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B-roll for Media: SCBI Researchers Discover Widespread Malaria Parasite in White-Tailed Deer

Creator:
National Zoo  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2016-02-05T18:58:29.000Z
YouTube Category:
Pets & Animals  Search this
Topic:
Zoology;Animals;Veterinary medicine;Animal health  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNZP
Data Source:
National Zoo
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNZP
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_E6wN4OD6gZI

It's a Boy! Smithsonian’s National Zoo’s Giant Panda Cub Is Male

Creator:
National Zoo  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-10-05T13:04:04.000Z
YouTube Category:
Pets & Animals  Search this
Topic:
Zoology;Animals;Veterinary medicine;Animal health  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNZP
Data Source:
National Zoo
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNZP
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_lRRpvnog8jI

Larva of peanut worm, Sipunculus sp.

Creator:
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2014-12-19T20:37:44.000Z
YouTube Category:
Science & Technology  Search this
Topic:
Tropics;Biology  Search this
See more by:
collinlabpanama
Data Source:
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
YouTube Channel:
collinlabpanama
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_u0bwgQ9aenI

Resurrecting the Sublime | Nature–Design Triennial

Creator:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2019-07-02T16:18:29.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Design  Search this
See more by:
cooperhewitt
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
YouTube Channel:
cooperhewitt
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_8AJTah6Lfh4

Convergent evolution of 'creepers' in the Hawaiian honeycreeper radiation

Author:
Foster, Jeffrey T.  Search this
Pratt, H. Douglas  Search this
Fleischer, Robert C.  Search this
Reding, Dawn M.  Search this
James, Helen F.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2009
Topic:
Natural History  Search this
Vertebrates  Search this
Animals  Search this
Zoology  Search this
Zoology  Search this
Animals  Search this
Veterinary medicine  Search this
Animal health  Search this
See others in:
Vertebrate Zoology
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_78432
Online Media:

Genome 10K: A Proposal to Obtain Whole-Genome Sequence for 10 000 Vertebrate Species

Author:
O'Brien, Stephen J.  Search this
Beja-Pereira, Albano  Search this
Estes, James  Search this
Hackett, Shannon  Search this
Schuster, Stephan C.  Search this
Zhang, Ya-Ping  Search this
Murphy, William J.  Search this
Venkatesh, Byrappa  Search this
Burke, Terry  Search this
Haussler, David  Search this
Sinervo, Barry  Search this
Bermingham, Eldredge  Search this
Shaffer, H. Bradley  Search this
Teeling, Emma  Search this
Bauer, Aaron  Search this
Vrijenhoek, Robert C.  Search this
Brenner, Sydney  Search this
Kessing, Bailey  Search this
Luikart, Gordon  Search this
Rawson, David Michael  Search this
Williams, Terrie M.  Search this
Turner, S. C.  Search this
Clamp, Michele  Search this
Lewin, Harris A.  Search this
Martelli, Paolo  Search this
Seuanez, Hector N.  Search this
Felsenfeld, Adam  Search this
Bernardi, Giacomo  Search this
Ericson, Per G. P.  Search this
Hebert, Paul  Search this
Helgen, Kristofer M.  Search this
Stuart, Joshua Michael  Search this
Graph-Odatsky, Alexander  Search this
Murphy, Robert W.  Search this
Sumner, Joanna  Search this
Wiley, Edward O.  Search this
Amato, George  Search this
Edwards, Scott  Search this
Graphodatsky, Alexander S.  Search this
Joseph, Leo  Search this
Nguyen, Ngan  Search this
Johnson, Warren E.  Search this
Barker, F. Keith  Search this
Hanner, Robert  Search this
McGuire, Jimmy A.  Search this
Cracraft, Joel  Search this
Diekhans, Mark  Search this
Flesness, Nate  Search this
Green, Eric D.  Search this
Wolfe, Nathan D.  Search this
Ryder, Oliver A.  Search this
Crawford, Andrew J.  Search this
Orti, Guillermo  Search this
Ward, Robert D.  Search this
Green, Richard E.  Search this
Miller, Webb  Search this
Kingsley, David M.  Search this
Pike, Brian L.  Search this
Wayne, Robert K.  Search this
Baker, C. Scott  Search this
Bonvicino, Cibele R.  Search this
Gamble, Tony  Search this
Sheldon, Frederick H.  Search this
Moreira, Miguel A. M.  Search this
Warren, Wesley C.  Search this
Hanotte, Olivier  Search this
Allendorf, Fred W.  Search this
Fjelsda, Jon  Search this
Gaubert, Philippe  Search this
Graves, Jennifer A. Marshall  Search this
Springer, Mark S.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2009
Topic:
Natural History  Search this
Vertebrates  Search this
Animals  Search this
Zoology  Search this
See others in:
Vertebrate Zoology
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_80911
Online Media:

