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180 documents - page 1 of 9

1929-1930 

Collection Creator:
ETL Testing Laboratories, Inc.  Search this
Keystone View Company  Search this
Shinn, Walter Scott  Search this
Underwood & Underwood, Inc.  Search this
Fotograms (New York (N.Y.)  Search this
International Newsreel Corp (New York (N.Y.)  Search this
Extent:
34 Items
Container:
Folder 9, Item 1-34
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents note:
With Charles Schwab and Adolph Ochs; Harvey Firestone; with giant birthday card; receiving honorary degree; with Supreme Court justice Owen J. Roberts.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.

Most images probably public domain due to expired copyrights.
Collection Citation:
Edison Photographs, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Thomas Alva Edison Photoprints
Thomas Alva Edison Photoprints / Series 1: Silver Gelatin Prints / 1.2: Folder-Level Summaries with Highlights of Contents
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep859b05647-77e9-40ae-901a-a1b3eb33ca25
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0299-ref60

Chase-Riboud, Barbara - General

Collection Creator:
Parsons, Betty  Search this
Extent:
(5 folders)
Container:
Box 2, Folder 23-27
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1970-1980
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers, 1916-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers / Series 1: Artists Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw91495e213-519c-4929-93db-aad2cd8a761a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-parsbett-ref67
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Harry Siddons Mowbray and Mowbray Family papers

Creator:
Mowbray, H. Siddons (Harry Siddons), 1858-1928  Search this
Names:
American Academy in Rome  Search this
Pierpont Morgan Library  Search this
United States. Commission of Fine Arts  Search this
University Club (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
McKim, Charles Follen, 1847-1909  Search this
Mead, William Rutherford, 1846-1928  Search this
Mowbray, Florence Millard  Search this
Mowbray, George Mordey, d. 1891  Search this
Mowbray, George S.  Search this
Mowbray, Helen Amelia, d. 1910  Search this
Sherwood, Herbert F. (Herbert Francis), 1872-  Search this
Extent:
7.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Prints
Sketches
Etchings
Diaries
Place:
Larz Anderson Park (Brookline, Mass.)
Date:
1872-1976
Summary:
The papers of painter and muralist Harry Siddons Mowbray (1858-1928) and the Mowbray family measure 7.5 linear feet and date from 1872 to 1976. The papers document Mowbray's career as a painter and decorative muralist as well as his activities with the Commission of Fine Arts, the American Academy in Rome, and the Sculpture Commission of Connecticut. The papers include biographical materials, scattered correspondence, nineteen diaries, personal business records, commission files, organization files, writings and notes, printed materials, three scrapbooks, photographs, and artworks. There are scattered family papers of Helen Mowbray, Florence Mowbray, George Mowbray, and George Siddons Mowbray.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter and muralist Harry Siddons Mowbray (1858-1928) and the Mowbray family measure 7.5 linear feet and date from 1872 to 1976. The papers document Mowbray's career as a painter and decorative muralist as well as his activities with the Commission of Fine Arts, the American Academy in Rome, and the Sculpture Commission of Connecticut. The papers include biographical materials, scattered correspondence, nineteen diaries, personal business records, commission files, organization files, writings and notes, printed materials, three scrapbooks, photographs, and artworks. There are scattered family papers of Helen Mowbray, Florence Mowbray, George Mowbray, and George Siddons Mowbray.

Biographical material includes biographical sketches, certificates, obituaries and estate records, and school material. Also found are printed materials from memorial dedications, ceremonies, and dinners held in Washington, D.C., such as menus, invitations, and admission tickets.

Correspondence is scattered and consists of letters from family, professional colleagues, artists, and architects including Charles McKim and William R. Mead. Florence Mowbray's correspondence includes thank you notes and condolences.

Diaries include seventeen written by Harry Siddons Mowbray, one by Helen Mowbray, and one by Florence Mowbray. Harry Siddons Mowbray's diaries date from 1876 to 1927 and reference a trip to the Azores, current events, his career and works of art, and his service with the Commission of Fine Arts.

Writings and notes consist of Mowbray's handwritten autobiography, school writings, lists, and a biography of Mowbray by Herbert Sherwood.

Personal business records consist of a French military sponsorship, gift acknowledgements and receipts.

Commission files include correspondence, printed materials, and writings relating to Mowbray's works of art at: Larz Anderson House, Appellate Court in New York City; Federal Building in Cleveland, Ohio; Gunn Memorial Library in Washington, CT; the Life of Christ Series; Madison Square Church in New York City; Morgan Library in New York City; St. John's Church in Washington, CT; University Club in New York City; and F. W. Vanderbilt House in Hyde Park, New York.

Organization files document Mowbray's participation with the American Academy in Rome, the Commission of Fine Arts, and the Sculpture Commission of Connecticut. Files generall include organizational history, correspondence, printed material, writings, reports, meeting minutes, and printed material. Of note are materials relating to the standardization of the flag of the United States.

Printed material includes blank stationery and postcards, clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs, and an issue of Collector's News.

Photographs include two photo albums complied by the Mowbray family, portraits of Mowbray, snapshots with colleagues and friends, and photos of works of art.

One scrapbook compiled by Harry Siddons Mowbray relates to his travels in Rome in 1903-1904. Annother documents his artwork and career, and the third contains clippings concerning his chemical inventions.

Artworks include sketches, prints, and etchings by Harry Siddons Mowbray and others.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 11 series. Glass plate negatives are housed separately and closed to researchers.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Information, 1872-1965 (0.4 linear feet; Box 1, 13, 15)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1873-1957 (0.4 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 3: Diaries, 1876-1929 (1.2 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 4: Writings and Notes, circa 1870-circa 1930 (0.2 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 5: Personal Business and Financial Records, 1877-1966 (3 folders; Box 3)

Series 6: Commission Files, 1896-1979 (0.4 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 7: Organization Files, 1904-1928 (0.7 linear feet; Box 3-4, 13, 15-16)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1876-1976 (0.2 linear feet; Box 4, 16)

Series 9: Photographs, circa 1874-circa 1928 (4.7 linear feet; Box 4-14, 17-18)

Series 10: Scrapbooks, circa 1890-1920 (0.3 linear feet; Box 5, 13-14)

Series 11: Artwork, 1870-1910 (3 folders; Box 5, 13)
Biographical / Historical:
Harry Siddons Mowbray (1858-1928) was a painter, muralist, and public servant who was active in New York, Connecticut, and Washington, D.C..

Born in Alexandria, Egypt in 1858, Harry Siddons was orphaned at an early age. He was sent to live with his mother's sister Annie and uncle, George Mowbray, whose name he adopted. Harry Siddons Mowbray attended West Point Military Academy but left to pursue a career as a painter. Upon moving to Paris, Mowbray enrolled at the Atelier Bonnant where he studied under Léon Bonnat. Mowbray received attention for his decorative murals thoughout the East Coast of the United States. His commissions included the J.P. Morgan Library, F. W. Vanderbilt house, Larz Anderson house, Appellate Courthouse of New York City, St. John's Church in Washignton Connecticut, and the Federal Building in Cleveland, Ohio. Later in his career, Mowbray returned to painting and completed theLife of Christ series of works.

In addition to painting, Mowbray served on public commissions and committees. He was a member of the federal Commission of Fine Arts from 1921 until his death in 1928. During this time, he was involved in the planning of many Washington, D.C. memorials and public works including the standardization of the flag of the United States of America. He served as director of the American Academy in Rome from 1903-1904.

Harry Siddons Mowbray married Helen Amelia Millard in 1888. They had one child, George Siddons Mowbray. After his wife's death, Mowbray married her sister, Florence in 1915. Together, Florence and Mowbray had two children. He died in 1928. After her husband's death, Florence Mowbray was active in publishing her husband's autobiography.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reel 2895) including Mowbray's letters to his son George, travel diaries of Helen Mowbray, writings, artworks, and a photograph. Lent materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
The Harry Siddons Mowbray and Mowbray family papers were donated in multiple accretions by Mrs. Henry S. Mowbray, Mowbray's widow, Hugh McKittrick Jones, Jr., Mowbray's son in law, and Mrs. Helen M. Rogers from 1979-1983. Mrs. Helen M. Rogers also loaned materials for microfilming in 1983.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Connecticut  Search this
Topic:
Muralists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Flags -- United States  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Prints
Sketches
Etchings
Diaries
Citation:
Harry Siddons Mowbray and Mowbray family papers, 1872-1976. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.mowbharr
See more items in:
Harry Siddons Mowbray and Mowbray Family papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9427779e6-0055-4892-aef8-0287d36de439
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mowbharr
Online Media:

Brents Carlton papers

Creator:
Carlton, Brents, 1903-1962  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
Golden Gate International Exposition (1939-1940 : San Francisco, Calif.)  Search this
Arnautoff, Victor Mikhail, 1896-1979  Search this
De Patta, Margaret, 1903-1964  Search this
Dean, Mallette, 1907-  Search this
Helser, Carrie Carlton  Search this
Neuhaus, Eugen, 1879-1963  Search this
Nichols, Dale, 1904-  Search this
Smith, Judson, 1880-1962  Search this
Extent:
4.7 Linear feet
0.528 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Photographs
Prints
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Date:
1903-2014
Summary:
The papers of sculptor and painter Brents Carlton measure 4.7 linear feet and 0.528 GB and date from 1903 through 2014. The collection consists of biographical material, correspondence, personal business records, notes, a scrapbook, exhibition files, art work, photographs, digital photographs, and printed material.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of sculptor and painter Brents Carlton measure 4.7 linear feet and 0.528 GB and date from 1903 through 2014. The collection consists of biographical material, correspondence, personal business records, notes, a scrapbook, exhibition files, art work, photographs, digital photographs, and printed material.

Biographical materials include several autobiographical accounts, school-related materials, a student card from the Art Students' League, and other identification cards.

Correspondence consists primarily of letters from family members and colleagues, including letters from Victor Arnautoff, H. Mallette Dean, Margaret De Patta, Eugen Neuhaus, Dale Nichols, and Judson T. Smith.

Personal business records include bank passbooks, pharmacy licensing records, receipts, income tax records, and ledgers of income, expenses, and art work sold.

Notes consists of Brents Carlton's address book, notebooks, and meeting minutes, as well as notes written by his daughter Carrie Carlton Helser.

There is one scrapbook. Exhibition files include correspondence, notes, photographs, and printed material related to the Golden Gate International Exhibition and other shows. There are also sketches, drawings, and prints by Carlton in the artwork series.

Photographic material includes an album, slides, negatives, and prints depicting Brents Carlton and his artwork, friends, family, and studios.

Printed material includes magazines, brochures, catalogs, and clippings.

A 2015 addition to the Brents Carlton papers includes additional biographical material, correspondence, personal business records, photographic material, and printed material.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 10 series. Series 10 consists of a 2015 addition to the papers that was not integrated into the other series, although there are similar types of materials.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1921-1944 (0.1 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1922-1987 (0.2 linear feet; Boxes 1, 6)

Series 3: Personal Business Records, 1924-1959 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 4: Notes, circa 1923-2009 (0.1 linear feet; Boxes 1, 6, 0.013 GB; ER01)

Series 5: Scrapbook, 1928-1962 (0.2 linear feet; Box 6)

Series 6: Exhibition Files, 1927-1983 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1, OV 8)

Series 7: Art Work, 1924-1962 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1, 6, OV 8)

Series 8: Photographs, 1923-circa 1960 (0.6 linear feet; Boxes 1-2, 6-7)

Series 9: Printed Material, 1923-2012 (0.2 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 10: 2015 Addition to the Brents Carlton Papers, 1903-2014 (2.3 linear feet; Boxes 2-5, 7, 0.515 GB; ER02-ER03)
Biographical / Historical:
Brents Carlton was a sculptor and painter who worked primarily in San Francisco, California.

Brents Carlton was born on October 31, 1903, in Roswell, New Mexico; his family later moved to Arkansas. In 1924, Carlton moved to San Francisco to attend the California School of Fine Arts for four years. From 1928 to 1929, he studied under a scholarship at the Art Students' League in New York, after which he returned to San Francisco and established his own studio at Polk Street. In order to support his family, Carlton was also employed as a pharmacist for 30 years.

In 1937, Carlton moved to a studio on Montgomery Street. In 1938, Carlton was commissioned to create four of his most notable works for the Golden Gate International Exposition (1939-1940) on Treasure Island: two large cast concrete figures for the Fountain of Western Waters at the Court of Pacifica, and two 18-foot bas-relief figures for the façade of the California State Building. He married Jessie Bosworth in 1939 and they had a daughter Carrie.

In the mid-1940s, Carlton relocated to a new studio above the pharmacy on Mission Street, where he worked. Due to failing health in the late 1950s, Carlton switched from sculpture to painting. Brents Carlton died of cancer on September 6, 1962 in San Francisco. His works have been exhibited in the California Palace of the Legion of Honor, the Oakland Art Gallery, and the San Francisco Museum.
Provenance:
The Brents Carlton papers were donated by the artist's daughter Carrie Carlton Helser in 1991 and 2015.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- California  Search this
Topic:
Sculptors -- California  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Prints
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Brents Carlton papers, 1903-2014. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.carlbren
See more items in:
Brents Carlton papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw90c442493-a9cb-43e5-a7f1-1b3e1d362974
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-carlbren
Online Media:

Minutes

Extent:
8.70 cu. ft. (9 document boxes) (7 12x17 boxes) (1 16x20 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
1846-1995
Descriptive Entry:
These records are the official minutes of the Board. They are compiled at the direction of the Secretary of the Smithsonian, who is also secretary to the Board, after approval by the Regents' Executive Committee and by the Regents themselves. The minutes are edited, not a verbatim account of proceedings. For reasons unknown, there are no manuscript minutes for the period from 1857 through 1890; and researchers must rely on printed minutes published in the Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution instead. Minutes are transferred regularly from the Secretary's Office to the Archives. Minutes less than 15 years old are closed to researchers. Indexes exist for the period from 1907 to 1946 and can be useful.
Historical Note:
The Smithsonian Institution was created by authority of an Act of Congress approved August 10, 1846. The Act entrusted direction of the Smithsonian to a body called the Establishment, composed of the President; the Vice President; the Chief Justice of the United States; the secretaries of State, War, Navy, Interior, and Agriculture; the Attorney General; and the Postmaster General. In fact, however, the Establishment last met in 1877, and control of the Smithsonian has always been exercised by its Board of Regents. The membership of the Regents consists of the Vice President and the Chief Justice of the United States; three members each of the Senate and House of Representatives; two citizens of the District of Columbia; and seven citizens of the several states, no two from the same state. (Prior to 1970 the category of Citizen Regents not residents of Washington consisted of four members). By custom the Chief Justice is Chancellor. The office was at first held by the Vice President. However, when Millard Fillmore succeeded to the presidency on the death of Zachary Taylor in 1851, Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney was chosen in his stead. The office has always been filled by the Chief Justice since that time.

The Regents of the Smithsonian have included distinguished Americans from many walks of life. Ex officio members (Vice President) have been: Spiro T. Agnew, Chester A. Arthur, Allen W. Barkley, John C. Breckenridge, George Bush, Schuyler Colfax, Calvin Coolidge, Charles Curtis, George M. Dallas, Charles G. Dawes, Charles W. Fairbanks, Millard Fillmore, Gerald R. Ford, John N. Garner, Hannibal Hamlin, Thomas A. Hendricks, Garret A. Hobart, Hubert H. Humphrey, Andrew Johnson, Lyndon B. Johnson, William R. King, Thomas R. Marshall, Walter F. Mondale, Levi P. Morton, Richard M. Nixon, Nelson A. Rockefeller, Theodore Roosevelt, James S. Sherman, Adlai E. Stevenson, Harry S. Truman, Henry A. Wallace, William A. Wheeler, Henry Wilson.

Ex officio members (Chief Justice) have been: Roger B. Taney, Salmon P. Chase, Nathan Clifford, Morrison R. Waite, Samuel F. Miller, Melville W. Fuller, Edward D. White, William Howard Taft, Charles Evans Hughes, Harlan F. Stone, Fred M. Vinson, Earl Warren, Warren E. Burger.

Regents on the part of the Senate have been: Clinton P. Anderson, Newton Booth, Sidney Breese, Lewis Cass, Robert Milledge Charlton, Bennet Champ Clark, Francis M. Cockrell, Shelby Moore Cullom, Garrett Davis, Jefferson Davis, George Franklin Edmunds, George Evans, Edwin J. Garn, Walter F. George, Barry Goldwater, George Gray, Hannibal Hamlin, Nathaniel Peter Hill, George Frisbie Hoar, Henry French Hollis, Henry M. Jackson, William Lindsay, Henry Cabot Lodge, Medill McCormick, James Murray Mason, Samuel Bell Maxey, Robert B. Morgan, Frank E. Moss, Claiborne Pell, George Wharton Pepper, David A. Reed, Leverett Saltonstall, Hugh Scott, Alexander H. Smith, Robert A. Taft, Lyman Trumbull, Wallace H. White, Jr., Robert Enoch Withers.

Regents on the part of the House of Representatives have included: Edward P. Boland, Frank T. Bow, William Campbell Breckenridge, Overton Brooks, Benjamin Butterworth, Clarence Cannon, Lucius Cartrell, Hiester Clymer, William Colcock, William P. Cole, Jr., Maurice Connolly, Silvio O. Conte, Edward E. Cox, Edward H. Crump, John Dalzell, Nathaniel Deering, Hugh A. Dinsmore, William English, John Farnsworth, Scott Ferris, Graham Fitch, James Garfield, Charles L. Gifford, T. Alan Goldsborough, Frank L. Greene, Gerry Hazleton, Benjamin Hill, Henry Hilliard, Ebenezer Hoar, William Hough, William M. Howard, Albert Johnson, Leroy Johnson, Joseph Johnston, Michael Kirwan, James T. Lloyd, Robert Luce, Robert McClelland, Samuel K. McConnell, Jr., George H. Mahon, George McCrary, Edward McPherson, James R. Mann, George Perkins Marsh, Norman Y. Mineta, A. J. Monteague, R. Walton Moore, Walter H. Newton, Robert Dale Owen, James Patterson, William Phelps, Luke Poland, John Van Schaick Lansing Pruyn, B. Carroll Reece, Ernest W. Roberts, Otho Robards Singleton, Frank Thompson, Jr., John M. Vorys, Hiram Warner, Joseph Wheeler.

