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Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
Extent:
245 Linear feet ((375 boxes and 10 map drawers))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1878-1965
Summary:
The records in this collection embody the administrative functions of the Bureau of American Ethnology from 1879 to 1965. The collection consists of correspondence, card files, registers, official notices, annual and monthly work reports, research statements, research proposals, grant applications, personnel action requests, notices of personnel action, meeting minutes, purchase orders and requisitions, property records, biographical sketches, resolutions, newspaper clippings, reviews of publications, drafts of publications, circulars, programs, pamphlets, announcements, illustrations, cartographic materials, photographic prints, photographic negatives, bibliographies, and reprinted publications.
Scope and Contents:
The records in this collection embody the administrative functions of the Bureau of American Ethnology from 1879 to 1965. The collection consists of correspondence, card files, registers, official notices, annual and monthly work reports, research statements, research proposals, grant applications, personnel action requests, notices of personnel action, meeting minutes, purchase orders and requisitions, property records, biographical sketches, resolutions, newspaper clippings, reviews of publications, drafts of publications, circulars, programs, pamphlets, announcements, illustrations, cartographic materials, photographic prints, photographic negatives, bibliographies, and reprinted publications.

Correspondence comprises the bulk of this collection. A significant portion of this correspondence originates from the Bureau's duty to field inquiries regarding North American aboriginal cultures and respond to requests relating to the duplication of BAE library and archival materials. Inquiries and requests, received from all parts of the world, were submitted by colleagues, museum curators and directors, students, professors, amateur archaeologists, government agents, military officials, Smithsonian Institution officials, artists, and members of the general public. Other correspondence reflects the Bureau's day-to-day operations and internal affairs. Subjects discussed in this correspondence include research projects, field expeditions, annual budgets, personnel matters, the acquisition of manuscripts, the disbursement of specimens, and production of BAE publications. Correspondence is occasionally accompanied by announcements, circulars, programs, pamphlets, photographs, drawings, diagrams, bibliographies, lists, newspaper clippings, and maps. Also among these records are the card files and registers of incoming and outgoing correspondence maintained by early BAE administrative staff. For a list of correspondents, see the appendix to this finding aid, available in the NAA reading room.

The majority of illustrations, artwork, and photographs that appear in this collection are associated with BAE publications, including BAE Annual Reports, BAE Bulletins, Contributions to North American Ethnology and Smithsonian Institution, Miscellaneous Collection. Maps located among the collection originate, by and large, from BAE field expeditions and research projects. BAE staff also amassed great quantities of newspaper clippings that concerned BAE research or points of interest. Of particular note are three scrapbooks comprised of clippings that relate to "mound builders" and the work of the BAE's Division of Mound Explorations.

Also worthy of note are the various records relating to the 1903 investigation of the BAE. Records related to the investigation highlight the Smithsonian Institution's longstanding dissatisfaction with the internal management of the BAE, its concerns over the BAE's loose relationship with the parent organization, and displeasure with the manner in which BAE scientific research was developing. Other materials of special interest are the various administrative records covering the period 1929 to 1946 and 1949 to 1965. The majority cover personnel matters; however, others justify the work of the BAE and bear witness to growing concerns that the BAE would eventually be absorbed by the Department of Anthropology within the United States National Museum.
Arrangement:
The collection has been arranged into the following 12 series: (1) Correspondence, 1897-1965; (2) Cooperative Ethnological Investigations, 1928-1935; (3) Miscellaneous Administrative Files, 1929-1946; (4) Miscellaneous Administrative Files, 1949-1965; (5) Records Concerning the Photographic Print Collection, 1899-1919; (6) Records Concerning Employees; (7) Fiscal Records, 1901-1902 and 1945-1968; (8) Records Relating to the 1903 Investigation of the BAE; (9) Property Records and Requisitions; (10) Clippings; (11) Publications; (12) BAE Library Materials, Pamphlets and Reprints
Administrative History:
The Bureau of Ethnology was established by an act of the United States Congress on March 3, 1879, but it was largely the personal creation of the geologist and explorer Major John Wesley Powell. His earlier explorations of the Colorado River and Grand Canyon formed the basis of the Geographical and Geological Survey of the Rocky Mountain Region. While exploring the area, Powell became alarmed at what he perceived to be the decline of the aboriginal way of life due to rapid depopulation. In a letter to the Secretary of the Interior, he warned that "in a few years, it will be impossible to study…Indians in their primitive condition, except from recorded history" (Hinsley). He urged swift government action; the result of which was the appropriation of $20,000 (20 Stat. 397) to transfer all documents relating to North American Indians from the Department of Interior to the Smithsonian Institution and its Secretary's appointment of Powell as director of the newly established Bureau of Ethnology, a position he held until his death in 1902. In 1897, its name was changed to the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) to underscore the limits of its geographical reaches.

Under Powell, the BAE organized the nation's earliest anthropological field expeditions, in which the characteristics and customs of native North Americans were observed firsthand and documented in official reports. Images of Indian life were captured on photographic glass plate negatives, and their songs on wax cylinder recordings. Histories, vocabularies and myths were gathered, along with material objects excavated from archaeological sites, and brought back to Washington for inclusion in the BAE manuscript library or the United States National Museum.

The fruits of these investigations were disseminated via a series of highly regarded and widely distributed publications, most notably BAE Annual Reports, BAE Bulletins, and Contributions to North American Ethnology. BAE research staff also responded routinely to inquiries posed by colleagues, government agencies, and the general public on matters ranging from artwork to warfare. Moreover, the BAE prepared exhibits on the various cultural groups it studied not only for the Smithsonian Institution, but also for large expositions held nationwide.

In 1882 Powell, under instruction of Congress, established the Division of Mound Explorations for the purpose of discovering the true origin of earthen mounds found predominately throughout the eastern United States. It was the first of three temporary, yet significant, subunits supported by the Bureau. Cyrus Thomas, head of the Division, published his conclusions in the Bureau's Annual Report of 1894, which is considered to be the last word in the controversy over the mounds' origins. With the publication of Thomas' findings, the Division's work came to a close.

The course of BAE operations remained largely the same under Powell's successors: W.J. McGee (acting director) 1902; William Henry Holmes, 1902-1910; Frederick W. Hodge, 1910-1918; J. Walter Fewkes, 1918-1928; Matthew W. Stirling, 1928-1957; Frank H.H. Roberts, Jr., 1957-1964; and Henry B. Collins (acting director), 1964-1965. However, following a 1903 internal investigation of the Bureau's administrative activities, Smithsonian officials called for a broader scope of ethnological inquiry and greater application of anthropological research methodologies. The BAE responded in 1904 by expanding agency activities to include investigations in Hawaii, the Philippines, and the Caribbean.

The BAE extended its geographical reaches once again, in the 1940s, to include Central and South America. In 1943, the Institute of Social Anthropology (ISA) was established as an independent subunit of the Bureau for the purpose of developing and promoting ethnological research throughout the American Republics. The findings of ISA-sponsored investigations were published in the six volume series, Handbook of South American Indians (BAE Bulletin 143). Julian H. Steward, editor of the Handbook, was appointed director of ISA operations and held the position until 1946 when George M. Foster assumed responsibility. The ISA was absorbed by the Institute of Inter-American Affairs in 1952, thus terminating its relationship with the BAE.

In 1946 the BAE assumed partial administrative control of the recently established River Basin Surveys (RBS), its third and final autonomous subunit. The purpose of the RBS was to salvage and preserve archaeological evidence threatened by post-World War II public works programs, more specifically the rapid construction of dams and reservoirs occurring throughout the country. Excavations conducted under the RBS yielded considerable data on early North American Indian settlements, and subsequent deliberations on this data were published as reports in various BAE Bulletins.

In 1965, the BAE merged administratively with the Smithsonian Institution's Department of Anthropology to form the Office of Anthropology within the United States National Museum (now the Department of Anthropology within the National Museum of Natural History). The BAE manuscript library, also absorbed by the Department of Anthropology, became the foundation of what is today the National Anthropological Archives (NAA).

In its 86 year existence, the BAE played a significant role in the advancement of American anthropology. Its staff included some of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries' most distinguished anthropologists, including Jeremiah Curtain, Frank Hamilton Cushing, J.O. Dorsey, Jesse Walter Fewkes, Alice Cunningham Fletcher, Albert H. Gatschet, John Peabody Harrington, John N.B. Hewitt, William Henry Holmes, Ales Hrdlicka, Neil Judd, Francis LaFlesche, Victor and Cosmo Mindeleff, James Mooney, James Pilling, Matilda Coxe Stevenson, Matthew Williams Stirling, William Duncan Strong, and William Sturtevant. The BAE also collaborated with and supported the work of many non-Smithsonian researchers, most notably Franz Boas, Frances Densmore, Gerard Fowke, Garrick Mallery, Washington Matthews, Paul Radin, John Swanton, Cyrus Thomas, and T.T. Waterman, as well as America's earliest field photographers such as Charles Bell, John K. Hillers, Timothy O'Sullivan, and William Dinwiddie. Several of its staff founded the Anthropological Society of Washington in 1880, which later became the American Anthropological Association in 1899. What is more, its seminal research continues to be drawn upon by contemporary anthropologists and government agents through the use of BAE manuscripts now housed in the NAA.

Sources Consulted:

Hinsley, Curtis. Savages and Scientists: The Smithsonian Institution and the Development of American Anthropology, 1846-1910. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1981.

McGee, WJ. "Bureau of American Ethnology." The Smithsonian Institution, 1846-1896, The History of its First Half-Century, pp. 367-396. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1897.

Sturtevant, William. "Why a Bureau of American Ethnology?" Box 286, Functions of the BAE, Series IV: Miscellaneous Administrative Files, 1948-1965, Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology, National Anthropological Archives.
Related Materials:
Additional material relating to BAE administrative affairs and research projects can be found among the National Anthropological Archives' vast collection of numbered manuscripts. Too numerous to list in this space, these include official correspondence, monthly and annual work reports, fiscal records, field notes, personal diaries, expedition logs, catalogues of specimens, vocabularies, historical sketches, maps, diagrams, drawings, bibliographies, working papers and published writings, among various other material. Most of these documents are dispersed throughout the numbered manuscript collection as single items; however, some have been culled and unified into larger units (e.g., MS 2400 is comprised of documents relating to the Division of Mound Explorations). Artwork and illustrations produced for BAE publications are also located among the NAA's numbered manuscript collection as well as its photograph collection (e.g., Photo Lot 78-51 and Photo Lot 80-6).

Photographs concerning BAE research interests can be found among the following NAA photographic lots: Photo Lot 14, Bureau of American Ethnology Subject and Geographic File ca. 1870s-1930s; Photo Lot 24, BAE Photographs of American Indians 1840s to 1960s (also known as the Source Print Collection); Photo Lot 60, BAE Reference Albums 1858-1905; and Photo Lot 85, BAE Miscellaneous Photographs 1895 to 1930. Other photographic lots include portraits of BAE staff and collaborators, namely Photo Lot 33, Portraits of Anthropologists and others 1860s-1960s; Photo Lot 68, Portraits of John Wesley Powell ca. 1890 and 1898; and Photo Lot 70, Department of Anthropology Portrait File ca. 1864-1921.

Additional materials in the NAA relating to the work of the BAE can be found among the professional papers of its staff, collaborators and USNM anthropologists. These include the papers of Ales Hrdlicka, John Peabody Harrington, Otis Mason, J.C. Pilling, Matthew Williams Stirling, and William Duncan Strong. Documents relating to the work of the BAE can be found among the records of the River Basin Surveys (1928-1969) and the Institute of Social Anthropology (1941-1952).

Records related to this collection can also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives (SIA). SIA accession 05-124 includes information regarding the 1942 transfer of six audio recordings related to the Chumash Indian language from the Bureau of American Ethnology to the National Archives, nine pages of Chumash translations, and "The Story of Candalaria, the Old Indian Basket-Maker." The Fiscal and Payroll Records of the Office of the Secretary, 1847 to 1942 (Record Unit 93), includes voucher logs, disbursement journals and daybooks of money paid out to the BAE from 1890 to 1910. BAE correspondence can also be found among the Records of the Office of the Secretary (Record Unit 776, accession 05-162). The Papers of William Henry Holmes, second director of the BAE, are also located among the SIA (Record Unit 7084).

Accession records concerning artifacts and specimens collected by the BAE are located in the registrar's office of the National Museum of Natural History.

Related collections can also be found at the National Archives and Records Administration. RG 57.3.1, the Administrative Records of the United States Geological Survey, includes register of applications for BAE ethnological expositions conducted between 1879-1882. RG 75.29, Still Pictures among the Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, includes 22 photographs of Arapaho, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Comanche, Navajo, and Apache Indians taken by William S. Soule for the BAE during 1868-1875. RG 106, Records of the Smithsonian Institution, includes cartographic records (106.2) relating to Indian land cessions in Indiana created for the First Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology, 1881 (1 item); a distribution of American Indian linguistic stock in North America and Greenland, by John Wesley Powell, for the Seventh Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology, ca. 1887 (1 item); a distribution of Indian tribal and linguistic groups in South America, 1950 (1 item); the Indian tribes in North America, for Bulletin 145, Bureau of American Ethnology, 1952 (4 items). Sound Recordings (106.4) include songs and linguistic material relating to the Aleut, Mission, Chumash, and Creek, gather by the BAE in 1912, 1914, 1930-41. Some include translations (122 items).
Provenance:
The Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology were transferred to the Smithsonian Office of Anthropology Archives with the merger of the BAE and the Department of Anthropology of the National Museum of Natural History in 1965. The Smithsonian Office of Anthropology Archives was renamed the National Anthropological Archives in 1968.
Restrictions:
The Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology are open for research.

Access to the Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Citation:
Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.XXXX.0155
See more items in:
Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw391046c25-21e2-4334-a01f-9a6f734ae9cd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-xxxx-0155
Online Media:

Nancy Spero papers

Creator:
Spero, Nancy, 1926-2009  Search this
Names:
A.I.R. Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Galerie Lelong (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Golub, Leon, 1922-2004  Search this
Mendieta, Ana, 1948-1985  Search this
Sosa, Irene  Search this
Extent:
26.4 Linear feet
19.12 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Sound recordings
Interviews
Video recordings
Documentary films
Motion pictures
Date:
1940s-2009
Summary:
The papers of painter, collage artist, and printmaker Nancy Spero measure 26.4 linear feet and 19.12 GB and are dated 1940s-2009. Biographical material, correspondence and other files documenting Spero's personal and professional relationships, interviews and writings, records of Spero's many exhibitions and projects, files highlighting the major subjects that galvanized her, business records, printed and photographic material, and digital and video recordings, offer detailed insight into the career of one of the earliest feminist artists.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter, collage artist, and printmaker Nancy Spero measure 26.4 linear feet and 19.12 GB and are dated 1940s-2009. Biographical material, correspondence and other files documenting Spero's personal and professional relationships, interviews and writings, records of Spero's many exhibitions and projects, files highlighting the major subjects that galvanized her, business records, printed and photographic material, and digital and video recordings, offer detailed insight into the career of one of the earliest feminist artists.

Biographical material includes biographical notes and curricula vitae, as well as several video recordings of documentaries about Spero by Patsy Scala and Irene Sosa which feature original footage of Spero at work. Correspondence is personal and professional, and includes letters from artists including Judy Chicago and Ana Mendieta, writers and curators such as Deborah Frizzell and Susanne Altmann, regarding Spero exhibition catalogs, monographs, and articles, and personal news from family members such as Spero's sons, and correspondence related to other aspects of Spero's career.

Interviews of Spero include transcripts, published interviews, and video recordings. Writings include many of Spero's statements about her work, as well as notes, published versions of articles written by Spero, and video recordings of talks and panel discussions she participated in.

Exhibition files for over 75 shows document the extent to which Spero's work has been widely exhibited in her lifetime with numerous solo exhibitions, including major retrospectives in London, Paris, Barcelona, and Madrid, and dozens of group exhibitions in which she participated over the course of her career.

Gallery and museum files supplement the exhibition files by further documenting Spero's dealings with numerous galleries and museums, including Galerie Lelong, which represents Spero's estate, Barbara Gross Galerie, the first gallery in Germany to represent Spero, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the National Gallery of Canada, and many others. The series also documents Spero's involvement with A.I.R. Gallery, the first independent women's art venue in the United States.

Professional files document other aspects of Spero's career including, but not limited to, awards she received, organizations she participated in or contributed to, publishing projects related to her work, and individual projects she executed such as an installation at the Harold Washington Library in Chicago and the Artemis, Acrobats, Divas & Dancers mosaic tiles she created for the Metropolitan Transit Authority for the 66th Street/Lincoln Center subway station. Also included here are files related to works of art such as Codex Artaud, and Notes in Time.

Subject files, contents of which were presumably used as source material for Spero, document subjects of interest to her, many of which were incorporated into her work and consists primarily of printed material. Broad subject categories include animal rights and conservation, feminism, war, and women. One set of folders documents "museum and political actions" undertaken by Spero and other activists during the 1960s-1970s to fight for equal representation of women in the arts and challenge the male-dominated hierarchy of the art world. Subject files include multiple news articles on torture, rape, and other atrocities committed particularly against women during wartime and by repressive and autocratic political regimes, and also include source material on the archetypal images of women that were fundamental to her interpretation of the female experience.

Printed material documents Spero's entire career from the late 1950s on. Announcements, exhibition catalogs, invitations, news clippings, and periodicals provide comprehensive coverage of her many exhibitions and other events. Printed material also documents the activities of a few other artists, primarily from the 2000s, and includes periodicals, primarily about art, and video recordings of documentaries about art and various other subjects.

Photographic material includes photographs of Nancy Spero from the 1940s on, photos of Spero with family and friends, and photographs of artwork including the heads of Spero's 2007 Maypole: Take No Prisoners which was the last major work completed before her death, originally realized for the Venice Biennale. Also found are a few installation shots and prints, slides, and digital images of Notes in Time at A.I.R. Gallery in 1979.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1950-2009 (Box 1, FC 30; 0.85 linear feet, ER01-ER04; 9.58 GB)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1946-2009 (Boxes 1-4, 27; 2.75 linear feet)

Series 3: Interviews, 1973-2007 (Boxes 4-5; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings, 1950-2007 (Boxes 5-6; 1 linear foot)

Series 5: Exhibition Files, circa 1976-2009 (Boxes 6-9, 27, OV 28; 3.3 linear feet, ER09-ER10, ER14-ER17; 1.5 GB)

Series 6: Gallery and Museum Files, 1972-2009 (Boxes 9-14; 5.1 linear feet; ER05-ER08, ER12-ER13; 2.962 GB)

Series 7: Professional Files, circa 1967-2008 (Boxes 14-17, RD 29; 3.5 linear feet; ER15; 0.74 GB)

Series 8: Subject Files, 1950s-2009 (Boxes 17-19, 27, OV 28; 2.4 linear feet)

Series 9: Business Records, circa 1976-2008 (Boxes 19-20; 0.7 linear foot)

Series 10: Printed Material, 1949-2009 (Boxes 20-25, 27, OV 28; 5.5 linear feet)

Series 11: Photographic Material, 1940s-2009 (Boxes 25-27; 0.7 linear foot; ER18-ER19; 0.151 GB)
Biographical / Historical:
Nancy Spero (1926-2009) was a figurative painter, printmaker, and collage artist based in New York City whose work was executed primarily on paper from the 1960s on, and often incorporated text. Spero was among the first feminist artists and a political activist whose convictions were expressed relentlessly in her work. Using archetypal representations of women to examine the range of female experience, Spero centered "woman as protagonist" whilst simultaneously examining the suffering women have long been subjected to through structural inequality, the systematic abuses of repressive political regimes, and the atrocities of war.

Born in Cleveland, Nancy Spero lived in Chicago from the time she was a very young child until completing her studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (BFA 1949) where she met her future husband, painter Leon Golub (1922-2004). Spero studied briefly in Paris and lived in New York City, returning to Chicago after her marriage in 1951. The couple and their two sons lived in Italy from 1956 to 1957. In 1959, after a few years in New York, the family moved to Paris where Spero developed an interest in existentialism and produced a series of black paintings. Spero and Golub returned to New York in 1964 with their three sons.

Nancy Spero was strongly affected by the war in Vietnam and the many social changes of the period. She became an activist and feminist, joined various organizations, and participated in a variety of demonstrations. Work such as the War series began to include political and sexual imagery, and Spero's work from here on was primarily executed on paper.

Spero was among the founding members of the women's cooperative A.I.R. Gallery established in 1972. In the 1970s archetypal representations of women in mythology, history, art, and literature became predominant in her work. Included in this vein are major series and installations, among them Torture of Women, Notes in Time on Women, The First Language, and her 66th Street/Lincoln Center subway station mosaic mural Artemis, Acrobats, Divas and Dancers.