DNA sequencing reveals simple vegetables in ancient Roman medicines

Creator:
Smithsonian Insider  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Thu, 21 Oct 2010 17:49:45 +0000
Topic:
Science  Search this
See more posts:
Smithsonian Insider
Data Source:
Smithsonian Insider
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_e8a0bf9344fafa1c4bda4b35f4957d78

DNA-polymerase

User:
Genentech, Inc.  Search this
Physical Description:
potassium phosphate, 50 mmol/l (overall active ingredients)
dithiothreitol, 0.25 mmol/l (overall active ingredients)
metal (overall material)
DNA-polymerase I (large fragment, Klenow enzyme), dissolved in 50% glycerol (v/v) (overall active ingredients)
Measurements:
overall: 2 7/8 in x 1 1/4 in; 7.3025 cm x 3.175 cm
Object Name:
DNA-polymerase
Place made:
West Germany
Used:
United States: California, South San Francisco
Date made:
1983-08-16
Credit Line:
Gift of Genentech
ID Number:
2012.0198.23
Accession number:
2012.0198
Catalog number:
2012.0198.23
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Biological Sciences
Science & Mathematics
Biotechnology and Genetics
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746ad-a6c1-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1427282
Online Media:

Polynucleotide Synthesizer Model 280, Solid Phase Chemistry Module

Measurements:
overall: 51 cm x 54.3 cm x 33.3 cm; 20 3/32 in x 21 3/8 in x 13 1/8 in
Object Name:
polynucleotide synthesizer
solid phase chemistry module, polynucleotide synthesizer
Subject:
Science & Scientific Instruments  Search this
Chemistry  Search this
ID Number:
1984.0719.01
Catalog number:
1984.0719.01
Accession number:
1984.0719
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Medicine
Science & Mathematics
Biotechnology and Genetics
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746ad-43ea-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1397088
Online Media:

Polynucleotide Synthesizer Model 280, Solid Phase Microprocessor/Controller Model 100B

Object Name:
solid phase microprocessor/controller (100B), polynucleotide synthesizer
Subject:
Science & Scientific Instruments  Search this
Chemistry  Search this
ID Number:
1984.0719.21
Catalog number:
1984.0719.21
Accession number:
1984.0719
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Medicine
Science & Mathematics
Biotechnology and Genetics
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746ad-eea7-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1451158
Online Media:

Paracords Data Visualization | Nature–Design Triennial

Creator:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2019-07-02T15:07:51.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Design  Search this
See more by:
cooperhewitt
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
YouTube Channel:
cooperhewitt
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_6k8m4q4ugMc

Metagenomic Data Visualization | Nature–Design Triennial

Creator:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2019-07-02T15:02:55.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Design  Search this
See more by:
cooperhewitt
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
YouTube Channel:
cooperhewitt
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_0C-jNt7losQ

Smallpox Virus Sequencing Project Videohistory Collection

Extent:
2 videotapes (Reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Videotapes
Transcripts
Place:
Somalia
Date:
1991
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Videohistory Program, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation from 1986 until 1992, used video in historical research. Additional collections have been added since the grant project ended. Videohistory uses the video camera as a historical research tool to record moving visual information. Video works best in historical research when recording people at work in environments, explaining artifacts, demonstrating process, or in group discussion. The experimental program recorded projects that reflected the Institution's concern with the conduct of contemporary science and technology.

Smithsonian historians participated in the program to document visual aspects of their on-going historical research. Projects covered topics in the physical and biological sciences as well as in technological design and manufacture. To capture site, process, and interaction most effectively, projects were taped in offices, factories, quarries, laboratories, observatories, and museums. Resulting footage was duplicated, transcribed, and deposited in the Smithsonian Institution Archives for scholarship, education, and exhibition. The collection is open to qualified researchers.
Descriptive Entry:
Ramunas Kondratas, Curator of the Division of Medical Sciences of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History (NMAH), documented the start of the project to sequence the smallpox virus genome at the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke at the National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland. As the result of NINDS's extensive facilities for DNA sequencing, it was chosen as the site for the joint CDC-NIH project to sequence the Bangladesh 1975 strain of the virus. The session was videotaped in the instrument room, laboratory, library, and computer room of NINDS, November 21, 1991.