Citizen Regents have been: David C. Acheson, Louis Agassiz, James B. Angell, Anne L. Armstrong, William Backhouse Astor, J. Paul Austin, Alexander Dallas Bache, George Edmund Badger, George Bancroft, Alexander Graham Bell, James Gabriel Berrett, John McPherson Berrien, Robert W. Bingham, Sayles Jenks Bowen, William G. Bowen, Robert S. Brookings, John Nicholas Brown, William A. M. Burden, Vannevar Bush, Charles F. Choate, Jr., Rufus Choate, Arthur H. Compton, Henry David Cooke, Henry Coppee, Samuel Sullivan Cox, Edward H. Crump, James Dwight Dana, Harvey N. Davis, William Lewis Dayton, Everette Lee Degolyer, Richard Delafield, Frederic A. Delano, Charles Devens, Matthew Gault Emery, Cornelius Conway Felton, Robert V. Fleming, Murray Gell-Mann, Robert F. Goheen, Asa Gray, George Gray, Crawford Hallock Greenwalt, Nancy Hanks, Caryl Parker Haskins, Gideon Hawley, John B. Henderson, John B. Henderson, Jr., A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., Gardner Greene Hubbard, Charles Evans Hughes, Carlisle H. Humelsine, Jerome C. Hunsaker, William Preston Johnston, Irwin B. Laughlin, Walter Lenox, Augustus P. Loring, John Maclean, William Beans Magruder, John Walker Maury, Montgomery Cunningham Meigs, John C. Merriam, R. Walton Moore, Roland S. Morris, Dwight W. Morrow, Richard Olney, Peter Parker, Noah Porter, William Campbell Preston, Owen Josephus Roberts, Richard Rush, William Winston Seaton, Alexander Roby Shepherd, William Tecumseh Sherman, Otho Robards Singleton, Joseph Gilbert Totten, John Thomas Towers, Frederic C. Walcott, Richard Wallach, Thomas J. Watson, Jr., James E. Webb, James Clarke Welling, Andrew Dickson White, Henry White, Theodore Dwight Woolsey.
Topic:
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Museum trustees  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 1, Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents, Minutes
Identifier:
Record Unit 1
See more items in:
Minutes
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0001
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Brownie McGhee and Sonny Terry

Artist:
Terry, Sonny  Search this
McGhee, Brownie, 1915-1996  Search this
McGhee, Sticks, 1918-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Asch, Moses  Search this
Distler, Marian, 1919-1964  Search this
Folkways Records  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (sound-tape reel, analog, 7 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
North Carolina
New York (N.Y.)
Tennessee
United States
Contents:
Ballin' in my room--Froggy went a-courting (2x)--I'm a stranger here--Dirty mistreater--Drinkin wine spo-de-o-dee
Local Numbers:
FW-ASCH-7RR-5985
General:
CDR copy
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Listening only. No Duplication Allowed.
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for additional information.
Topic:
Blues (Music)  Search this
Guitar  Search this
Harmonica  Search this
Collection Citation:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.ASCH, Item FW-ASCH-7RR-5985
See more items in:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection
Moses and Frances Asch Collection / Series 9: Audio Recordings / RR
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk50273c230-f331-4ba0-a569-175dbe00d767
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-asch-ref27929

Marilyn Church Courtroom Drawings

Creator:
Church, Marilyn  Search this
Names:
Black Liberation Army  Search this
FALN.  Search this
WorldCom (Firm).  Search this
Berkowitz, David Richard, 1953-  Search this
Carter, Rubin, 1937-  Search this
Chapman, Mark David  Search this
Combs, Sean John  Search this
Galella, Ron  Search this
Hinckley, John, Jr.  Search this
Kennedy, Caroline, 1957-  Search this
Milken, Michael  Search this
Mitchell, John N. (John Newton), 1913-1988  Search this
Onassis, Jacqueline Kennedy, 1929-1994  Search this
Quinlan, Karen Ann  Search this
Shakur, Tupac, 1971-1996  Search this
Shields, Brooke  Search this
Stans, Maurice H., 1908-1998  Search this
Stewart, Martha  Search this
Vicious, Sid  Search this
Westmoreland, William C. (William Childs), 1914-  Search this
Whitehead, Mary Beth  Search this
Williams, Harrison A.  Search this
Extent:
1.5 Cubic feet (3 map-folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Courtroom illustrations
Date:
1975-2004.
Scope and Contents note:
Thirty-eight courtroom drawings by artist Marilyn Church. The drawings depict scenes from some of the most famous and notorious cases in the city of New York: Tupac Shakur's 1994 trial for sexual abuse; Sean John Combs's 2001 trial for assault and weapons violations; Sid Vicious's (John Simon Ritchie) pre-trial hearing for murder in 1978; Rubin "Hurricane" Carter's 1976 re-trial for murder; John Hinckley, Jr.'s 1982 trial for attempting to assassinate President Ronald Reagan; Mark David Chapman's 1981 trial for the murder of John Lennon; Kevin King's 1982 trial for harassing Caroline Kennedy; photographer Ron Galella's trial for stalking Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis; Brooke Shields's 1981 case against photographer Gary Gross; David "Son of Sam" Berkowitz's 1978 murder trial; the 1990 trial of five youths charged with assaulting a jogger in Central Park; Bernhard Goetz's 1987 trial for attempted murder and assault; Michael Milken's 1990 trial for securities violations; the 2002 trial of executives of WorldCom; Martha Stewart's 2004 trial for conspiracy and obstruction of justice charges; John Gotti's 1992 trial for racketeering, murder and numerous other charges; Joseph Quinlan's petition to the court to discontinue keeping his daughter, Karen Ann Quinlan, alive by means of a respirator; the 1978 negligence lawsuit of a Florida couple named Del Zio against Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center over one of the first attempts at conceiving a "test tube baby"; the 1987 custody dispute regarding "Baby M", who was born to a surrogate mother, Mary Beth Whitehead; the 1974 trial of John Mitchell and Maurice Stans for their roles in the Watergate conspiracy; New Jersey Senator Harrison A. Williams's 1981 trial for conspiracy and bribery following the FBI's "Abscam" sting operation; General William Westmoreland's 1982 lawsuit against CBS; the FALN's (Fuerzas Armadas de Liberacion Nacional) 1997 hearing on charges of terrorism; the 1983-1984 trial of several members of the Black Liberation Army for robbery of a Brinks armored car (a series of trials that came to be referred to as the "Brinks trials"); the 1993 trial of four defendants in the 1993 World Trade Center bombing; and the "Landmarks Terror Trial", in which ten Arab immigrants were tried for a plot to blow up a wide range of New York City landmarks.
Arrangement:
1 series.
Biographical/Historical note:
New York-based courtroom artist.
Provenance:
Collection donated by Marilyn Church in 2008.
Restrictions:
Unrestricted research access on site by appointment.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Trials (Murder)  Search this
Trials (Sex crimes)  Search this
Trials -- New York (N.Y.)  Search this
World Trade Center Bombing, New York (N.Y.), 1993  Search this
Trials (Assassination)  Search this
Trials (Assault and battery)  Search this
Surrogate mothers  Search this
Terrorism -- United States  Search this
Trials (Conspiracy)  Search this
Trials (Attempted murder)  Search this
Trials (Bribery)  Search this
Central Park Jogger Rape Trial -- 1990 -- New York (N.Y.)  Search this
Courtroom art  Search this
Trials (Malpractice)  Search this
Trials (Custody of children)  Search this
Courts -- New York (N.Y.)  Search this
Fertilization in vitro  Search this
Courtroom artists -- New York (N.Y.)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Courtroom illustrations
Citation:
Marilyn Church Courtroom Drawings, 1975-2004, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1137
See more items in:
Marilyn Church Courtroom Drawings
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep80e3d1953-2ae7-4091-8177-4e026ef4b5dd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1137
Online Media:

[E. Howard Clock Tower Clocks Ledger, Volume 2, book.]

Author:
E. Howard Clock Co.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Howard, Edward  Search this
E. Howard Clock Co.  Search this
Extent:
1 Volume (Ink on paper, 10.6" x 8.2".)
Container:
Box 16
Type:
Archival materials
Volumes
Ledgers (account books)
Place:
Massachusetts -- 19th century
Boston (Mass.) -- 19th century
Date:
Circa 1900
Scope and Contents:
Listing of tower clock serial numbers 18/787 to 24/2361.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Clock and watch making  Search this
Clock and watch makers  Search this
Clocks and watches  Search this
Genre/Form:
Ledgers (account books) -- 20th century
Ledgers (account books) -- 1840-1900
Collection Citation:
E. Howard Clock Company Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
E. Howard Clock Company Records
E. Howard Clock Company Records / Series 9: Tower Clocks / [E. Howard Clock Tower Clocks Ledger, Volume 2, book.] (Serial numbers 18,787-24,2361)
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8300eb7c1-96ae-4477-9534-4a9d3ef5b016
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0776-ref657
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Perls Galleries records

Creator:
Perls Galleries  Search this
Names:
Art Institute of Chicago  Search this
Fujikawa Gallery  Search this
Galerie Maeght  Search this
James Corcoran Gallery  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
National Gallery of Art (U.S.)  Search this
Pierre Matisse Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Austin, Darrel, 1907-  Search this
Cafritz, Gwendolyn  Search this
Cafritz, Morris, 1886?-1964  Search this
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Canaday, John, 1907-1985  Search this
De Menil, Adelaide  Search this
Dudensing, F. Valentine, 1892-1967  Search this
Ford, Henry, 1917-1987  Search this
Garbo, Greta, 1905-1990  Search this
Hitchcock, Alfred, 1899-  Search this
Luce, Claire  Search this
Luce, Henry, III, 1925-2005  Search this
Miró, Joan, 1893-  Search this
Perls, Klaus  Search this
Picasso, Pablo, 1881-1973  Search this
Priebe, Karl J., 1914-1976  Search this
Streisand, Barbra  Search this
Extent:
79.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Illustrated letters
Drawings
Photographs
Date:
1937-1997
Summary:
The records of the Perls Galleries measure 79.6 linear feet and date from 1937 to 1997. Founded by Klaus Perls in 1937 and operating until 1997, the gallery dealt primarily in modern French art and the artwork of Alexander Calder. Found within the records are extensive correspondence (circa 44 linear feet) with artists, dealers, galleries, museums, and collectors; photographs and negatives of inventory and other artwork; exhibition files, scattered financial records; and exhibition catalogs and clippings.
Scope and Content Note:
The records of the Perls Galleries measure 79.6 linear feet and date from 1937 to 1997. Founded by Klaus Perls in 1937 and operating until 1997, the gallery dealt primarily in modern French art and the artwork of Alexander Calder. Found within the records are extensive correspondence (circa 44 linear feet) with artists, dealers, galleries, museums, and collectors; photographs and negatives of inventory and other artwork; exhibition files, scattered financial records; and exhibition catalogs and clippings.

Correspondence primarily discusses sales (and includes invoices), loans, and exhibitions, as well as more routine activities such as gallery maintenance, the printing of exhibition catalogs and letterhead, and the shipment, framing, or restoration of artwork. Many letters enclose photographs, negatives, or slides of artwork, and clippings. A few letters contain oversize architectural or engineering drawings, and a small handful of letters are illustrated.

Correspondents include artists such as Darrell Austin, Joan Mir, Pablo Picasso, and Karl Priebe; galleries such as the Corcoran Gallery, Fujikawa Galleries, Galerie Maeght, and the Pierre Matisse Gallery; museums such as the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Modern Art, the National Gallery of Art, and the Whitney Museum of Modern Art; collectors such as Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz, Adelaide de Mnil, Valentine Dudensing, and Henry Ford, II; and celebrity clients such as Greta Garbo, Alfred Hitchcock, Henry and Clare Booth Luce, and Barbra Streisand.

The records contain nearly thirty-two linear feet of photographs and negatives. Photographs are of artists and the inventory of the gallery's artwork. Additional photographs represent artwork either by artists not represented by the gallery or not included in the gallery's inventory. Most of the photographs are black and white. Over fifteen linear feet of negatives are of gallery stock. Photographs are also found in the exhibition files.

There is a relatively small amount of records relating to exhibitions, loans, and sales. Found are exhibition lists, schedules, invitations and announcements, photographs of exhibition installations, press releases, and records of loans to other institutions and galleries. Sales records include artist lists, inventory lists, invoices, pick up and delivery receipts, and price lists.

Printed materials include a large number of clippings and an incomplete run of catalogs from Perls Galleries exhibitions between 1939 and 1980.

The collection also includes ten original pencil drawings from John Canaday's series entitled My Beautiful Girls and a reproduction of eight drawings from the same series
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 7 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Correspondence, 1937-1995 (Boxes 1-44, OV 81-83; 43.6 linear feet)

Series 2: Negatives, circa 1937-1995 (Boxes 44-59; 15.7 linear feet)

Series 3: Photographs, circa 1937-1995 (Boxes 60-75, OV 84; 16.1 linear feet)

Series 4: Exhibition, Loan, and Sales Records, 1937-1995 (Boxes 76-78; 2.1 linear feet)

Series 5: Clippings Files, 1943-1989 (Box 78; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 6: Exhibition Catalogs, 1939-1980 (Boxes 78-79; 1.4 linear feet)

Series 7: Drawings by John Canaday, circa 1967-1972 (Box 80; 0.3 linear feet)
Historical Note:
Klaus Perls (b. 1912, d. 2008) formally opened Perls Galleries in New York in 1937, and ran it with his wife Amelia until its closing in 1997. The gallery dealt in contemporary French artists of the School of Paris, such as Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso, but also acted as the primary representative of Alexander Calder beginning in 1954. In the 1970s Mr. Perls developed an interest in art from Benin and built an important collection of African sculpture, some of which was later donated to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Amelia Perls died in 2002, and Klaus Perls died in 2008.

Klaus Perls was born in 1912 in Berlin in a house Mies van der Rohe designed for his parents, who owned an art gallery specializing in Impressionists, post-Impressionists, Old Master paintings, Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, and African sculpture. Perls studied Art History in Hamburg and Munich but completed his PhD in Basel, Switzerland in 1933 after the Nazi government stopped awarding degrees to Jews. His dissertation covered the complete works of 15th-century French painter Jean Fouquet.

Before moving to New York in 1935, Perls worked for his mother, Kaethe Perls, in her Paris gallery that she opened in 1932 after splitting up with Klaus' father Hugo. He spent his first two years in New York selling paintings through other art dealers, primarily paintings shipped or recommended to him by his mother from Paris that were not selling well in the Depression-era French art market. These were primarily the work of Maurice Utrillo, Marie Laurencin, Raoul Dufy and Maurice de Vlaminck. In 1937 he formally established his own gallery, the Perls Galleries, on East 58th Street and continued to specialize in French and European contemporary art. Around the same time, his older brother Frank opened a gallery in Beverly Hills, California.

Klaus Perls was familiar with other New York dealers specializing in modern European art such as Valentine Dudensing and Pierre Matisse, but he tried to distinguish himself by catering to young collectors. When the war restricted the international art trade and his mother was forced to flee France during the Occupation, Perls began dealing in contemporary American artists such as Darrel Austin and Karl Priebe.

Perls married Amelia Blumenthal, fondly known as "Dolly," in 1940, and she became his business partner.

After the war, the international art market exploded, and the Perls made frequent buying trips to Europe. The Perls Galleries continued to sell primarily contemporary French art and gained an early reputation as a staunch defender of modern art by European artists such as Picasso, Modigliani, Braque, Lger, Soutine and Pascin. Perls prepared catalogues raisonns on Soutine and Pascin.

Klaus Perls was one of the founding members of the Art Dealer's Association, whose initial mission was to clean up the reputation of the art market following a series scandals involving fake antiquities that flourished in the 1960's. Perls was the Association's second president, after Pierre Matisse.

In 1954 Perls Galleries moved to 1016 Madison Avenue, a building that served as both gallery and home for the Perls. The same year Perls became Alexander Calder's dealer after the death of Calder's previous dealer, Curt Valentin. Perls explained his inclusion of Calder, a rare American among his stable of European artists, by saying that Calder's roots lay in France and that Calder bridged Europe and America the way Perls felt he did himself. In 1970, Calder designed the terrazzo sidewalk in front of the gallery and often resided in the Perls' home during long visits to New York City. Perls Galleries later handled Calder's estate and functioned as a quasi-archives of Calder's works, holding more than 7,000 negatives depicting Calder's art and preparing a Calder catalogue raisonn.

Klaus was named as a third-party defendant in the 1969 World War II looted art case Menzel v. List. When Erna Menzel sued Albert List for ownership of a Chagall painting confiscated from Menzel by the Nazis, List in turn sued Perls, who had sold him the painting in 1955, having purchased it himself from a Paris art dealer. The court awarded the Chagall painting to Menzel and ordered Perls to pay List the appreciated value of the painting.