Spero exhibited in the 1950 Salon des Independents and her first solo exhibition (in tandem with Leon Golub) was held at Indiana University in 1958. Thereafter, she showed sporadically until nearly 30 years later when her career flourished and she enjoyed international stature. Beginning in 1986, each year brought multiple solo exhibitions at galleries and museums in the United States and internationally. In addition, she continued to participate in group shows such as "Documenta" and the Venice Biennale. Her work is included in the permanent collections of museums throughout the world.

Awards and honors included the Skowhegan Medal for Works on Paper (1995), Hiroshima Art Prize shared with Leon Golub (1996), The Women's Caucus for Art award for Outstanding Achievement in Visual Arts (2003), and The Women's Caucus for Art Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement (2005). Spero was awarded honorary Doctorates of Fine Arts by The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (1991) and Williams College (2001), and was elected a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters (2006).

After several years of declining health, Nancy Spero died from heart failure in New York City, October 18, 2009.
Related Materials:
Also among the holdings of the Archives of American Art are an interview with Nancy Spero conducted 2008 Februay 6-July 24, by Judith Olch Richards, and the papers of Spero's husband, Leon Golub.
Provenance:
Following a gift of materials by Nancy Spero in 1979, the majority of the collection was donated by Spero's sons, Stephen Golub, Philip Golub, and Paul Golub, in 2013.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Collagists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Printmakers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Political aspects  Search this
Feminism and art  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women printmakers  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Video recordings
Documentary films
Motion pictures
Citation:
Nancy Spero papers, 1940s-2009. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.spernanc
See more items in:
Nancy Spero papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9ee586015-b282-427f-88a2-0768b0b0e79b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-spernanc
Online Media:

Family fallout shelter inspection trip, Fort Wayne, Indiana, 1991

Creator:
National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2012-05-10T15:32:21.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
American History  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianAmHistory
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianAmHistory
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_dGFdujwZBHc

Mascots, Myths, Monuments, and Memory 06 — Contested Symbols in Sports and American Culture

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2018-03-10T15:47:40.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_iCEEryDSnoU

Session 2 - Symposium: Nation Building: Values on Display

Creator:
Smithsonian American Art Museum  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2012-11-08T21:26:57.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
See more by:
americanartmuseum
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
YouTube Channel:
americanartmuseum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_P76gyhkKDNE

Clarice Smith Distinguished Lecture Series with Barbara Haskell

Creator:
Smithsonian American Art Museum  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2013-11-21T08:33:53.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
See more by:
americanartmuseum
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
YouTube Channel:
americanartmuseum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_zSQADaa3sqY

Pullman Palace Car Company Photographs

Creator:
Pullman Palace Car Co.  Search this
Donor:
Pullman-Standard  Search this
Names:
Lincoln, Robert Todd  Search this
Pullman, George M., 1831-1897  Search this
Extent:
128.5 Cubic feet (147 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Glass plate negatives
Photographs
Date:
circa 1882-1955
Summary:
Collection consists of approximately 13,500 images (original photographs, copy prints, and film and glass plate negatives) for freight, passenger, private, and street and rapid transit cars manufactured by the Pullman Palace Car Company. The collection contains primarily early railroad Americana, including interior and exterior views of private and business cars as well as passenger and street cars. The collection is an important part of the historical record of the railroad car-building industry as well as the history of architecture and interior design.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of approximately 13,500 images (original photographs, copy prints, and film and glass plate negatives) for freight, passenger, private, and street and rapid transit cars manufactured by the Pullman Palace Car Company. The collection contains primarily interior and exterior views of private and business cars as well as passenger and street cars. The collection is an important part of the historical record of the railroad car-building industry as well as the history of architecture and interior design. Historians, designers, railroad enthusiasts, model railroad hobbyists, scholars, and others will find this collection useful.

The glass plate negatives in this collection were produced using the wet collodion process, which was introduced to the United States in 1855 and used into the 1880s. The plates were coated with chemicals, sensitized, exposed and developed, all while the plate was wet. Later, Pullman photographers used the dry collodion process. This process involved using glass plates with a photographic emulsion of silver halides suspended in gelatin. This process had shorter exposure times.

George Pullman assembled a variety of photographers to document his company's work. The photography was primarily used as a record of work, especially for the Operating Department and Manufacturing Department at Pullman, as well as for prospective corporate customers.

Before establishing an in-plant photographic department in 1888, Pullman relied on local photographers. Some of the photographers included John Jex Bardwell, Wylie Dennison, Henry R. Koopman, J. W. Taylor, Thomas S. Johnson, Wylie Dennison, John P. Van Vorst, Clayton Ford Smith, Joseph McAllister, Melvin C. Horn, Ernie Stutkus, and Donald J. O'Barski. Many of the photographers signed the glass plates using their initials. For example, John P. Van Vorst signed his J.P.V.V.

Photography of Pullman activities began in the Detroit Shops (property of the Detroit Car & Manufacturing Co. which was purchased by Pullman in 1873 and operated as the Detroit Shops of Pullman) in the 1870s and expanded to include photographing the town of Pullman, steel car construction, shop accidents, workers, panoramic views, and in some instances, for company publications. In-plant photography was started with Wylie Dennison in 1888. Dennison was the first full-time Pullman photographer, and he created the Pullman Photographic Department. Dennison instituted the practice of recording each photograph, noting the negative number, description of the car, the type of view (typically one interior view and one exterior view) and lot number. All of Dennison's photography was done outside in the daylight.

The negative numbers assigned to the glass plates were identified with a "lot" number. The lot number identified the production order, and in later years, the plan number was added, designating the layout of the car. Photographing one car out of each new lot was the intital practice, but over-time, the Photographic Department began taking six or more views of the interior and exterior as well as end views.

Lot numbers include:

Lots 1 - 500 (Pullman Car Works - Chicago)

Lots 1 - 500 (Detroit Car Works)

Lots 500 plus (can be freight and passenger mixed)

Lots 1000 to 4999 (Pullman passenger equipment)

Lots 5000 to 5999 (Pullman freight equipment)

Lots 5000 + Haskell and Barker (Pullman overlap)

Lots 6000 to 7000+ (Pullman and P-S passenger)

Lots 8000 to 9999 (Pullman freight equipment)

Lots 10000+ (Pullman freight equipment)

Series 1, Original prints, circa 1880-1949, are arranged numerically by Pullman numbers. The original prints begin with number 7343 and end with number 33091. The photographs document Pullman cars, including freight, passenger, private, and street railway/rapid transit. Many of the images depict interior views of the cars, and there are some views of porters and passengers. There is some documentation of the workmen constructing the cars. The prints are primarily 8" by 10" black-and-white and were originally bound into books and backed on linen. The prints were unbound at some time. Many of the original prints bear an embossed stamp "Built by Pullman Car and Manufacturing Corporation Chicago." Some photographs are sepia-tone and there are no negatives for these prints.

Series 2, Copy prints, 1885-1955, consists of prints made from the glass plate negatives by the Smithsonian photographic services office. The copy prints were originally stored in loose binders but were re-housed into folders and arranged numerically according to the original Pullman Company number. The number is typically found in the lower right corner of the image. The copy prints are black-and-white and are either 5" x 7" or 8" x 10".

Series 3, Film negatives, 1917-1955, consists of film negatives (4" x 5" and 8" x 10") that are arranged numerically by Pullman numbers. In some instances, information on the enclosure includes the type of car (e.g. sleeper, freight), the name of the car if applicable, name of railroad company, geographical information, and date(s). In some instances, "repro," or "broken glass" are recorded. For negatives that did not conform to the Pullman numbering system, the container list provides additional information. For example, Haskell and Barker Car Company (Haskell and Barker merged with the Pullman Company in 1922) machine shop views, or Pullman cars in St. Paul, Minnesota are recorded in the collection inventory listing.

Series 4, Glass plate negatives, [circa 1882-1948], is divided into two subseries, Subseries 1, 6" x 8" negatives and Subseries 2, 8" x 10" negatives. The series consists of approximately 13,500 glass plate negatives arranged by Pullman Company negative number. The negatives document primarily Pullman cars, including freight, passenger, private and street railway/rapid transit. Many of the images depict interior and exterior views of the cars and some views of porters and passengers. The interior views include details such as seating, window treatments, lighting fixtures, bathroom fixtures, wood paneling, marquetry work, fabrics, floor treatments, and other furnishings. There is some documentation of the construction of the cars by workmen in the factory.

The negative numbers and lot numbers are etched on the glass plates. Overall the series is in good condition, although there are some broken plates which have been separated. The negatives are not inclusive and some plates are missing, or there are two copies. If plates are missing or additional copies exist, this is noted in the collection inventory. In some instances, plates are labeled 3937 and then 3937-A. This numbering distinguished two different views/angles of the same car.

Many of the envelope enclosures contain the negative number, sometimes preceed by the letter "P" (e.g. P9597), lot number (L4700), and in some instances, text describing the negative. Text typically includes the type of car (sleeper, freight), the name of the car if applicable, name of railroad company, geographical information, and date(s). If a copy print was created from the negative plate, the enclosure is stamped "printed." However, this practice was not consistent. Plates that were not printed are occasionally noted, but not with any consistency.

The 6" by 8" glass plates numbered 82-4130 to 82-4167, represent numbers assigned by the Office of Photographic Services, Smithsonian Institution. Previously labeled "Pullman" on the enclosures, the plates primarily document engines and passenger cars for the New York, New Haven, & Hartford Railroad, 1870-1890 and undated. The plates do not have Pullman negative numbers etched in the lower left or right corners and it is unclear if these plates belong to this collection.

Series 5, Indices, 1990 and undated include bound, typescript indices to the Pullman negatives. Created by the National Museum of American History, Division of Transportation (now known as the Division of Work and Industry), the indices include listings by railroad, private cars, freight cars, street cars and rapid transit, and Pullman negatives. The indices provide the name of the railroad/railway (e.g. Chicago & Alton), type of car (e.g. coal car or box car), number, lot, remarks (e.g. baggage area), year, type of view (e.g. exterior or interior) and frame number (for the laser disc).

One index is a supplemental guide listing sepia tone prints for which no negative exists in our collection. The indices for the negative listings on laser discs one and two are available. However, the actual lasers discs are missing.

References

Horn, Don. "The Pullman Photographers," Railroad Heritage, No. 7, 2003, pp. 5-13.

Arnold, Rus. "This Negative File was a Sleeper." Technical Photography. May 1970, pp. 21-XX.

Pullman State Historic Site, http://www.pullman-museum.org/theCompany/timeline.html (last accessed April 18, 2011)
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into five series.

Series 1, Original prints, 1904-1949

Series 2, Copy prints, 1885-1955

Series 3, Film negatives, undated

Series 4, Glass plate negatives, circa 1882-1948

Series 5, Indices, 1990 and undated
Biographical / Historical:
Recognizing a market for luxurious rail travel, George M. Pullman, who had earlier experimented with sleeping car construction and was wealthy from the provisioning and transporting of Colorado miners in the early 1860s, incorporated the Pullman's Palace Car Company in 1867. By the 1870s his operations were already national and included the operation of sleeping cars under contract with the nation's railroads, the manufacture of cars at the Detroit Works, and the creation of subsidiary firms serving Great Britain and Europe. In the three decades before the turn of the century, the prosperous company grew enormously and included a much heralded model company town adjacent to the new car works at Pullman, Illinois. Acclaim turned to condemnation following the nationwide strike that originated at the Pullman Car Works in 1894. Pullman died in 1897, two years before his company absorbed its last major competitor, the Wagner Palace Car Company, which had been financed by the Vanderbilts.

The Pullman's Palace Car Company entered the twentieth century with a new name, the Pullman Company, and a new president, Robert Todd Lincoln. An extremely profitable virtual monopoly, the Pullman Company began replacing its wood cars with safer all steel bodied models (heavyweights) in its newly segregated manufacturing department and at the same time (1906) came under the regulation of the Interstate Commerce Commission. From 1918 to 1920, the United States Railroad Administration, citing the war emergency, assumed control of the operating arm of the firm, renamed the Pullman Car Lines for the duration of federal control.

The Pullman Company reached its peak during the 1920s, manufacturing new heavyweight cars at a rapid pace. Seeking to expand its freight car production, Pullman merged with the Haskell and Barker Car Company in 1922. Edward F. Carry and his Haskell and Barker associates assumed the presidency and other executive positions in the enlarged Pullman Company. More reorganization took place in 1924, when the Pullman Company Manufacturing Department became a distinct firm, the Pullman Car and Manufacturing Corporation, and in 1927, when a parent or holding company, Pullman Incorporated, was created to oversee the two subsidiary firms. In 1929, following Carry's death, President David A. Crawford engineered the merger of the Pullman Car and Manufacturing Corporation with the Standard Steel Car Company, forming the Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Company.

During the first three decades of the twentieth century Pullman sought to impede the unionization of its workers by offering new benefits, including a pension plan in 1914, a death benefit plan in 1922, and a plan of group insurance in 1929. F. L. Simmons' Industrial Relations Department, created in 1920, also directed the formation of company-sponsored occupationally-based unions under the plan of employee representation. A. Philip Randolph's Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters and other unions would not successfully organize company workers until the New Deal Railway Labor Act of 1934 forbade corporate interference in union matters. The Depression marked the end of Pullman prosperity. Both the number of car orders and sleeping car passengers declined precipitously. The firm laid off car plant and service workers, reduced fares, and introduced such innovations as the single occupancy section in an effort to fill its cars. During this decade the firm built fewer new cars, but it added air conditioning to its existing heavyweights and remodeled many into compartment sleepers.

In 1940, just as orders for lightweight cars were increasing and sleeping car traffic was growing, the United States Department of Justice filed an anti-trust complaint against Pullman Incorporated in the U. S. District Court at Philadelphia (Civil Action No. 994). The government sought to separate the company's sleeping car operations from its manufacturing activities. In 1944 the court concurred, ordering Pullman Incorporated to divest itself of either the Pullman Company (operating) or the Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Company (manufacturing). After three years of negotiations, the Pullman Company was sold to a consortium of fifty-seven railroads for around forty million dollars. Carroll R. Harding was named president of this new Pullman Company. The new Pullman Company started out optimistically in 1947 with good passenger traffic figures, but the years following brought steady and marked decline. Regularly scheduled lines were cancelled; all shops except St. Louis and Chicago were closed; employees were furloughed, and major railroad owners such as the New York Central and Pennsylvania Railroad totally or partially withdrew from service. On January 1, 1969, at the age of 102, the Pullman Company ceased operation, though it maintained a small central office staff to wind up affairs and handle an equal pay-for-equal-work lawsuit (Denver Case) that continued in the courts until 1981.

John H. White (1933-), historian and curator, collected the Pullman photographs in 1969. White was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and graduated with a bachelors of arts in history from Miami University Ohio in 1958. Shortly after receiving his degree, He joined the staff of the Smithsonian Institution as Assistant Curator of the Division of Transportation, Department of Science and Technology, Museum of History and Technology. White later became Associate Curator of the Division, 1961-1966, Curator, 1967-1985, and Senior Historian, 1986-1989. White specialized in land transportation, particularly the history of railroads.

White worked closely with Arthur Detmers Dubin (1923-) to acquire the Pullman photographs for the museum. Dubin was an avid train enthusiast and collector, and he frequently used the Pullman "archives" for his own research on railroads. Dubin was born in Chicago, Illinois and began his architectural education at the University of Michigan in 1941 but his education was interrupted by World War II, and he served with distinction in the United States Army until 1946. After completing his studies in 1949, Dubin joined his father's and uncle's architectural firm, Dubin and Dubin, as a second--eneration architect. The leadership of the firm soon passed to Arthur and his brother, Martin David, and in 1965 they were joined by John Black and in 1966 by John Moutoussamy. Arthur's life--ong interest in trains and transportation and their implications for architecture is evident in transit stations commissions and service on transportation--elated advisory boards (Dubin was a member of the Illinois Railroad Commission), as well as in his writings and personal collections.

In July, 1966, Dubin contacted then Vice President of Public Relations at Pullman-Standard E. Preston Calvert about the history and future of the photographic negative plates. Dubin appealed to Calvert to preserve these materials. Dubin and White were also in contact by correspondence and in June, 1967, White contacted Calvert also, stating that the Chicago Historical Society or Illinois State Historical Society should be offered the plates as a first option. Failing a local Illinois repository accepting the materials, White indicated that the Smithsonian would accept the negatives.

During the spring of 1968, White, working with Dubin and Nora Wilson, editor of the company's publications, coordinated a visit by White to Chicago to examine the photographic negatives at the Pullman Car Works factory in south Chicago. In April 1968, White examined the vast collection of glass plate negatives (approximately 20,000). From April, 1968 to August, 1969, Pullman-Standard and the Smithsonian negotiated acquisition details, including shipping and related costs. In August, 1969, White returned to complete the task of sorting the glass plates, discarding broken plates, and weeding repetitive views. He selected approximately 13,500 glass plates. Views of Pullman towns were donated to the Chicago Historical Society. Dubin appraised the photographic plates and film negatives, presumably on behalf of Pullman-Standard, and estimated the plates to be worth between $54,000 and $67,500 dollars.

References

Historical note courtesy Martha T. Briggs and Cynthia H. Peters, Guide to Pullman Company Archives, The Newberry Library, Chicago, 1995.

Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago Area Architects Oral History Project http://www.artic.edu/aic/resources/resource/734?search_id=1 (last accessed on February 23, 2011)

John H. White papers, 1959-1989, Record Unit 007384, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Washington, D.C.

Telephone conversation of Alison Oswald, archivist, with John H. White, April 14, 2011.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

Pullman Palace Car Company Materials, 1867-1979 (AC0181)

John H. White, Jr. Railroad Reference Collection, 1880s-1990 (AC0523)

Materials in Other Organizations

•Art Institute of Chicago

•Bombardier Corporation

•California State Railroad Museum

•Chicago History Museum

•Arthur Dubin Collection at Lake Forest College

•Illinois Railway Museum

•Indiana University Northwest's Calumet Regional Archives

Pullman-Standard Railroad Car Manufacturing Company Personnel Records—Personnel Record Series CRA 314 This index of employee names was created from the original personnel cards housed at Indiana University Northwest's Calumet Regional Archives from the Indiana locations. Although the records are not complete from the Michigan City plant for the entire period from 1912 to the 1970's, there may be information that will assist researchers with finding key details of a family member. The Hammond Pullman plant was merged with the Haskell Barker Company of Michigan City in 1922.

•Newberry Library, Chicago

The Pullman Company archives at the Newberry Library consists of 2,500 cubic feet of records from the Pullman Company and Pullman heirs. The collection is comprised of business archives of the Pullman Palace Car Company from 1867 and includes records of the entire firm up to the 1924 split into operating (sleeping car operation, service, and repair) and manufacturing companies. From 1924 to 1981 the records chronicle the activities of the operating company only.

•Pennsylvania State Archives

•Pullman State Historic Site

•Pullman Technology (Harvey, Illinois)

•Smithsonian Institution Archives

•South Suburban Genealogical & Historical Society (South Holland, Illinois)
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Pullman-Standard Company, through Nora Wilson, editor of employee publications for the Department of Public Relations and Advertising, on October 8, 1969.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but the negatives are stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Special arrangements required to view original glass plate and film negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Rights:
Copyright held by the Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Freight cars  Search this
Railroads -- Dining-car service  Search this
Roomette car  Search this
Hospital cars  Search this
Dining cars  Search this
Hotel car  Search this
Sleeping cars (Railroads)  Search this
Local transit  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass plate negatives
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film -- 1890-1900
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film -- 1900-1950
Citation:
Pullman Palace Car Company Photographs, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1175
See more items in:
Pullman Palace Car Company Photographs
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep85e54d13d-eb5a-4971-8e39-ecfe85039ed4
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1175
Online Media:

Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
Extent:
112.75 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1897-1965
Scope and Contents:
This series constitutes the administrative correspondence of the BAE, and is the largest series in the collection. It is divided into twenty subseries. The first subseries, Indices and Registers of Letters Sent and Received, is arranged chronologically and then, therein, alphabetically by correspondent. These records provide the date of receipt, name of sender and a brief description of subject discussed. There is a substantial gap in these records from 1902 to 1949.