This collection consists of one interview session, totaling approximately 3:00 hours of video recordings and 44 pages of transcript.

For additional information on DNA Sequencing, see Record Unit 9549, DNA Sequencing, Smithsonian Videohistory Collection, in Smithsonian Institution Archives.
Historical Note:
In 1967, the World Health Organization (WHO) initiated a program of world-wide eradication of smallpox through mass immunization and vigorous containment of outbreaks. The last naturally occurring case of smallpox was identified in Somalia in 1977. After two additional years of worldwide surveillance, on October 26, 1979, WHO announced the global eradication of smallpox.

The virus remained in storage at two authorized sites--the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, and the Research Institute for Viral Preparations in Moscow, Russia. In an address to the World Health Assembly in May 1990, United States Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan stated that technological advances had made it possible to map the entire smallpox genome within three years. Scientists agreed that the preferred first step toward the destruction of the virus was to determine its complete DNA sequence and in that way retain the essential scientific information of what would become an extinct virus. At a meeting of the ad hoc WHO Committee on Orthopoxvirus Infections held in Geneva, Switzerland, in December 1990, it was agreed that all remaining stocks of the Vaccinia virus would be destroyed by December 31, 1993.

Li-Ing Liu received a B.A. in nursing from the National Taiwan University in 1979, and an M.S. in nursing from the National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, in 1983. In 1990, she was awarded a Ph.D. in physiology and biophysics from the University of Illinois, Chicago. In 1990, she joined the staff of the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as a special volunteer on the sequencing project.

Brian Wilfred John Mahy received a B.S. from the Department of Physiology and Biochemistry at the University of Southampton, England, in 1959, and a Ph.D. there in 1963. In 1965, Mahy entered the Wolfson College of the University of Cambridge, where he received an M.A. in pathology in 1966 and a Doctor of Science in virology in 1982. From September 1973 to August 1974, Mahy conducted research on RNA tumor viruses at the University of California, San Francisco. From September 1980 to August 1981, he researched coronaviruses at the Universitat Wurzburg, Germany. In 1984, he was appointed Director of the Animal Virus Research Institute, Pirbright, Surrey, England, and in 1986, became head of the Pirbright Laboratory Institute for Animal Health. In 1989, he accepted the position of Director of the Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases at the National Center for Infectious Diseases, CDC.

J. Craig Venter received a B.A. in biochemistry from the University of California, San Diego in 1972, and a Ph.D. in physiology and pharmacology in 1975. From 1976 to 1982, he served as a Professor of pharmacology and biochemistry at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo. From 1982 to 1985 he served as Associate Chief Cancer Research Scientist in the Department of Molecular Immunology at the Roswell Park Memorial Institute. In 1983 he was appointed Adjunct Professor of biochemical pharmacology at SUNY-Buffalo, and joined NIH in 1984 as Chief of the Receptor Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Section, NINDS. In 1987 he also became Co-director of the Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology at NINDS, and was appointed Director of the NINDS DNA facility.

Teresa Utterback, a medical technologist working as a sequencing technician on the smallpox project, demonstrated DNA sequencing processes; Nicolay Selivanov, an Associate Professor at the Soviet Institute of Virology working on advanced cloning and subcloning of viral genes, demonstrated his template making of the pox virus, and Anthony Kerlavage demonstrated the data processing associated with the project.
Topic:
Technology -- History  Search this
Molecular biology  Search this
Medicine  Search this
Smallpox  Search this
Virology  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Genomics  Search this
Medicine -- History  Search this
Science -- History  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Immunization  Search this
Genre/Form:
Videotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9564, Smallpox Virus Sequencing Project Videohistory Collection
Identifier:
Record Unit 9564
See more items in:
Smallpox Virus Sequencing Project Videohistory Collection
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9564

Was recorded at the Receptor Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Section of the Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology, NINDS, NIH. Venter, Mahy, Kerlavage, Liu, Utterback, and Selivanov discussed the history of the smallpox sequencing projec...