Perls began building an important collection of African artwork and fell in love with art from Benin in the 1970's. In 1991 he donated more than 150 pieces of royal art from Benin to the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The Perls closed their gallery in 1997; Amelia Perls died in 2002, and Klaus Perls died in 2008.
Related Material:
Among the resources relating to the Perls Galleries in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Klaus Perls done by Mona Hadler on January 19, 1993.
Provenance:
The records were donated in 1997 by Douglas Mayhew, associate and legal representive of Klaus G. and Amelia B. Perls.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Art, Modern  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Genre/Form:
Illustrated letters
Drawings
Photographs
Citation:
Perls Galleries records, 1937-1997. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.perlgall
See more items in:
Perls Galleries records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9adaab16b-4838-4b64-9ff6-0cf04fa2f3fa
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-perlgall
Online Media:

A-B

Collection Creator:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Collection Director:
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 2
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1936 - 1955
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation Records, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records / Series 1: Directors / 1.1: George Gustav Heye / 1A.1: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4b0dcd93d-2b04-4c01-be1b-d7675c3c92da
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-ref8166
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Hilla Rebay papers

Creator:
Rebay, Hilla, 1890-1967  Search this
Names:
Art Dealers Association of America  Search this
Bauhaus  Search this
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum  Search this
Moholy-Nagy, László, 1895-1946  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet ((on 2 partial microfilm reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1921-1963
Scope and Contents:
Photographs, printed material, and court records.
REEL 74: Exhibition announcements, postcards, and catalogs from the Guggenheim Foundation Museum of Non-Objective Painting, including exhibitions for Bauhaus artist Laszlo Maholy-Nagy and Rebay; a 1921 issue of "Der Sturm," a modern art magazine from Berlin; and photographs of Rebay and the architectural model of the new Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.
REEL 3481: A record (171 p.) of the hearing before the Tax Court of the United States, "Hilla Rebay, Petitioner, vs. Commissioner of the Internal Revenue, Respondent," January 1963. The case involved the Government dispute over the value of art work claimed as deductions for tax purposes.
Biographical / Historical:
Abstract painter, art collector, museum director; New York, N.Y. Born in France. Active in Germany, Switzerland and France from 1910-1920 in the abstract art movement. Rebay worked with Solomon Guggenheim to form a collection of Non-Objective paintings. This collection became the basis of the Guggenheim Museum; Rebay served as its first director.
Provenance:
Provenance of material on reel 74 is unknown. Material on reel 3481 donated by the Art Dealers Association of America, 1963, who participated in the legal case by designating expert witness for the government to testify as to the market value of paintings.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Museum directors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Painting, Abstract -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art as an investment -- Taxation -- Law and legislation -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.rebahill
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw94c99bc4c-c46e-401c-909c-32a84113f943
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rebahill

Inside Ocean Hill-Brownsville a teacher's education, 1968-69 Charles S. Isaacs

Author:
Isaacs, Charles S. 1945-  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (xvii, 346 pages) illustrations
Type:
Biography
Biographies
Electronic books
Place:
New York (State)
New York
New York (État)
Date:
2014
Topic:
Strikes and lockouts--Teachers  Search this
Discrimination in education  Search this
Teachers  Search this
Grèves et lock-out--Enseignants  Search this
Discrimination en éducation  Search this
Enseignants  Search this
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS--Labor  Search this
POLITICAL SCIENCE--Labor & Industrial Relations  Search this
Call number:
LB2844.47.U62 N485 2014 (Internet)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1156288

Serra, Richard, 8 Drawings: Weights and Measures (Sept 23-Oct 14, 1989); 420 W Broadway

Collection Creator:
Leo Castelli Gallery  Search this
Container:
Box 52, Folder 90-91
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1989
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Leo Castelli Gallery records, circa 1880-2000, bulk 1957-1999. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Leo Castelli Gallery records
Leo Castelli Gallery records / Series 3: Exhibition Files / 3.5: Solo Shows
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9c2d7c6e6-7279-4926-a827-8f5847f18418
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-leocast-ref9867
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Rauschenberg, Robert

Collection Creator:
Leo Castelli Gallery  Search this
Container:
Box 17, Folder 34
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1969-1973, 1980-1985
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Leo Castelli Gallery records, circa 1880-2000, bulk 1957-1999. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Leo Castelli Gallery records
Leo Castelli Gallery records / Series 1: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw95095d17e-fa3c-4645-9be0-fa4329ce8de5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-leocast-ref8945
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Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney papers

Creator:
Whitney, Gertrude Vanderbilt, 1875-1942  Search this
Names:
American Ambulance Field Hospital (Juilly, France)  Search this
Greenwich House (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Whitney Studio Club  Search this
Cushing, Howard Gardiner, 1869-1916  Search this
De Meyer, Adolf, Baron, 1868-1949  Search this
Miller, Flora Whitney  Search this
Strelecki, Jean de, count  Search this
Watson, Forbes, 1880-1960  Search this
Whitney, Harry Payne, 1872-1930  Search this
Extent:
36.1 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Lithographs
Photographs
Interviews
Sketchbooks
Diaries
Scrapbooks
Blueprints
Sketches
Date:
1851-1975
bulk 1888-1942
Summary:
The Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney papers measure approximately 36.1 linear feet and date from 1851 to 1975, with the bulk of the material dating from 1888 to 1942. The collection documents the life and work of the art patron and sculptor, especially her promotion of American art and artists, her philanthropy and war relief work, her commissions for memorial sculpture, and her creative writing. Papers include correspondence, journals, writings, project files, scrapbooks, photographs, artwork, printed material, two sound recordings, and miscellaneous personal papers.
Scope and Content Note:
The Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney papers measure approximately 36.1 linear feet and date from 1851 to 1975, with the bulk of the material dating from 1888 to 1942. The collection documents the life and work of the art patron and sculptor, especially her promotion of American art and artists, her philanthropy and war relief work, her commissions for memorial sculpture, and her creative writing. Papers include correspondence, journals, writings, project files, scrapbooks, photographs, artwork, printed material, two sound recordings, and miscellaneous personal papers.

Material relating to more personal aspects of Whitney's life include school papers, a paper doll book dating from her childhood, financial material, interviews, awards and honorary degrees, address and telephone books, committee files, and other items. Correspondence consists of incoming and outgoing letters concerning both personal and professional matters, including her patronage of the arts and sponsorship of artists, her sculpture commissions and exhibitions, and her war relief work and other philantrophic activities. Also found are family correspondence and correspondence received by the Flora Whitney Miller and the Whitney Museum of American Art after Whitney's death. Journals include personal ones that she kept periodically from the time she was a child to near the end of her life, in which she recorded her travels, her impressions of people, her experiences with friends, and her thoughts on art, among other topics; and social ones, in which she recorded dinners and dances attended, and people invited to different social gatherings, and in which she collected invitations received and accepted.

Scattered files can be found that relate to the Whitney Studio Club and the Whitney Museum of American Art, consisting of notebooks, catalogs, a financial report, and other material. Files relating to Whitney's own sculpture projects are more extensive and consist of correspondence, contracts, printed material, notes, financial material for proposed and completed commissions for fountains, memorials, and monuments. The Whitney Museum of American Art, rather than Whitney herself, seems to have kept these files. Files relating to Whitney's philanthropic activities span from the time just before to just after the First World War and consist of correspondence, minutes, reports, and printed material stemming from her contributions to charities and war relief organizations, her sponsorship of the war hospital in Juilly, France, and her support of the Greenwich House Social Settlement.

Whitney's writings include extensive drafts, and handwritten and typed manuscripts and copies of novels, plays, and stories, as well as some autobiographical and early writings, notes and writings on art, and clippings of published writings, documenting her principle means of creative expression towards the end of her life. Also found are some writings by others. Scrapbooks consist of clippings, photographs, letters and other material, compiled by Whitney, Flora Whitney Miller, and possibly others, documenting Whitney's public life, her sculpture commissions and exhibitions, exhibitions at the Whitney Studio, the war hospital in Juilly, France, the death of Harry Payne Whitney in 1930, and the sickness and death of Whitney in 1942.

Photographs include ones of the Whitney and Vanderbilt families, ones of Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney (including portraits taken by Baron Adolf de Meyer and Count Jean de Strelecki), ones of various Vanderbilt and Whitney residences and of Whitney's studios, ones of Whitney's sculpture exhibitions as well as exhibitions at her studio, and ones of her sculptures, as well as some miscellaneous and unidentified ones. Artwork consists of sketchbooks and sketches by Whitney (including sketches for sculptures) and artwork by others (including a sketchbook of Howard Cushing's containing a sketch of her and albums of World War I lithographs) collected by Whitney. Also found amongst the collection are printed material (clippings, exhibition catalogs, programs, and publications) and blueprints (including drawings for Whitney's studio on MacDougal Alley and various of her sculptures).
Arrangement:
The Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney papers are arranged into twelve series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Miscellaneous Personal Papers, 1888-1947, 1975 (Boxes 1-3, 33-34, OV 42; 2.5 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1889-1949, 1959 (Boxes 3-9; 6 linear feet)

Series 3: Journals, circa 1886-1939 (Boxes 9-12, 33; 2.5 linear feet)

Series 4: Whitney Studio Club and Whitney Museum of American Art Files, 1921-1943 (Box 12; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 5: Sculpture Files, 1900-1960 (bulk 1909-1942) (Boxes 12-15; 3 linear feet)

Series 6: Philanthropy Files, 1902-1923 (bulk 1915-1920) (Boxes 15-17; 2 linear feet)

Series 7: Writings, 1889-1942, 1974 (Boxes 17-26; 10 linear feet)

Series 8: Scrapbooks, 1893-1942 (Boxes 26-27, 33, 35; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 9: Printed Material, 1859-1942 (Boxes 27-28, 36; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 10: Photographs, 1862-1942 (Boxes 28-32, 36-41, OV 43-51; 6.4 linear feet)

Series 11: Artwork, 1871-1930s (Boxes 32, 41, OV 52-54; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 12: Blueprints, 1913-1945 (OV 55; 0.1 linear feet)
Biographical/Historical note:
New York art patron and sculptor, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney (1875-1942), was the eldest daughter of Cornelius Vanderbilt II and Alice Gwynne Vanderbilt, and founder of the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Whitney was born January 9, 1875 in New York City, the. She was educated by private tutors and attended Brearley School in New York. From the time she was a young girl, she kept journals of her travels and impressions of the people she met, and engaged in creative pursuits such as sketching and writing stories. In 1896, she was married to Harry Payne Whitney. They had three children, Flora, Cornelius, and Barbara.

In 1900, Whitney began to study sculpture under Hendrik Christian Anderson, and then under James Fraser. Later, she studied with Andrew O'Connor in Paris. From the time she started studying sculpture, her interest in art grew, as did her particular concern for American art and artists. In 1907, she organized an art exhibition at the Colony Club, which included several contemporary American paintings. She also opened a studio on MacDougal Alley, which became known as the Whitney Studio and was a place where shows and prize competitions were held. (She also had other studios in Westbury, Long Island and Paris, France.) Over the years, her patronage of art included buying work, commissioning it, sponsoring it, exhibiting it, and financially supporting artists in America and abroad. From 1911 on, she was aided in her work by Juliana Force, who started out as Whitney's secretary, was responsible for art exhibitions at the Whitney Studio, and became the first director of the Whitney Museum of American Art.

The first recognition Whitney received for her sculpture came in 1908 when a project on which she had collaborated (with Grosvenor Atterbury and Hugo Ballin) won a prize for best design from the Architectural League of New York. The following year she received a commission to do a fountain sculpture for the Pan-American Building in Washington, D. C. She went on to do numerous other commissioned works over the next several decades, including: a fountain for the New Arlington Hotel in Washington D.C. (the design of which was reproduced in various sizes and materials, one cast being submitted to the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition where it won a bronze medal and a later cast being installed on the campus of McGill University, Montreal, Canada in 1930); the Titanic Memorial (designed in 1913 and erected in 1930); the Buffalo Bill Memorial (1924) in Cody, Wyoming; the Columbus Memorial (1929) in Port of Palos, Spain; the Peter Stuyvesant statue in Stuyvesant Square (1939); and The Spirit of Flight (1939) for the New York World's Fair. In 1916, she had her first one-man show at the Whitney Studio, another at the Newport Art Association, and a retrospective at the San Francisco Art Association Palace of Fine Arts. A traveling exhibition in the Midwest followed in 1918.

During the First World War, Whitney was involved with numerous war relief activities, most notably establishing and supporting a hospital in Juilly, France. She made several trips to France during the war, keeping a journal and eventually publishing a piece on the hospital in several newspapers. Her sculpture during this period was largely focused on war themes. In 1919, she exhibited some of these works at the Whitney Studio in a show called "Impressions of War." In the years after the war, she was also commissioned to do several war memorials, including the Washington Heights War Memorial (1922) and the St. Nazaire Memorial (1926) commemmorating the landing of the American Expeditionary Force in France in 1917.

In 1918, Whitney opened the Whitney Studio Club, which served as pioneering organization for American art, putting on exhibition programs and offering social space and recreational amenities to its members (one point numbering over four hundred artists living in New York). She planned an "Overseas Exhibition" of American art, which traveled to Paris and other European cities in 1920-1921, and had her own shows in Paris and London in 1921. In 1928, the Whitney Studio Club was transformed into an art gallery, known as the Whitney Studio Galleries and directed by Juliana Force, which eventually became the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1931.

Whitney pursued creative writing throughout her life, but beginning in the 1930s writing became her principle means of creative expression. Over the years, she produced numerous manuscripts for stories, novels, and play. One novel, Walking the Dusk, was published in 1932 under the pseudonym L. J. Webb. Beginning in 1940, Whitney took a "Professional Writing" course at Columbia University with Helen Hull, which resulted in the production of numerous short stories. In 1941, she collaborated with Ronald Bodley to adapt one of her stories as a play and attempted to get it produced, although unsuccessfully.

In 1934, Whitney was involved in a custody battle for her niece, Gloria Vanderbilt (daughter of her late brother, Reginald Vanderbilt and his wife, Gloria Morgan Vanderbilt). In an agreement reached by the court, custody was awarded to Whitney and visitation rights to Gloria's mother. Litigation continued in the ensuing years.

In 1935, Whitney established the World's Fair Five Organization, with Juliana Force and four architects, to work on preparing a plan for the site of the 1939 New York World's Fair at Flushing Meadow, although the fair's own Board of Design ended up coming up with its own plan.

Whitney continued her work in sculpture, writing, art patronage, and philanthropy throughout the remaining years of her life. She died on April 18, 1942.
Related Archival Materials note:
Related material found in the Archives includes Research Material on Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney compiled by Flora Miller Irving and the Whitney Museum of American Art artists' files and records, available on microfilm only (originals are located in the Whitney Museum of American Art). Also found in the Archives of American Art's Miscellaneous Exhibition Catalog Collection are a bundle of Whitney Studio Club and Mrs. H. P. Whitney's Studio catalogs and announcements.
Provenance:
The Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney papers were donated in 1981 and 1991 by Whitney's granddaughter, Flora Miller Irving.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Philanthropists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Art patrons -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Genre/Form:
Lithographs
Photographs
Interviews
Sketchbooks
Diaries
Scrapbooks
Blueprints
Sketches
Citation:
Whitney Museum of American Art, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney Papers, 1851-1975 (bulk 1888-1942). Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.whitgert
See more items in:
Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9db113d72-cc31-4974-85fe-3e99c53dd62e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-whitgert
Online Media:

Skating on Central Park, New York City [graphic arts] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Artist:
Currier & Ives  Search this
Type:
Photograph
Date:
1861
Topic:
Figure group  Search this
Landscape--Season--Winter  Search this
Recreation--Sport & Play--Skating  Search this
Landscape--Park--Central Park  Search this
Landscape--New York--New York City  Search this
Recreation--Courting  Search this
Image number:
JUL J0023952
See more items in:
Photograph Study Collection
Data Source:
Photograph Study Collection, Smithsonian American Art Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_jul_23953

William R. Hutton Papers

Creator:
Hutton, William R., 1826-1901  Search this
Extent:
30 Cubic feet (33 boxes, 21 oversize folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Letterpress copybooks
Blueprints
Diaries
Drawings
Cashbooks
Business records
Business letters
Notebooks
Topographic maps
Tax records
Technical drawings
Stock certificates
Technical literature
Photoengravings
Notes
Maps
Microfilms
Linen tracings
Letter books
Letters
Land titles
Legal documents
Sketches
Salted paper prints
Reports
Receipts
Plans (drawings)
Photostats
Photographic prints
Architectural drawings
Administrative records
Albumen prints
Albums
Annual reports
Booklets
Account books
Books
Family papers
Financial records
Cyanotypes
Correspondence
Deeds
Printed material
Contracts
Harlem river bridge
Photograph albums
Specifications
Christmas cards
Menus
Place:
France
Maryland
Chesapeake and Ohio Canal
Panama Canal (Panama)
New Jersey
New York (N.Y.)
Hudson River
Baltimore (Md.)
Georgetown (Washington, D.C.)
New York
Washington Bridge
New Croton Aqueduct
Kanawha River Canal
Washington Aqueduct
Potomac River -- 19th century
Washington Memorial Bridge
Hudson River Tunnel
Date:
1830-1965
Summary:
The papers document the life and work of William R. Hutton, a civil engineer during the late 1800s to the early 1900s. Materials include diaries, notebooks, correspondence, letterpress copy book, printed materials, publications, specifications, photographs, drawings, and maps that document the construction of several architectural and engineering projects during this period. Most notable are the records containing information related to the construction of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, Hudson River Tunnel, the Washington Aqueduct, the Kanawha River Canal, and the Washington/Harlem River Bridge. There are also several records about railroads in the state of Maryland, the District of Columbia and elsewhere, including the Western Maryland Railroad, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, Colorado Midlands Railway, Baltimore and Drum Point Railroad, the Northern Adirondack Railroad, and the Pittsfield and Williamstown Railroad. The records can be used to track the progression of these projects, and engineering innovation during the late 1800s to the early 1900s.
Scope and Contents:
These papers document William R. Hutton's professional career as a civil engineer and his personal affairs. Although the personal materials in the collection provide insight into a man and a family that have been largely forgotten by biographers, it is the professional materials that are perhaps the most interesting to researchers. They provide a compelling narrative of the push to the West that occurred in 19th century America and the internal improvements movement typified by the American System plan proposed by Henry Clay. Perhaps best remembered for the high tariffs that accompanied it, the American System plan was also concerned with the advancement of internal improvements, such as canals, that would unite the East and West in communication, travel, and trade. The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal can be seen as one of the products of this movement (1) and was in fact initially heralded as the first great work of national improvement (2).

The papers in this collection that are related to the construction and maintenance of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal are an invaluable documentation of efforts during this turbulent time to unite the eastern and western United States. They provide details of the canal from its initial construction to its decline with the incline at Georgetown project. The canal also serves as an example, or perhaps a warning against, federal involvement in state improvement efforts as it was the first project to be directly funded and staffed by the federal government (3). The groundbreaking ceremony was attended by then President John Quincy Adams whose toast, "to the canal: perseverance," (4) became an ironic omen, as construction of the canal took over twenty-two years to be completed. The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal materials can be used as a case study for the problems encountered during canal building (5). These problems are best typified in the collection by the papers relating to the Georgetown incline. This project was headed by Hutton and was plagued with construction problems, boating accidents, and obsolescence from the moment of its completion. Despite these issues, the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal remains a structure of historical significance in America. As the third and last effort to construct an all-water route to the West (6), the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal is an important artifact of 19th century attitudes and efforts towards commerce, trade, travel, and communication between the eastern and western United States. Other significant canals and water structures represented in the collection are the Kanawha Canal, the Washington Aqueduct, and a large collection of materials relating to the Kingston Water Supply (New York).