Bound copies of outgoing letters comprise the second subseries, Letterbooks. Letterbooks are arranged categorically by kind and then, therein, chronologically. Letterbooks in the "general series" include outgoing letters sent chiefly by John Wesley Powell, James C. Pilling, Garrick Mallery, H.C. Rizer, WJ McGee, Frederick W. Hodge and William Henry Holmes. Matters discussed in these letters relate to the preparation and distribution of publications issued by the BAE; formal instructions relating to staff research projects; the maintenance and reproduction of manuscripts and photographs within the BAE collection; the collection and distribution of material objects obtained on BAE field expeditions; the appointment of BAE staff and arrangements made with outside collaborators; requests for appropriations; plans of operation; summaries of expenditures; Indian legislation; laws for the preservation of antiquities; execution of the Antiquities Act; and cooperation with other government agencies. Also discussed are routine housekeeping matters such as the acquisition and return of materials borrowed from the Library of Congress and other institutions or the purchase of supplies and equipment. Lettersbooks comprising letters of "transmittal" discuss the distribution of publications, manuscripts or anthropological information. Letterbooks regarding "requisitions for printing and binding" include letters sent to the Public Printing Office. Letterbooks pertaining to "annual reports" include complete or partial reports addressed to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. They differ slightly in content from those published in the BAE Annual Report series. Letters filed and bound under "library" mostly concern the borrowing or lending of library material, and the purchase of library supplies. "Editorial" letterbooks includes letters to authors, editors and printers, expressing editorial or printing concerns. Letterbooks relating to "accounts" pertain generally to BAE accounts and the conveyance of vouchers.

The letterbooks of William Henry Holmes include letters concerning his charge as Chief Officer of the BAE. Many discuss BAE accounts, plans of operation, staff changes, staff instructions and proposed federal laws for the preservation of antiquities. Others discuss the archaeological work of the BAE, especially the mound surveys carried out by the Division of Mound Explorations. They include replies to requests for information pertaining to Indian mines, quarries and caves, as well as the methods used in excavating these sites. Also included are acknowledgements for the receipt of specimens, photographs and manuscripts. The letterbook of Frank M. Barnett includes letters relating primarily to BAE accounts. Letters in Frank Hamilton Cushing's letterbooks concern, by and large, the collection of specimens in Florida for the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Pennsylvania.

The letterbooks of WJ McGee include letters relating to BAE scholarly work and the Bureau's dealings with the American Geological Society, the Columbia Historical Society, the Joint Commission of the Scientific Societies of Washington (later the Washington Academy of Science), the National Geographic Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Anthropological Association, the Washington Chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America and the International Archaeological Commission. Other letters document McGee's professional relationship with fellow ethnologists and geologists, his personal relationship with William Henry Holmes, and his role as the executor of the estate of Alexander H. and Maria Matilda Evans (parents of Matilda Coxe Stevenson). Others document his position as vice president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and his role as the American representative to the preliminary conferences responsible for forming the International Archaeological Commission. Discussed elsewhere is the preparation and distribution of McGee's own publications, his involvement in a series of public lectures hosted by the Smithsonian Institution, and his observances on the death of John Wesley Powell. Of particular interest is a letter dated July 10, 1896 concerning charges of fraud brought against Frank Hamilton Cushing and another dated November 18, 1902 describing John Wesley Powell's last years as a scholar and administrator of the BAE. McGee's letterbooks also include typescript articles, lectures and similar works. Worthy of note is an article by Matilda Coxe Stevenson relating to a Zuni Scalp ceremony (November 27, 1894). Other articles include, "Primitive Trephining Illustrated by the Munis Peruvian Collection" (January 26, 1894), "The Antiquity of Man in America" (April 13, 1894), "The Expedition to Seriland" (February 14, 1896), "The Papago Time Concept" (July 22, 1896), "A Proposed American Anthropologic Association" (June 21, 1902), "Powell as Anthropologist" (April 11, 1902) and "Progress toward an International Archaeolgic and Ethnologic Commission".

The third subseries, Letters Received 1878, relates exclusively to the work of the US Geographical and Geological Survey of the Rocky Mountain Region. The series is arranged in no particular order. The fourth subseries, Letters Received 1879-1887, is arranged alphabetically by correspondent or institution. Attached to many of these letters are official copies of BAE outgoing replies. Letters deserving special attention include Alexander Graham Bell's letter and chart pertaining to Powell's phonetic alphabet; Franz Boas' rationale and plan for publishing material relating to Northwest Coast Indians; Cushing's sketch map of ruins and caves in the vicinities of San Juan and Wingate, Arizona; Dorsey's wordlist of "Shasti or Klamath"; Gatschet's 1884 "Map of Creek Country in the Eighteenth Century: Names and Sites Restored from the Contemporaneous Documents"; Gatschet's "Affinities between Tehwa and Shoshonian Dialects"; and Cyrus Thomas' report regarding the Traona manuscript.

The fifth subseries, Letters Received 1888-1906, is arranged alphabetically by correspondent or institution. Attached to many of these letters are official copies of BAE outgoing replies. Letters deserving special mention include Dinwiddie's explanation of the fraud charges brought against Frank Hamilton Cushing; Washington Matthews' discussion of the pueblo names in Chaco Canyon; Shelley's transcription of Quanah Parker's statements regarding James Mooney; Mooney's letters concerning his Arapaho photographs; Franz Boas' list of Chinook place names; Abbe's letter concerning the origin of the term "Chinook winds"; and Ashenhurst's letter including a copy of "The Lord's Prayer in Millipama (Mith-hhlama, Tenino).

The sixth and seventh subseries, Letters Received 1907 and Letters Received 1908, are arranged alphabetically by correspondent or institution. Attached to many of these letters are official copies of BAE outgoing replies. Material largely concerns special projects being conducted by the BAE at the time, including the study of various aboriginal languages spoken throughout Indiana, Fewkes' work at Casa Grande, and Frachtenberg's work among the Tutelo. Letters regarding the preparation of various BAE publications, such as the second volume of Hodge's Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico, are also included in these subseries.

The eighth and ninth subseries, Letters Received 1909-1949 and Letters Received 1950-1965, are arranged alphabetically by correspondent or institution with the exception of those letters filed by subject or project. Letters received include requests for information regarding Native American languages, customs, relics or lands surveyed by the BAE. Inquiries were received from museum curators, geologists, military officials, professional anthropologists, students and members of the general public. The majority of outgoing letters were composed by BAE administrative staff fielding these queries; however, some were composed by members of the BAE research staff themselves. Other incoming letters concern personnel matters; research proposals; the BAE budget; the acquisition or distribution of specimens, manuscripts and photographs; legislation affecting BAE activities; and BAE publications. Also found among these letters are official reports concerning the progress of field work being carried out by BAE staff and collaborators. Noteworthy material found among Letters Received 1909-1949, include Boas' "Memorandum on the Changes of the Human Body under the Influences of American Life"; Densmore's "Native Songs of Two Hybrid Ceremonies among the American Indians"; Fenton's photographs taken while on the Tonawanda Reservation; John Peabody Harrington's photographs of his informants; Thomas M. Galey's print of the Osage Indian Non-pe-wa-the; and Kelsey's photograph of Kuanui of the Palolo Valley, Oahu, Hawaii; and the Latin American Expedition's photographs of the Tule. Material deserving special mention in Letters Received 1950-1965 is William S. Laughlin's preliminary report of the archaeological work being conducted on the Aleutian Islands during the summer of 1952; William Reeder's report on the biological investigations carried out on the Kodiak Islands; and Alice Larde de Venturino's "Astonishing Stone Inscriptions of North Chile".

The tenth and eleventh subseries, Letters Sent, Photocopies and Transcripts 1879-1902 and Letters Received, Photocopies and Transcripts 1879-1906, are arranged in no particular order. Reasons behind the duplication or transcription of these letters are unknown. The twelfth subseries, Letters Received, Temporary Correspondence 1949 to 1965, follows two ordering schemes: material dating from 1949 to 1952 is arranged alphabetically by correspondent or institution and material dating from 1953 to 1965 is arranged chronologically. Letters in this subseries appear to have been culled from two separate accumulations of correspondence (one maintained between 1949 and 1952; the other between 1953 and 1965), and unified as a sampling of the various types of requests that were received by the Bureau during this period.

The remaining eight subseries comprise the correspondence of specific individuals, institutions or organizations that worked directly or indirectly with the BAE. They are arranged chronologically and then, therein, alphabetically. The decision to isolate this correspondence from the larger, chronologically ordered unit of BAE correspondence (described above) is unknown. Also unknown is when the separation occurred; it may have occurred at the archival processing level or earlier at the BAE administrative level. It should be noted that the separation process was not comprehensive and, thus, BAE correspondence with these individuals, institutions and organizations may also be found elsewhere in the series.
Arrangement:
Subseries: Indices and Registers of Letters Sent and Received. Subseries: Letterbooks Subseries: Letters Received 1878 Subseries: Letters Received 1879-1887 Subseries: Letters Received 1888-1906 Subseries: Letters Received 1907 Subseries: Letters Received 1908 Subseries: Letters Received 1909-1949 Subseries: Letters Received 1950-1965 Subseries: Letters Sent, Photocopies and Transcripts 1879-1902 Subseries: Letters Received, Photocopies and Transcripts 1879-1906 Subseries: Letters Received, Temporary Correspondence 1949 to 1965 Subseries: Letters Received, S. F. Baird, 1879-1887 Subseries: Letters Received, Franz Boas, 1889-1947 Subseries: Letters Received, Matilda Coxe Stevenson, 1890-1918 Subseries: Letters Received, Smithsonian Institution, 1889-1907 Subseries: Letters Received, Matthew Stirling 1925-1950 Subseries: Letters Received, US Government Agencies 1888-1908 Subseries: Letters Received, US Government Agencies 1909-1950 Subseries: Letters Received, US National Museum Smithsonian Institution 1889-1909 Subseries: Letters Received, Charles D. Walcott 1907-1909
Collection Restrictions:
The Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology are open for research.

Access to the Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.XXXX.0155, Series 1
See more items in:
Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3f9ffe440-6983-4444-b64f-177e18139cb9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-xxxx-0155-ref13

Curators' Annual Reports

Extent:
49 cu. ft. (98 document boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
1881-1964
Descriptive Entry:
The administration of the United States National Museum required curators to submit regular reports on the activities of the departments, divisions, and sections. Prior to about 1900 these reports were often made monthly and semiannually as well as annually. The reports were traditionally submitted to the Director of the National Museum to be used in preparing the published Annual Report of the United States National Museum. The individual reports, however, were not reproduced in their entirety in the published Annual Report and generally contain more information than is to be found in the published version.

Reports were stored by the Office of Correspondence and Reports (later known as the Office of Correspondence and Documents), and then by the Office of the Registrar.

Includes reports submitted to the Director of the United States National Museum by curators and administrators.
Topic:
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 158, United States National Museum, Curators' Annual Reports
Identifier:
Record Unit 158
See more items in:
Curators' Annual Reports
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0158
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Records

Extent:
22.74 cu. ft. (1 record storage box) (40 document boxes) (3 tall document boxes) (1 oversize folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scientific illustrations
Manuscripts
Maps
Place:
Texas
Mexico
Date:
1886-1928 and undated
Descriptive Entry:
These papers include official records that document the history of the USNH while Joseph Nelson Rose was assistant botanist at the United States Department of Agriculture (1888-1896), assistant and associate curator, USNH, United States National Museum (1896-1911), and the Division of Plants, USNM (1917-1928); also personal and official papers documenting Rose's professional career, including incoming and occasional loose outgoing correspondence after 1910 (watermarks on 1910 and 1911 outgoing loose correspondence along with virtually nonexistent outgoing letterpress correspondence after 1909 are a result of water damage to the records) with leading foreign and United States botanists; colleagues; herbarium and nursery curators; florists; agrostologists; field agents; amateur plant collectors; United States Department of Agriculture administrative officers; Smithsonian Institution administrative officers; agricultural experiment stations; editors; and friends. Correspondence regards examination, identification, and reports on botanical specimens; identification of specimens for publications; transfer of specimens to the USNH; exchange of specimens; requests to Rose regarding information on the flora of Texas and Mexico; requests for bulbs, seeds, and plants; purchasing of cacti collections; research and collecting expeditions; authorization for expeditions; nomenclature; illustrations for journals; collaboration over collecting specimens and publishing; requests for jobs; requests to recommend colleagues to systematize cultivated plants; proposals for a building to house the USNH in order to expand the collection; meetings of scientific societies; requests for Who's Who autobiographical information; outgoing letterpress correspondence (1894-1909, 1911-1912) regarding the above; also manuscripts and correspondence pertaining to the joint Cactaceae project with Nathaniel Lord Britton; manuscripts and correspondence about the joint project with John Donnell Smith regarding Hauyeae; reviews; and occasional newspaper clippings pertaining to botanists whose letters are located in the correspondence folders.
Historical Note:
Joseph Nelson Rose, botanist, was born on a farm near Liberty, Indiana, on January 11, 1862. In 1881 he entered Wabash College, graduating with an A.B. in 1885. Rose stayed on at Wabash College as its first postgraduate student, receiving his A.M. in 1887 and his Ph.D. in 1889. During his last two years he acted as an assistant in botany under John M. Coulter, who was to have an influence on his later career.

Rose was appointed as an assistant botanist in the United States Department of Agriculture under George Vasey, working in the United States National Herbarium (USNH), in August 1888. (For a history of the USNH and George Vasey, see the description for the Hunt Institute collection 105.)

When the USNH was moved back to the Smithsonian in 1896, Rose transferred to the United States National Museum as an assistant curator, Division of Plants. In 1905 he was made associate curator.

Though Frederick Vernon Coville was honorary curator, USNH and the Division of Plants, in the United States National Museum (while at the same time chief botanist of the Plant Industry, USDA), it appears that Rose was directly in charge of the National Herbarium. Outgoing letterpress correspondence within these records contains copies of the USNH report for the Smithsonian Annual Report being transmitted by Coville through Rose and Rose's report on the Division of Plants for the Annual Report being sent to Coville. At times, Rose signed outgoing correspondence over the title, acting curator. Coville remained Rose's supervisor, however, with correspondence regarding Rose's collecting activities being transmitted between Smithsonian administrative officers and Coville.

In 1912, Rose transferred from the United States National Museum (USNM) to the Carnegie Institution of Washington as a research associate in order to prepare a monograph with Nathaniel Lord Britton on Cactaceae of the world. This work was jointly supported by the Carnegie Institution, the New York Botanical Garden, and the USDA. Rose was relieved of his administrative duties with the Smithsonian. Nonetheless, he retained an office in the Smithsonian and was allowed the use of Smithsonian franking privileges for all correspondence regarding his project, while retaining the title of custodian of "Cactaceae, Crassulaceae, and Miscellaneous Mexican Collections" in the National Herbarium.

Rose officially returned to the Smithsonian as associate curator, Division of Plants, in 1917, retaining that position until his death on May 4, 1928.

Rose's collecting activities and botanical studies began with the flora, fungi, and pine of Indiana and the Umbelliferae of North America. He was assigned the Mexican collections gathered by Edward Palmer while assistant botanist at the USDA. This led to 20 years of study of the flora of Mexico and numerous publications, including his "Studies of Mexican and Central America Plants," published in Contributions from the United States National Herbarium (1897-1911). His important study on Cactaceae of the world with Nathaniel Lord Britton resulted in the publication of four volumes titled The Cactaceae (1919-1923). Overall, Rose published almost 200 articles and monographs by himself and in collaboration with other botanists. Besides his own collecting explorations, Rose was instrumental in bringing to the Smithsonian one of its most important gifts, the large private herbarium and botanical library belonging to John Donnell Smith of Baltimore.

In reward for his botanical investigations and publications, Rose received an LL.D. from Wabash College in 1925. His remarks made during the ceremonies are included in this collection.
Topic:
Cactus  Search this
Botanists  Search this
Botany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scientific illustrations
Manuscripts
Maps
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 221, United States National Museum, Division of Plants, Records
Identifier:
Record Unit 221
See more items in:
Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0221

Minutes

Extent:
8.70 cu. ft. (9 document boxes) (7 12x17 boxes) (1 16x20 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
1846-1995
Descriptive Entry:
These records are the official minutes of the Board. They are compiled at the direction of the Secretary of the Smithsonian, who is also secretary to the Board, after approval by the Regents' Executive Committee and by the Regents themselves. The minutes are edited, not a verbatim account of proceedings. For reasons unknown, there are no manuscript minutes for the period from 1857 through 1890; and researchers must rely on printed minutes published in the Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution instead. Minutes are transferred regularly from the Secretary's Office to the Archives. Minutes less than 15 years old are closed to researchers. Indexes exist for the period from 1907 to 1946 and can be useful.
Historical Note:
The Smithsonian Institution was created by authority of an Act of Congress approved August 10, 1846. The Act entrusted direction of the Smithsonian to a body called the Establishment, composed of the President; the Vice President; the Chief Justice of the United States; the secretaries of State, War, Navy, Interior, and Agriculture; the Attorney General; and the Postmaster General. In fact, however, the Establishment last met in 1877, and control of the Smithsonian has always been exercised by its Board of Regents. The membership of the Regents consists of the Vice President and the Chief Justice of the United States; three members each of the Senate and House of Representatives; two citizens of the District of Columbia; and seven citizens of the several states, no two from the same state. (Prior to 1970 the category of Citizen Regents not residents of Washington consisted of four members). By custom the Chief Justice is Chancellor. The office was at first held by the Vice President. However, when Millard Fillmore succeeded to the presidency on the death of Zachary Taylor in 1851, Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney was chosen in his stead. The office has always been filled by the Chief Justice since that time.

The Regents of the Smithsonian have included distinguished Americans from many walks of life. Ex officio members (Vice President) have been: Spiro T. Agnew, Chester A. Arthur, Allen W. Barkley, John C. Breckenridge, George Bush, Schuyler Colfax, Calvin Coolidge, Charles Curtis, George M. Dallas, Charles G. Dawes, Charles W. Fairbanks, Millard Fillmore, Gerald R. Ford, John N. Garner, Hannibal Hamlin, Thomas A. Hendricks, Garret A. Hobart, Hubert H. Humphrey, Andrew Johnson, Lyndon B. Johnson, William R. King, Thomas R. Marshall, Walter F. Mondale, Levi P. Morton, Richard M. Nixon, Nelson A. Rockefeller, Theodore Roosevelt, James S. Sherman, Adlai E. Stevenson, Harry S. Truman, Henry A. Wallace, William A. Wheeler, Henry Wilson.

Ex officio members (Chief Justice) have been: Roger B. Taney, Salmon P. Chase, Nathan Clifford, Morrison R. Waite, Samuel F. Miller, Melville W. Fuller, Edward D. White, William Howard Taft, Charles Evans Hughes, Harlan F. Stone, Fred M. Vinson, Earl Warren, Warren E. Burger.

Regents on the part of the Senate have been: Clinton P. Anderson, Newton Booth, Sidney Breese, Lewis Cass, Robert Milledge Charlton, Bennet Champ Clark, Francis M. Cockrell, Shelby Moore Cullom, Garrett Davis, Jefferson Davis, George Franklin Edmunds, George Evans, Edwin J. Garn, Walter F. George, Barry Goldwater, George Gray, Hannibal Hamlin, Nathaniel Peter Hill, George Frisbie Hoar, Henry French Hollis, Henry M. Jackson, William Lindsay, Henry Cabot Lodge, Medill McCormick, James Murray Mason, Samuel Bell Maxey, Robert B. Morgan, Frank E. Moss, Claiborne Pell, George Wharton Pepper, David A. Reed, Leverett Saltonstall, Hugh Scott, Alexander H. Smith, Robert A. Taft, Lyman Trumbull, Wallace H. White, Jr., Robert Enoch Withers.

Regents on the part of the House of Representatives have included: Edward P. Boland, Frank T. Bow, William Campbell Breckenridge, Overton Brooks, Benjamin Butterworth, Clarence Cannon, Lucius Cartrell, Hiester Clymer, William Colcock, William P. Cole, Jr., Maurice Connolly, Silvio O. Conte, Edward E. Cox, Edward H. Crump, John Dalzell, Nathaniel Deering, Hugh A. Dinsmore, William English, John Farnsworth, Scott Ferris, Graham Fitch, James Garfield, Charles L. Gifford, T. Alan Goldsborough, Frank L. Greene, Gerry Hazleton, Benjamin Hill, Henry Hilliard, Ebenezer Hoar, William Hough, William M. Howard, Albert Johnson, Leroy Johnson, Joseph Johnston, Michael Kirwan, James T. Lloyd, Robert Luce, Robert McClelland, Samuel K. McConnell, Jr., George H. Mahon, George McCrary, Edward McPherson, James R. Mann, George Perkins Marsh, Norman Y. Mineta, A. J. Monteague, R. Walton Moore, Walter H. Newton, Robert Dale Owen, James Patterson, William Phelps, Luke Poland, John Van Schaick Lansing Pruyn, B. Carroll Reece, Ernest W. Roberts, Otho Robards Singleton, Frank Thompson, Jr., John M. Vorys, Hiram Warner, Joseph Wheeler.