Container:
Interviews
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9564, Smallpox Virus Sequencing Project Videohistory Collection
See more items in:
Smallpox Virus Sequencing Project Videohistory Collection
Smallpox Virus Sequencing Project Videohistory Collection / Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru9564-refidd1e286

Didelphis marsupialis

Collector:
F. M. Greenwell  Search this
Microhabitat Description:
Ecological remarks by collector(s): yes  Search this
Weight - Specimen:
1.5 kg
Length - Total:
875 mm
Length - Tail:
474 mm
Length - Hind-tarsus:
65 mm
Length - Ear:
56 mm
Preparation:
Skin
Skull
Sex:
Male
Place:
Peninsula Valiente, Punta Alegre, Kusapín, Ngäbe-Buglé, Panama, North America
Collection Date:
20 Apr 1990
Taxonomy:
Animalia, Chordata, Vertebrata, Mammalia, Metatheria, Didelphimorphia, Didelphidae, Didelphinae
Published Name:
Didelphis marsupialis
Accession Number:
389352
Other Numbers:
Mammals Field Number : FMG 2573
USNM Number:
578138
See more items in:
Vertebrate Zoology
Mammals
Data Source:
NMNH - Vertebrate Zoology - Mammals Division
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/36e365d9e-8464-4a64-b9fe-8397d991470e
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhvz_7076792

DNA Sequencing Videohistory Collection

Extent:
5 videotapes (Reference copies). 22 digital .wmv files and .rm files (Reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Videotapes
Transcripts
Date:
1989-1990
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Videohistory Program, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation from 1986 until 1992, used video in historical research. Additional collections have been added since the grant project ended. Videohistory uses the video camera as a historical research tool to record moving visual information. Video works best in historical research when recording people at work in environments, explaining artifacts, demonstrating process, or in group discussion. The experimental program recorded projects that reflected the Institution's concern with the conduct of contemporary science and technology.

Smithsonian historians participated in the program to document visual aspects of their on-going historical research. Projects covered topics in the physical and biological sciences as well as in technological design and manufacture. To capture site, process, and interaction most effectively, projects were taped in offices, factories, quarries, laboratories, observatories, and museums. Resulting footage was duplicated, transcribed, and deposited in the Smithsonian Institution Archives for scholarship, education, and exhibition. The collection is open to qualified researchers.
Descriptive Entry:
Ramunas Kondratas, curator at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History (NMAH), was interested in documenting the history, development, and applications of the DNA Sequencer. He also explored the commercialization of the instrument, including its testing and marketing, and addressed current and future uses of the ABI 370A model sequencer in medical research. Sessions were recorded at California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California, on October 19, 1988, at Applied Biosystems, Inc., in Foster City, California, on October 21, 1988, and at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Washington, D.C., on March 27, 1990.

Interviewees included scientists and technicians at Cal Tech, ABI, and NIH. Jeannine Gocayne received a M.A. in molecular biology from the State University of New York-Buffalo in 1985 and was appointed a biologist and sequencing supervisor with the Receptor Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Section of the Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), NIH in 1986.

Several others provided additional information about the sequencer for the three video sessions. These people included: Kurt Becker, DNA Sequencing Product Manager; Kip Connell, research scientist; Marilee Shaffer, products specialist for DNA sequencing, ABI; and Anthony R. Kerlavage and W. Richard McCombie of the Receptor Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Section of the Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology, NINDS, NIH.

Session one took place at the California Institute of Technology with Hood, Sanders, and Kaiser. Interviews focused on the history, design, and development of the sequencer prototype and its operation.

Session Two took place at Applied Biosystems, Inc., with Hunkapiller, Becker, Connell, and Shaffer and dealt with the commercial design, fabrication, and marketing of the sequencer and other related instrumentation. Tours of the assembly and manufacturing areas were included in the session, as well as a demonstration of how the DNA sequencing data is represented graphically on a computer.

Session Three took place at the Receptor Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Section of the Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology, NINDS, NIH, where Venter explained and demonstrated the automated DNA sequencing processes during a tour of the lab. Kerlavage and McCombie assisted during the tour. Finally, Gocayne described the application of new DNA sequencing technology to work in the lab.

This collection consists of three interview sessions, totaling approximately 8:40 hours of recordings and 176 pages of transcript.
Historical Note:
DNA is composed of the four individual nucleotides: adenine (A), thymine (T), cytosine (C), and guanine (G). To decipher a particular piece of DNA, it is necessary to determine the exact sequence of these nucleotides. The sequence of the nucleotides determines the genetic information encoded in a DNA strand. A partial nucleotide sequence for a human gene might look like: GGCACTGACTCTCTC. In 1977, biochemist Fred Sanger developed the enzymatic chain termination procedure that allowed for sequencing of individual strands of DNA. This made mapping and sequencing of genetic material possible.