One of the most significant internal improvements made during this time was the railroad. The legal conflicts that arose between the canal companies and railroads is also represented in the materials relating to the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. These materials specifically deal with the legal conflict's between the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The development and construction of the railroads is also represented in the materials documenting the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, the Baltimore and Drum Point Railroad, the Northern Adirondack Railroad, the Western Maryland Railroad, the Mexican National Railroad, the Colorado Midlands Railroad, and the Columbia Railroad.

The collection also demonstrates the spirit of innovation and invention that was prevalent in the engineering field in the nineteenth century. Joseph Gies writes, "...one of the distinctive characteristics of the great nineteenth century engineering adventurers was their readiness to gamble on the translation of theory into practice" (7). In this quote, he is speaking of the civil engineer Dewitt Clinton Haskins and a project that truly encapsulates engineering invention in the nineteenth century, the Hudson River Tunnel. Responding to the increase in the population of the City of New York in the late nineteenth century from sixty thousand to three and a half million, the Hudson River Tunnel was originally devised as a way to alleviate traffic and to transport train passengers directly across the Hudson River (8). Beginning with records dating from 1881 to 1901, the Hutton papers can be used to document not only the advances in engineering during this time but also the costs of progress. Haskins' initial efforts to build the tunnel using submerged air pressurized caissons were marked by failure and in some cases fatalities. Workers on the tunnel often suffered from what came to be known as "caisson disease" or "the bends," caused by the immense forces of compression and decompression experienced while working in the tunnels (9). This problem was so prevalent that as construction progressed the rate of worker deaths caused by "the bends" rose to twenty-five percent (10). Materials in the collection document worker complaints and deaths resulting from this disease as well as providing a technical record of the construction of the tunnel. The highlight of the materials relating to the Hudson River Tunnel is an album that contains photographs of workers in the tunnel and a detailed daily report of the construction progress on the tunnel that was maintained by Hutton's assistant, Walton Aims. The first hand account in these reports provides insight not only into the construction of the tunnel, but also the problems encountered.

Another project featured in the Hutton collection that was devised in response to the population explosion in the City of New York in the nineteenth century is the Harlem River Bridge, or as it is now known, the Washington Bridge. Known as one of the longest steel arch bridges of its time, the Harlem River Bridge also represents that spirit of invention and innovation that was prevalent in the civil engineering field during the nineteenth century. The collection provides an invaluable resource for those wishing to track the construction of the bridge from early concept drawings and proposals to finalized plans. Also present are photographs of the construction and workers. Societal response to the bridge in the form of newspaper and magazine clippings help to create the narrative of the Washington Bridge, and these are supplemented by correspondence from the builders, suppliers, and planners.

This collection also includes diaries, 1866-1901; letterpress copybooks, 1858-1901; correspondence on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, Hudson River Tunnel, Washington Bridge over the Harlem River, and Maryland and Colorado railroads, 1861-1901, and on Hutton's financial and real estate affairs, 1835-1921; construction photographs of the Harlem River, Cairo, Poughkeepsie, Niagara bridges and the Hudson River Tunnel, Washington Aqueduct, and Capitol Dome (in the form of albumen, cyanotype, salted paper print); data and drawings; rolled land profile drawings; canal notes, 1828-1892; Hudson River Tunnel construction reports, 1889-1891; publications, drawings, and maps of railroad routes; pamphlets and reprints on hydraulic works and water supply; road, railway, bridge, and hydraulic construction specifications, 1870-1900; drawings (linen, oil cloth, and heavy drawing paper), and blueprints; account books, 1891-1899; and plans, drawings, field notebooks, and publications on American and European construction projects, especially in Maryland, New York, and France; personal correspondence detailing his role as executor for the estates of Benjamin H. Hutton, Joseph Hutton, Annie Theller, and the Countess H. De Moltke-Hvitfeldt and his relationships with his children, siblings, cousins, and colleagues, 1850-1942.

Materials are handwritten, typed, and printed.

Special note should be made that any materials dated after the year 1901 were added to the collection by another creator who is unidentified. It can be speculated that professional materials added after this date were contributed by his brother and colleague Nathanial Hutton or his son Frank Hutton. Personal materials contributed after this date may have been added by his wife, daughters, or other members of his extended family.

Series 1, Letterpress Copybooks, 1858-1901, consists of twenty seven letterpress copybooks containing correspondence between Hutton and other engineers, architects, and building suppliers. The letterpress copybooks in this series have been arranged chronologically. The books involve a process by which ink is transferred through direct contact with the original using moisture and pressure in a copy press. The majority of the correspondence is business- related. Some letterpress copybooks are devoted to specific projects such as the Washington/Harlem River Bridge, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, Baltimore and Drum Point Railroad, Annapolis and Elk Ridge Railroad, and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The letterpress copybooks provide a record of correspondence written by Hutton, which makes it distinctive from the other correspondence in the collection. Most of the other correspondence has Hutton as recipient.

The letterpress copybooks also document Hutton's various residences throughout his life and provide a glimpse into the civil engineering profession at the time by demonstrating how engineers shared ideas and comments about projects. This can be supplemented with the printed materials in the collection as many of the authors also appear in the correspondence. Other topics covered in the letterpress copybooks include business reports (specifically the report of the president and directors of the Baltimore and Drum Point Railroad), records of people and companies involved in projects, pasted in engineering sketches, engineering specifications and notes, travel expenses and estimates, construction histories and progress, legal issues with family estates, tax information, Colorado Railroad, payment certificate schedules, St. Paul Railroad, personal correspondence, title guarantees, Hudson River Tunnel, financial matters, real estate matters, insurance information, sketches and drawings, supply lists, cost estimates, the Memorial Bridge, Coffin Valve Company, engineering expenses, engineering calculations, payroll notes for Kingston Water Supply, proposals, account information, Hutton Park, reservoirs, contract drafts, French Society of Civil Engineers, inspection results (specifically Piedmont Bridge), land descriptions, damage reports, Morse Bridge, Illinois Central Railroad, North Sea Canal, moveable dams, iron works, site histories, Potomac Lock and Dock Company, Kanawha River canal (lock quantities, specifications, payroll information), Pennsylvania Canal, and bills for services.

Series 2, Professional Correspondence, 1861-1901, consists of correspondence that relates to Hutton's architectural and engineering projects. This series is further subdivided into two subseries: Project Correspondence and General Correspondence. Subseries 1, Project Correspondence, 1876-1899, correspondence is divided by project and arranged alphabetically. Subseries 2, General Correspondence, 1861-1901, is arranged chronologically. Both series contain handwritten and typed letters. Some letters are on letterpress copybook pages and are most likely copies. Some materials are in French and Spanish. Special note should be made that this series does not contain all of the professional correspondence in the collection. Some correspondence has been separated according to project and placed in Series 8, Professional Projects, 1830-1965, in order to make it easier for researchers to access materials related to those subjects.

Subseries 1, professional correspondence topics include comparisons between construction projects (specifically comparisons of the Kanawha River Canal to other canals), supply lists, location recommendations, sketches, construction plans and modifications, bills for supplies and works, leaks in the gates, cost estimates, Brooklyn Water Supply, use of lake storage (Ramapo Water Supply), water supply to states and counties, damages to water supply pipes, estimates of water quantities, responses to construction reports, legal issues related to projects, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and payment for services.

Subseries 2, general correspondence topics include employment opportunities, committee meetings and elections, land surveys, sketches, engineering plans and ideas, work on projects, dismissal from projects, notes on supplies, Washington Aqueduct, construction progress, land purchases, Civil War, Jones Falls, cost of water pumps, steam drills, lots divisions and prices, repairs, report of the engineering bureau, tidewater connection at Annapolis, bridge construction, construction costs, statement of vessels that entered and cleared Baltimore, technical questions from colleagues, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, supply costs, letters of introduction, requests for reference, changes to plans and designs, survey reports, St. Andrew's lot, Canal Coal Company, publication process, American Society of Civil Engineers and its members, responses to project inquiries, Graving Dock gross revenue, job offers, specifications, trade figures, contracts, water levels, appointment dates and times, moveable dams, proposals for membership, salaries, Piedmont Coal Lands, maps, land profiles, Washington Bridge, board payments, Nicaragua Canal, Grant Coal Company, statistics, engineering notes, Hartford Bridge, water pressures, coal deposits, Colorado Coal, pipe lines, reservoirs, boat costs for canals, floods, bridges, letters of resignation, engines, Ruxton Viaduct, Colorado and Midland Railroad, Morse Bridge, share values, railroad locations, membership invitations, call for submissions, structural tests, record of accounts for room and board, appointments, water rights (Putnam County), publications, blueprints, visitation programs, cotton compresses, street trenches, pressures in dams, level tests, Portland Transportation bureau, trade information, concrete steel, Chicago drainage canal, ship canals, Augusta Cotton and Compress Company, Sooysmith case, Consolidated Gas Company, masonry, book binding, Columbia Railway Company, jetties, land grades, Chesapeake and Delaware canal, water wheels, pneumatic lock, tunnel arches, rifton power, Hutton's health, elevators, Brooklyn Bridge Terminals, girder weights, legal issues and their results, rating table for the Potomac, land profiles, transmission lines, transformers, water turbines, and water power on the Potomac River.

Correspondents for this series include the following: Captain Montgomery C. Meigs, Captain T.W. Symons, William Bryan, Ernest Flagg, John Hurd, Jake Wolfe, J.C. Saunders, J.H. Dolph, Charles J. Allen, G.H. Mendell, Virgil S. Bogue, B.A. Mounnerlyn, Edward Burr, H.G. Prout, R. William, H. Dodge, C.R. Suter, M. Mink, W.R. King, John Lyons, Alex Brown and Sons, John G. Butler, D. Condon, Bernard Carter, R.P. McCormick, D.R. Magruder, Andrew Banks, Isaac Solomon, C.J. Mayer, C.W. Kern, John Herring, James S. Mackie, D.R. Magunde, D. Rittaguide, R.S. Stevens, J.L. Raudolph (Baltimore and Ohio Railroad), J.M. Lane, W.D. Stuart, W.G.P. Palmer (Committee Church of the Ascension), C. Crozet, General W. Hughes, V.R. Maus, J.M. Hood (Western Maryland Railroad Company), Ernest Pontzen, M. Haus, William F. Craighill, Harry Hutton, John W. Pearce, Reverend James A. Harrald, William Watson, A.L. Rives, Thomas Monro, A.F. Croswan (Commander United States Navy), H.R. Garden, William McAlpine, James Forrest, Wm. Bloomsfield, Daniel Ammen, Linel Wells, A. and Otto Sibeth, Alfred Noble, Clemens Hershel, Sidney Warner, E.H. de Rheville, Theodore Cooper, William Findlay Shunk, Lewis S. Wolfe, Rufus Mead, Theodore F. Taylor, John Bogart, J. Whaler, B. Williamson, Colonel F.V. Greene, Robert H. Sayre (Lehigh Valley Railroad Company), Charles W. Pussey, Louis Q. Rissel, V.C. Bogue, H.C. Eckenberger, Melville E.G. Leston, Edwin Parson, Rudolph Hering, R.S. Hale, F.M. Turner, Thosl Martindale, Justus C. Strawbridge, William M. Ayresm, R.L. Austin, A.M. Miller, P. Livingston Dunn, T.J. Cleaver, C.S. Dutton, H.A. Carson, William Bainbridge Jaudon, H.A. Presset, Thomas H. McCann, Russel Sturgis, H.G. Prout, Alexis H. French, John K. Cowen, F.W. Williams, J. Waldorf, B.H. Byrant, B.H. Jones, M.H. Rogers, J.W. Ogden, General W. Cashing, William Longhudge, A.J. Cameron, T.L. Patterson, J.J. Hagerman, H. Wigglesworth, Charles B. Rowland, E. Bantz, W.G. Lathrop, Clarence King, George Rowland, George A. Tibbals (Continental Iron Works), George N. Vanderbilt, Eugene C. Lewis, F.P. Burt, Colonel John C. Clarke, Lieutenant Thomas Turtle, W.S.M. Scott, E. Bates Dorsey, Bernard Carter, George M. Shriver (Baltimore and Ohio Railroad), Russel Sturgis, Macmillan Publishing, James Abernethy, B. Baker, J.G.W. Fynje, A. Mallet, Jean Hersuy, L.F. Vernon Horcourt, Robert Lilley, A.J. Johnson, F.M. Colby, Henry D. Loney, A.S. Cameron, James A. Harrald, William Watson, John B. Lervis, A.L. Rives, Edwin F. Bidell, Frank H. Stockett, E. McMahon, C.F. Elgin, Enrique Budge, G. Clayton Gardiner, Dwight Porter, William A. Chapman, T.E. Sickels, Theodore Cooper, C.J. Warner, Institution of Civil Engineers, Robert Gordon, United States Coast of Geodetic Survey Office, C.P. Pattun, J.N. Putnam, Sidney B. Warner, H.D. Fisher, Union Pacific Railway Company, Lewis S. Wolle, George E. Waring Junior, The American Exhibition, G.F. Swain, American Society of Civil Engineers, N.H. Whitten, U.S. Engineer Office, Government Works Committee, J.J. Hagerman, D. Jackson, Sterling Iron and Railway Company, E.P. Alexander, E. Williamson, Central Railway Company of New Jersey, William A. Underwood, F. Collingwood, James Dun (Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad Company), Henry F. Kilburn, Louis A. Bissell, Virgil G. Boque, H.C. Eckenberger, Melville Egleston, Charles Parson, George Swain, Continental Iron Works, Rudolph Hering, J.B. Gordon, Mayor's Office (Baltimore), Harry Robinson, Pennsylvania Railway Company, W.H. Gahagan, L. Luiggi, B.H. Bryant, T.J. Cleaver (Chesapeake and Delaware Canal Company), H.A. Carson, H.A. Presset (Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey), John K. Cowen, Vernon H. Brown, J. Waldorf, B.H. Bryant, L.F. Root, P.W. White, Metropolitan Railroad Company, Charles F. Mayer (Consolidated Coal Company, Cumberland and Pennsylvania Railroad Company), J.M. Lane (Western Maryland Railroad), Dr. R.S. Stewart (Annapolis and Elk Ridge Railroad), Baltimore and Drum Point Railroad (John Lyons, John G. Butler, D. Candon, R.P. McCormick, Andrew Banks), Thomas F. Rowland, J.A. Bensel, Walton Aims, S.D. Coykendall, H.C. Rogers, John F. Ward, T.B. Jewell, H.A. Pressey, C.S. Armstrong, J. Nennett, V.G. Bague.

Series 3, Personal Correspondence, 1850-1942, contains correspondence with immediate and extended family, specifically the heirs to the Benjamin H. Hutton and Joseph Hutton estates and Adele Gorman. Correspondence is primarily arranged chronologically, but some files have been divided based on subject or author (the Deer Park and Adele Gorman files), or by form (the Telegrams, and Cablegrams file). Special note is made of the posthumous correspondence file, which includes correspondence both relating to Hutton's death and correspondence that was written by family members after the years of his death. The series contains both hand written and typed letters. Some correspondence is in French. The correspondence demonstrates his relationship with his children specifically Elizabeth (Bessie) Hutton, and illuminates his role in his family. This series also provides details about nineteenth century upper class society and activities. Special note should be made that this folder does not contain all of the personal correspondence contained in the collection. Some correspondence has been separated according to recipient, or subject in order to make researching these recipients or subjects easier.

Series 3 correspondence topics include: estate payments, distribution of assets, funds transfers, estate lines, conflicts with tenants, sketches, lot maintenance, real estate sales, deeds, real estate sales negotiations, congratulations wishes on new babies, family illnesses, family affairs and travels, traveling directions, personal investments, invitations for social occasions, family debts, professional interests, professional and personal appointments, family issues, requests for money, sketches, advice to children (specifically Frank Hutton), life insurance, books, letters of introduction, legal issues, funeral expenses, charity donations, advertisements, minutes from professional organizations, army enlistment, deaths of friends and family, recipes, estimates of personal expenses, renovations, stock certificates (Great Northern Railway Company, New York), food, social activities, the weather, marriages, real estate and construction plans, and loan agreements.

Correspondents include the following: Frank Hutton, Thomas B. Brookes, J.L. Marcauley, C.M. Matthews, Edward J. Hancy, John M. Wilson, H.A. Carson, William H. Wiley (of John Wiley and Sons Scientific Publishers, New York), Georgina Hutton, Pierre and Jane Casson, George McNaughlin, Henrietta Hutton, Aaron Pennington Whitehead, J.B. Wheeler, B. Williamson, Robert De Forest, Elizabeth (Bessie) Hutton, Grace Beukard, J.C. Saunders, Mary Hutton, William J. Pennington, C.S. Hurd, Henry C. Cooper, Henry J. Segers, S.F. Miller, Annie Theller, Alfred Noble, Maria Burton, Joseph Hobson, E. Lennon, F. Hulberg, Charles Gordon Hutton, Edward C. Ebert, A. William Lewin, E.R. Dunn, William P. Craighill, Theodore Cooper, P.I. Chapelle, Anita McAlpine, Clarence King, Victoria Raymond, and Adele Gorman.

Series 4, Personal Materials, 1835-1946, contains documentation about Hutton's personal finances, role as executor of the Benjamin H. Hutton, Joseph Hutton, Annie Theller, and Countess H. De Moltke-Hvitfeldt estates, Mary Augusta Hutton (wife), Mary Hutton (daughter), Frank Hutton, John Caulfield (son-in-law), and B.F. and C.H. Hutton. The series has been divided into four subseries: Financial Records, 1876-1901, Estate and Real Estate Records, 1835-1921, Other Huttons, 1876-1936, and Personal Material, 1878-1946. Subseries 2, Estate and Real Estate Records, 1835-1921, contains correspondence relating to specific family estates and family members. This correspondence was separated from Series 3, Personal Correspondence, 1850-1942, to make it easier for researchers to access all records relating to the family estates. This series includes hand written, typed, and printed materials. Some materials are in French. All material dated after 1901 has been added to the collection by other creators such as Hutton's wife and children.

Subseries 1, Financial Records, 1876-1901, includes account books, account records, correspondence related to bank accounts, bank statements, financial notes, bills and proofs of payment, rent receipts, tax bills (New York, Flatbush, Montgomery County), checks, money exchanges, receipts for tax payments, real estate receipts, stock and bond certificates, loan agreements, executor accounts, rebate calculation sheet, and tax and insurance payments.