Citizen Regents have been: David C. Acheson, Louis Agassiz, James B. Angell, Anne L. Armstrong, William Backhouse Astor, J. Paul Austin, Alexander Dallas Bache, George Edmund Badger, George Bancroft, Alexander Graham Bell, James Gabriel Berrett, John McPherson Berrien, Robert W. Bingham, Sayles Jenks Bowen, William G. Bowen, Robert S. Brookings, John Nicholas Brown, William A. M. Burden, Vannevar Bush, Charles F. Choate, Jr., Rufus Choate, Arthur H. Compton, Henry David Cooke, Henry Coppee, Samuel Sullivan Cox, Edward H. Crump, James Dwight Dana, Harvey N. Davis, William Lewis Dayton, Everette Lee Degolyer, Richard Delafield, Frederic A. Delano, Charles Devens, Matthew Gault Emery, Cornelius Conway Felton, Robert V. Fleming, Murray Gell-Mann, Robert F. Goheen, Asa Gray, George Gray, Crawford Hallock Greenwalt, Nancy Hanks, Caryl Parker Haskins, Gideon Hawley, John B. Henderson, John B. Henderson, Jr., A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., Gardner Greene Hubbard, Charles Evans Hughes, Carlisle H. Humelsine, Jerome C. Hunsaker, William Preston Johnston, Irwin B. Laughlin, Walter Lenox, Augustus P. Loring, John Maclean, William Beans Magruder, John Walker Maury, Montgomery Cunningham Meigs, John C. Merriam, R. Walton Moore, Roland S. Morris, Dwight W. Morrow, Richard Olney, Peter Parker, Noah Porter, William Campbell Preston, Owen Josephus Roberts, Richard Rush, William Winston Seaton, Alexander Roby Shepherd, William Tecumseh Sherman, Otho Robards Singleton, Joseph Gilbert Totten, John Thomas Towers, Frederic C. Walcott, Richard Wallach, Thomas J. Watson, Jr., James E. Webb, James Clarke Welling, Andrew Dickson White, Henry White, Theodore Dwight Woolsey.
Topic:
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Museum trustees  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 1, Smithsonian Institution, Board of Regents, Minutes
Identifier:
Record Unit 1
See more items in:
Minutes
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0001
3 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
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Oral history interview with Larry Aldrich, 1972 April 25-June 10

Interviewee:
Aldrich, Larry, 1906-2001  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul, 1933-1997  Search this
Subject:
Antonakos, Stephen  Search this
Baker, Richard Brown  Search this
Barr, Alfred H., Jr.  Search this
Castelli, Leo  Search this
Hartigan, Grace  Search this
Hopkins, Budd  Search this
Indiana, Robert  Search this
Johns, Jasper  Search this
Lieberman, William Slattery  Search this
Miller, Dorothy Canning  Search this
Myers, John Bernard  Search this
Rauschenberg, Robert  Search this
Smithson, Robert  Search this
Stella, Frank  Search this
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Larry Aldrich, 1972 April 25-June 10. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12596
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)216586
AAA_collcode_aldric72
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_216586
Online Media:

Donald H. Sultner-Welles Collection

Collector:
Sultner-Welles, Donald H. (Sultner, Donald Harvey), 1914-1981  Search this
Printer:
Janus, Allan  Search this
Interviewee:
Hanfstaengl, Erna  Search this
Names:
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra  Search this
Chautauqua Institute  Search this
Colonial Williamsburg Foundation  Search this
Holland-America Cruises  Search this
Hitler, Adolf, 1889-1945  Search this
Extent:
87.6 Cubic feet (331 boxes, 2 map-folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Passports
Photographs
Travelogs
Receipts
Ephemera
Files
Filmstrips
Lecture notes
Personal papers
Silver-dye bleach process
Contracts
Notebooks
Prints
Press releases
Ships' passenger lists
Project files
Magnetic tapes
Posters
Postcards
Vertical files
Dye destruction process
Travel diaries
Letters (correspondence)
Professional papers
Bank statements
Correspondence
Audiotapes
Series 12.
Clippings
Card files
Concert programs
Dye destruction photoprints
Biography files
Awards
Business records
Birthday cards
Date:
circa 1790-1981
bulk 1945-1980
Scope and Contents:
This collection is primarily the work of one individual, Donald Harvey Sultner, known professionally as Donald Sultner-Welles (1914-1981). The collection forms a written and visual record of Sultner's family, life, and career from 1913-1980. Its major strength is Sultner's photographic documentation of the world during his travels, ca. 1950-1980. Work by other photographers and artists, correspondence, greeting cards, and contemporary memorabilia and ephemera are included, along with fewer than fifty examples of earlier materials, ca. 1790-1900, collected by Sultner.

The entire collection reflects Sultner's lifework and interests. Housed in boxes the collection is organized into eleven series: Personal Papers; Professional Papers; Lecture Materials; Biographical Materials; Transparencies; Photoprints; Photonegatives; Prints, Drawings, Mixed Media; Audio Tapes; Miscellaneous; and Steve Eyster Addenda. The arrangement within each series is based as closely as possi-ble on Sultner's own organization of the materials. However, in several instances similar materials were found separated and have been placed together. In addition, obvious filing mistakes and spelling errors have been corrected. The spelling of geographic place names is based on Official Standard Names prepared by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names, Office of Geography, U.S. Department of the Interior. Not all names given by Sultner were found in the gazetteers, so there may be errors.

The bulk of the collection consists of 2-1/4-inch by 2-1/4-inch color transparencies (Series 5). However, the manuscript materials (Series 1-4) provide a detailed complement to the transparencies. For example, from the mid-1950s until the late 1970s, Sultner kept a travel diary (Se-ries 1). Written on the backs of postcards, this stream-of-consciousness journal reflects not only his daily trips, but his impressions of the countries and thoughts on his photography. A juxtaposition of cards with images is especially useful in understanding what Sultner photographed as well as why and how he photographed it. Sultner's professional corre-spondence (Series 2) documents the various types of groups before which he performed and equipment manufacturers dealt with for cameras, projectors, and so on. Notes, drafts, and final lectures (Series 3) present the performance side of Sultner. This material, when viewed with tapes of concerts and slides, begins to recreate the photo-concert as Sultner presented it. Scrapbooks (Series 4), kept by Sultner from the 1940s to the 1980s, present Sultner's life and career in chronological fashion.

The transparency portion of the collection (Series 5), containing over 87,000 images, is especially rich because of its documentation of the countries of the world. People are seen at their daily tasks, such as washing clothes, marketing, shopping, and eating. Cities are documented as they changed over the years. Two areas in particular will be of spe-cial interest to European and Asian researchers. The first is Sultner's USIS Asian tour in 1959. He visited Japan, Java, India, Korea, the Phil-ippines, Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam. The serene, prewar cities and coun-tryside of Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam evince nothing of the devastation to come in the 1960a and 70s.

The second area of interest is Sultner's passion for documenting archi-tecture. As a guest of the German government in 1954, Sultner documented the devastation of World War II and photographed both the reconstruction of bombed buildings and the construction of buildings reflecting "new" postwar architectural styles. In addition to photographing post-WW II styles, throughout his career Sultner documented Palladian, baroque and Rococo architecture. This interest manifested itself in several of his lectures.

A third subject area of interest to Sultner was gardens. Among his first lectures following his USIS tour was "Gardens of the World." Sultner de-veloped this theme into an ongoing commitment to ecology, culminating in a filmstrip, "The Time is Now" (Series 10), prepared for the Hudson River Conservation Society in the 1960s. Carl Carmer, a noted author, wrote the text for the filmstrip. Sultner's taped interviews, lectures, and program music (Series 9) complement the transparencies. During his USIS-sponsored Asian tour in 1959, Sultner recorded impressions of his trip on tape. Interviews with people living in the countries he visited, radio interviews, and his own personal reflections are included. Of particular interest are his "No Harm Asking" interviews in Manila (tape #2), his interview of two French hotel managers in Saigon discussing post-French control conditions (tape #9), and--perhaps the most unusual--his discussion with Erna Hanfstaengl about her personal relationship with Adolf Hitler (tape #107). Scripts for lectures (Series 3) round out the documentation of Sultner's profes-sional work.

Because of the arrangement of the transparencies, it is necessary to check several areas for the same subject. For example, Vietnam images are in the "World" section alphabetically under Vietnam (box 81). Sult-ner also lectured on Vietnam, so there are Vietnamese images in the "framed subjects" (Boxes 137-138). Another example, perhaps more compli-cated, but more common to Sultner, was his distinguishing between images of unidentified "People" and identified "Portraits." Transparency stud ies of human beings will be found under the subseries "People." "Subjects --Portraits," various countries in the subseries "World," and "Lectures." There are also individuals in the black-and-white photoprints (Series 6), and photonegatives (Series 8). The painter and print-maker Charles Shee-ler appears in a number of locations, as does tenor Roland Hayes. Another area of complexity with regard to people concerns the transparencies and negatives. Sultner interfiled his transparencies and negatives of iden-tified individuals. For appropriate storage, these two different formats have been arranged in separate series. Therefore, instead of container lists for the two series, there is a combined alphabetical index to both (pp. 166-206).

Of tangential interest are the photoprints (Series 6), etchings, wood-cuts, and other prints (Series 8) collected by Sultner. One particular subseries of interest contains photographs presented to Sultner by Asian photographers during his 1959 tour. Over 45 images were given to Sultner and represent the standards of camera-club photography in the 1950s. Thesecond subseries consists of over 25 prints by the Italian-American art-ist Luigi Lucioni (1900- ). For further information on this artist,see The Etchings of Luigi Lucioni, -A Catalogue Raisonne', by Stuart P.Embury (Washington, 1984). Lucioni also painted Sultner's portrait in1952 and the "People" section of the transparencies contains a number of images of Lucioni at work. Another significant category is the Japanese prints, including two by a major nineteenth-century artist, Ando Hiro-shige (1797-1858).
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into eleven series.

Series 1: Personal Papers, 1923-1981

Series 2: Professional Papers, 1954-1980

Series 3: Lecture Materials, 1952-1980

Series 4: Biographical Materials, 1954-1980

Series 5: Transparencies, 1947-1980

Series 6: Photoprints, 1913-ca. 1980

Series 7: Photonegatives, 1929-1981

Series 8: Prints, Drawings, Mixed Media, ca. 1790-1979

Series 9: Audio Tapes, 1947-1980

Series 10: Miscellaneous, 1947-1980

Series 11: Steve Eyster Addenda, 1937-1980
Biographical / Historical:
Donald Harvey Sultner was bom in York, Pennsylvania, on April 13, 1914, the son of Lillian May Arnold Sultner and Harvey A. Sultner. In 1923 Sultner attended the Lewis Institute in Detroit, Michigan, to overcome a speech impediment. He entered the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1932 and graduated in 1936. Sultner studied merchandising and sang in the glee club, then under the direction of composer Harl MacDonald. Sultner, a baritone, continued his interest in music and studied voice with Reinald Werrenrath and with Florence Benedict and Bruce Benjamin in New York City. In the late 1940s and early 1950s he appeared in concert with accompanists at schools, clubs, and resort hotels along the East Coast. It appears that photography was always an important part of Sultner's life. Using a small format (120) camera, he recorded his vacation travels around the United States and Canada, parties, and his family. While living in New York, Sultner continued photographing friends and family and began photographing the famous people he encountered on his concert tours. In the early 1950s he began taking 2-1/4-inch by 2-1/4-inch color transparencies (slides) of landscapes and architecture as he traveled giving concerts.

Sultner, who had taken the stage name of "Sultner-Welles," began what was to be his lifework as a professional "photo-lecturer" in 1952. He illustrated his talks on nature, art, architecture, and the environment with his color slides. In 1954 Sultner toured West Germany as a guest of the Bonn government, and in 1959 he lectured in Asia under the auspices of the U.S. State Department. He was dubbed the "camera ambassador." Constantly adding new material to his collection of slides, Sultner traveled extensively throughout the United States, speaking before garden clubs, cultural organi-zations, and schools. He also appeared aboard various ships of the Holland-America line during a number of cruises abroad.

Sultner had established his performance style by the early 1960s. He expanded his lectures to include a combination of art, words, and music. The expanded presentation resulted in the "photo-concert," a unique synthesis of light and sound that Sultner frequently per-formed with a symphony orchestra. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra commissioned "Concertino for Camera and Orchestra" by Eric Knight with Sultner in mind. The world premiere was in Baltimore in March 1979. While he spoke on many art, garden, and architectural topics, Sultner specialized in subjects relating to the baroque and rococo periods and Palladian architecture.

Sultner died of cancer in York, Pennsylvania, on March 25, 1981, at the age of 67.

1914 -- April 13, born York, Pennsylvania.

1929 -- In Detroit at Lewis Institute to overcome a speech impediment.

1932 -- To University of Pennsylvania.

1935 -- Summer trip to Roanoke (VA), Picketts, Hershey (PA); fall trip to New England for fraternity (AXP) convention.

1936 -- Spring glee club trip; graduated from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania; summer trips to Newport News (VA), northern trip to Canada, Picketts (PA).

1937 -- Fall trip to Williamsburg (VA), Duke University (NC); Sultner family begins building "Glen Hill" (Dover, PA).

1938 -- Summer at home, and Picketts (PA), Camp Pratt.

1939 -- Spring trip to Washington, D.C.; September trip to The Homestead (WV), Hot Springs (WV), Virginia; Lake Mohonk (NY).

1940 -- Summer trip to New Orleans, Blowing Rock (NC); winter trip to Skytop Club (NY); fall trip to Atlantic City (NJ), Philadelphia (PA), Annapolis (MD).

1941 -- Winter 1941-42 appearance in "Hit the Deck." Lake Mohonk (NY) with Ted Walstrum (Sept. 22-23); Skytop Club (NY) (February); summer trip to Canada, Lake Chazy (NY) (Aug. 17-23).

1942 -- Spring in Atlantic City (NJ); summer to Buck Hill Falls, Lakes Chazy and Mohonk.

1943 -- Summer trip to Mohonk (NY).

1944 -- Summer: To Toronto (Ontario), Muskoka Lake, Bigwin Island, Montreal (Quebec), Mohonk (NY).

1945 -- Summer: To Winnepesauke (ME), Woodstock (NY), Ogunquit (ME), Bridgeport (CT).

1946 -- To Mohonk (NY), Ogunquit (ME), Old Saybrook (CT), Nantucket (RI).

1947 -- Singing tour of Canada and New England; winter-spring tour to Georgia and Florida.

1948 -- To Florida and Nassau, Feb.-Mar., Vermont, July-Aug.; Nassau-Havana-Miami-Bermuda, October.

1949 -- Singing tour of North and South Carolina.

1950 -- Summer trip to South.

1951 -- To District of Columbia, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, [New Jersey?], New York, Vermont.

1952 -- January 9: first public photo-concert, Pennsylvania Academy of the Arts, Philadelphia; trips to Connecticut, Florida, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Vermont.

1953 -- To Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Vermont.

1954 -- Guest of German government for a study tour in the fall. To District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Virginia.

1955 -- To Holland; Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Vermont, Virginia.

1956 -- To California, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia.

1957 -- Holland-America Cruise to Germany, Austria, Italy. To Connecticut, Illinois, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Virginia.

1958 -- Holland-America Cruises to Germany, Austria, Holland, Italy, Switzerland. To Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Minnesota., Missouri, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Vermont, Wisconsin.

1959 -- United States Information Service (USIS)-sponsored tour of Asia: Burma, Cambodia, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Laos, Malaya, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, Vietnam. Also visited Austria, Czechoslovakia, Germany, Greece, Iran, Italy, Spain; Alaska, California, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania.

1960 -- Holland-America Cruise to Austria, Belgium, Caribbean, France, Germany, Holland, Italy, Morocco. To Arizona, California, Florida, Indiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin.

1961 -- To Canada, France, Germany, Switzerland; Alabama, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode.Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin.

1962 -- Portfolio, "Autumn in Vermont," with introduction by Carl Carmer, published in Autumn issue of Vermont Life. Holland-America Cruise to Denmark, England, France, Germany, Holland, Italy, Sweden. To Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Vermont, Virginia.

1963 -- Holland-America Cruise to Caribbean, Canada, Sweden, Thailand. To Alabama, California, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota Mississippi, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, N;w York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, Washington.

1964 -- Holland-America Cruise to Germany, Canada, England, Holland, Wales. To Delaware, District of Columbia, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia.

1965 -- Holland-America Cruise to Austria, Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, Holland, Portugal, Wales. To Arkansas, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Indiana, Kentucky, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Virginia.

1966 -- Holland-America Cruise to Caribbean, Germany, France, Holland, Italy, Portugal, Switzerland. To New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia.

1967 -- Holland-America Cruise to Caribbean, Austria, Denmark, England, Germany, Holland, Italy, Portugal, Sweden, Wales. To Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia.

1968 -- To Germany; Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Virginia.

1969 -- To England, France, Germany, Holland, Switzerland; Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia.

1970 -- Holland-America Cruise to Caribbean, Denmark, Iceland, Sweden. To Alabama, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Vermont, Virginia.

1971 -- Holland-America Cruise to Caribbean, Canada, Denmark, Italy, Portugal, Sweden. To Alabama, Georgia, Massachusetts, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania.

1972 -- Holland-America Cruise to Asia, Pacific, Caribbean, Africa, Austria, Italy, Japan, Thailand, Turkey. To California, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia.

1973 -- Holland-America Cruise to Austria, Denmark, Germany, Holland, Iceland, Sweden. To California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Vermont.

1974 -- To Germany, Switzerland; California, Illinois, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia.

1975 -- To Austria; California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia.

1976 -- To Canada; Connecticut, District of Columbia, Illinois, Iowa, Massachusetts, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Utah.

1977 -- To Canada, Germany; New York, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Virginia.

1978 -- To Scotland; Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina.

1979 -- To England; Florida.

1980 -- To Florida.

1981 -- March 25: Sultner dies of cancer, York, Pennsylania.
Introduction:
The Donald H. Sultner-Welles Collection, ca. 1790-1981, came to the National Museum of American History in 1982 from the estate of Mr. Sultner. The collection was created by Sultner over his adult life and represents one of the most extensive collections of color transparencies created by one individual and held in a public repository. Sultner's emphasis was on world culture. He took the majority of his photographs in the eastern United States, western Europe, and Asia. Gardens, architecture, and people are the three major subject areas represented in the collection. Of additional interest are Sultner's taped impressions of his 1959 United States Information Service (USIS)-sponsored Asian tour. The collection occupies 309 boxes and covers more than 83 cubic feet.

The Donald H. Sultner-Welles Collection is open to researchers in the Archives Center, third floor east, of the National Museum of American History, between 12th and 14th Streets, on Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20560. The Archives Center is open Monday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Written and telephone (202/357-3270) inquiries are welcome and researchers are encouraged to contact the Archives Center before their arrival. The FAX number is 202/786-2453.

This is the eleventh in a series of occasional guides to collections in the Archives Center. Finding aids to other collections are available. The Guide to Manuscript Collections in the National Museum of History and Technology (1978) and an updated compilation contain brief descriptions of all archival holdings in the Museum. All current Archives Center holdings are available for search on the Smithsonian Institution Bibliographic Information System (SIBIS), an online database.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but a portion of the collection is stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.

