Jany., 1860. It is spoken by the Indians of Clarke's Fork of the Columbia River." Page 119 marked "copied."

16. "Shoos-whap or She-whap-much" vocabulary, 1860. 15 pages in notebook, pages 134-138. "Obtained at Colville Depot, Jany., 1860 from a woman by the assistance of the man from which the foregoing of the Kalispeln was derived [Manuscript Number 227, part 15], and using that in interpreting. Page 134 marked "copied."

17. "Chepewyan vocabulary" extracted from MacKenzie." No date. 7 pages in notebook, pages 149, 150, 152, 154, 156, 158, 160, 162.

18-19. "Knistinaux" (Cree) (18) and "Algonquin" (19) vocabulary "extracted from MacKenzie." 8 pages in notebook, pages 149, 151, 153, 155, 157, 161, 163.

20. "Kootenay" vocabulary. Place and date not recorded, 33 pages in notebook, pages 164-198, not including page 186 and 192. Page 164 is marked "copied." A copy by Gibbs of this vocabulary, pages 164-176 is filed Manuscript 512 with the note that this vocabulary "was taken from the son of the chief at the Chelenta Depot (Che-tam-towse)" with help of half breed interpreter; "I think the vocabulary can be relied on." Also note in Manuscript Number 512: "additional words of the Algonquin Kootenay in the book." This probably refers to pages 177-198 in Manuscript Number 227. Manuscript Number 512 contains 1 page of "Additional words in Kootenay" not found in Number 227.

21. Vocabulary of the Kalispel & Flathead including geographical names, No date. 2 pages in notebook, pages 199-200.

22. "Similkameen", dialect of the Okinagan, vocabulary, No date,. 9 pages in notebook, pages 202-210. Note in Mooney's hand on page 1 says Okinakane and Similkameen are 2 dialects of 1 language. Note on page 202: "Sam says that the Similkameen, Okin-a-kane, Sin-ke-mah-pe-luks, Skla-kum Methone; Che-lehn, Sin-pai-li-hooch; Se-leh-nich, Sins-peh-lich; Swoi-yehlp, Sche-wuch-hooch all understand one another but not the Soushwap & Couteaux." Sam was informant in 1853, cf. 227, part 10.

23. "Nooksaak" ("Nooksahk") vocabulary. June, 1859. 2 pages in notebook, pages 211 & 228. The Nooksak is a dialect of Squawmish coast group, Handbook of American Indians, page 417.

24. "Soomass" vocabulary. Place and date not recorded. 3 pages in notebook, pages 212-214. Sumass is a dialect of the Cowichan group of coast dialects, Handbook of American Indians, page 417.

25. "Simiahmoo" vocabulary: animals and proper names. 1 page in notebook, page 215. No date. The Semiahmoo is a dialect of the Songish coast group, Handbook of American Indians, page 417.

26. "Saamena" vocabulary. 1 page in notebook, page 216. No date.

27. Skagit vocabulary "(vide Dr Craig's corrections)." No date. 1 page in notebook, page 217. Skagit is a dialect of the Nisqualli group of coast dialects, Handbook of American Indians, page 417.

28. "Simiahmoo" vocabulary of 10 terms. Date and place not recorded. 1 page in notebook, page 218. The Semiahmoo is a dialect of the Songish coast group, Handbook of American Indians, page 417.

29. "Chiloweyuck" vocabulary. Date and place not recorded. 2 pages in notebook, pages 218 & 223. Chilliwack is a dialect of the Cowichan coast group, Handbook of American Indians, page 417.

30. "Nisqually" vocabulary. October, 1858. 6 pages in notebook, pages 219-221, 223 & 226. Note on page 219, "copied."

31. Chehalis vocabulary of 8 words. (Terms for salmon.) No date. page 222. Chinook vocabulary of 9 terms. (Terms for salmon.) No date. Page 224 in notebook. "Cowlitz" vocabulary of 5 terms. (Terms for salmon.) Page 224 in notebook. No date.

32. "Toanhooch" vocabulary. No date. 1 page in notebook, page 227; only 4 terms are recorded.

33. Chimakum- Not filled in; English only.

34. Kwillehyuts- Not filled in; English only.

35. Kwinaiutl- Not filled in; English only.

36. Noo-so-lupsh- Not filled in; English only.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 227
Local Note:
Notes by Gibbs on the source of many of the Salishan vocabularies in this volume are catalogued under Numbers 735 and 742.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Salish  Search this
Upriver Halkomelem  Search this
Saamen  Search this
Tait  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 227, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS227
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms227
Online Media:

MS 1522 Notes on names, and linguistic notes on Siouan, Athapascan, Caddoan, Iroquoian, and Muskhogean tribes