Subseries 2, Estate and Real Estate Records, 1835-1921, includes property maps and information (rent, mortgage costs, deeds), correspondence, notes on estate distribution, estate assets, value of estate and estate payments, account records, loan agreements, receipts, proof of payments, checks, financial records, legal documents, insurance documents, tax bills, auction receipts, and wills relating to the estates of Benjamin H. Hutton, Joseph Hutton, Countess H. de Moltke-Hivtfeldt, Annie Theller, and William R. Hutton. Also included are correspondence, property maps and information, and deeds and mortgages on Hutton properties.

Subseries 2, the estate and real estate records correspondence topics include: Virginia state building codes, construction costs, construction notices, purchasing offers for property, real estate prices, receipts of payments, property lines, real estate purchases and sales, real estate sales negotiations, deeds insurance estimates and costs, loan costs, property estimates, renovation costs, mortgages, property damages and repairs, property tax payments, insurance rates and payments, rent payments, telephone installation, building permits, rental agreements, reports on property condition, contracts of sale, conflicts with tenants, changes of address, deeds, distribution of estate monies, details about the Countess' illness, estate arrangements, changes of address, problems arising out of estate distribution, payment of debts, will details, selling of mortgage shares, accounts, estate settlement, money cables and transfers, dealings with lawyers, rent on Hutton Park property, legal and accounting fees, power of attorney transfer, investments, property security, land appraisals, lists of assets, legacy taxes, mortgages transfers, property management, Flatbush property, property rent and values, and physicians bills.

Correspondents include the following: A.C. Weeks, Walter I. Green, John D. Probsh, A.G. Darwin, Thomas H. McCann, Allan Farguhar, Thomas Dawson, Potter and Crandall Real Estate and Insurance Brokers, George C. Tilyou, H.D. Olephant, F. Winston, Richard E. Calbraith, Frank P. Martin, Henry DeForest, Henry C. Cooper, Metropolitan Telephone and Telegraph Company, John Ecker, C.K. Avevill, Georgina Hutton, Edward J. Hancy, Robert Graham, W.M. Bennett, Willis E. Merriman, Nathan L. Miller, Harry Hutton, Marquise de Portes (Adele Gorman), Annie Theller, Samuel L. Theller, Mrs. R. Locke, Frank Z. Adams, John Palmer (Secretary of State, New York), J.T. Cammeyer, Frank P. Martin, Florence Theller, Francis H. Seger, Henry C. Cooper, D.W.G. Cammeyer, Campbell W. Adams, Jane Casson, Elizabeth Hutton, Rene de Portes, H.G. Atkins, Grace Beukard, Aaron Pennington Muikhead, J.E. Delapalme, T.H. Powers, Egerton L. Winthrop Junior, George B. Glover, William Jay and Robert W. Candler, B. Williamson, J.E. Knaff, Cornelius C. Vermeule, S.V. Hayden, Charles G. Landon[?], H.A. Hurlbert, F.A. Black, John L. Calwalder, the Health Department of New York, A.G. Darwin, William Laue, Frederick Frelinghuysen, Charles S. Brown, Henrietta Hutton, Edward Gelon.

Subseries 3, Other Huttons, 1874-1936, includes professional drawings and proposals, checks, insurance information, correspondence, tax information, medical information, tax bills, relating to Mary Augusta Hutton (wife), Mary Hutton (daughter), Henry and Harry Hutton, Frank Hutton (son), John Caulfield (son-in-law), B.F. Hutton, and C.H. Hutton.

Subseries 4, Personal Materials, 1878-1946, contains handwritten property notes, school notes, sermons, travel documents, menus, Christmas cards, jewelry box, postal guide, typed religious materials and flyers.

Series 5, Diaries, 1866-1901, contains twenty nine diary books that document both Hutton's personal and professional life. These diaries provide not only a record of Hutton's life, but were also used by Hutton himself as a reference tool. When working on projects he would refer to notes and observations he made in his diary (as evidenced by notes made in his diaries). The first pages of the diaries often list his height, weight and clothing sizes as they varied from year to year. A researcher could probably use the cashbooks (see Series 7) and the diaries in conjunction as both detail the purchases made by Hutton. Many of the diaries also include a short record of accounts in the back. The diaries are arranged chronologically.

Topics found in the diaries include short form accounts of daily activities and appointments, records of the weather, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal project, construction progress on projects, steam pumps, sketches and calculations, extension of Washington railroads, cost of food, work supplies, travel costs, costs of goods and food, work deadlines, home renovations, visits to family, cash accounts, accounts of household duties, produce on Woodlands property, records of deaths, debts owed, account of clearing Woodlands property, church visits, Hancock and Tonoloway Aqueduct, canals, Drum Point Railroad, Montgomery C. Meigs, Washington Aqueduct, Annapolis Water Works, telegram costs, wages for Chesapeake and Ohio Canal project, William Craighill, Morris Canal, Annapolis Railroad and Canal, professional duties (inspections), Kanawha River Canal, travel schedules, professional expenses, cash received from Chesapeake and Ohio Canal project, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, John's Dam, cathedral construction (St. Patricks?), Piedmont Bridge, Cumberland, account of farm property belonging to Major Campbell Bruns, Cunard Pier, Marquise de Portes, rent costs, Baltimore Canal, Kingston Water Supply, Croton Orange Estate, Pierre Casson, Hudson River Tunnel, Washington/Harlem River Bridge, entertainment costs, Greenwood cemetery, train schedule, notes on illness, real estate sales, Hutton Park, Benjamin H. Hutton estate and heirs, estimates, accounts of correspondence received and sent, Central Railroad, rent on Orange properties, addresses, contracts and building supplies for projects, personal finances, Joseph Hutton property on Vanderbilt Avenue, New York, amounts paid and received, medical appointments, Ramapo Water Company, drawing progress of maps and diagrams, Harbor Board (New York), property repairs, inspection and test reports, reservoirs, lists of birthdays, Boston Tunnel, family financial issues, tax payments, and prayers.

Series 6, Notebooks, 1860-1900, document the engineering and architectural projects worked on by Hutton. The series has been divided into three subseries: Subseries 1, Engineering and Survey Field Notes, 1860-1899; Subseries 2, Notebooks, 1871-1886; and Subseries 3, Notes, 1863-1900. Subseries 1, Engineering and Survey Field Notes, 1860-1899, contains sixteen field notebooks used by Hutton. Subseries 2, Notebooks, 1871-1886, contains seven notebooks. Subseries three, Notes, 1863-1900, contains four documents.

Some notebooks correspond to specific projects such as the Kanawha River Canal (lockgate and Phoenix Waterline), Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, Buffalo Reservoir, Potomac Lock and Dock Company, Northern Adirondack Railroad account, Washington Aqueduct, Little Rock Bridge, Wilson-Adam Dock, Croten Brick Works, Hutton Park, Centennial Iron Works, Cumberland Canal, Williamsport Aqueduct, Catoctin Aqueduct, Alexandria Canal, Miller's Saw Mill, Seneca Dam, Union Tunnel, Cumberland Waterworks, Victoria Bridge, Welland Canal, North Sea Canal, Ramapo Water Company, Annapolis Water Company, Antietam Aqueduct, Interoceanic Canal, San Quentin Canal, Suez Canal, Amsterdam Canal, Harlem Bulkhead, Morris Canal, Blue Lake Canal, and Nicaragua Canal.

These notebooks should be used in conjunction with the other materials in the collection related to professional projects, as they often provide more detailed accounts of the construction and land surveys. Some of the notebooks contain entries from several different sources. The notebooks were probably shared among the engineers working on these projects. The notebooks also contain looseleaf ephemera such as hand written calculations, newspaper clippings, and blueprints. Languages found in this series are English and French.

Notebook topics include construction projects, supply needs, costs for labor, sketches (Woodland Mills, landscapes, dams, railway cars, Noland Tunnel), costs of crops, survey measurements, cost of livestock, aqueducts, inspections, canal bridges, seed prices, dams, measurements, coffer dam, canal maintenance, worker salaries, calculations, towpath sketches and measurements, shipping rates, worker accidents, water and coal used, geometrical sketches (Washington Aqueduct), locks, damage reports, interactions with other engineers (William Reading), coal shipments on the canal, travel expenses, land survey notes, drafts for correspondence, William Craighill, Victoria docks, lists of personal supplies used, construction time estimates, surveying expenses, telegram costs, sand pump, canal from Sherling to Tuxedo Bay, analysis of several artificial lakes and reservoirs, distances of reservoirs to main pipes, calculations for the Austin Wheel, engine construction, bridges, gauging water depth, results and observations of tests and performance, problems with construction, to-do lists, cost of land surrounding towpaths, Fawcett's Lock, Tarman's Lock, comparison of costs in transporting coal by water and by rail, inspection notes, iron work, drainages, leaks, cost of supplies, watergates, harbor ferries, railroad station distances, flood protection, Panama Canal via the Nicaraguan route, cost of jetties, water levels, pressure of steam, boilers, steam and water cycle, water depth, cement, Great Falls, Virginia, waterflow, soundings, time of floats, flow of currents, rain fall measurements, tunnel measurements, cost of trenching San Francisco water supply, record of livestock, cost of food, rates of sawing woods and mills, preliminary railroad line measurements, profile of final line, and railroad line profiles.

Series 7, Cash Books, 1856-1899, contains seven cashbooks which list prices for personal items purchased by Hutton. Topics include groceries, church dues, clothes, hygiene products, cigars, some short journal entries about his work (Williamstown), concerts, dinners, family addresses, cakes, meals, cars, stamps, office supplies (pencils and papers), valentines, glasses, gloves, fabric, medicine, needles, diapers, tobacco, shoes (adult and childrens), travel expenses, telegrams, candles, newspapers, liquor, coal oil, jewelry, allowances given to family members, bank deposits, monies paid and received, taxes, subscriptions, tailoring costs, deposits and payments into estate trusts, and notes about payments to Benjamin H. Hutton heirs. The cashbooks also contain some personal loose leaf ephemera such as prayers, sketches, and engineering notes collected by Hutton.

Series 8, Professional Projects, 1830-1965, contains documents about engineering and architectural projects throughout Hutton's career, including information about the professional organizations and the legal issues in which he was involved. This series has been divided into eight subseries based on project, document form, and document subject. Some materials are in French and Italian.

Series 8, Professional Projects, also includes correspondence related to specific projects, primarily the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, the Hudson River Tunnel, the Washington/Harlem River Bridge, and the Georgetown Incline.

Topics include construction and repair to the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, engineering and use of Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, worker contracts, supply and labor purchases, design plans and proposals, construction and repair costs, supply notes and costs of supplies, water pressure and power, shipping materials and routes (specifically the shipping of coal), inspections and their findings, condition of canal dam and locks, water supply, drainage, sketches, board proceedings, business meetings, deeds, cost comparisons to other shipping methods, hiring processes, wages, cost estimates, Hutton's consulting fees, measurements and calculations, funding issues, worker conflicts, negotiations with municipal governments, payment schedules, bills for services, air pressure in Hudson River Tunnel, permission for construction, specifications, mortality rate among workers on the Hudson River Tunnel, construction reports, outlet incline, proposals for construction, letters of introduction, railroad versus water for trade, controversy with Tiersey, construction contracts, construction schedules, construction issues, construction progress, construction damage, basis for estimates, supply requests, internal politics, changes to construction plans, contract and price adjustments, issues with suppliers, construction delays, work permits, bills, worker issues, engineering notes, construction excavations, expenses, construction instructions, Union Bridge Company, lighting installations, construction processes, hiring practices, electrical conductors, water proofing, hydraulics, cement, concrete, payment of contributors, processes of approval for construction, meeting dates of the Harlem River Bridge Commission, and contract restrictions.

Correspondents include the following: W.W.M. Kaig, Henry Dodge, E. Mulvany, John Shay, James Clarke, H.D. Whitcomb, Horace Benton, J. Rellan, J.R. Maus, W.E. Merrill, A.P. Gorman, J.H. Staats, Vernon H. Brown, Charles H. Fisher (New York Central and Hudson River Railway Company), B. Baker, John Fowler, Benjamin and John Dos Passos, Charles B. Colby, Charles B. Brush, S. Pearson, Stanford White, Horace E. Golding, R.H. Smith, Daniel Lord, A. Fteley, Herbert Hinds, J.R. Bartlett, D.M. Hirsch, M.H. Bartholomew, Thomas O. Driscoll, W.E. Porter, Thomas F. Rowland, George Edward Harding, R.H. Dames, William Watson, James B. Eads, J.D. Bright, H. Aston, Charles Suley, A.M. Maynard, W.R. Henton, G. Geddes, H.P. Gilbut, Malcolm W. Niver (Secretary of the Harlem River Bridge Commission), J.D. Patterson, George Devin (Assistant Engineer Washington/ Harlem River Bridge), J.B. Wheeler, John Bogart, Charles Burns, J. McClellon, Rob Bassee, B. Williamson, Theodore Cooper, Lewis Cass Ledyard, R.M. Hunt, John Cooper, Henry Wilson, A.A. Caille, Myles Tierney, W. Pentzen, L.B. Cantfield, George Q. Grumstaid Junior, M.J. Funton, George Pierce, W.O. Fayerweather, Noah S. Belthen, Herbert Steward, W.M. Habirsham. Subseries 1, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, 1828-1965, consists of plans, blueprints, land profiles, drawings, boat rates, contract forms, order forms, descriptions of the canal, design information, engineering data, sketches, cost estimates, land titles, microfilm, business papers, supply bills, patent bills, news clippings, reports, specifications, stockholder's reports, receipts, water leases, printed materials, and correspondence.

The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal project was started in 1828 and completed twenty two years later in 1850. The canal's main objective was to connect Georgetown to the coal banks above Cumberland, Maryland, providing a short and cheap trade route between the eastern and western United States. It was also hoped that the canal would provide greater communication and travel between these two regions. Plagued by natural disasters, and construction setbacks, the canal was never completed in time to be useful and became obsolete shortly after its completion. Canal trade was eventually put out of business by the increase of railroads. Although it was an important development in engineering at its inception, the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal is no longer in use and has become what locals affectionately refer to as "the old ditch." The canal was designated a National Historical Park in 1971 and consists of 184.5 miles of hiking and biking trails.

Subseries 2, Hudson River Tunnel, 1887-1901, consists of agreements for construction, certificates, contracts, and cost estimates, construction reports, engineering notebooks, engineering notes, sketches, land profiles, maps, progress profiles, plans, proposals, printed material, statements of expenses, and correspondence.

The Hudson River Tunnel project was started in 1874, and the final tubes were opened in 1910 after several construction setbacks. The tunnel connects Weehawken, New Jersey and Pennsylvania Station in Manhattan, New York City. Today the Hudson River Tunnel, known as the North River Tunnels is used by Amtrak's Northeast Corridor and New Jersey Transit rail lines.

Subseries 3, Harlem River Bridge, 1878-1982, consists of blueprints, printed materials, photographs, engineer's estimates, schedules, costs, reports, proposals, contracts, specifications, and correspondence.

The Harlem River Bridge project was started in 1885 and was completed in 1889. It spans the Harlem River in New York City, New York and connects the Washington Heights section of Manhattan with the Bronx. It was later named and is still known as the Washington Bridge and has been adapted over time to carry highway traffic. These adaptations have allowed the bridge to remain in use today.

Subseries 4, Other Projects, 1858-1832, consists of drawings, maps, blueprints, plans, proposals, cost estimates, bills, correspondence, sketches, land profiles, dimensions, engineering notes, account records, photostats, supply lists, calculations, legal documents, surveys, inspection reports, financial data, and measurements on architectural and engineering projects. Highlights of this subseries include: Western Maryland Railroad, Washington Aqueduct, Panama Canal, Ramapo Water Company, Piedmont Bridge, Northern Adirondack Railroad, Columbia Railroad, Morris Canal, Pittsfield and Williamstown Railroad, Suez Canal, St. Gothard Canal, Tansa Dam, Colorado Midland Railroad Company, Memorial Bridge, Mersey Tunnel, Little Rock Bridge, Kingston Water Supply, Kanawha River Canal, Florida Ship Canal, East Jersey Water Company, Consolidated Coal Company, Dismal Swamp Canal, Boston and Baltimore Tunnels, St. Patrick's Cathedral, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, Annapolis Water Company, Baltimore and Drum Point Railroad Company, and the Baltimore Beltline.

Subseries 5, Unidentified Project Files, 1872-1900, consists of bills of sale, engineering forms and regulations, cement test results and methods, census bulletin, contracts, cost estimates, correspondence, notes on publications, engineering data and notes, drawings, surveys, sketches, payrolls, photographs, and reports.

Subseries 6, Specifications, 1870-1900, consists of documents related to some of Hutton's projects, including specifications for bridges, reservoirs, canals, viaducts, docks, buildings, water works, and tunnels. Some specifications are more general, and some are blank proposal/specification forms. There are also proposals for estimates and a "call" or advertisement to contractors to bid on certain projects. Many of the specifications deal with projects in New York State, but projects in Pennsylvania, the City of Baltimore, and Europe are represented. The materials are arranged alphabetically by project name. There is one folder of documentation for the Potomac River Bridge (Arlington Memorial Bridge) in Washington, D.C. The Arlington Memorial Bridge was part of the 1901 McMillan Commission's plan for restoring Pierre (Peter) Charles L'Enfant's original plan for the capital. Two decades passed before construction was initiated by the architectural firm McKim, Mead, and White. The documentation for the Memorial Bridge consists of calculations and monetary figures for materials such as granite.

Subseries 7, Legal Documents, 1886, contains documents related to a patent infringement suit for moveable dams involving Alfred Pasqueau vs. the United States. This file contains both a printed version of the case and a handwritten statement from Hutton.

Subseries 8, Professional Organizations, 1870-1902, contains documents related to professional organizations where Hutton held membership. Specific organizations represented are American Institute of Architects, American Society of Civil Engineers, Institution of Civil Engineers, Boston Society of Civil Engineers, Societe des Ingenieurs Civils de France, Librarie Polytechnique, American Agency of "Engineering" in London, Imperial Institute, League of Associated Engineers, Railroad Corporation, American Institute of Mining Engineers, and the Century Association. Material in the subseries includes correspondence, candidates for membership, membership payments, membership lists, meeting minutes, schedule of terms, professional practices, charges, articles of association, invitations for membership, and election notes. Some materials are in French.