A small number of letters and photographs are restricted until the year 2031. Identification list in box.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Portraits -- 20th century  Search this
Lecturers  Search this
Photographers  Search this
Gardens -- Photographs -- 1300-1980  Search this
Architecture -- Photographs -- 1300-1980  Search this
Travel photography -- 1950-2000  Search this
Genre/Form:
Passports
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Travelogs
Receipts -- 20th century
Ephemera
Files
Filmstrips
Lecture notes
Personal papers -- 20th century
Silver-dye bleach process
Contracts
Notebooks
Prints
Press releases
Ships' passenger lists
Project files
Magnetic tapes
Posters
Postcards
Vertical files
Dye destruction process
Travel diaries
Letters (correspondence) -- 20th century.
Professional papers
Bank statements
Correspondence -- 1930-1950
Photographs -- Phototransparencies -- 20th century
Audiotapes -- 1940-1980
Series 12. -- Cibachrome (TM)
Photographs -- 20th century
Clippings
Card files
Concert programs
Dye destruction photoprints
Biography files
Awards
Business records
Birthday cards
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0145
See more items in:
Donald H. Sultner-Welles Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8c00c15e0-d905-4a3c-ab89-6fbd2f9c5f7d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0145
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Larry Aldrich

Interviewee:
Aldrich, Larry  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul  Search this
Names:
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts  Search this
Antonakos, Stephen, 1926-2013  Search this
Baker, Richard Brown  Search this
Barr, Alfred H., Jr., 1902-1981  Search this
Castelli, Leo  Search this
Hartigan, Grace  Search this
Hopkins, Budd, 1931-2011  Search this
Indiana, Robert, 1928-  Search this
Johns, Jasper, 1930-  Search this
Lieberman, William Slattery, 1924-  Search this
Miller, Dorothy Canning, 1904-2003  Search this
Myers, John Bernard  Search this
Rauschenberg, Robert, 1925-2008  Search this
Smithson, Robert  Search this
Stella, Frank  Search this
Extent:
9 Sound tape reels (Sound recording, 5 in.)
385 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1972 April 25-June 10
Scope and Contents:
Interview of Larry Aldrich conducted 1972 April 25-June 10, by Paul Cummings, for the Archives of American Art. Aldrich speaks of his acquisitions and his program for selling art at Christmas and praises William S. Lieberman as "the curator of collectors". He discusses funds given to museums by the Larry Aldrich Foundation; visits to artists' studios; exhibiting a portion of his collection for the first time at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, Virginia, exhibitions at the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art; Robert Indiana's "Love Series"; and modern movements including "Lyrical Abstraction" and "Cool Art." He recalls Stephen Antonakos, Richard Brown Baker, Alfred H. Barr, Jr., Leo Castelli, Grace Hartigan, Budd Hopkins, Jasper Johns, John Myers, Dorothy Miller, Robert Rauschenberg, Frank Stella, Robert Smithson, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Larry Aldrich (1906-2001) was an art collector from New York, New York.
General:
Originally recorded on 9 sound tape reels. Reformatted in 2010 as 18 digital wav files. Duration is 17 hrs., 11 minutes.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.aldric72
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9ec7e519e-a013-41aa-9add-fe37fd60dcc7
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-aldric72
Online Media:

Rosa Esman Gallery and Tanglewood Press Inc. records

Creator:
Rosa Esman Gallery  Search this
Names:
Tanglewood Press  Search this
Darger, Henry, 1892-1972  Search this
Esman, Rosa  Search this
Gray, Eileen, 1878-1976  Search this
Rodchenko, Aleksandr, 1891-1956  Search this
Warhol, Andy, 1928-1987  Search this
Extent:
13.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1922-1998
bulk 1972-1994
Summary:
The Rosa Esman Gallery and Tanglewood Press Inc. records measure 13.4 linear feet and date from circa 1922 to 1998, with the bulk of the records dating from 1972 to 1994. The records shed light on two businesses operated by Rosa Esman through administrative files, artist files, exhibition and event files, sales and financial records, printed material, photographic materials, and several objects.
Scope and Contents:
The Rosa Esman Gallery and Tanglewood Press Inc. records measure 13.4 linear feet and date from circa 1922 to 1998, with the bulk of the records dating from 1972 to 1994. The records shed light on two businesses operated by Rosa Esman through administrative files, artist files, exhibition and event files, sales and financial records, printed material, photographic materials, and several objects.

Administrative files contain correspondence files, printed material, and inventories; photos of the gallery, Rosa Esman, and others; a few gallery blueprints; and pins and magnets from a collaboration between the Esman Gallery and artists Roy Lichtenstein, Gustav Klutsis, Lazar "El" Lissitzky, and Sol LeWitt. Artist files consist of resumes and biographical summaries, correspondence, pricelists, exhibition material, press packets, photographic materials depicting artwork and artists, and more. Artists include Eileen Gray, Lev Nussberg, Pascal Verbena, Helen Frankenthaler, Alexander Rodchenko, Sol LeWitt, Peter Boynton, and Jan Muller. Exhibition and event files contain price lists, loan agreements, correspondence, printed materials, and photographic materials. Included in this series is one file for an exhibition held at Knoedler Gallery that was in collaboration with Rosa Esman after she had closed her gallery. Financial records consist of sales books, consignment records, receipts and invoices, ledgers, and some appraisals. Tanglewood Press Inc. files contain correspondence files, financial records, order forms and receipts, photographic materials, press packets, mailers, a certificate, and some exhibition materials.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as five series.

Series 1: Administrative Files, 1973-1997 (Box 1-2; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 2: Artist Files, 1920s, 1953-1998 (Box 2-8; 5.6 linear feet)

Series 3: Exhibition and Event Files, 1971-1994 (Box 8-12; 4.6 linear feet)

Series 4: Financial Records, 1977-1993 (Box 12-13; .8 linear feet)

Series 5: Tanglewood Press Inc. Records, 1964-1997 (Box 13-15; .9 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Rosa Esman Gallery was established in 1972 in New York, New York by Rosa Esman. The gallery exhibited mostly twentieth-century American and European art in various mediums and styles, including pop art, European outsider art, Dada, constructivism, architecture, interior design, and Russian artists from the early twentieth century. Tanglewood Press Inc. was an art publishing company founded by Esman, and published thirteen limited-edition portfolios by a number of artists from 1965 to 1991.

With encouragement from Doris Freedman and Hans Kleinschmidt, Esman established Tanglewood Press Inc. in 1965 as a publisher of artists' portfolios. The first publication, New York Ten (1965), included artwork by Tom Wesselmann, George Segal, Claes Oldenburg, Roy Lichtenstein, Mon Levinson, Robert Kulicke, Nicholas Krushenick, Helen Frankenthaler, Jim Dine, and Richard Anuszkiewicz. Later publications included artwork by Andy Warhol, Mary Bauermeister, Ad Reinhardt, Robert Motherwell, Sol LeWitt, Jim Dine, and many others. The portfolio, "Ten Landscapes-Roy Lichtenstein (1967), was published in collaboration with Abrams Original Editions. Esman was contracted to work at Abrams Original Editions for a short period of time in the late 1970s. Esman and her Tanglewood Press Inc. were featured in the exhibition, The Great American Pop Art Store: Multiples of the sixties (1997-2000), University Art Museum, California State University, Long Beach, California.

Esman held a drawings exhibition of artwork borrowed from the Leo Castelli Gallery in 1972 in a space she rented for Tanglewood Press Inc.; she credited this as the beginning of Rosa Esman Gallery. Esman continued exhibiting in that location for the next several years, including a solo show of folded drawings by Sol LeWitt and Modern Master Drawings: Avery, Stuart Davis, De Kooning, Hoffman, Motherwell (1973). Esman moved her operation in 1975 to a building in midtown near the galleries of Tibor de Nagy and Virginia Zabriskie. Artists and printmakers shown at Esman Gallery during 1970s include Christo, Bill Fares, Tom Noskowski, Ursula Von Rydingsvard, Hannah Tierney, and Eileen Gray. In 1979, Esman began an exhibition series of Russian avant-garde art, The Russian Revolution in Art, 1-5 (1979-1983), featuring artwork by Kasmir Malevich, Alexander Rodchenko, Lyubov Popova, and many others of the Russian avant-garde. Esman moved the gallery to SoHo in 1980. In the 1980s, Esman began showing European outsider artists Pascal Verbena and Henry Darger and held a group exhibition of outsider artists in 1986, Outsiders: Art Beyond the Norm. Other exhibitions in the 1980s included Art by Architects (1980), Architecture by Artists (1981), Curator's Choice: A Tribute to Dorothy Miller (1982). Later exhibitions featured artists Joseph Zito, Sofia Dymshits-Tolstaya, Eric Snell, and Carl Goldhagen; and group shows of Dada art, twentieth-century photography, and constructivism. After closing Rosa Esman Gallery in 1992, Esman entered a partnership at Ubu Gallery with Adam Boxer and Alfred Jarry.

Rosa Mencher Esman was born in New York, New York in 1927. She studied government at Smith College in Northhampton, Massachusetts. She went abroad to Europe her junior year, visiting museums in Geneva, Florence, and Paris. After college, she worked several jobs including a position in the art book department of Harper and Brothers and as an office administrator for Rene d'Harnocourt at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. In 1957, she and a friend opened Tanglewood Gallery in Stockbridge, Massachusettes, showing artwork by artist-friends, utilizing the Museum of Modern Art lending service, and borrowing from the Downtown Gallery. The Tanglewood Gallery exhibited artists Milton Avery, Karl Schrag, Tom Wesselman, Alexander Calder, George Morrison, Robert Indiana, Richard Anuszkiewicz, Mervin Jules, and George L. K. Morris, among others. The gallery operated until circa 1960.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Rosa Esman conducted by James McElhinney, June 9-16, 2009.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Rosa Esman in 2003 and 2014.
Restrictions:
Two folders comprised of Rosa Esman Gallery legal files, 1989-1991, in Box 15 are access restricted. Contact Reference Services for more information. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Women art dealers  Search this
Pop art  Search this
Art, Russian -- 20th century  Search this
Outsider art  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Citation:
Rosa Esman Gallery and Tanglewood Press Inc records, circa 1922-1998. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.rosaesmg
See more items in:
Rosa Esman Gallery and Tanglewood Press Inc. records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw90b5afc25-4ac5-4700-9d90-a03c3ac29007
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rosaesmg
Online Media:

Giving Voice: The Power of Words in African American Culture

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The 2009 Festival program Giving Voice, presented by the National Museum of African American History and Culture, showcased the many oral traditions and verbal arts that hold a special place in African American folk culture. Giving Voice focused on the word power and word play that shape, define, and transform human experience. These cultural expressions represent a living legacy for black Americans and ultimately for all Americans. Through the deep, rich strains of African American oral traditions, the Festival program explored and displayed the vital connections between the power of words in African American folklife and the attributes of American culture itself.

Giving Voice created a learning experience that provided audiences with a better understanding of the everyday language and expression inherent in African American folklife. For instance, Festival visitors were invited into simulated social sites and gathering places where African Americans traditionally have felt free to talk to one another beyond the gaze and financial control, or below the radar, of racial others. Settings such as restaurants and home kitchens, churches and meeting halls, playgrounds and street corners, barbershops and beauty parlors, community radio stations and the "soapbox" - recreated on the National Mall - provided a living context for demonstrating the power of words to shape the daily experiences of African Americans.

With this Festival program, the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture demonstrated its commitment to documenting and preserving the oral expressions of a people whose voices were muzzled, who were denied the opportunity to read and to write, and whose speeches and oratory often did not survive. A people's culture is inexorably linked to its language, and by helping to raise public awareness of African American linguistic creativity, the Museum highlighted a major aspect of black culture. In the process, the Museum moved closer to its goals of helping all Americans to learn more about African American history and culture, and to understand and appreciate how this history and culture provide a powerful lens for understanding what it truly means to be an American.

James Alexander Robinson was Curator, and Dianne Green was Program Coordinator. Diana Baird N'Diaye and Esther J. Washington were Curatorial Advisors for Children's Culture; John W. Davis II was Curatorial Advisor for Community Radio; Roland Freeman was Curatorial Consultant for Photography; Kenny Carroll was Curatorial Consultant for Poetry; and Tony Smalls was Curatorial Consultant for Drama.

The program was produced in partnership with the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.
Presenters:
Deborah Asante, Carmen Ashhurst, Jade Banks, Kenny Carroll, Lorne Cress Love, James Counts Early, Anthony Gittens, E. Ethelbert Miller, Bob Sumner, Eleanor Traylor, Esther J. Washington
Participants:
Children's and Youth Culture

Asante Children's Theatre, Indianapolis, Indiana

Schroeder Cherry, 1954-, Baltimore, Maryland

The Dr. Beverly Robinson Community Folk Culture Program, Bronx, New York

Hot Topic All Stars, Alexandria, Virginia

Ella Jenkins, Chicago, Illinois

Humor

James Hannah, 1968-, Coppell, Texas

Royale Watkins, Encino, California

Poetry

Toni Blackman, Brooklyn, New York

Kenny Carroll, Washington, D.C.

Thomas Sayers Ellis, 1963-, Brooklyn, New York

Tonya Matthews, 1974-, Cincinnati, Ohio

Sonia Sanchez, 1934-, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Radio

WPFW, Washington, D.C.

Storytelling

Charlotte Blake-Alston, 1948-, Landsdowne, Pennsylvania

Victoria Burnett, 1951-, San Juan Capistrano, California

Len Cabral, 1948-, Cranston, Rhode Island

Mitchell G. Capel, 1955-, Spring Lake, North Carolina

Diane Ferlatte, Oakland, California

Hugh "Brother Blue" Hill, 1921-, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Joni L. Jones, 1955-, Austin, Texas

Baba Jamal Koram, 1949-, Alexandria, Virginia

Onawumi Jean Moss, 1936-, Amherst, Massachusetts

Tejumola Ologboni, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Dylan Pritchett, 1959-, Williamsburg, Virginia

Sankofa, 1930-, Rochester, New York

Valerie Tutson, 1966-, Providence, Rhode Island

Theater

Holly Bass, 1971-, Washington, D.C.

Roger Guenveur Smith, 1955-, Los Angeles, California

Anu Yadav, 1977-, Washington, D.C.
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2009 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2009, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2009 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk522ddb6d2-b2ba-449a-a630-8d0a8d3543ba
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2009-ref26

DC Street Art: A Visual Conversation

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 July 02
Scope and Contents:
Diana N'Diaye (presenter); CHELOVE (Cita Sadeli) and MASPAZ( Frederico) ;Artists CHELOVE and MASPAZ discuss how they use their work to celebrate the natural world and examine cultural roots drawing upon their American upbringing, their cultural heritage (Javanese and Colombian, respectively), and their involvement in the D.C. street art scene.
General:
This audio recording has been transcribed. View transcription and play recording here. Download a PDF of the transcription here.
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Mural painting and decoration -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Street art  Search this
Graffiti artists  Search this
Immigrants  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0702_OTM_Story_Circle_0001
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 4: On The Move / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5fcf97e25-ba9e-4c83-9f23-0878db9e55ea
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref949
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Masters of the Building Arts

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
From the soaring skyscrapers of New York City to the adobe churches of New Mexico, from the sturdy stone walls of New England to the majestic monuments of the nation's capital, master craftworkers in the building arts have brought enduring beauty to our built environment. Working in wood, stone, brick, and metal, in plaster, paint, glass, and clay, they transform designs on paper into three-dimensional works of art. Much depends on their workmanship and skill: on their deep understanding of raw materials, their careful selection and use of tools, their mastery of technique. The final product is the result not only of their knowledge and abilities, but also their creativity and care - their will to excellence.

Artisans in the building trades share a deep appreciation for the aesthetic value and expressive power of technical perfection. They delight in skill and find meaning and pleasure in the poetic qualities of workmanship - in their ability to craft objects of beauty and strength through their special touch. Their great pride and creative spirit, their love for their work, and their commitment to excellence are manifested in a lasting legacy of architectural achievement left behind for generations to come.

The 2000 Festival program celebrated the extraordinary artistry of craftspeople in the building arts and explored the many challenges they face today as they work to preserve our nation's past and build for the future. The Festival brought together a selection of master artisans - stone carvers, masons, carpenters, terra cotta artisans, plasterers, blacksmiths, stained glass artisans, and adobe builders - who have enriched our world with the work of their hands, and who educated and informed Festival visitors not only with their skills but also with their knowledge and lore.

Marjorie Hunt was Curator and James Deutsch was Program Coordinator; Betty Belanus was Education Specialist and Family Activity Guide Coordinator. An Advisory Committee included: J. Bryan Blundell, Kurt Dewhurst, William Dupont, Cynthia Field, Henry Glassie, Norman Koonce, Betty Monkman, Peter Nabokov, Joanna Reagan, Rex Scouten, William Seale, Chris Sturbaum, John Michael Vlach, and Ed Worthy.

The program was produced in collaboration with the International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers and the International Masonry Institute, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the National Building Museum, the American Institute of Architects, and the Preservation Trades Network. Major funding was provided by Homestore.com, the Marble Institute of America, Allied Stone Industries, the Building Stone Institute, the Indiana Limestone Institute, and the National Building Granite Quarries Association. Major contributors included Target Stores, the Associated General Contractors of America, the National Association of Realtors, and the Smithsonian Women's Committee. Additional donors included the School of the Building Arts, Duron, Inc., the Brick Industry Association, the Laborers' International Union of North America, the Smithsonian Educational Outreach Fund, and the Copper Development Association, Inc.
Researchers:
Jane Beck, Betty Belanus, Ray Brassieur, Amanda Dargan, James Deutsch, Kurt Dewhurst, Karen Duffy, Lynn Martin Graton, Dwight Pauahi Kauahikaua, Winnie Lambrecht, Tim Lloyd, Gregory Sharrow, Gary Stanton, David Taylor, Elaine Thatcher, John Michael Vlach
Presenters:
Betty Belanus, Barry Bergey, Ray Brassieur, Olivia Cadaval, Amanda Dargan, William Dupont, Brian Finnegan, Lynn Martin Graton, Tim Lloyd, Philip "Pete" Pederson, Clift Seferlis, Peter Seitel, Gregory Sharrow, Angelo Simone, Nick Spitzer, Gary Stanton, David Taylor, Elaine Thatcher, Cynthia Vidaurri, John Michael Vlach
Participants:
David Adams, historic preservation specialist, Portsmouth, New Hampshire

Robert Alger, stone carver, sculptor, Spencerville, Maryland

Joseph Alonso, stone mason, Vienna, Virginia

Onofre Anguiano, terra cotta hand presser, mold maker, Lincoln, Calif.

Walter S. Arnold, stone carver, Skokie, Illinois

Sam Baca, program director, Cornerstones Community Partnerships, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Earl A. Barthe, 1932-2010, plasterer, historian and consultant, New Orleans, Louisiana

Hurchail Barthe, plasterer, New Orleans, Louisiana

Terry Barthe, plasterer, historic housing specialist, New Orleans, Louisiana

Nick Benson, stone carver, letterer, Newport, Rhode Island

Johan Bjurman, decorative painter, Cheshire, Connecticut

Anna Bowen, stone carver, letterer, Newport, Rhode Island

Dan Boyle, timber framer, Dover, New Hampshire

Rory Brennan, historic plaster specialist, Putney, Vermont

Ron Brooks, decorative painter, Rockville, Maryland

John Canning, decorative painter, Cheshire, Connecticut

Jacqueline Canning-Riccio, decorative painter, Cheshire, Connecticut

Jesus Cardenas, terra cotta modeler, mold maker, Lincoln, California

Charles Cardine, architectural blacksmith, Chantilly, Virginia

Patrick Cardine, architectural blacksmith, Chantilly, Virginia

Carson Christian, timber framer, Wooster, Ohio

Rudy Christian, timber framer, Burbank, Ohio

Peter "Billy" Cleland, 1921-2010, stone mason, Clinton, Maryland

William R. Cleland, Jr., stone mason, Dunkirk, Maryland

Rose Concha, -- enjarrodoro -- (adobe plasterer), Taos, New Mexico

Brian Cox, carpenter, Lyndhurst, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Tarrytown, New York

John Drew, carpenter, St. Leonard, Maryland

William Dupont, Graham Gund Architect of the National Trust, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Washington, D.C.

Cane Fields, Hawaiian dry stack mason, Kailua-Kana, Hawaii

Billy Fields, Hawaiian dry stack mason, Kailua-Kana, Hawaii

David Flaharty, ornamental plasterer, sculptor, Green Lane, Pennsylvania

lsidoro Flaim, stone mason, Camp Springs, Maryland

Tom Glynn, timber framer, South Berwick, Maine

Dieter Goldkuhle, 1938-2011, stained glass artisan, Reston, Virginia

Giles Harper, preservation carpenter, Lyndhurst, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Tarrytown, New York

Adam Heller, stone carver, letterer, Newport, Rhode Island

Randy Herald, sheet metal craftsperson, Bethesda, Maryland

Randy Herald, Jr., sheet metal craftsperson, Bethesda, Maryland

Hans Herr, coppersmith, Holtwood, Pennsylvania

John Paul Huguley, president, School of the Building Arts, Charleston, South Carolina

Judy Jacob, architectural conservator, National Park Service, New York, New York

Raymond Johnson, terra cotta modeler, draftsman, Lincoln, California

Dean Kalomas, decorative painter, Washington, D.C.

Vikki Keys, deputy superintendent, National Park Service, Washington, D.C.

Rick King, dry stone wall mason, Holderness, New Hampshire

Scott King, dry stone wall mason, Holderness, New Hampshire

Naomi Kroll, architectural conservator, National Park Service, New York, New York

Wade Lawrence, assistant director, Drayton Hall, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Charleston, South Carolina

Elmo Leonardelli, scaffold erector, Baltimore, Maryland

Stephen Lorenzetti, chief of resource management, National Park Service, Washington, D.C.