In 1986, Leroy E. Hood's Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology (Cal Tech) announced its development of a semiautomated machine for sequencing DNA. The machine automated the enzymatic chain termination procedure for DNA sequence analysis developed by Sanger and became a key instrument in mapping and sequencing genetic material. That same year, Applied Biosystems, Inc. (ABI) produced the first commercial instruments for clinical use. Constant improvements in the technology resulted in faster sequencing capacity, which was significant for advanced scientific research in projects such as mapping the human genome.

Leroy E. Hood received his M.D. from The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1964, and a Ph.D. in immunology from Cal Tech in 1968. From 1968 until 1970 he held a postdoctoral fellowship at the National Institutes of Health. In 1970 he was appointed professor of biology at Cal Tech and eventually became chairman of the Division of Biology and the director of its cancer center.

Michael Hunkapiller received a Ph.D. in chemistry from Cal Tech in 1974. He joined ABI as its vice president for research and development in 1983.

Robert J. Kaiser received his Ph.D in chemistry from Cal Tech in 1983, and subsequently joined the Cal Tech staff as a research fellow in biology. Jane Z. Sanders joined the Cal Tech staff in 1984 as an associate biologist and was appointed senior biologist a year later. She took graduate courses in biochemistry in 1971-1972 at the Stanford University Medical School.

Lloyd M. Smith received a Ph.D. in biophysics from Stanford University in 1981, and was a senior research fellow in biology at Cal Tech from 1982 until 1987, when he was appointed assistant professor in the Analytical Division of the Department of Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

J. Craig Venter received his Ph.D. in physiology and pharmacology from the University of California, San Diego in 1975. In 1983 he was appointed adjunct professor of biochemical pharmacology at the State University of New York-Buffalo and joined NIH in 1984 as chief of the Receptor Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Section, NINDS. In 1987 he also became co-director of the Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology, NINDS, NIH and was appointed director of the NINDS DNA facility at NIH.
Rights:
Restricted. The permission of Ramunas Kondratas must be obtained before the public broadcast or public viewing of the tapes. Contact SIHistory@si.edu for more details.
Topic:
Sequence alignment (Bioinformatics)  Search this
Science -- History  Search this
Molecular biology  Search this
Laboratories  Search this
Nucleic acids -- Analysis  Search this
Nucleotides -- Analysis  Search this
Nucleotide sequence  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Technology -- History  Search this
DNA -- Analysis  Search this
Genre/Form:
Videotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9549, DNA Sequencing Videohistory Collection
Identifier:
Record Unit 9549
See more items in:
DNA Sequencing Videohistory Collection
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9549

Interviews

Type:
Archival materials
Collection Rights:
Restricted. The permission of Ramunas Kondratas must be obtained before the public broadcast or public viewing of the tapes. Contact SIHistory@si.edu for more details.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9549, DNA Sequencing Videohistory Collection
See more items in:
DNA Sequencing Videohistory Collection
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru9549-refidd1e287

Session 1: October 19, 1988

Container:
Interviews
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Rights:
Restricted. The permission of Ramunas Kondratas must be obtained before the public broadcast or public viewing of the tapes. Contact SIHistory@si.edu for more details.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9549, DNA Sequencing Videohistory Collection
See more items in:
DNA Sequencing Videohistory Collection
DNA Sequencing Videohistory Collection / Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru9549-refidd1e294

Was recorded at Church Laboratory, Cal Tech, Pasadena, California. Hood, Kaiser, and Sanders discussed the history and development of the prototype DNA sequencer and ABI 370A, and activities in the lab, c. 1970s-1988, including: Demonstration of the pr...

Container:
Interviews
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Rights:
Restricted. The permission of Ramunas Kondratas must be obtained before the public broadcast or public viewing of the tapes. Contact SIHistory@si.edu for more details.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9549, DNA Sequencing Videohistory Collection
See more items in:
DNA Sequencing Videohistory Collection
DNA Sequencing Videohistory Collection / Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru9549-refidd1e309

Transcript, 1-69 pages, of videotape recording, 3 hours, 40 minutes.

Container:
Interviews
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Rights:
Restricted. The permission of Ramunas Kondratas must be obtained before the public broadcast or public viewing of the tapes. Contact SIHistory@si.edu for more details.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9549, DNA Sequencing Videohistory Collection
See more items in:
DNA Sequencing Videohistory Collection
DNA Sequencing Videohistory Collection / Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru9549-refidd1e320

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