Series 9, Printed Materials, 1850-1913, contains a variety of printed materials relating to engineering and architectural projects written by Hutton and fellow engineers. This series can be used to examine not only professional developments of the period and responses to those developments, but also to track how ideas were transferred between engineers across countries and continents. This series should be used in conjunction with the professional correspondence found in this collection, as many of the authors also appear there. Some materials are in French, German, Spanish, and Italian.

Subseries 1, Printed Materials by Hutton, 1852-1900, includes printed papers on the Missouri flood wave, the Ravine du Sud, the Potomac waterfront, the Colorado midlands, and the application of water supply machinery.

Subseries 2, Printed Materials by Others, 1826-1913, includes printed materials on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canals, Tehuantec Ship Railway, Interoceanic canals and railways, jetties, Nicaragua Canal, uses of cements, mortars, concretes, steam power, harbors, Niagara Falls, Kanawha River canal, Mississippi River, Hudson River Bridge, sewage disposal, Washington Aqueduct, specifications, construction progress reports, hydraulic experiments, water supply, drainage, road surfacing, sea walls, water-cooling apparatus, pollution reports, bridges, pipes, channels, reservoirs, irrigation, water power, and sewers.

Subseries 2 contains an issue of The North American Review in which Hutton has specifically highlighted an article entitled, "The Inter-Oceanic Canal." Please see the container list for names of authors.

Subseries 3, Printed Materials with No Author, 1852-1903, includes printed materials on harbor reports, Annapolis Water Company, Ramapo Water Company, water departments and boards, maps, engineer's reports, sea walls, preservation of structures, annual reports, Coal and Iron Railway Company, sewers, Baltimore and Drum Point Railroad, contract specifications, proposals, social club life, Croton Water Supply, law suits, water supplies, moveable dams, reservoirs, East River Bridge, Eastern Canal, water filtration, Kingston New Water Supply, water pipes, locks, docks, contracts, construction reports, Croton Water Supply, and surveys. Also included are issues of journals such as Le Correspondant, Circular of the Office of Chief Engineers, The Club, VIII Congres International de Navigation, Journal of the Association of Engineering Studies, and Journal of the Franklin Institute.

Subseries 4, Newspaper, Journals and Magazine Clippings, 1873-1900, contains clippings from a variety of newspapers such as Scientific American, andRailroad Gazette. Subjects included are the Union Tunnel opening in Baltimore, Drum Point Railroad, railroad company conflicts, Washington/Harlem River Bridge, Metropolitan Railroad, Western Maryland Railroad, crop prospects, lumber trade, North Avenue Bridge, Nicaraguan Canal, harbors, river improvements, reactions to engineering projects, Belt tunnel, city transit, Washington, D.C. flood in 1880, tunnel shields, Springfield Bridge, railroad patents, Panama Canal, jetties, Hudson Tunnel, steel boilers, composition and use of cement, and the Brooklyn Bridge.

Subseries 5, Oversized Printed Materials, 1889-1892, contains large printed materials related to the Washington Aqueduct, General Post Office Building, subway arches, cornices, Warwick's Castle, Neuschwanstein Castle, Renaissance paintings, botanical drawings, school buildings, church architecture, the Hospital for the Insane of the Army and Navy and the District of Columbia, the Panama Canal, Morningside Park, and the Mississippi Jetties. Also includes engravings of Hutton, T.N. Talfound, and F. Jeffrey and photographs of Montgomery C. Meigs, and Hutton. Some materials are in German and French.

References:

1. Ward, George Washington, "The Early Development of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Project," Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science Series XVII, no. 9-11 (1899): 8.

2. Ibid., 88.

3. Ibid., 55.

4. Ibid., 90.

5. Sanderlin, Walter S., "The Great National Project: A History of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal," Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science Series LXIV, no. 1 (1946): 21.

6. Ibid., 282.

7. Gies, Joseph, Adventure Underground (Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday and Company Inc., 1962): 134.

8. Ibid., 131-132.

9. Ibid., 135-136.

10. Ibid., 145.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into ten series.

Series 1, Letterpress Copybooks, 1858-1901

Series 2, Professional Correspondence, 1861-1901

Subseries 1, Project Correspondence, 1876-1899

Subseries 2, General Correspondence, 1861-1901

Series 3, Personal Correspondence, 1850-1942

Series 4, Personal Materials, 1835-1946

Subseries 1, Financial Records, 1876-1901

Subseries 2, Estate and Real Estate Records, 1835-1921

Subseries 3, Other Huttons, 1874-1936

Subseries 4, Personal Materials, 1878-1946

Series 5, Diaries, 1866-1901

Series 6, Notebooks, 1860-1900

Subseries 1, Engineering and Survey Field Notes, 1860-1899

Subseries 2, Notebooks, 1871-1886

Subseries 3, Notes, 1863-1900

Series 7, Cashbooks, 1856-1899

Series 8, Professional Projects, 1830-1965

Subseries 1, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, 1828-1965

Subseries 2, Hudson River Tunnel, 1887-1901

Subseries 3, Harlem River Bridge, 1878-1892

Subseries 4, Other Projects, 1858-1932

Subseries 5, Identified Project Files, 1872-1900

Subseries 6, Specifications, 1870-1900

Subseries 7, Legal Documents, 1886

Subseries 8, Professional Organizations, 1870-1902

Series 9, Printed Materials, 1826-1913

Subseries 1, Printed Materials by Hutton, 1852-1900

Subseries 2, Printed Materials by Others, 1826-1913

Subseries 3, Newspaper, Journals, and Magazine Clippings, 1855-1901

Subseries 4, Oversized Printed Material, 1889-1892

Series 10: Drawings, 1875, 1883
Biographical / Historical:
Not much is known about the history of William Rich Hutton outside of his role in architectural and engineering projects of the late 1800s and early 1900s. In many cases, he is spoken of only in reference to his projects, and the short biographies that have been written read more like a resume than a life story. Because of this lack of information, this note will focus on Hutton's professional accomplishments, but will attempt to make some comments on his personal life.

William Rich Hutton was born on March 21, 1826 in Washington, D.C., the eldest son of James Hutton (died 1843) and his wife, the former Salome Rich (1). He was educated at the Western Academy (Washington, D.C.) from 1837-1840 under George J. Abbot and then at Benjamin Hallowell's School in Alexandria, Virginia, where he received special training in mathematics, drawing, and surveying (2). Hutton began his professional career in California when he, along with his younger brother James, accompanied their uncle William Rich to work for the United States Army. His uncle was a paymaster for the army and Hutton became his clerk. They traveled around the new state paying the various platoons stationed there, but Hutton also occupied his time by drawing the landscapes and structures he saw in the settlements of Los Angeles, San Francisco, La Paz, Mazatlan, Santa Barbara, Monterey, San Pedro, San Diego, and Cape San Lucas (3). These drawings are now held by the Huntington Library in San Marino, California. Hutton held the position of clerk until the spring of 1849, and in July of that year he began working with Lieutenant Edward O.C. Ord and completed the first survey of Los Angeles and its surrounding pueblo lands and islands. Hutton continued surveying in California from 1850-1851. He was hired by William G. Dana to survey the Nipomo Ranch in San Luis Obispo County and also surveyed the ranches Santa Manuela and Huer-Huero, both owned by Francis Z. Branch. After his employment with Dana, he became the county surveyor for San Luis Obispo County, where he prepared the first survey and map of the region. He also continued to survey ranches for Captain John Wilson during this time. In August 1851, he resigned from his position as county surveyor and moved to Monterey where he worked as an assistant to Captain (later General) Henry W. Hallack, superintendent of the New Almaden Quicksilver Mine in Santa Clara County (4). He remained in this position until March, 1853 when he returned to Washington, D.C. by way of Mexico (5).

Hutton began his career as a civil engineer in Washington, D.C. He was first assigned to the position of assistant engineer on a survey of the projected Metropolitan Railroad in 1853, which was chartered to connect Washington, D.C. with the mainline of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. In 1855 he began his professional relationship with Montgomery C. Meigs when he was appointed to the position of assistant engineer on the Washington Aqueduct. He also served as division engineer on this project until construction was shut down in 1861 because of the outbreak of the Civil War. Fortunately for Hutton, the construction on the Aqueduct was resumed in 1862, and when Congress transferred the supervision of the aqueduct project from the War Department to the Department of the Interior, Hutton was made chief engineer. By the end of the Civil War, Hutton's reputation as a civil engineer was established (6).

During this decade Hutton also served as the chief engineer for the Annapolis Water Works (1866) and as chief engineer for one of his most famous projects, the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal (1869-1871). Although some historians minimize Hutton as just one of many engineers to work on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, he did make one major contribution to its construction: the Georgetown Canal Incline. Perhaps the final effort of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal company to compete with the emerging and fast expanding railroad, the Georgetown Incline was designed to allow canal boats to travel through the canal with low water levels and to alleviate canal congestion. Unfortunately, by the time the incline was completed use of the canal had decreased so significantly that it was no longer needed to help control traffic (7). Despite this, Hutton continued to work as a consulting engineer for the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Company until 1881, when he was let go because of the dwindling fortunes of the company (7).

In the 1870s and 1880s Hutton was busy with several engineering projects. During 1871-1873, he was the chief engineer in the completion of the Western Maryland Railroad to Hagerstown and Williamsport (9). He also practiced as an architect with his brother, the prominent Baltimore architect Nathanial Henry Hutton, during the years 1873-1880. He relocated to New York in 1880, serving as chief engineer for the Washington Bridge in 1888 and 1889 and the Hudson River Tunnel from 1889 to 1891. In 1886, he became the consulting engineer for the New Croton Aqueduct and served in the same position for the Colorado Midland Railway between the years of 1886-1889 (10).

As his personal and professional correspondence shows, Hutton continued to work on various engineering and architectural projects until his death on December 11, 1901. In addition to these projects, he also invented the innovative system of locks and moveable dams used in the Kanawha River Canal. He was awarded the Diplome d'Honneur for this featat the Paris Exposition in 1878 (11). His correspondence also demonstrates how Hutton was respected within his professional community. These letters refer to the accuracy of his work, his willingness to help other colleagues and supply them with reference materials and information, and, in addition to all this, his politeness. It seems that these qualities defined not only his personality but also his ideology. In one of the cashbooks in the collection, dated 1899, a hand written note contains a religious parable of "The Straw." The phrase in this parable that speaks most to Hutton's work ethic, and to the spirit of inventors everywhere, is this: "Even so however lowly may be the act, however little opportunities we may have of assisting others, we may still do something. Let us beg to fulfil our duty in this regards by making ourselves useful to others by some little act of thoughtful charity..." (12). Hutton, in his dedication to civil engineering, seems to have lived up to this virtue, and in his work he changed the landscape of Washington, D.C. and New York.

The Fairy Godfather: Hutton's Personal History

His professional records reveal a man who was fiercely dedicated to his work. His obituary references his professional life more than his personal life (13). Despite his reputation in the professional engineering community, his personal records demonstrate that Hutton was also dedicated to his family and children. In 1855, he married Montgomery County native Mary Augusta Clopper (died 1915). Together they lived on her family's estate known as the Woodlands, and had five children: Frank C. Hutton, Mary Hutton, Elizabeth Hutton (later Caulfield), Rosa Hutton, and Annie Salome Hutton (14). It is at this estate that Hutton died and was buried. The personal letters to his wife found in the Woodlands Collection held at the Montgomery County Historical Society show a man in love and willing to take time from his work to write to his wife. His letters to his children show a similar interest and compassion. In the many letters found in this collection from his daughter Elizabeth (Bessie) one can see a father who is interested in not only his daughter's activities abroad, but also in her opinion. This interest also extends to his son Frank Hutton, as their correspondence shows Hutton offering his son advice on his own engineering projects.

Hutton also served as executor to many of his extended family's estates. Many letters show the conflicts that Hutton had to mediate and the dependence of his cousins on him for advice and money. Although his family was wealthy (his cousin was Benjamin H. Hutton whose daughters married into the court of Napoleon III), they were volatile, and his records seem to indicate that he served as a mediator for many of their disputes. In addition to this, as his nickname of Fairy Godfather suggests, Hutton was always willing to lend his family either financial or moral support when needed. Unfortunately, little other documentation concerning Hutton's personal life exists outside of this collection and the one held at the Montgomery County Historical Society.

References:

1. Waters, Willard O., "Introduction," California 1847-1852 (San Marino: The Huntington Library, 1942).

2. Waters, Willard O., "Memoir," Glances at California 1847-1853 (San Marino: The Huntington Library, 1942): ix.

3. Waters, Willard O., "Introduction," California 1847-1852 (San Marino: The Huntington Library, 1942). and Waters, Willard O., "Memoir," Glances at California 1847-1853 (San Marino: The Huntington Library, 1942): x-xi.

4. Waters, Willard O., "Introduction," California 1847-1852 (San Marino: The Huntington Library, 1942).

5. Waters, Willard O., "Memoir," Glances at California 1847-1853 (San Marino: The Huntington Library, 1942): xvii.

6. Waters, Willard O., "Memoir," Glances at California 1847-1853 (San Marino: The Huntington Library, 1942): xvii-xviii.

7. Skramstad, Harold, "The Georgetown Canal Incline," Technology and Culture, Vol. 10, no. 4 (Oct. 1969): 555.

8. Business Correspondence, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, 22 February 1881, William R. Hutton Papers, 1830-1965, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, box number 27, folder number 29.

9. "William Rich Hutton," The Club: A Journal of Club Life for Men and Women,(July 1894):37

10. Ibid.

11. Monzione, Joseph, "William R. Hutton," A.P.W.A. Reporter (Sept. 1977): 7.

12. Cashbook, 1899, William R. Hutton Papers, 1830-1965, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, box number 23, folder number 5.

13. The Woodlands Collection, Montgomery County Historical Society.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

The Montgomery C. Meigs Papers, 1870-1890, (AC0987). Contains materials relating to the construction of the Washington Aqueduct including a book of drawings illustrating reservoirs, tunnels, culverts, and other structural elements, a Government Senate Document relating to construction progress, scrapbooks created by Meigs that include newspaper clippings about the Washington Aqueduct project, water supply, engineering projects, building construction, architecture and other subjects. Collection is currently unprocessed, but is available for research.

Materials in Other Organizations:

The William Rich Hutton Papers, 1840-1961, are located at the Huntington Library in California (see http://catalog.huntington.org).

The collection contains 95 drawings, 13 letters, and 39 facsimile copies of letters and manuscripts. The illustrative material includes both watercolor and pencil drawings of California (including Los Angeles, Monterey, San Francisco, the New Almaden Quicksilver Mine, and the California missions), Baja California, Mexico, and Peru. There are also five pieces in the collection related to the author María Amparo Ruiz de Burton. In 1942, the Huntington Library published Glances at California 1847--853: Diaries and Letters of William Rich Hutton, Surveyor and California 1847--852: Drawings by William Rich Hutton.

The Hutton family papers are located at the Montgomery County Historical Society, Sween Library (see http://www.montgomeryhistory.org/sites/default/files/Family_Files.pdf).

The collection contains account books from the Woodlands estate, recipe books, livestock records, records of Mary Augusta Hutton (wife), Mary and Rose Hutton (daughters), newspaper clippings (including his obituary), correspondence, record books, deeds, bills and receipts, engineering papers, religious momentos (funeral service cards), and insurance papers.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Mr. and Mrs. James J. Madine, a relative of Hutton's and last owners of the Woodlands estate; the Department of Forests and Parks, Maryland; Louis Fischer; and Mr. and Mrs. Mayo S. Stuntz, 1965-1966, 1974.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Dams  Search this
Hydraulic engineering  Search this
Canals  Search this
Underwater tunnels  Search this
Railroad bridges  Search this
Railroad construction  Search this
Water-supply  Search this
Construction workers  Search this
Construction equipment  Search this
Concrete construction  Search this
Concrete  Search this
Coal -- Transportation  Search this
Civil engineers  Search this
Civil engineering  Search this
Canals -- Panama  Search this
Canals -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Canals -- Maryland  Search this
Canals -- Design and construction  Search this
Bridges -- United States  Search this
Waterworks  Search this
Tunnels  Search this
Tunnels -- New York (N.Y.)  Search this
Construction -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Underground construction  Search this
Locks and dams  Search this
Shipping  Search this
Iron and steel bridges  Search this
Sewage disposal  Search this
Railroads -- Maryland  Search this
Railroads -- 19th century  Search this
Railroad engineering  Search this
Railroad companies  Search this
Aqueducts  Search this
Arch bridges  Search this
Architects -- 19th century  Search this
Books  Search this
Bridges -- New York (N.Y.)  Search this
Bridges -- Design and construction  Search this
Bridge construction industry -- United States  Search this
Engineering notebooks  Search this
Docks  Search this
Domestic and family life  Search this
Architecture -- United States  Search this
Architecture -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Western Maryland Railroad  Search this
Annapolis Waterworks  Search this
Steam engineering  Search this
Harlem River Bridge Commission  Search this
Washington (D.C.) -- 19th century  Search this
Reservoirs  Search this
Patents  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Letterpress copybooks
Blueprints
Diaries
Drawings
Photographs -- 19th century
Cashbooks
Business records -- 19th century
Business letters
Notebooks
Topographic maps
Tax records
Technical drawings
Stock certificates
Technical literature
Photoengravings
Notes
Maps -- 19th century
Microfilms
Linen tracings
Letter books
Letters
Land titles
Legal documents
Sketches
Salted paper prints
Reports
Receipts
Plans (drawings)
Photostats
Photographic prints
Architectural drawings
Administrative records
Albumen prints
Albums
Annual reports
Booklets
Account books -- 19th century
Books -- 19th century
Family papers -- 18th century
Financial records -- 19th century
Diaries -- 19th century
Drawings -- 19th century
Cyanotypes
Correspondence -- 19th-20th century
Deeds
Printed material
Correspondence
Contracts
Harlem River Bridge
Photograph albums
Specifications
Christmas cards
Menus
Citation:
William R. Hutton Papers, dates, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0987
See more items in:
William R. Hutton Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep84f6824ce-7291-4ac4-ab0f-abaa2071815e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0987
Online Media:

Project Files

Collection Creator:
Wilbur H. Burnham Studios  Search this
Extent:
10.6 Linear feet (Boxes 2-12, 42)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1916-1980s
Scope and Contents note:
Project, or "Job," files provide documentation of contracts for approximately 250 locations held by Burnham Studios throughout the United States and in Bellau, France, from the 1920s-1980s. Files typically include correspondence with clients, architects and builders, contracts, purchase orders, building plans, sketches, scattered photographs and some printed material. Found at the beginning of the series are some files relating to projects in general, including correspondence and job orders with metal window specialists, Chas. Haas Company; 2 sets of index cards listing project numbers and materials used; records of repair contracts; and a set of completed contracts for the firm Reynolds, Francis & Rohnstock from 1920s-1960s.