Amber Lucero, -- enjarrodoro -- (adobe plasterer), Taos, New Mexico

Rick Lykins, restoration carpenter, Bloomington, Indiana

George McDaniel, director, Drayton Hall, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Charleston, South Carolina

Richard Marks, architectural conservator, Charleston, South Carolina

Antonio Martinez, community leader, Upper Rociada, New Mexico

David Martinez, terra cotta draftsman, Roseville, California

David Mason, dry stone wall mason, Starksboro, Vermont

Rick Mason, dry stone wall mason, Hinesburg, Vermont

John O'Connor, engineer, Universal Builders Supply, Cheverly, Maryland

David Overholt, restoration project manager, Lyndhurst, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Tarrytown, New York

Albert D. Parra, adobe builder, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Theodore Pierre, Jr., brick mason, New Orleans, Louisiana

Konstantinos Pilarinos, Byzantine-style woodcarver, Astoria, New York

Panagiota Pylarinos, architect, Astoria, New York

Dennis Playdon, program manager, Cornerstones Community Partnerships, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Patrick Plunkett, stone carver, Takoma Park, Maryland

Joseph Pringle, blacksmith, Charleston, South Carolina

Nol Putnam, artist blacksmith, The Plains, Virginia

Clay Raley, restoration carpenter, Norman, Indiana

Brad Robinson, architectural blacksmith, Chantilly, Virginia

Steve Roy, historic preservation specialist, Portsmouth, New Hampshire

Brett Rugo, president, Rugo & Carosi, Woodbridge, Virginia

Laura Saeger, timber framer, Burbank, Ohio

George Salvador, restoration crew leader, Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico

Eduardo Seara, vice-president, Lorton Contracting Company, Lorton, Virginia

Manuel Seara, president, Lorton Contracting Company, Lorton, Virginia

Tony Segreti, architect, Bethesda, Maryland

Carlton Simmons, blacksmith, Charleston, South Carolina

Philip Simmons, 1912-2009, blacksmith, Charleston, South Carolina

Louis Soublet, plasterer, New Orleans, Louisiana

Larry E. Stearns, coppersmith, Westford, Vermont

Ben Sturbaum, restoration carpenter, Owensburg, Indiana

Chris Sturbaum, restoration carpenter, Bloomington, Indiana

Arran Sturgis, timber framer, Eliot, Maine

Daniel Szwed, construction manager, Waldorf, Maryland

Mark Tamara, structural engineer, James Madison Cutts, Washington, D.C.

Lonn Taylor, historian, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

Lloyd Tortalita, Adult, Higher Education director, former governor, Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico

Roman Troyer, timber framer, Wooster, Ohio

Dexter Trujillo, adobe builder, mud preserver, Abiquiu, New Mexico

Mark Tsirigos, president, Universal Builders Supply, Cheverly, Maryland

George Void, masonry crew, Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C.

Chuck Wagner, owner, Wagner Roofing Company, Hyattsville, Maryland

Sheila Wagner, owner, Wagner Roofing Company, Hyattsville, Maryland

Tom Weddle, restoration carpenter, Bloomington, Indiana

Bob Wooldridge, slater, Mercersburg, Pennsylvania

Jeff Wooldridge, slater, project manager, Bethesda, Maryland

Bill Yeingst, curator, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

Pauli Zmolek, decorative painter, Takoma Park, Maryland

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF BRICKLAYERS AND ALLIED CRAFTWORKERS (BAC), INTERNATIONAL MASONRY INSTITUTE (IMI)

Frank Baiocchi, marble mason, Mt. Airy, Maryland

Ed Bellucci, IMI deputy director of Apprenticeship and Training, Jefferson, Maryland

Robert Bernardon, marble mason, Suitland, Maryland

Lewis Carrara, mosaic worker, Fortville, Indiana

Raoul Cervantes, bricklayer, Claremont, California

Kurt Colo, bricklayer, New Baltimore, Michigan

Laird Donaldson, IMI regional director, Auburn, Washington

James Farris, stone mason, Stafford, Virginia

Richard Francescon, marble mason, South Easton, Massachusetts

Greg Hartseil, IMI Job Corps regional director, Lorida, Florida

Dennis Holloway, IMI Scola Training Center director, West Babylon, New York

Mike Kassman, IMI pointing, cleaning, and caulking instructor, Waynesboro, Pennsylvania

Tony Kassman, IMI National Safety, pointing, cleaning, and caulking coordinator, Tonawanda, New York

John Kitchen, bricklayer apprentice, Dryden, New York

Frank Koletar, refractory bricklayer, Orchard Park, New York

Annette Ludwig, tile layer, Bellevue, Washington

Nelson McMath, BAC Local 9 Michigan field representative, Saline, Michigan

Tom McQuaid, BAC Local 1 DC, MONA secretary, treasurer, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Steve Martini, IMI Strategic Programs director, Cascade, Maryland

Steve Mason, terrazzo apprentice, Washington, D.C.

Antoine Matthews, bricklayer, Baltimore, Maryland

Michael Menegazzi, IMI terrazzo instructor, South Gate, California

Bob Mion, IMI tile, marble, and terrazzo instructor, Binghamton, New York

Guillermo Moreno, stone mason, Hyattsville, Maryland

Colleen Muldoon, coordinator of Education Programs, bricklayer, Baltimore, Maryland

Clarence Nichols, IMI deputy director of Apprenticeship and Training, Cumberland, Maryland

Angela Olszewski, tile layer, Jersey City, New Jersey

Lester Parnell, bricklayer, Detroit, Michigan

Bob Perry, IMI regional director, Culver City, California

Darren Raines, tile layer, Chicago, Illinois

Matthew Redabaugh, IMI coordinator of Special Projects, Cascade, Maryland

Butch Rovder, BAC stone craft director, South Riding, Virginia

Joe Stewart, BAC pointing, cleaning, and caulking craft director, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Gene Stinner, IMI director of Apprenticeship and Training, Cascade, Maryland

Dennis Studley, IMI Job Corps regional director, Yucaipa, California

Harold Sugg, refractory bricklayer, West Seneca, New York

Jimmy Ternent, marble mason, Westminster, Maryland

John Totten, IMI plaster instructor, Clintondale, New York

Drew Vecchione, IMI stone instructor, Flourtown, Pennsylvania

Battista Yon, bricklayer, Hyattsville, Maryland
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2001, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk504922fdd-8abb-43a1-a132-41400c430cd8
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2001-ref26

New York City at the Smithsonian

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
At first, it might seem like an oxymoron to talk about the "folklore" or "folklife" of one of the world's most modern cities, but daily life in New York would be impossible without this body of shared urban traditions, of collective community knowledge, customs, historical memories, and cultural understandings that constitutes the folklife of the city. lt provides the basic ground rules that shape how New Yorkers interact with their families, their colleagues, and their fellow New Yorkers. From subway etiquette to local street food to stickball games, these traditions give New York City its unique sense of place.

ln addition to a shared urban culture, most New Yorkers also have one or more reservoirs of specialized traditional knowledge, which they have acquired from their ethnic and/or religious upbringing, working in a particular occupation, or living in a specific area of the city. The innumerable, multifaceted ways in which these factors interact are what make New York and New Yorkers so fascinating. Of course, it was impossible to cover all aspects of New York's culture in a single event, but by approaching city culture thematically, and by carefully selecting examples that highlight different aspects of work, life, and leisure in New York, New York City at the Smithsonian sought to acquaint Festival visitors with both the ordinary and extraordinary aspects of life in Gotham.

What gives New York a sense of being different is not merely tbe myriad ethnic and interest groups that are found in the city, but the complex ways in which they overlap and interact. The physical landscape of New York - the lack of space, the reliance on mass transit by people of vastly differing backgrounds, neighborhoods which are home to both the very rich and the extremely poor - makes it impossible for New Yorkers to ignore the influence of "others." From kosher Chinese restaurants to lrish hip-hop groups to Mexican pizzas, cultures from all corners of the globe have influenced one another in New York, in part because of their physical proximity.

The 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival celebrated just a few of the innumerable manifestations of traditional culture in New York City. More importantly, fieldwork leading up to the Festival allowed the Smithsonian, working in close collaboration with city-based cultural organizations and ethnic and occupational communities, to document daily life in New York City at the turn of the millennium. Material collected during the course of this research, as well as information recorded during and after the Festival, will significantly enrich the Smithsonian's archival holdings about New York City. A century from now, when scholars and writers want to know what it was like to live in New York in 2001, to work on Broadway, to drive a taxi, to trade stocks on Wall Street, or teach English in a school filled with recent immigrants, they can turn to the documentation collected by this project. That body of documentation - and the recordings and photographs made during the Festival itself - took on increased importance with the events of September 11, 2001, barely three months after the Festival had closed, which emphasized to all observers how the cultural values of New Yorkers, vividly on display to Festival visitors, also provided them a reservoir of resiliency to surmount those tragic events.

Nancy Groce was Senior Curator for the program, supported by several Area Curators: Ray Allen, music; Marion Jacobson, urban fashion; Annie Hauck-Lawson, foodways; Cathy Ragland, music; Ethel Raim, music; Henry Sapoznik, media; Brian Thompson, Wall Street; Kay Turner, Wall Street; and Steve Zeitlin, neighborhood. Arlene Reiniger was Program Coordinator.

An Advisory Committee included: Ruth Abram, Director, Lower East Side Tenement Museum; Gladys Pena Acosta, Director, RAICES; Ray Allen, Director, American Studies Program, Brooklyn College/CUNY; Gage Averill, Chair, Music Department, New York University; Fatima Bercht, Chief Curator, El Museo del Barrio; Melody Capote, Executive Director, Caribbean Culture Center/African Diaspora Institute; Barbara Cohen-Stratyner, Curator, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts; Cara De Silva, Food Historian; Miriam De Uriarte, Director of Education, El Museo del Barrio; Howard Dodson, Director, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture/NYPL; Sharon E. Dunn, Senior Assistant for the Arts, New York City Board of Education; Juan Flores, Professor, Black and Puerto Rican Studies, Hunter College/CUNY; Laura Hansen, Director, Place Matters, Municipal Art Society; John Haworth, Assistant Director, National Museum of the American Indian; Ellie Hisama, Director, Institute for Studies in American Music, Brooklyn College/CUNY; Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Professor, Performance Studies Department, NYU; Leah Krauss, Program Officer, The New York Community Trust; Susana Torruella Leva!, Executive Director, El Museo del Barrio; Robert MacDonald, Executive Director, Museum of the City of New York; Fay Chew Matsuda, Executive Director, Museum of Chinese in the Americas; Ethel Raim, Executive Director, Center for Traditional Music and Dance; Jan Seidler Ramirez, Vice President of Public Affairs, New York Historical Society; Frances A. Resheske, Vice President of Public Affairs, Consolidated Edison Company; Joseph Sciarra, Academic Programs, Calandra Italian American Institute, Queens College; Gabrielle Shubert, Director, New York Transit Museum; Pravina Shukla, Assistant Professor, Folklore Department, Indiana University; John Kuo Wei Tchen, Director, Asian/Pacific/American Studies Program & Institute, NYU; Brian Thompson, Director, Museum of American Financial History; Michael Wallace, Historian and Author, CUNY; Steve Wheeler, Archivist, New York Stock Exchange; Theodora Yoshikami, Multicultural Program, American Museum of Natural History; Steven Zeitlin, Executive Director, City Lore: The Center for Urban Culture.

The program was produced in collaboration with New York's Center for Traditional Music and Dance and City Lore, with major funding from the New York City Council, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, Howard P. Milstein, and the New York Stock Exchange. The Leadership Committee was co-chaired by The Honorable Daniel Patrick Moynihan and Elizabeth Moynihan and corporate chairman Howard P. Milstein. Major support was provided by Amtrak, Con Edison, the Recording Industries Music Performance Trust Funds, Arthur Pacheco, and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Major contributors included The New York Community Trust, The Coca-Cola Company, The Durst Foundation, the May & Samuel Rudin Family Foundation, Leonard Litwin, Bernard Mendik, and Stephen and Judy Gluckstern. Additional donors included Emigrant Savings Bank, Jeffrey Gural, Lester Morse, Richard Schwartz, Michael Bloomberg, Keyspan Energy, Martin Segal, and Earle Mack.
Researchers:
Jerald Albarelli, Ray Allen, Emily Botein, Lori Branston, Kathleen Condon, Martha Cooper, Amanda Dargan, Andrew Davis, Tony DeNonno, Sonia Estreich, Makale Faber, Kwali Farbes, Michael Greene, Laura Hansen, Annie Hauck-Lawson, Marion Jacobson, Denise Lynn, Elena Martinez, Cathy Ragland, Ethel Raim, Henry Sapoznik, Roberta Singer, Les Slater, Scott Spencer, Brian Thompson, Kay Turner, Tom Van Buren, Li Wangsheng, Bill Westerman, Lois Wilken, Steven Zeitlin
Presenters:
Judy Adamson, Ray Allen, Dwight Blocker Bowers, Kathleen Condon, Andrew Davis, James Early, Makale Faber, Juan Flores, Annie Hauck-Lawson, Marion Jacobson, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Wangsheng Li, Elena Martinez, Cathy Ragland, Ethel Raim, Kristin Richard, Henry Sapoznik, Les Slater, Brian Thompson, Kay Turner, Tom Van Buren, Meg Ventrudo, Cynthia Vidaurri, George Zavala, Steve Zeitlin
Participants:
Arts & Artists

Wilfreda "Bio" Feliciano, muralist, Tats Cru

Hector "Nicer" Nazario, muralist, Tats Cru

Sotero "BG 183" Ortiz, muralist, Tats Cru

Gaspar Ingui, neon sign maker

Robbie Ingui, neon sign maker

Theresa Ingui, neon sign maker

Backstage Broadway

Judy Adamson, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Jarred Aswegan, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Gary Brouwer, theatrical milliner

Kimberly Cea, actress

Edie Cowan, director, choreographer

Brian Healy, prop maker, armorer, Costume Armour

Bob Kelly, wig maker, make-up artist

Polly Kinney, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Janice Lorraine, actress

Terry Marone, Gypsy Robe, Actors' Equity

Barbara Matera, costume maker

Nino Novel lino, prop maker, Costume Armour

Peter Ray, prop maker, Costume Armour

Woody Regan, rehearsal pianist

Linda Rice, wig maker, Bob Kelly

Tom Rocco, actor

Tom Schneider, theatrical milliner

Scott Sliger, make-up artist, Bob Kelly

Josephine Spano, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Patricia Sullivan, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Brian Wolfe, prop maker, Costume Armour

Leslie Wolfe, prop maker, Costume Armour

Building Trades

George Andrucki, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Stan Bernstein, sheet metal worker, Local 28

William Bush, water tank builder

Adonis Cegisman, water tank builder

Ryszard Danielewski, water tank builder

John DeGeorge, water tank builder

Robin Delk, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Nicholas Maldarelli, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Leah Rambo, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Andrew Rosenwach, water tank builder

Thomas Schlitz, sheet metal worker, Local 28

George Treanor, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Arthur Tyburski, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Urban Fashion & Garment Industry

Britt Bowers, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Vanessa Burgos, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Lidia Carrera, needle trade worker, UNITE! Local 23-25

Esther Cheung, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Mary Costantini, mannequin sculptor

Linda Dworak, director, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Shiniji Horimura, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Elizabeth Jacobsen, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Anne Kong, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Anne Liu, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Nicole Mata, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Adrienne Muken, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Ana Perez, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Ramon Roman, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Isabel Toledo, fashion designer

Ruben Toledo, fashion designer

Monica Williamson, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

May Xian, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Foodways

Salvator Bartolomeo, Italian cook

Kam-Chung Chan, Chinese cook

Cara De Silva, food researcher, writer

Makale Faber, West African cook

Mark Federman, Jewish appetizing

Trevor Fraser, West Indian, Caribbean cook

Theresa lngui, Polish, German cook

Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, food historian

Alana Grace Lawson, Polish cook

Vertamae Grosvenor, African-American cook

Molly O'Neill, food writer and chef

Ming Hua Qian, Chinese cook

Donald Ross, bagel and bialy maker

Esta Ross, bagel and bialy maker

Steve Ross, bagel and bialy maker

Community Media

Clay Berry, producer, African-American radio

Kathleen Biggins, host, Irish-American radio

Joe Franklin, host, entertainment community

Debi Jackson, producer, African-American radio

Hal Jackson, host, African-American radio

Bill Jaker, 1939-, radio historian

René Lopez, host, Latino radio

Henry Sapoznik, host, Yiddish radio

Music, Dance & Performance

Wrickford Dalgetty, Caribbean song

Julio Diaz, Latin dancer

Tony DeMarco, Irish fiddle

Linda Hickman, Irish flute

D.J. Angola, turntablist

D.J. Rehka, turntablist

ABDOULAYE DIABATE & SUPER MANDEN -- ABDOULAYE DIABATE & SUPER MANDENAbdoulaye Diabate, director, vocals, guitarChiek Barry, bassMoussa Cissoko, n'goni, guitarAboubakar Diabate, djembeMamadou Diabate, 1975-, koraTapani Sissoko, vocalsAbou Sylla, bala

APOLLO THEATRE, AMATEUR NIGHT AT THE APOLLO -- APOLLO THEATRE, AMATEUR NIGHT AT THE APOLLOVanessa Brown, Amateur Night assistantJoseph Gray, lead vocalsJane Harley, Kemet ProductionsMonteria Ivey, hostSteve Jones, production managerC.P. Lacey, The ExecutionerShirley Matthews, coordinating producerMoni-J, hostessDavid Rodriguez, executive director

RAY CHEW & THE CREW -- RAY CHEW & THE CREWRay Chew, musical directorMike Ciro, guitarBobby Douglas, keyboardArtie Reynolds, bassRalph Rolle, drums

CHERISH THE LADIES -- CHERISH THE LADIESSean Conner, step dancerDeirdre Connolly, tin whistle, vocalsMary Coogan, guitar, banjo, mandolinKatie Fox, step dancerDonna Long, piano, fiddleJoanie Madden, director, tin whistle, flute, vocalsPaul McKeown, sound engineerMary Rafferty, accordion, tin whistleMarie Reilly, fiddle

CHERES UKRAINIAN FOLK ENSEMBLE -- CHERES UKRAINIAN FOLK ENSEMBLEAndriy Milavsky, leader, woodwindsVictor Cebotari, accordionGeorge Cheremush, violinAlexander Fedoriouk, cymbaly (hammered dulcimer)Oleh Ivanyschuk, contrabass

DAVID DAVID -- DAVID DAVIDLauterio Polanco, director, lead vocals, accordionAdriel Espaillat, guieraAdelso Fernandez, bajoKenny Fernandez, tamboraMenecio Martinez, pianoHector Mota, saxophoneFernando Rodreguez, conga

FRISNER AUGUSTIN AND LA TROUPE MAKANDAL -- FRISNER AUGUSTIN AND LA TROUPE MAKANDALFrisner Augustin, 1948-2012, lead drums, vocalsRaymond Charles, third drumSteve Deats, second drumSmith Destin, dancerKethelyne Jean-Louis, dancerKesler Pierre, percussionSandy St. Cyr, dancer

HANGUK: SOUNDS OF KOREA (KOREAN TRADITIONAL PERFORMING ARTS ASSOCIATION) -- HANGUK: SOUNDS OF KOREA (KOREAN TRADITIONAL PERFORMING ARTS ASSOCIATION)Gee Soak Back, percussionHyung Joan Kim, percussionChii-Seung Kwon, percussionJi-Young Park, dancer, percussionSue Yeon Park, dancer, percussionKathy Soh, dancer, percussionMaggie Soh, percussion

LOS AFORTUNADOS -- LOS AFORTUNADOSFelix Sanabria, director, congas, bata, percussionFrancisco Cotto, bassPedro Domeich, dancer, vocalsAlbert Lusink, trumpetAbraham Rodriguez, vocals, percussionMichael Rodriguez, percussionBrandon Rosser, percussionSusan Richardson Sanabria, dancerAdam Tully, tres guitar

LOS MACONDOS -- LOS MACONDOSJorge L. Marquez, bajoEugenio R. Ortega, accordion, lead vocalsJuan A. Ortega, caja vallenata, vocalsDavid Pacheco, timbalesGuillermo E. Penate, guieroMario A. Rodriguez, congas

LOS PLENEROS DE LA 21 -- LOS PLENEROS DE LA 21Juan J. Gutierrez, leader, tamboreroAlberto Cepeda, güiro, tamboreroRoberto Cepeda, vocals, bailador de bomba, güiro, maraca, tamboreroJose Lantigua, keyboardHector Matos, vocals, tamboreroEdgardo Miranda, cuatroDonald Nicks, bassJose Rivera, vocals, tamboreroDomingo Tanco, vocalsNellie Tanco, vocals, bailadora de bomba, tamboreraVictor Velez, vocals, tamborero

MERITA HALILI & THE RAIF HYSENI ORCHESTRA -- MERITA HALILI & THE RAIF HYSENI ORCHESTRAGezim Halili, clarinet, saxophoneMerita Halili, vocalsRaif Hyseni, accordionArtan Kushi, dajreTome Lleshaj, bass guitarEdmond Xhani, laouta