Collector:
Haggadorn, Francis T.  Search this
Extent:
256 Pages
Culture:
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)  Search this
Pamlico  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Eskimos  Search this
Massachusett  Search this
Wichita  Search this
Apache  Search this
Shawnee  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Cree  Search this
Mi'kmaq (Micmac)  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Unangan (Aleut)  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Passamaquoddy  Search this
Miami  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Caddo  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Wampanoag  Search this
Woccon  Search this
Mohegan  Search this
Natick  Search this
Openango  Search this
Pennacook  Search this
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
ca. 1900
Scope and Contents:
Contents: Dakota or Sioux vocabulary, approximately 27 pages. (notebook) Various Languages- brief vocabularies. 22 pages (copy book) Wampanoag vocabulary 5 pages loose. Sioux vocabulary 3 pages. Blackfoot vocabulary 3 pages. Wichita vocabulary 2 pages. Miscellaneous vocabulary 1 page (name not given) Arikara vocabulary 1 page. Apache vocabulary 8 pages. Aleut (Aleouteans) vocabulary 1 page. Iroquois vocabulary 82 pages. Caddo vocabulary 4 pages. Creek vocabulary 2 slips. Mandan vocabulary 4 pages. Passamaquoddy or Openango vocabulary 3 pages. Micmac vocabulary 11 pages. Pamlico (North Carolina) vocabulary 2 pages. Wocon vocabulary 4 pages. Natick vocabulary 1 page. Pennacook vocabulary 1 page. Mohegan vocabulary 1 page. Number 27. Miami, Comanche and Cushna (Maidu) vocabulary 11 pages. Number 28-a Cuchan, Chippewa of St Marys, Chippewa of Traverse Bay, vocabulary 19 pages. Number 28-b Cree (Knisteneaux) Chippewa of Michigan, Chepewyan approximately 17 pages, 7 pages that are full. Creek and Seminole vocabulary 4 pages (brief notations) Creek and Seminole vocabulary 14 pages. Number 31. Chippewa (Ojibwa or Saulteux) vocabulary Approximately 17 pages. Menominee, Shawnee, and Delaware vocabularies Approximately 12 pages. Notes on the Eskimo, Iroquois, Delaware (Lenape), and Massachuset; notes on the languages of Florida, Cherokee and Sioux languages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1522
Topic:
Siouan Indians  Search this
Vocabularies  Search this
Algonquian Indians  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Caddoan Indians  Search this
Iroquoian Indians  Search this
Muskogean Indians  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Algonquin  Search this
Lenape  Search this
Mi'kmaq  Search this
Penacook  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Athapaskan  Search this
Athabaskan  Search this
Blackfeet  Search this
Massachusett  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1522, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1522
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1522

MS 123 Concordance of the Athapascan languages, with an appendix

Creator:
Anderson, Alexander Caulfield, 1814-1884  Search this
Extent:
20 Pages
Culture:
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Athapaskan  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Montagnais Innu  Search this
Kwalhioqua  Search this
Clatskanie  Search this
Applegate Creek  Search this
Tututni (Tutuni)  Search this
Umpqua Indians  Search this
Hupa  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Dakelh (Carrier)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Summary:
This manuscript is a set of comparative data containing materials in several Athabascan/Athapascan languages. The language names as they appear in the ms. with alternative spellings in parenthesis. Chipwyan (Chipewyan, Montagnais, Dene Suline, Sluacus-tinneh, Dene Soun'line), Tacully (Tâh-killy, Tâ-cully ), Klatskani [Kwalhioqua ?] (Kwalhioqua-Tlatskanai Kwalhioqua- Clatskanie, Kwalhioqua-Tlatskanie), Willopah (Willapa, Willoopah) Upper Umpqua, Tootooten, Applegate Creek, Hopah, Haynarger with notes in English.
Scope and Contents:
Consists of Comparative vocabulary, 4 double leaves; Appendix, 8 pages.
Place and date of record not on manuscript; recorded at Cathlamet, Washington Territory, February 24, 1858, according to Pilling, Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 14.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 123
Topic:
Chipewyan language  Search this
Hupa language  Search this
Athapascan languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Athabaskan  Search this
Dene Suline  Search this
Carrier language  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 123, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS123
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms123
Online Media:

MS 206 Comparative vocabulary of Chipewyan languages, Slave, and Hare with notes

Annotator:
Roehrig, F. L. O. (Frederic Louis Otto), 1819-1908  Search this
Creator:
Ross, Bernard R.  Search this
Kennicott, Robert, 1835-1866  Search this
Petitot, Emile Fortune Stanislas Joseph  Search this
Extent:
23 Pages
Culture:
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Deh Gah Got'ine (Slavey)  Search this
Kawchodinne (Hare)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
There is a set of miscellaneous notes based on each of the Indian vocabularies; also a photostatic copy of the manuscript. The vocabularies appear to be derived from material in National Anthropological Archives manuscripts 144 (Ross); 132 (Kennicott, Chipewyan); 120 (Kennicott, Slave); 141 (Kennicott, Hare); and 221 (Pettitot, Hare). Differences between forms in this manuscript and those in the originals suggests that some analysis was carried out by Roehrig.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 206
Local Note:
Chipewyan according to B.R. Ross (Caribou Eaters, or Etheneldeli, and Yellowknife); Chipewyan on the south shore of Slave Lake according to R. Kennicott; Slave Indians of Liard River near Fort Liard according to Kennicott; Hare Indians of Fort Good Hope, Mackenzie River, according to Kennicott; and Hare Indians of Great Bear Lake according to Father E. Petitot.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 206, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS206
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms206

MS 143 Paradigm of two Chipewyan verbs

Collector:
Ross, Bernard R.  Search this
Extent:
1 Page
Culture:
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1858
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 143
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 143, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS143
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms143

MS 126 Notes on the Tinn'e or Chipewyan Indians of British Columbia

Collector:
Ross, Bernard R.  Search this
Annotator:
Gibbs, George, 1815-1873  Search this
Extent:
4 Pages
Culture:
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Contains notes by George Gibbs; all in Mr. Gibb's writing.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 126
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 126, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS126
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms126

MS 170 Letter addressed to George Gibbs, relative to the Loucheux dialect

Collector:
Ross, Bernard R.  Search this
Extent:
5 Pages
Culture:
Gwich'in (Kutchin)  Search this
American Indians -- Folklore  Search this
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
American Indian -- Folklore  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
April 10, 1861
Scope and Contents:
Includes Kutchin Song of the Dead and other music; description of the Dead Dance; miscellaneous linguistic notes; notes on the industrial art of the Chipewyan; legend of the formation of the McKenzie River, and the origin of fire in the Bear River coal beds.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 170
Topic:
Gwich'in Indians -- Dead Dance  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 170, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS170
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms170

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