The series contains significant documentation for the following projects in particular: New York's Cathedral of Saint John the Divine, Saint Mary's Cathedral in Peoria, Illinois, Saint Martin's Church in Providence, Rhode Island, and the Washington National Cathedral in Washington D. C.

See Appendix for a list of numbered contracts in Series 6.
Arrangement note:
Arrangement of this series reflects the studio's main system for organizing project files alphabetically by name of the town in which the job site was located. It can be assumed that all folder titles containing references to letters elsewhere in the collection (e.g. "Repairs, A-C, E,") also follow that system of arrangement. Beginning in the 1920s Burnham Studios began assigning numbers to contracts and several copies of a list of contracts by number were found in the collection. That list is provided below and allows for cross-referencing (albeit incomplete) of the projects arranged by location in this series with the design studies found in Series 10: Artwork and Sketchbooks. The list was transcribed from hand-written records which were incomplete and sometimes illegible.
Appendix: List of Numbered Contracts in Series 6:
1. Pitsburgh, E. Liberty Presbyterian Church, 3 figure windows

2. Pittsburgh, E. Liberty Presbyterian Church

3. Sample, Liturgical Arts Exhibition

4. New York, Cath. St. John Divine, Missionary sample

5. Chevy Chase, Shrine Most Blessed Sacrament

6. Boston, Old South, repair corridor windows

7. Boston, Old South, 30 clerestory windows

8. Sample, duplicate Liturgial Arts #3

9. Boston, Old South rose

10. Worcester, All Saints Church, chancel

11. Boston, N. E. Mutual

12. Fall River, St. Mark's Church

14. Albany, St. Andrew's

15. Worcester, All Saints Church (Thompson) duplicate (restored after fire)

16. Buffalo, Westminster Presbyterian

17. Transparencies, Dusky Dancer

18. Quincy, Mausoleum, Long & Saunders

19. Worcester, All Saints Church, aisle, St. Martin of Tours

20. Greenwood, Union Church

21. Illegible

22. New York, Cath. St. John Divine, Lawyers

23. Worcester, All Saints Church, Sample Mr. Robb

24. Waban, Union Church

25. New York, Cath. St. John Divine, Ecclesiastical

26. Worcester, All Saints Church aisle, St. Elizabeth of Hungary

27. New York, Cath. St. John Divine, clerestory (Lawyers Bay-St. Paul; Ecclesiastical Bay-Moses)

28. New York, Cath. St. John Divine, clerestory (St. Augustine, St. Aidan)

29. New York, St. Thomas Chapel

30. Transparency, Erica

31. Transparency, Dickey, Coats of Arms

32. Boston, Tremont Temple, Erica

33. Northeast Harbor, St. Mary's by the Sea

34. Albany, Westminster Presbyterian, Herrick Mem'l aisle, Faith

35. Detroit, Backus, design

36. New York, Cath. St. John Divine, aisle sample #25

37. New York, Cath. St. John Divine, clerestory sample #28

38. Cambridge, St. Peter's

39. Detroit, Backus

40. Worcester, All Saints-Thompson

41. Needham, Legion

42. Christ circle

43. Sunapee, N. H. Private Chapel, Crowther

44. Durham, N. C. (see also #19 old groups of numbers)

45. Needham, Congregational, Long Church

46. Sample, Madonna and Child

47. Salisbury, MD, St. Peter's

48. Mechanicville, NY, Frye

49. Transparency, Portia and the Prince, King Lear Spring

50. Resnick-Roslindale-Church Saviour

51. Melrose, Trinity Church

52. Dobbs Ferry, N. Y., Ferncliff Chapel

53. Peoria, IL, St. Mary's Cath.

54. Clinton, St. John's Choir windows

55. Beverly, Appleton, circle

56. Repair, National Casket Co.

57. Au Sable Forks

58. Cincinnati, Calvary Church

59. Norwich, CO, repair

60. Lanesboro, St. Luke's Church

61. Repair, Lantern, Mrs. George Hall

62. Beverly, St. Peter's Gove

63. Belfast, ME, Matthews Brothers

64. Los Angeles, Dohney Mausoleum

65. Barharbor, Lingee Memorial

66. Peoria, IL, Lady Chapel

67. Tozzer House, Fry, Cambridge

68. Detroit, Central M. E. Church

69. Bishop O'Leary's House

70. Concord, St. Paul's School, fifteen medallions

71. Repair, Melrose, Trinity Church

72. Winter Park, Rollins College

73. Repair, lampshade, Smith

74. Swampscott, Ch. Holy Name

75. Marblehead, Unitarian Church

76. Grand Rapids, Klise Chapel chancel window

77. Hadley, South, Mount Holyoke Chapel

78. Peoria, Illinois, roses

79. Clinton, St. John's, 3 sanctuary, 2 chapel, 2 front

80. Concord, N. H. - Adams

81. St. Augustine, FL

82. Salt Lake City-Fry

83. Winter Park, Rollins College-Erasmus, John, Eliz. of Hungary

84. Cincinnati, Trailer cathedral-Bishop Hobson

85. Mechanicville-Fry (2 aisles)

86. Sample, Eve from Peoria Lady Chapel

87. Transparencies, Erica 2 coat of arms and 2 trans.

88. Northampton-Prof. Putnam

89. Albany, N.Y., St. Andrew's

90. Allentown, PA, St John's Ev. Luth. Church

91. Hampton, NH, Congregational Church

92. Northampton, Smith College, Library Chapel, Irving & Casson

93. Repair, Brookline, St. Paul's

94. San Francisco, St. Ives' Law Club, St. Ignatius

95. Brookline, Mr. Page, 80 Seaver St.

96. Brookline, Leyden Congregational Church, West transept

97. Sample, Duplicate #46

98. Peoria, IL, St. Thomas More Chapel

99. Brocton, Bart Bonner

100. Sample, Gowns

101. Sample, duplicate of #52

102. Processes for exhibition-how window is made

103. Repair-Long & Saunders

104. Repair

105. Brookline, Harvard Church

106. Coat of Arms, Bishop Schlarman

107. Peoria, St. Mary's Cath. 12 nave windows

108. Medway

109. Cleveland, Ohio, Trinity Cathedral, aisle windows

110. Elyria, St. Andrew's Episcopal Church

111. Braintree, Emmanuel Church

112. West Roxbury, Church Holy Name

114. Montpelier, St. Augustine's Ch.

115. Winchester, Ch. Epiphany

116. Exeter, NH, repair

117. Bradford, VT-Congregational Church

118. Transparency, colored pieces

119. Repair, Chestnut Hill, Ch. Redeemer

120. Pittsburgh, PA, Hunt Residence

121. Wellesley, College

122. Repair, Collens

123. Melrose, Repair

124. Newport, RI, St. George's School

125. Brookline, St. Paul's, repair

126. Wrentham, Trinity Episcopal, repair

127. Repair, Leominster, Pilgrim Congregational

128. Christ Chapel, Brookline-Sears 1st repairs

129. Sample, Dagit, Philadelphia

130. Harrisburg, Pine Street Church

131. Repair, Stafford Springs, Molitoris

132. Repair, Holy Name, W. Roxbury, basement

133. Repair, Chestnut Hill, Ch. Redeemer

134. Repair, Leominster, Methodist

135. Repair, Medfield, Congregational

136. Repair, New Badford, Weber

137. Church Hill, Md., St. Luke's

138. Mt. Vernon, O., Mercy Hospital

139. Cincinnati, Calvary Ch. transept

140. Transparency, St. Francis of Assisi (WHB)

141. Jamaica Plain, Unitarian Cong. Ch. repair

142. Transparency, Fry

143. Transparency, WHB Owl

144. Concord, St. Paul's School Shields

145. New Haven, CO, St. Thomas Ch.

146. Greensbury, 1st Pres. Ch.

147. Albany, St. Andrews, aisle

148. Sample, Jr. auto panel

149. Repair, Ch. New Jerusalem

150. Milford, Trinity Ch. design

151. Greensburgh (Taylor)

152. Transparency, Sea Horse

153. Repair, Cambridge

154. Lynn, Ch. Incarnation

155. Miss Frye., Mechanicsville, NY

156. Webster, Church of Reconciliation, Col. Wilson

157. Sample, Tricker Gallery, Exhibition, Kotzian Cruifixion

158. Montpelier-St. Augustine's-Crosby

159. Springfield, Hillcrest Mausoleum, Heydt

160. Brookline, Christ Church (Sears)

161. Transparency, St. Francis two ovals

162. Brookline, Christ Chapel (Sears) reglazing rose

163. Newport, St. George's Chapel

164. Webster, Church of Reconcilliation, Chancel, 2 grisaille windows

165. Maynard, Heffernan, circular and 2 quarries

166. Transparency ship no paint

167. Washington Cathedral, Choir clerestory-Peter Paul, Annunciation

168. Transparency, Owl

169. Swampscott, St. John's Convent repair

170. New Bedford, St. Joseph's Ch., Maginnis & Walsh

171. Transparency, St. Francis, Gothic

172. Sample, auto panel Jr., framing & boxing

173. Transparency, Jr. Mexican dancer

174. Transparency, Chocolate soldiers

175. Transparency, Knave of Spades-Erica

176. Transparency, Queen of Hearts-Erica

177. Maynard, 10 aisle windows

178. Peoria, St. Mary's Cathedral, St. Thomas More Chapel, murals

179. Roxbury, Jewish Synagogue (now 209)

180. Worcester Tech, 29 medallions

181. Repair, Charleston, SC

182. New Bedford, Holy Name Parish

183. Finkelstein, 2 cabinet doors, king and queen

184. Holyoke, Our Lady Perpetual Help

185. Mechanicsville, NY, balcony window, Frye

186. Mechanicsville, NY, aisle and clerestory, Frye

187. Cleveland, OH, First Baptist

188. Wakefield, Universalist Church

189. Gloucester, L. Buswell

190. Transparency, Monkey, Bush

191. Winthrop, C. L. Covington

192. Natick, Morse Institute

193. Fall River, St. Mark's 4/18/40

194. Montgomery, AL, Ch. Ascension

195. New York, Cath. St. John Divine, 5 apse clerestory 450 sq. ft.

196. Sample, Exhibition, Hotel Penn., New York

197. Clifton, O. Ch. Annunciation

198. Sample for Mr. Hoyle

199. New York, Christ Ch., Mosaics

200. Lynn, First Universalist

201. Repair, Quincy, Atlantic Methodist

202. New Haven, CO, Evergreen Cemetery Chapel

203. Litchfield, CO, St. Michael's Church aslo #210

204. Chicago, IL, First Presbyterian Church

205. Lexington, Hancock Congregational

206. Fitchburg, St. Bernard's Convent Chapel

207. Brookline, Temple Israel

208. East Boston-two windows-quarry

209. West Roxbury, Austrian Hungarian Society

210. Litchfield, CO., St. Michael's door lights see #203

211. Valhalla, Long Island, Gate of Heaven Cemetery

212. Albany, St. Andrews, aisle, St. Paul

213. Cambridge, book case

214. Westfield, St. Mary's lower church

215. Cleveland, OH, First Baptist, Dr. Phillips'single lancet

216. Milford, Trinity Church, rose, Miss Brent

217. Toledo Museum, Music transparency

218. Boston, Old South church, Children's Chapel

219. Palmer, St. Thomas Church

220. West Roxbury, Church of Holy Name

221. Watertown, CO, Christ Church-2 lancet window

222. Newton, Finkelstein, quarry

223. Boston, Emmanuel Church

224. Albany, NY, St. Andrew's, five windows

225. Chestnut Hill, Ch. Redeemer, choir window

226. Hampton, NH, 1st Congregational Church

227. Boston, Ch. Disciples, Frye

228. Cambridge, First Unitarian

229. St. Agatha, Maine, Ch. St. Agatha

230. Portland, Maine, Mr. Graham

231. Transparency repair-Veritas

232. Bronx, NY, St. Helena

233. Washington Cathedral, Peter, Paul, Joan of Arc

234. Worcester, Chestnut St. Congregational

235. Washington Cathedral, Peter Paul, Color scheme

236. Newton, Mr. Porder (2 small king and queen)

237. Bronx, NY, Carmelite Monastery

238. Dorchester, St. Matthews

239. Salisbury, MD, St. Peter's (4 lancets)

240. Dover, NH, St. Thomas Episcopal Church, inscription

241. Roxbury, Jewish Cemetery, inscriptions

242. Repair, Boston, Mt. Vernon

243. Peoria, IL, St. Mary's Cath., Good Shepherd panel

244. Albany, NY, St. Andrews: Sts. Luke, Stephen, George

245. Watertown, CO, Christ Church, Bread of Life

246. Peoria, IL, St. Mary's Cathedral, St. Thomas More, ceiling, see #178

247. Lynn, Miss McCarthy, Dining Room

248. West Haven, CO, Christ Church

249. New Britain, CO, Ch. Holy Cross

250. Roxbury, Temple Mishkan Tefila

251. Cambridge, Harvard-Epworth, Methodist repair

252. Northampton, Mr. Putnam

253. West Roxbury, Ch. of the Holy Name repair

254. Albany, St. Andrew's Church

255. Punxsutawney, Pa, Cosmos and Damian

256. Whitinsville, Trinity Ch.

257. New York, Holy Ghost Chapel, Stearns and Stanton

258. Clinton, First Congregational Church

259. Boston, repair

260. Turners Falls, Congregational

261. Wash. D. C., Cath. Peter Paul, Apse window, Resurrection

262. Baltic, CO, Academy of the Holy Family

263. Boston, Hotel Lenox repair

264. Albany, St. Andrew's Ch., Joan of Arc, Augustine, Seabury, Bishop Doan, Cranmer, Wycliffe, St. Francis Assisi

265. Repair, Boston, lantern

266. Westfield, St. Mary's Ch., 22 aisle, 3 sanc., 13 clerestory

267. Austin, TX, Presbyterian Theological Seminary rose

268. Winter Park, FL, Rollins College

269. Winter Park, FL, All Saints

270. New York, Cath. St. John Divine, baptistry

271. Bridgeport, CO, Methodist Ch.

272. Repair, Brookline, All Saints Ch.

273. Lantern slides made 1940 (entire year)

274. Adams, First Congregational Ch.

275. Atlanta, GA, Mrs. McBurney

276. Repair, Maynard

277. Repair, Boston, Mr. Sargent

278. Sample, grisaille #164

279. Groton, Baptist Ch.

280. Repair, Newton

281. Chelsea, St. Rose's Ch.

282. Albany, NY, St. Paul's Ch.

283. Worcester, All Saints

284. Westfield, St. Mary's, Stations of the Cross

285. Peoria, IL, St. Mary's Cath., lightening windows

286. Bellaire, OH, Trinity Episcopal

287. Lantern slide, Joan of Arc

288. Newton, Temple Emmanuel

289. Westfield, St. Mary's Baptistry

290. Holyoke, Our Lady of Perpetual Help, Rose Dollard and Joan of Arc windows

291. Springfield, Holy Family (repair aisle in shop)

292. West Roxbury, Holy Name, gates

293. Roslindale, Ch. Our Savior

294. Westfield, St. Mary's Gallery Window

295. Westfield, St. Mary's 3 tympanum

296. Westfield, St. Mary's 2 small angel (5 entrance)

297. Transparencies, Christmas angels

298. Brookline, Mr. Green

299. Springfield, Holy Family, clerestory, sanctuary

300. Exhibition, Boston, Bornstein

301. Cambridge, Mt. Auburn

302. Repair, Winter Park, FL, Rollins College

303. Winchester, Congregational

304. Gales Ferry

305. Exhibition, Boston, St. Paul's Cath.

306. Boston, Station WMEX

307. Pittsfield, St. Mary Morning Star, Rose

308. Springfield, Holy Family, 10 door lights

309. Springfield, Holy Family, altar aisle tracery

310. Pittsfield, St. Mary Morning Star, 32 clerestory

311. Boston, Ch. Covenant

312. Holyoke, Sisters of Providence

313. Spotswood, N. J., St. Peter's Episcopal

314. Repair, Brookline, Wm. J. Barry

315. Attleboro, St. John's Ch., quarry

316. Pittsfield, St. Mary Morning Star, 10 nave

317. Pittsfield, St. Mary Morning Star, 12 boys and chapel sacistry

318. Pittsfield, St. Mary Morning Star, 7 amb. clerestory

319. Pittsfield, St. Mary Morning Star, 6 chapel

320. Pittsfield, St. Mary Morning Star, 4 nave

321. Watertown, Mr. Porter

322. Pittsfield, St. Mary Morning Star, confessionals, etc.

323. Newton, Mr. Leo Mayer

324. Repair, Attleboro, St. John's Ch.

325. Westfield, St. Mary's, door lights

326. Westrield, St. Mary's, plate

327. Lancaster, Immaculate Conception Ch.

328. Albany, NY, Madison Ave. Presbyterian

329. Boston, Bachrach

330. Cambridge, Episcopal Theological

331. Ipswich, Ascension Memorial

332. Wakefield, Mr. B., repair

333. Everett, Universalist Ch.

334. Roxbury, Mr. Libby

335. Albany, St. Andrew's Resurrection

336. Fall River, St. Mark's 2 transept, Christ blessing children and Boy Christ

337. Brookline, estimate, Honsberg

338. Repair, panels

339. Albany, NY, St. Andrew's clerestory

340. Colorado Springs, Grace Episcopal Ch.

341. Portland, ME, Mercy Hospital

342. Wash. D. C., Cath. Peter Paul, Center Apse, Christ in Glory

343. Fall River, St. Mark's, Resurrection, Tomb

344. Pittsburgh, Mellon Chapel

345. Fredericksburg, MD, St. George's, large window

346. Springfield, St. Michael's Cath.

347. Boston, U. S. Quartermaster Depot

348. N. Adams, St. John' Ch.

349. New Bedford, St. Andrew's Ch.

350. Dorchester, Baptist Temple

351. Brookline, Mr. Macmillan

352. Braintree, Emmanuel Ch.

353. Holyoke, Ch. Holy Rosary

354. Providence, R. I., Mr. Long

355. Fredericksburg, 3 door lights

356. Dorchester, Baptist Temple

357. Boston, Repair

358. Boston, Mrs. Turner

359. Worcester, Odd Fellows Home

360. Boston, Mr. Collens

361. Boston, Mrs. Hamilburg

362. Greenwood, Most Blessed Sacrament

363. Brookline, St. Lawrence Ch.

364. Boston, Kingsley School

365. Brookline repair

366. Concord, Trinity Ch., rose

367. Roxbury, Ch. St Theresa, rose

368. Boston, Touraine

369. Manton, R. I., St. Peter's

370. Wash. D. C., Rock Creek, St. Paul's Ch. three nave

371. Pittsfield, St. Mary's M. S. 29 doors

372. Fredericksburg, St. George's Ch. repair

373. Roslindale, Ch. Our Saviour

374. Boston, Hotel Touraine

375. Concord, Trinity Ch. lancets

376. Pawtucket, R. I., Trinity Church, door light

377. Fredericksburg, St. George's Ch. repair

378. Transparency, Choate

379. Wash. D. C., Red Cross

380. Portland, C. H. Farley Co.

381. Wash. D. C., Rock Creek, St. Paul's Ch. one tower

382. Jamaica, N. Y., Bishop Molloy Retreat House

383. Norfolk, Va. David Adams Memorial Chapel: 1 over side; 2 vestibule windows; 9 aisle; 2 side windows; 6 door lights; 1 over west; 6 narthex