MESAOUDA JUDEO-ARABIC ENSEMBLE -- MESAOUDA JUDEO-ARABIC ENSEMBLEMarc Hazan, vocalsJoshua Levitt, naiHaig Manoukian, oudTomer Tzur, percussion

MUKTHAMBAR FINE ARTS, INC. -- MUKTHAMBAR FINE ARTS, INC.A. Balaskandan, violinBala Ganesh, mrudangist (Asian Indian drum)Aarati Ramanand, dancerSaavitri Ramanand, vocals

MUSIC FROM CHINA -- MUSIC FROM CHINASusan Cheng, director, daruanChung Bun Chiu, percussionWai Wah Law, vocalsGao Renyang, dizi, xiaoGuowei Wang, erhu, zhong hu, daohuTienjou Wang, gou hu, zhong huHerman Wong, concert managerMin Xiaofen, pipaHelen Yee, yang qinYing Ying Zhu, vocals

SAU FAMILY ORCHESTRA -- SAU FAMILY ORCHESTRAZoran Muncan, keyboardErnie Sau, button accordionMichael Sau, button accordionVinnie Sau, violin

SHASHMAQAM BUKHARAN JEWISH CULTURAL GROUP -- SHASHMAQAM BUKHARAN JEWISH CULTURAL GROUPAbokhay Aminov, vocals, doyra (drum)Tavriz Aronova, ensemble memberDavid Davidov, tarFiruza Junatan, dancerShumiel Kuyenov, doyra (drum)Boris Kuknariyev, accordionIzro Malakov, vocals

SIMON SHAHEEN & QANTARA -- SIMON SHAHEEN & QANTARASimon Shaheen, director, oud, violinOlga Chirino, keyboardsBilly Drewes, soprano saxJamie Haddad, world percussionFrancois Moutin, contrabassAdam Rogers, acoustic and electric guitarBassam Saba, flute, naiLuis Santiago, Latin percussionNajib Shaheen, oudSteve Sheehan, world percussionSoraya, vocalsMartin Zarzar, world percussion

SON MUNDANO -- SON MUNDANOBobby Allende, bongosJimmy Bosch, 1962-, tromboneNelson Gonzalez, Cuban tresNelson Gonzalez, Jr., lead vocalsOscar Hernandez, electric pianoRene Lopez, Jr., congasLuis Rosa, vocalsJoe Santiago, upright bass

VISION BAND

X-ECUTIONERS -- X-ECUTIONERSD.J. AngolaTotal EclipsePeter KangRoc RaiderMista SinistaRob Swift

YURI YUNAKOV ENSEMBLE -- YURI YUNAKOV ENSEMBLELauren Brody, keyboard, vocalsCatherine Foster, clarinetIvan Milev, accordionGeorge Petrov, drumsCarol Silverman, vocalsYuri Yunakov, 1958-, saxophone

Neighborhood & Community Life -- Neighborhood & Community LifeLori Brandston, urban sports and gamesSam Chwat, speech therapist, dialect coachMichael E. Clark, Citizens Committee for New York CitySonia Estreich, Citizens Committee for New York CityMichael Greene, urban sports and gamesLaura Hansen, Place Matters, Municipal Art SocietyRoberta Jones, storytellerJessica Katz, Citizens Committee for New York CityAnnie Lanzilloto, storyteller, performance artistMoe Maloney, community activist, "Mayor of Windsor Terrace"Rosalyn Perry, storytellerLiz Sevcenko, Memory Map, Lower East Side Tenement Museum

Street Life, Festival, Celebration

Mikey Enoch, steel pan tuner

Richie Richardson, Caribbean carnival costume maker

Les Slater, Caribbean carnival culture

Transit

Carissa Amash, New York Transit Museum

Bruce Alexander, subway engineer, MTA

Chris Creed, subway engineer, MTA

Sandra Lane, subway operator, MTA

Anthony Palombella, bus operator, MTA

Luz Montano, New York Transit Museum

Tarin Reid, subway operator, MTA

Charles Sachs, Sr., curator, New York Transit Museum

Gabrielle Shubert, director, New York Transit Museum

Mark Watson, New York Transit Museum

Wall Street

Richard Anderson, Jr., stock market investor, speaker

Richard Anderson, Sr., stock market investor, analyst

Richard Baratz, caricaturist, stock certificate engraver, American Bank Note Company

Madeline Boyd, trader, New York Stock Exchange

Victoria Chukwuka, New York Metro Coordinator, Stock Market Game

Joseph Cicchetti, trader, New York Mercantile Exchange

Anthony DeMarco, trader, New York Board of Trade

Joe Gabriel, engineer, plant manager, New York Stock Exchange

Michael Geoghan, clerk, New York Mercantile Exchange

John E. Herzog, founder, Museum of American Financial History

Scott Hess, trader, New York Mercantile Exchange

Myron Kandel, senior financial editor, CNN

Michael LaBranche, specialist, New York Stock Exchange

Gary Lapayover, trader, New York Mercantile Exchange

Michel Mark, New York Mercantile Exchange

Mark Tomasko, financial printer, engraving historian

Nancy Norton Tomasko, financial printer

Steve Wheeler, archivist, New York Stock Exchange

Jason Zweig, columnist, -- Money -- Magazine

Generations: a centennial tribute to Margaret Mead

THE FLOWERS FAMILY SINGERS -- THE FLOWERS FAMILY SINGERSRev. James N. Flowers, Jr., director, vocals, Ft. Washington, MarylandAnthony Flowers, vocals, keyboard, Seat Pleasant, MarylandYolanda Flowers, vocals, Capital Heights, MarylandMarie Hickson, vocals, Capital Heights, MarylandDorothy McDowell, vocals, Upper Marlboro, MarylandMargie Pickett, vocals, Landover, MarylandErma Reed, vocals, Landover, MarylandMildred Scruggs, vocals, Capital Heights, Maryland

WALKER CALHOUN AND THE RAVEN ROCK DANCERS -- WALKER CALHOUN AND THE RAVEN ROCK DANCERSWalker Calhoun, director, vocals, drum, rattle, Cherokee, North CarolinaAndrew Calhoun, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaJennifer Calhoun, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaChris Mahan, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaVelma Mahan, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaDelana Smith, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaPatrick Smith, dancer, vocals, Cherokee, North Carolina

THE SAU FAMILY ORCHESTRA, RIDGEWOOD, QUEENS, NEW YORK -- THE SAU FAMILY ORCHESTRA, RIDGEWOOD, QUEENS, NEW YORKZoran Muncan, keyboard, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkAksenti Sau, piano accordion, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkErnie Sau, button accordion, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkMichael Sau, button accordion, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkNikica Sau, keyboard, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkVinnie Sau, violin, Ridgewood, Queens, New York
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2001, Series 4
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5fa8116c3-ad1f-4df7-ae92-1bfaad7778fa
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2001-ref34

Campus and Community: Public and Land-grant Universities and the USDA at 150

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The year 1862 marked the founding of two types of institutions that touch the lives of people across the United States and the world every single day: public universities and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Public and land-grant universities and the USDA partner with communities to put research into action in the areas of agriculture and food, health care, sustainable living, urban and rural revitalization, and education. The 2012 Festival program brought these partnerships to life through demonstrations, discussions, and hands-on activities, focused around several themes.

Building on Traditions: Many programs at public and land-grant universities and the USDA build on traditional culture, using it as a bridge to the future. Connecting with community members - from preschool students to elders - enriches the learning and research of university students, faculty, and staff by tapping into traditional creative expression and scientific knowledge. From Hawaiian celestial navigation to Mexican American medicinal methods, these programs offer mutual benefits for communities and universities while helping to preserve important knowledge for the future.

Reinventing Agriculture: The study of agriculture was part of the original mission of land-grant universities. Today, land-grant universities - often through USDA-supported programs - conduct cutting-edge agricultural research, which leads to important breakthroughs in seed quality, crop yield, and food security. Similarly, community-based projects of the universities and the USDA benefit the nation and the world. Projects in this area of the Festival connected the best of the past to the promise of the future.

Sustainable Solutions: The future of our world depends on solutions to growing and harvesting more food, reducing waste, conserving water, and finding viable alternative energy sources. Land-grant and public universities and the USDA collaborate with farmers, foresters, fishermen, biofuel producers, and others to put sustainability research into action, making daily life "greener" for local, regional, and global communities.

Transforming Communities: What does it take to transform a community? Public and land-grant universities and the U.S. Department of Agriculture use the power of their research and outreach capabilities to partner with community members in ways that profoundly improve many aspects of daily life, including health, education, accessibility, and connectivity.

Visitors to the Campus and Community program exercised their green thumbs in our garden spaces; got advice from Executive Master Gardeners and learned how to grow their own pizza garden; attended a "mini-university" class on entomology, paleontology, sustainable energy, and many other topics; explored innovative ideas that communities are using to repurpose items usually considered trash; tried a wide variety of 4-H program family activities, from gardening with heirloom seeds to robotics competitions; enjoyed community-based music and dance, which helps preserve and nurture traditional knowledge and keeps students motivated; and shared stories about their personal experiences with public university and USDA programs.

Betty Belanus was Curator, with a Curatorial Team consisting of Kurt Dewhurst, Sandy Rikoon, and Pat Turner; Cristina Díaz-Carrera was Program Coordinator.

The program was produced in partnership with the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Sponsoring universities included University of California, Davis; University of Florida; University of Hawai'i; University of Illinois; Indiana University; Iowa State University; University of Maryland; Michigan State University; Mississippi State University; University of Missouri; Montana State University; Oregon State University; University of Tennessee, Knoxville; Texas A&M University; University of Vermont; Washington State University; and West Virginia University. Mississippi State University Bagley College of Engineering Dean's Advisory Council was a Donor. Federal support for the program came from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. The U.S. Forest Service and Francis Hamilton Fund for Excellence were Contributors. Friends of Mississippi State University, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences; Hawai'i Convention Center; McCullough Steel Products Inc., Mississippi; PetSmart Charities; and Sanderson Farms Inc. were Supporters.
Presenters:
Betty Belanus, Harold Closter, James Deutsch, David Edelson, Lorenzo Esters, Wendy Fink, Nancy Groce, Lisa L. Higgins, Marjorie Hunt, Suzanne Ingalsbe, Cathy Kerst, Helen Klaebe, Josh Lasky, Elaine J. Lawless, Mario Montaño, Tracy Parish, Sandy Rikoon, Pat Turner, Caren Wilcox, Kurt Dewhurst, Jon Kay
Participants:
Building on Tradition

Michigan State University -- Michigan State UniversityKatherine Eleanor Barnes, 1948-, East Lansing, MichiganJessica Virginia Barnes-Najor, 1974-, East Lansing, MichiganAnn Frances Belleau, 1966-, Sault Ste. Marie, MichiganAyana Belleau, 1998-, Sault Ste. Marie, MichiganCarly Belleau, 2000-, Sault Ste. Marie, MichiganGeorge L. Belleau, 1967-, Sault Ste. Marie, MichiganLexy Belleau, 2000-, Sault Ste. Marie, MichiganTerrie Lynne Denomie, 1961-, Sault Ste. Marie, MichiganBarbara Dye, Middletown, MarylandClaire Dye, Middletown, MarylandEthan Dye, Middletown, MarylandPatricia Ann Farrell, 1946-, East Lansing, MichiganDelores Fitzgerald, East Lansing, MichiganRuth Ann Goorhouse, 1948-, Sault Ste. Marie, MichiganEarly John Kilpatrick, 1955-, Sault Ste. Marie, MichiganMary Margaret Kilpatrick, 1955-, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan

University of Hawai'i -- University of Hawai'iAlohilani M.K. Adachi-JoseAriana AkakaJonah AkakaKimberly Kainoa Ariola-SukisakiKakaihala'i AvilezRichard C.K. BarbozaSamuel BarrChad BaybayanPaanaakala BaybayanManette BenhamSharon Leinaala BrightUluwehi K. CashmanEdward Chung Cashman, Jr.Keola Kawaiulailiahi ChanLa'akea Kaleohaaheookeao ChanDoris Jane ChangeLauleipuaokalani A.O. CoenFrank DamasCarl I. EvensenArnel FergerstromRockne C. Freitas, Honolulu, HawaiiGinger L. HamiltonNicole Mehanaokala HindKalaihikiola A.T. Hind-BoydLui Hokoana, Honolulu, HawaiiHeidi Ilima Ho-LastimosaClaire K. HughesElijah Kalani IsaacVictoria Poliahu Ishibashi-NaboaStacey K. KaauaJoseph Keaweaimoku KaholokulaGordon Umialiloa KaiJanie Leinaala KaiPele Hosea KaioKeahikaaiohelo N. KanaheleKekuhi H. KanaheleDrew Eric HappAlvin Katahara, HonoluluKauilehuamelemele KauhaneLisa Lehue KaulukukuiJames Kanani Kaulukukui, Jr.Kekuhi KealiikanakaoleohaililaniEd KenneyMalu KidoLeslie Kaiu KimuraDerrick KiyabuJoanne Chieko Leong, Honolulu, HawaiiEcstasy LigonMele LookKevin George LopesNaomi C. Losch, Kailua, HawaiiGail Mililani Makuakane-LundinSummer Puanani MaunakeaRyan Martin Shinichi McCormackWahine Aukai MercadoLynne Keala Monaco, Honolulu, HawaiiGloria Ann MurakiTrina Nahm-MijoKatherine Kawhionalani NguyenScott NikaidoDerrik ParkerKapuaohooleiiaikapono Aluli SouzaDonald O. Straney, Hilo, HawaiiBruce Kukini SuwaNoel K. Tagab-CruzTammy M. TanakaTaupouri TangaroKeyra Marie TejadaTy Preston TenganGlenn I. TevesDanielle TorresRalstan Kaulana VaresEthel M. VillalobosLynne T. Waters, Honolulu, HawaiiClifford Watson, Ewa Beach, HawaiiKahealani Kuuipo WilcozPuanaupaka WilliamsMichelle Noe Noe Wong-WilsonMorgan Wright

University of Missouri -- University of MissouriLesley Barker, 1956-, Ste. Genevieve, MissouriJo Jean Britt-Rankin, 1967-, Columbia, MissouriCynthia Kay DeBlauw, 1964-, Columbia, MissouriLisa Lauren Higgins, 1963-, Columbia, MissouriLetitia Johnson, 1962-, Ste. Genevieve, MissouriRobert James Krumm, 1956-, Urbana, IllinoisElaine J. Lawless, 1947-, Columbia, MissouriLynda Lorenz, 1961-, Frohna, MissouriSusan Mills-Gray, 1958-, Harrisonville, MissouriLisa June Palmer, 1960-, Ste. Genevieve, MissouriJames Sanford Rikoon, 1953-, Columbia, MissouriStacy Jo Robb, 1955-, Jefferson City, MissouriLuAnne K. Roth, 1968-, Columbia, MissouriLeAnne StewartDennis Stroughmatt, 1971-, Albion, IllinoisMarie Tyrrell, 1977-, Blue Springs, MissouriIrene Natalie Villmer, 1938-, Cadet, MissouriJames Edward Willgoose, 1955-, Nashville, Illinois

University of New Mexico -- University of New MexicoAntoinette Gonzales, 1971-, Albuquerque, New MexicoRita Navarrete Perez, 1954-, Albuquerque, New MexicoEliseo Torres, 1945-, Albuquerque, New MexicoNieves Y. Torres, 1948-, Albuquerque, New Mexico

University of Texas-Pan Am -- University of Texas-Pan AmMirelle Yariela Acuña, 1985-, McAllen, TexasOrlando De Leon, 1981-, Edinburg, TexasRuben Lino De Los Santos, 1990-, Edinburg, TexasAaron Isai Enriquez, 1991-, McAllen, TexasMiguel Angel Galvan, 1989-, Mission, TexasAngelita Celeste Garcia, 1992-, Edinburg, TexasSteven Garcia, 1975-, Edinburg, TexasNathan Eric García, 1992-, Odessa, TexasDominga Andrea Garza, 1989-, Edinburg, TexasDahlia Ann Guerra, 1954-, Edinburg, TexasCésar Eduardo Jáuregui, 1977-, San Antonio, TexasErica Joanna Lazo-Elizondo, 1985-, Edinburg, TexasFrancisco Loera, 1971-, McAllen, TexasJuan Carlos Lopez, 1989-, Mission, TexasKarina A. Lopez, 1987-, Edinburg, TexasJuan Fernando Mendoza, 1979-, Edinburg, TexasDavid Abraham Moreno Quijano, 1990-, Sullivan City, TexasJose Luis Rangel, Jr., 1985-, Edinburg, Texas

West Virginia University -- West Virginia UniversityMelissa Ackerman, 1991-, Maidsville, West VirginiaBrad Bell, 1991-, Morgantown, West VirginiaCorey Bierer, 1992-, Morgantown, West VirginiaJustice Binegar, 1993-, Williamstown, West VirginiaGareth Blyth, 1992-, Ellwood City, PennsylvaniaNicoletta Ciampa, 1991-, Morgantown, West VirginiaIan Cicco, 1989-, Morgantown, West VirginiaJames Conkle, 1992-, Washington, PennsylvaniaZane Cupec, 1989-, Slippery Rock, PennsylvaniaJamal Davidson, 1991-, New Carrollton, MarylandBrian Falls, 1992-, Steubenville, OhioChristina Fantacci, 1987-, Morgantown, West VirginiaMatthew Finley, 1993-, Moon Township, PennsylvaniaJackson Flesher, 1990-, Grafton, West VirginiaRyan Frost, 1979-, Morgantown, West VirginiaChristopher George, 1988-, Westover, West VirginiaJessica George, 1987-, Westover, West VirginiaKaethe George, 1956-, Morgantown, West VirginiaElissa Laura Gross, 1986-, Washington, D.C.Larissa Hardin, 1990-, Pomfret, MarylandElliott Reid Hartman, 1992-, Burke, VirginiaAdam Honse, 1993-, Uniontown, PennsylvaniaHoward Keith Jackson, 1962-, Morgantown, West VirginiaAlicia Jordan, 1993-, Charlestown, West VirginiaAlison King, 1989-, Fairchance, PennsylvaniaPaul Kreider, 1956-, Morgantown, West VirginiaRafael Langoni de Mello Nunes Smith, 1987-, Morgantown, West VirginiaJohn Lofink, 1988-, Terra Alta, West VirginiaZachary Long, 1990-, Charlestown, West VirginiaElliott Mannette, 1927-Mitchell Marozzi, 1989-, Morgantown, West VirginiaRobert McEwen, 1992-, Oakland, MarylandAlexis Morrell, 1991-, Wheeling, West VirginiaCassandra Nelson, 1991-, Cassville, West VirginiaChristopher Nichter, 1980-, Morgantown, West VirginiaCorey Orban, 1990-, Maidsville, West VirginiaStephen Oswalt, 1993-, Coraopolis, PennsylvaniaSarah Plata, 1988-, Charleston, West VirginiaJohn Posey, 1990-, Wheeling, West VirginiaAndrew Rhodes, 1990-, Morgantown, West VirginiaCody Joseph Riggins, 1990-, Tunnelton, West VirginiaJennifer Sager, 1993-, Irwin, PennsylvaniaStephen Schramm, 1989-, Wheeling, West VirginiaThomas Seidler, 1991-, Wheeling, West VirginiaTyler Shreve, 1989-, Cumberland, MarylandAnne Stickley, 1993-, Fairfax, VirginiaAndrew Swisher, 1987-, Morgantown, West VirginiaMollie Talada, 1990-, Morgantown, West VirginiaAlaina Tetrick, 1990-, Morgantown, West VirginiaGregory Thurman, 1977-, Morgantown, West VirginiaMichael Vercelli, 1973-, Morgantown, West VirginiaRachel Weiss, 1987-, Pittsburgh, PennsylvaniaWilliam J. Winsor, 1956-, Morgantown, West VirginiaMatthew Zeh, 1989-, Morgantown, West Virginia

Reinventing Agriculture

1890 University Consortium -- 1890 University ConsortiumWanda Agnew, 1949-, Bismarck, North DakotaAmber Marie Allery, 1995-, Bismarck, North DakotaCynthia Ann Allery, 1974-, Bismarck, North DakotaPatricia Elaine Aune, 1948-, Bismarck, North DakotaAnnette E. Broyles, 1960-, Bismarck, North DakotaRandolph Judson Two Crow, 1970-, Bismarck, North DakotaKamran K. Abdollahi, 1960-, Baton Rouge, LouisianaRobert Chambers, 1986-, Zachary, LouisianaWilliam Buell Bean, 1977-, Frankfort, KentuckyKimberley Holmes, 1971-, Frankfort, KentuckyKirk Pomper, 1961-, Frankfort, KentuckyAvinash Tope, 1967-, Frankfort, KentuckyTeferi Tsegaye, 1962-, Lexington, KentuckyJason Paul Challandes, 1981-, Newark, DelawareJohn W. Clendaniel, 1972-, Dover, DelawareRose Ogutu, 1966-, Dover, DelawareKathryn A. Onken, 1985-, Dover, DelawareAndy Joseph Wetherill, 1966-, Newark, DelawareEnrique Nelson Escobar, 1948-, Princess Anne, MarylandThomas Handwerker, 1951-, Princess Anne, MarylandBerran Rogers, Princess Anne, MarylandWill Getz, 1942-, Fort Valley, GeorgiaBrou Kouakou, 1962-, Fort Valley, GeorgiaSchauston Miller, 1939-, Fort Valley, GeorgiaChristopher Mullins, Petersburg, Virginia

University of the District of Columbia (Associate Member of the 1890 Consortium) -- University of the District of Columbia (Associate Member of the 1890 Consortium)Howard Franklin, Jr.Tyrone HensonHerbert HoldenAllyn JohnsonJudith Korey, Washington, D.C.Josh LaskyLyle LinkLillie Monroe-LordSteve NovoselSabine O'Hara, Washington, D.C.Douglas PierceTambra Stevenson

1994 University Consortium -- 1994 University ConsortiumElizabeth Campbell, 1979-, Bellingham, WashingtonSusan Given-Seymour, 1946-, Bellingham, WashingtonMeghan Frances McCormick, 1982-, Bellingham, WashingtonTheresa Parker, 1956-, Neah Bay, WashingtonMary Margaret Pelcher, 1960-, Mt. Pleasant, MichiganValerie Segrest, 1983-, Bainbridge Island, Washington

Mississippi State University -- Mississippi State UniversityJames Vincent Aanstos, 1955-, Starkville, MississippiWilliam Heath Barret, 1970-, Starkville, MississippiMegan Bean, 1971-, Mississippi State, MississippiGregory Allan Bohach, 1954-, Starkville, MississippiPhilip Bonfanti, 1962-, Mississippi State, MississippiSusan Elaine Brooks, 1969-, Starkville, MississippiWilliam Blake Brown, 1987-, Columbus, MississippiAmber Burton, 1987-, Starkville, MississippiPhilip A. Bushby, 1949-, Starkville, MississippiGary Tyler Butts, 1989-, Mississippi State, MississippiCritz CampbellEmily Childers, 1983-, Starkville, MississippiJermi Coleman, 1978-, Starkville, MississippiJason Andrew Collins, 1988-, Starkville, MississippiWilliam Austin Dickerson, 1990-, Starkville, MississippiTodd Dickey, 1985-, Starkville, MississippiHaley Rubisoff Doude, 1984-, Starkville, MississippiMatthew Carter Doude, 1984-, Starkville, MississippiOlivia Erinne, 1990-, Natchez, MississippiErron Neal Flowers, 1987-, Starkville, MississippiDavid Garraway, 1980-, Starkville, MississippiJerome Gilbert, 1954-, Starkville, MississippiDavid E. Gillen, 1987-, Clifton, New JerseyThomas Christian Goddette, 1988-, Starkville, MississippiElizabeth Hiebert, 1990-, Moss Point, MississippiConstance Hoblet, 1951-, Starkville, MississippiKent Howard Hoblet, 1946-, Starkville, MississippiJoshua Caldwell Hoop, 1988-, Starkville, MississippiGeorge M. Hopper, 1953-, Starkville, MississippiPeggy F. Hopper, 1955-, Starkville, MississippiMark KeenumSusan Hughes Lassetter, 1985-, Louisville, MississippiChristopher Landon Magee, 1987-, Starkville, MississippiAllison Powe Matthews, 1977-, Starkville, MississippiGeorge Marshall Molen, 1945-, Starkville, MississippiElna Fay Moore, 1946-, Philadelphia, MississippiJonathan Dean Moore, 1988-, Starkville, MississippiReuben B. Moore, 1947-, Philadelphia, MississippiAmanda Mullen, 1990-, Starkville, MississippiEllen Dees Murphy, 1987-, Brandon, MississippiBailey Catherine Owens, 1987-, Starkville, MississippiMaggie Lee Pratt, 1988-, Starkville, MississippiSarah Ann Rajala, 1953-, Starkville, MississippiAnnie T. Ray, 1955-, Eupora, MississippiMichael Joseph Robinson, 1988-, Starkville, MississippiHeather Marie Rowe, 1981-, Starkville, MississippiPeter L. Ryan, 1958-, Starkville, MississippiKyle StewardKaren Marie Eggert Templeton, 1976-, Starkville, MississippiJohn TomlinsonKimberly Lynn Torries, 1989-, Starkville, MississippiJustin Taylor Veazey, 1991-, Pass Christian, MississippiScott Willard, 1968-, Starkville, MississippiAnne Browning Wilson, 1986-, Marietta, GeorgiaKimberly A. Woodruff, 1983-, Starkville, MississippiAmanda Beth Wynn

United States Department of Agriculture -- United States Department of AgricultureGeorge BowmanLincoln Bramwell, Washington, D.C.Rhonda Brandt, Washington, D.C.Russell BriggsEllen BuckleyDonna Burke-Fonda, Washington, D.C.Lorraine ButlerAnnie CeccariniJanette Davis, Washington, D.C.Tiffany EdmondsonJay Evans, Beltsville, MarylandMark Feldlaufer, Beltsville, MarylandSusan FugateLily GravitzRobert Griesbach, Beltsville, MarylandTina HanesJenna JadinRoxanne MacDonaldDuncan McKinleyLyndel Meinhardt, Beltsville, MarylandKelly Novak, Washington, D.C.Ronald Ochoa, Beltsville, MarylandJeff Pettis, Beltsville, MarylandMaggie Rhodes, Washington, D.C.Nichole RosamillaKristen TownsendJon Vrana, Washington, D.C.Caren Wilcox

University of Vermont -- University of VermontGeorge L. Cook, 1950-, Hyde Park, VermontEmily Vera Drew, 1989-, Underhill Center, VermontMark Isselhardt, 1976-, Hyde Park, VermontTimothy D. Perkins, 1961-, Underhill Center, VermontBrian William Stowe, 1963-, Johnson, VermontTimothy Roger Wilmot, 1949-, Underhill, Vermont

Sustainable Solutions

Mississippi State University

Oregon State University -- Oregon State UniversityKeria AndersonDan Arp, Corvallis, OregonBelinda Batten, Corvallis, OregonSamuel Shi-Nung Chan, 1959-, Corvallis, OregonMiguel Cholula, 1983-, Hillsboro, OregonKari Megan Christensen, 1983-, Corvallis, OregonSteve Clark, Corvallis, OregonBeth EmshoffWendy FekkersMatthew Ryan Fowler, 1984-, Everett, WashingtonScott Greenwood, Corvallis, OregonThomas GriffinDoug Hart, Corvallis, OregonBetsy HartleyKathy Higley, Corvallis, OregonAngela Lyn Hunt, 1973-, Astoria, OregonAlicia Lyman-Holt, 1975-, Corvallis, OregonDeb Maddy, Corvallis, OregonOctaviano Merecia-Cuevas, 1982-, Hillsboro, OregonLizeth OchoaJae Park, Astoria, OregonSony ParkGeorge PernsteinerPatrick Proden, Hillsboro, OregonBeth RayEd Ray, Corvallis, OregonScott Reed, Corvallis, OregonKatie ReinhardLaia Robichaux, Corvallis, OregonRobin Rosetta, 1959-, Aurora, OregonKristina Schnell, 1989-, Corvallis, OregonJulie SchwartzShelly Houghtaling Signs, 1972-, Corvallis, OregonKate SinnerIndira SirjueRick Spinrad

University of California, Davis -- University of California, DavisCharles William Bamforth, 1952-, Davis, CaliforniaGina Annette Banks, 1981-, Davis, CaliforniaKatrina Evans, 1980-, Woodland, CaliforniaJon Daniel Flynn, 1961-, Davis, CaliforniaSharon Campbell Knox, 1966-, Davis, CaliforniaLina C. Layiktez, 1970-, Davis, CaliforniaLaurie Ann Lewis Kinshella, 1950-, Davis, CaliforniaCheryl Purifoy, 1963-, Sacramento, CaliforniaChristopher Alan Reynolds, 1951-, Davis, CaliforniaAnn Elisa Savageau, 1945-, Davis, CaliforniaRobert Segar, 1955-, Davis, CaliforniaAbigail Elaine Selya, 1993-, Santa Rosa, CaliforniaCarol Hanling Shu, 1985-, Davis, CaliforniaHelen Xiomara Trejo, 1990-, Davis, CaliforniaPatricia A. Turner, 1955-, Davis, CaliforniaDiane E. Ullman, 1954-, Davis, CaliforniaVirginia Mae Welsh, 1972-, Davis, CaliforniaYi Zhou, 1988-, Davis, California

University of Florida -- University of FloridaErin Elizabeth Alvarez, 1977-, Gainesville, FloridaRuth Hohl Borger, 1957-, Gainesville, FloridaJacqueline K. Burns, 1956-, Auburndale, FloridaJamie Dianne Burrow, 1981-, Lake Alfred, FloridaJames P. Cuda, 1950-, Gainesville, FloridaLynne R. Cuda, 1951-, Gainesville, FloridaMichael Dale Dukes, 1972-, Gainesville, FloridaBetty Ann Dunckel, 1950-, Gainesville, FloridaMary Duryea, 1949-, Gainesville, FloridaEmily E. Eubanks, 1980-, Gainesville, FloridaSeth Charles Farris, 1988-, Davie, FloridaLyn Anne Gettys, 1965-, Davie, FloridaWilliam T. Haller, 1947-, Gainesville, FloridaGail Hansen de Chapman, 1956-, Gainesville, FloridaRebecca Grossberg Harvey, 1973-, Boca Raton, FloridaJohn Parker Hayes, 1955-, Gainesville, FloridaCarolyn Huntley, 1990-, Dunedin, FloridaDale Ann Johnson, 1960-, Gainesville, FloridaTyler Lennon Jones, 1981-, Gainesville, FloridaCassandra Jeaninne Lema, 1989-, Gainesville, FloridaLoy Reginal Markham, 1952-, Cedar Key, FloridaKathleen McKee, 1966-, Gainesville, FloridaBrian Niemann, 1981-, Gainesville, FloridaJack Payne, 1946-, Gainesville, FloridaAmy Nanette Richard, 1962-, Gainesville, FloridaLinda Ann Smith, 1963-, Gainesville, FloridaTimothy Matthew Spann, 1974-, Lake Alfred, FloridaLissette M. Staal, 1956-, Gainesville, FloridaTaylor Verne Stein, 1970-, Gainesville, FloridaLeslie Sturmer, 1951-, Cedar Key, FloridaJoy Vinci, 1981-, Davie, FloridaTimothy Lee White, 1951-, Gainesville, FloridaWilliam Robert White, 1974-, Clear Key, FloridaMegan Brooke Wichman, 1994-, Gainesville, FloridaTom Alan Wichman, 1963-, Gainesville, FloridaSara Elizabeth Williams, 1980-, Davie, FloridaRobert Anthony Witt, 1957-, Cedar Key, Florida

University of Tennessee -- University of TennesseeKate Armstrong, 1987-, Knoxville, TennesseeDiane Bossart, 1964-, Knoxville, TennesseeSteven Mason Davis, Knoxville, TennesseePeter Duke, 1987-, Knoxville, TennesseeKarl Langenberg Hughes, 1988-, Knoxville, TennesseeLauren McCarty, 1988-, Knoxville, TennesseeWilliam Miller, 1952-, Oak Ridge, TennesseeJason Pimsler, 1986-, Knoxville, TennesseeJames Rose, 1973-, Knoxville, TennesseeEdgar Stach, 1963-, Knoxville, Tennessee

Washington State University -- Washington State UniversityTammey Lynn Boston, 1958-, Pullman, WashingtonCharles Burke, 1961-, Pullman, WashingtonBrian C. Clark, 1957-, Pullman, WashingtonTherese Rose Harris, 1958-, Colton, WashingtonGwen-Alyn Hoheisel, 1975-, Prosser, WashingtonKathryn R. La Pointe, 1958-, Moscow, Idaho

Transforming Communities

Indiana University -- Indiana UniversityLetha R. Anderson, 1957-, Pecos, TexasEdward BalasSandra Brothers, 1947-, Spencerville, IndianaAlan Burdette, 1965-, Bloomington, IndianaMary Curry, 1942-, Fort Wayne, IndianaEdward Dambik, 1958-, Bloomington, IndianaW. Scott Deal, 1957-, Indianapolis, IndianaMargaret Dolinsky, 1960-, Bloomington, IndianaChristopher Edward Eller, 1975-, Bloomington, IndianaKatrina Darlene Gorman, 1973-, San Antonio, TexasGladys Gorman-Douglas, Pecos, TexasJeff Guernsey, 1959-, Jeffersonville, IndianaIvan Lane Guernsey, Jr., 1948-, Scottsburg, IndianaLarry Dale Hopkins, 1945-, Pekin, IndianaJon Kay, 1966-, Bloomington, IndianaChin Hua Kong, 1978-, Bloomington, IndianaJosephine E.J. McRobbie, 1984-, Bloomington, IndianaKathy Muhammad, 1949-, Fort Wayne, IndianaMilan Opacich, 1928-, Schererville, IndianaAmy Elizabeth Powell, 1936-, Baltimore, MarylandAndrew James Ragusa, 1984-, Bloomington, IndianaDavid Reagan, 1984-, Bloomington, IndianaElizabeth Shepherd, 1984-, Bloomington, IndianaMichael James Stamper, 1972-, Bloomington, IndianaMaxine Stovall, 1953-, Roanoke, IndianaJannie Wyatt, 1951-, Fort Wayne, Indiana

Iowa State University -- Iowa State UniversityLynn Adams, 1962-, Red Oak, IowaSteven Lynn Adams, Red Oak, IowaTim Borich, Ames, IowaCorydon Arthur Croyle, 1953-, Ames, IowaJennifer Drinkwater, 1979-, Ames, IowaAmy Elizabeth Edmondson, 1990-, Ames, IowaLisa Marie Fontaine, 1957-, Ames, IowaJane Nolan Goeken, 1958-, Spencer, IowaJuan Himar Hernandez, 1977-, Ottumwa, IowaKaren Kay Lathrop, 1966-, West Liberty, IowaSandra Elizabeth Norvell, 1960-, Ames, IowaChitra Rajan, 1958-, Ames, IowaDavid Allen Ringholz, 1972-, Ames, IowaChristopher Ray Van Oort, 1991-, Ames, Iowa

Montana State University -- Montana State UniversityKiah Abbey, Bozeman, MontanaTom Calcagni, Bozeman, MontanaClayton Christian, Helena, MontanaJean Margaret Conover, 1977-, Bozeman, MontanaWaded Cruzado, Bozeman, MontanaKelly Gorham, Bozeman, MontanaJeffrey Brian Holloway, 1955-, Bozeman, MontanaJack Horner, Bozeman, MontanaJamie Drago Jette, 1949-, Bozeman, MontanaMichael Patrick Leiggi, 1954-, Bozeman, MontanaMiki Lowe, Bozeman, MontanaLisa Marie Lundgren, 1989-, Bozeman, MontanaSheldon L. McKamey, 1951-, Bozeman, MontanaLindsay Murdoch, Bozeman, MontanaCollin Nelson, Bozeman, MontanaMartha Potvin, Bozeman, MontanaChase Rose, Bozeman, MontanaJoseph Steffens, Bozeman, MontanaJoseph Thiel, Bozeman, MontanaAngela H. Weikert, 1982-, Bozeman, Montana

Texas A&M University -- Texas A&M UniversityCory Lynn Arcak, 1973-, College Station, TexasRobert T. Bisor, IIIBryan O'Neil Boulanger, 1976-, College Station, TexasBooker Stephen Carpenter, II, 1965-, State College, PennsylvaniaSherylon J. Carroll, 1959-, College Station, TexasJason D. Cook, 1973-, College Station, TexasJuan Gerardo Galvan, 1954-, Laredo, TexasCynthia A. Gay, 1955-, College Station, TexasR. Bowen Loftin, College Station, TexasSherif Ezzat Mabrouk, 1989-, College Station, TexasMichelle Jean Mumme, 1990-, Indianapolis, IndianaOscar Jesus Muñoz, 1950-, College Station, TexasLynn Novick, 1945-, College Station, TexasKaran WatsonChad E. Wootton

University of Illinois -- University of IllinoisBonnie Jo Buckley, 1950-, Charleston, IllinoisAmber Jo Buckley-Shaklee, 1984-, Charleston, IllinoisAnn CameronJupin Abraham Chacko, 1990-, Skokie, IllinoiKen Cleeton, 1960-, Effingham, IllinoisK.L. Cleeton, 1989-, Effingham, IllinoisStephen Paul Diebold, 1988-, Inverness, IllinoiLily DiegoKathleen Downes, 1993-, Floral Park, New YorkSusan Downes, 1963-, Floral Park, New YorkSarah FranzJon Richard Gunderson, 1958-, Champaign, IllinoisAzarmidokht HamidianBrad Hedrick, 1952-, Urbana, IllinoisTamar HellerEmily M. Hoskins, 1983-, Nashville, TennesseeErik Jenkins, 1992-, Crystal Lake, IllinoisGregory Jenkins, 1955-, Crystal Lake, IllinoisJeong-Suk Jin, 1956-, Saint Louis, MissouriKatherine Ann Johnson, 1954-, Champaign, IllinoisKathleen Ann Johnson, 1956-, Northfield, IllinoisJi-Hae Lee, 1983-, Saint Louis, MissouriPage Lindahl-Lewis, 1966-, Urbana, IllinoisAnne Marois, 1981-, Champaign, IllinoisElizabeth McBrideDeana McDonagh, 1965-, Savoy, IllinoisKatelyn McNamaraKeith MillerTimothy Nugent, Champaign, IllinoisKushal Parikh, 1987-, Darien, IllinoisTracy Michael Parish, 1979-, Champaign, IllinoisAlyson PatsavasMatthew RamirHadi Rangin, 1962-, Champaign, IllinoisLynn Marie Raymond, 1959-, River Forest, IllinoisVictoria Ann Raymond, 1991-, River Forest, IllinoisKristina ReisCarrie SandahlSheila M. Schneider, 1958-, Champaign, IllinoisScott Wilson Schwartz, 1957-, Urbana, IllinoisJoan SestakRoxana StuppKaren SwanSara VogtJill Lindsey Von Fumetti, 1991-, Johnston, IowaRandy John Von Fumetti, 1956-, Johnston, IowaAnne Rose Wessel, 1992-, Teutopolis, IllinoisMichael Todd White, 1987-, Champaign, IllinoisTiffany Wilkinson, 1984-, Mesa, Arizona

University of Maryland Extension -- University of Maryland ExtensionDavid Franc, Westminster, MarylandKathryn A. Franc, 1993-, Westminster, MarylandDenise Elaine Frebertshauser, 1969-, College Park, MarylandKathy Gordon, Westminster, MarylandKevin Eugene Haenftling, 1994-, Mountain Lake Park, MarylandChris Johnston, Centreville, MarylandAaron Lantz, 1994-, Mountain Lake Park, MarylandArlene Lantz, 1965-, Mountain Lake Park, MarylandWillie LantzPhil Malone, Mountain Lake Park, MarylandAmy Rhodes, Salisbury, MarylandAnn Carroll Sherrard, 1956-, Mountain Lake Park, MarylandAnne TurkosAmanda Wahle, Glen Burnie, Maryland

Family Activity Area

California State University, Fresno -- California State University, FresnoMaria Guadalupe Carrillo, 1988-, Fresno, CaliforniaJasen Michael Costa, 1988-, Tulare, CaliforniaPaulette Spruill Fleming, 1948-, Fresno, CaliforniaVanessa Guadalupe Fuentes, 1991-, Fresno, CaliforniaJerica Corinne Guzman, 1987-, Reedley, CaliforniaKristine Michelle Habib, 1968-, Fresno, CaliforniaRonda Yvette Kelley, 1967-, Fresno, CaliforniaSydney Shenae Morrow, 1991-, Seaside, CaliforniaVictoria Nichole Ornelas, 1988-, Fresno, CaliforniaWilliam C. Raines, 1953-, Fresno, California

Michigan State University

Oregon State University

Performing Artists

Dennis Stroughmatt et l'Esprit Creole

University of Texas-Pan American Mariachi Aztlán

The Guernsey Brothers

University of Hawai'i's Tuahine Troupe

Unukupukupu

West Virginia University's Steel Band Drum Ensemble
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2012 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2012, Series 2
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2012 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk56479362f-4e0d-4e5b-b5d2-0425035f4c01
EDAN-URL:
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