384. Fredericksburg, St. George's Ch. repair

385. Repair, Boston, Swan

386. Repair, Boston, Presbyterian

387. Norfolk, Va. Our Lady of Victory Chapel, rose

388. New Bedford, St. James Ch.

389. Pawtucket, R. I., Trinity Ch., clerestory

390. Sample of #344, Mellon

391. New Bedford, Grace Ch.

392. Cleveland, OH, Euclid Avenue, Joan of Arc, Wycliff, St. Francis Assisi

393. Elyria, Ohio, St. Andrew's, Presentation in the Temple, Flight into Egypt

394. Sample, #180

395. Boston, repair, I. J. Fox

396. Worcester, Exhibition, general

397. Transparency, Jr. ship oblong 9 x 11

398. Transparency, Ernest's little round ship

399. Transparency, Rubiyat, glass upturned

400. Transparency, Rubaiyat IV - 58

401. Transparency, Rubaiyat, Bird of Paradise

402. Transparency, Erica's Madonna and Child

403. Transparency, Tahitian girl, Wallis

404. Transparency, ship, painted black round

405. Transparency, art and literature

406. Transparency, Egyptian charioteer

407. Worcester, Sacred Heart Ch.

408. Albany, St. Andrew's, 2 entrance, Lochner

409. Columbus, OH, Trinity Ch., designs only

410. Columbus, OH, Trinity Ch., 2 on south side

411. Fall River, St. Mark's, Gethsemane

412. Brunswick, Me., St. Paul's Ch.

413. Repair, Wakefield, Fussy

414. Repair, Peoria

415. Norfolk, Our Lady of Victory Chapel, 7 aisle

416. Norfolk, David Adams Memorial Chapel, one chancel window

418. Norfolk, David Adams Memorial Chapel, 1 circle, 1 window over balcony

419. Transparency, bunny

420. Transparency, Christ Child and lamb

421. Transparency, Puss in Boots

422. Transparency, Rooster

423. Roslindale, Ch. Our Saviour, Transept Window Fisk Memorial

424. Wash. D. C., Rock Creek, St. Paul's Ch. repair

425. Repair, Linden

426. Repair, Dedham

427. Repair, Boston

428. Transparency, St. Luke

429. Repair, Mr. Barber

430. Cleveland, OH, First Baptist, St. Mark

431. Exhibition, Modern Art

432. Wash. D. C., Rock Creek, St. Paul's Ch. two nave windows

433. Albany, St. Paul's, 4 chapel

434. Transparency pig

435. Winchester, Ch. Epiphany, 3-lancet tower

436. Repair, Boston

437. Sutton, Congregational

438. Northampton, St. John's

439. Dedham, Ch. Good Shepherd, 2 lancet

440. Repair, Leech

441. Albany, NY, St. Andrew's, 2 chapel

442. Pawtucket, RI, Trinity Ch., St. Michael's

443. Brookline, Torf Memorial Chapel

444. Brookline, St. Paul's Ch.

445. Camp Lejeune, N. C., chancel

446. Norfolk, VA, U. S. Naval Air Station

447. Boston, Bethlehem Steel

448. Worcester, St. John's Ch.

449. Providence, St. Martin's

450. Roxbury, St. Theresa's

451. Holyoke, Sacred Heart

452. Norfolk, Va. - Our Lady of Victory Chapel, 3 entrance

453. Auburn, N. Y., 2nd Presbyterian

454. Repair

455. Litchfield, Conn. - St. Michael's

456. Wash. D. C. - Cathedral Jefferson lancet

457. Pawtucket, R. I. - Trinity Ch., Nativity

458. Norfolk, VA - Frazier Hall, Naval Base, 3 entrance (Jewish)

459. Beverly - St. Peter's (Dorcas)

460. Lynn - Sacred Heart

461. Boston - Greek Cathedral (480)

461-A. Boston - Greek Cathedral (589)

462. Pawtucket, R. I. - Trinity alterations

463. Gardiner, Me. - Christ Ch., alterations

464. Bullions-Jewel

465. Boston-St. Elizabeth's Hospital, 14 win.

466. Auburndale - Ch. of the Messiah, chancel

467. Boston-S. Elizabeth's Hospital, 12 win.

468. Norfolk, Va.-Our Lady of Victory Chape (3 narthex, 1 transom, 2 door panels. Utilize 4 discarded medallions and make into 2 sacistry win. and 2 choir win. re-install 3 win. now in place)

469. Pascoag, R.I., Calvary Church

470. Albany, N. Y., St. Andrew's

471. Leominster, Pilgrim Congregational

472. Norfolk, VA., Our Lady of Victory Chapel (revision of rose, 4 nave windows)

473. Attleboro, All Saints

474. Bookplate-Stokes

475. Springfield-Hope Congregational

476. Boston-Holy Cross Cathedral

477. Waban-Union Church

478. Worcester-All Saints

479. Colorado Springs, CO, Grace Ch.

480. Boston-Greek Cathedral (461, 589)

481. Boston-Catholic Boys' Club

482. Providence Museum (repair)

483. Plymouth-St. Peter's (repair)

484. Providence, R.I.-St. Martin's

485. New York City-Mrs. Smith's panels

486. Easthampton-St. Philip's Ch.

487. Samples of glass (movie-Mrs. Taylor)

488. New York-Calvary Church, 5 apse

489. Washington Cathedral-Physician's window

490. Worcester-Sacred Heart

491. St. Paul, Minn.-House of Hope Ch. 7 chapel

492. Boston-Boston Univ., Mt. Chcorua

493. Milton-Milton Academy

494. Newton-St. Paul's

495. Holyoke-Mother House (see 554)

496. Waban-Union Church

497. Plymouth-St. Peter's

498. Boston-Trinity Ch. repair

499. Transparency-Bambino

500. Greenwood-Catholic Church

501. Plymouth-St. Peter's Church

502. Greenwood-Union Church

503. Waban-Union Ch., clerestory

504. Albany, N.Y.-St. Peter's

505. Boston-St. Clement's Church

506. Bronxville, N.Y.-Christ Church

507. Charlton City-St. Joseph's Church

508. Transparency-Small Christ Child

509. Waterbury, Conn.-Bunker Hill Cong. Ch.

510. Winchester-Unitarian Church (3 chapel)

511. Boston (Shaw)

512. Boston (Swift)

513. Montgomery, AL-St. John's (repair)

514. New York-St. John the Divine (St. Col. Chap.)

515. Ipswich-Ascension Memorial Church

516. Washington, D.C.-Rock Creek Parish (Brent)

517. St. Paul, MN-House of Hope, 2 narthex

518. Dedham-Ch. of Good Shepherd, clerestory

519. Granite Falls, MN, St. Paul's Luth. (cross)

520. Jamaica Plain-Blessed Sacrament

521. Briston, R.I.-Christ Church

522. West Roxbury-Jewish Cemetery (inscription)

523. Lonsdale, R. I.-Our Christ Church

524. Newton Center-Our Lady's (repair)

525. Manchester, NH-Grace Ch., 2 lancets

526. Newton-Vachon, 4 lights

527. Winchester-Congregational Ch., Sir Galahad

528. Winchester-Unitarian, Red Cross windows cloister

529. Central Falls, R.I.

530. Worcester-All Saints, 2 Baptistry

531. Boston-Kennedy Residence

532. Newton-Our Lady's, 2 lights

533. Brookline-Temple Israel, repair

534. Boston-St. Anthony's Shrine

535. Boston-St. Anthony's Shrine, 14 Stations

536. Boston-St. Anthony's Shrine, 2 murals

537. Colorado Springs, Grace Ch., 2 narthex

538. Colorado Springs-Grace Ch., Ascension

539. Brookline-Temple Israel, inscriptions

540. Brookline-Temple Israel, repair

541. New York-Calvary, 6 quatrefoils

542. New York-Calvary, 4 single lancets

543. New York-Calvary, 3 lancets

544. Boston-St. Anthony Shrine, 10 doorlights

545. Melrose-Trinity Church, 2 aisle

546. Burlington, Vt.-Cath. Immac. Conception

547. Greenwood-Union Church

548A. Washington Cath.-Choir, Civilizations

548B. Washington Cath.-Choir, Jacob

549. Providence-St. Martin's, 3 aisle

550. Watertown-Methodist, repair

551. Dorchester-St. Mark's

552. North Saugus-Union Church

553. Worcester-All Saints, repair

554. Holyoke-Mother House, 2 confessional

555. Milton-Reed, repair doorlight

556. St. Augustine, Fla-Trinity Ch., Vaill Mem. window

557. Winchester-Unitarian, repair vents

558. Mt. Desert, ME

559. Providence-St. Martin's, west window

560. St. Louis, MO-St. Michael's, 2 cleretory

561. St. Louis, MO-St. Michael's, 3 aisle

562. Colorado Springs-Grace Ch., Cruxifixion

563. Providence-St. Martin's, 3 lancet chapel win.

564. Providence-St. Paul's Ch., DeMaris window

565. Norwalk, CO-St. Paul's Ch.

566. Sprinfield-Trinity Ch., 10 windows

567. St. Louis, MO-1st Congreg'l (Creation)

568. West Roxbury-St. Theresa's, chancel

569. West Roxbury-St. Theresa's, 12 aisle

570. West Roxbury-St. Theresa's, transept

571. Evanston, Ill.-1st Presbyterian

572. Dorchester-St. Mary's Ch., 2 chancel

573. West Roxbury-St. Theresa's, 5 chapel

574. St, Paul, MN-House of Hope, War Memorial

575. Newton Hlds-St. Paul's, Ch. St. John window, St. Matthew

576. Lawrence-Central Methodist, Missionary win.

577. Colorado Springs-Grace Ch., Parables

578. Colorado Springs-Grace Ch., Miracles

579. Newport, R.I.-St. George's Ch., Missionary

580. Philadelphia, PA-St. Martin's, chancel

581. New York, N.Y.-Calvary, St. Francis

582. Cleveland, OH-Ch. Covenant

583. Cambridge-Theological Sch., rose

584. Bronxville, NY-Christ Ch., Epiphany

585. Providence, RI-St. Martin's s. porch win.

586A. Washington Cath.-Education; large Gemini

586B. Washington Cath.-Law

587. St. Louis, MO-1st Congreg'l, 4 prophets

588. Newton Corner-Grace Episcopal-Christ Window

589. Boston-Greek Cathedral, Good Shepherd

590. Colorado Springs-Grace Ch., 6 library

591. Colorado Springs-Pauline Chapel, 2 sanc.

592. West Roxbury-St. Theresa's Chapel, altar

593. New York-All Angel's, transept window

594. Cambridge-episcopal Theo. Sch., 9 aisle

595. Washington Cath-Book of Common Prayer

596. Bronxville, NY-Christ Ch., Boy Christ in Temple

597. Washington, DC-Rock Creek, Bishop Kemper

598. Philadelphia, PA-St. Martin's, repair

599. Newton Corner-Grace Ch., Old Testament repair

600. Newton Corner-Grace Ch., Creation

601. Colorado Springs-Pauline Chapel, rose

602. Litchfield-St. Michael's clerestory

603. Cambridge-St. Peter's, St. Anne Window

604. Ipswich-Ascension mem. Ch. 2 rose

605. Taunton-St. Thomas'-chapel window

606. Manchester, NH-Grace Ch., rose window

607. Bronxville, NY-Christ Ch., Jesse window, Missionary-3 lancet

608. Boston Univ.-Sch. Theology, Apostles-3 lancet, 8 sgle lancets, emblem

609. Boyd, Minn.-Redeemer Lutheran Ch., Cruxifixion

610. Rubaiyat transparency-rose center

611. Boston-Old South Ch, rear chapel window

612. Bronxville, NY-Christ Ch., Miracles aisle

613. Rockport, MA-St. Mary's Church

614. Lakewood, OH-Buchanan coat-of-arms

615. Portland, OR-Holy Name Church

616. Boston, MA-Old South Church, side chapel win.

617. Watertown, CO-Christ Church

618. Millwood, VA-Christ Ch. 2 aisle Baptism Annunciation

619. Melrose, MA-Altar win. Rev Smith's chapel

620. Transparency-Madonna and Child

621. Transparency-Madonna and Child

622. Albion, MI-Chapel, Starr Commonwealth for Boys

623. Buffalo, NY-Westminster Ch., 3 vestibule

624. Peabody, MA-St. Paul's Ch. Madonna and Child

625. Washington Cathedral-Suter Memorial windows

626. Millwood, VA-Christ Church, altar window

627. Millwood, VA-Christ Ch. 2 aisle, emblems, designed only

628. Bronxville, NY-Christ Ch., Ascension

629. Taunton-1st Parish Ch., aisle

630. Proctor, Vt.-Union Ch., 5 lancet rear window

631. Chestnut Hill, Mass.-Ch. Redeemer, Epiphany window

632. Plainfield, NJ-Crescent Avenue, Presbyterian Church

633. Cleveland, OH-Our Lady of Peace Ch.

634. Charlotte, NC-Myers Park Baptist Ch.

635. Holyoke-Greylock Rest, Good Shepherd Medallion

636. Providence, RI-Bishop Perry Mem. Win.

637. Waban-Union Ch., 8 clerestory

638. Orange, NJ-Grace Ch., "Baptistry win."

639. Brookline-temple Ohabei Shalom

640. Richmaond, VA-St. Paul's Church

641. Cleveland, OH-St. Philip and St. James' Ch., 13 emblems

642. Chestnut Hill-Ch. Redeemer, Te Deum win.

643. Gates Mills, OH-Gilmour Academy, 7 emblems

644. Arlington, MA-Ch. of Our Saviour

645. Lawrence, MA-Grace Episcopal

646. Newton Centre-First Parish Church, 3 2-lancet chapel windows

647. Wollaston-St. Chrysostom's, chancel window

648. Charlotte, NC-First Presbyterian, 10 chapel windows

649. Cleveland, OH-St. Jerome's Church

650. Attleboro-2nd Congregational Church, Mary and Martha lancet

651. Chestnut Hill-Ch. Redeemer, 2-lancet windows angels

652. Albany, NY-Westminster Presbyterian Ch., Antemann aisle window

653. Charlotte, NC, 1st Presbyterian, Madonna

654. Pittsfield-Congregational Ch.

655. Chestnut Hill-First Church, 6 2-lancet win.

656. Keene, NH-St. Jame's Ch., Nativity

657. Morgantown, VA-Trinity Ch.

658. Lynn-Ch. Incarnation, Mary Magdalene lancet

659. Rockport-St. Mary's, 2 door lights

660A. Washington Cathedral-Baptism

660B. Washington Cathedral-Go ye into the world

661. Charlotte, NC-Myers Park Baptist, Colonial lights

662. Portland, OR-Holy Trinity, Iconastasis

663. Winchester-Unitarian, 2 angel windows

664. Akron, OH-Ch. Immac. Conception

665. Washingon Cathedral-Sayre Memorial

666. Rye, NY-Christ Ch. Chapel, 2 three-lancets

667. Albion, MI-St. Geor and Dragon medallion

668. North Andover-Merrimac College Fac. House

669. St. Mary's City, Md.-Trinity Ch., 2 aisle

670. Worcester-All Saints, St. Anthony window

671. Wollaston, Methodist, chancel

672. Durham, NC-Trinity Methodist

673. Fairfield, CO-St. Paul's Ch.

674. Colorado Springs, CO-Grace Ch., triptych

675. Wakefield-Emmanuel, 2 aisle, A-St. Elizabeth; B-Madonna

676. Parma, O.-Alvernai Rest Home, 10 chapel

677. Gloucester-St. John's Church

678. Worcester-Trinity Lutheran, 2 chapel

679. Canton, OH-1st Presby. A-Chapel, B-Sanctuary

680. Malden-St. Paul's, aisle

681. West Roxbury-Jewish Benevolent Cemetery Assn.

682. Franfort, KY-Ch. Ascension

683. New Orleans, LA-Christ Ch. Cathedral, Nativity

684. St. Louis, MO-1st Cong., chancel window

685. Lewes, DE-St. Peter's, A-Baptism, B-Holy Communion, C-Tower, Virgin and Child

686. Beverly-St. Peter's Church, 8 aisle

687. Washington Cathedral-Lee and Jackson windows

688. Wakefield-Emmanuel Ch., St. George, Rose window

689. Wilmington, DE-Trinity Ch., 5 chapel

690. Eaton Rapids, MI-VFW Home, Chapel Windows, Colorado State seal medallion for cottage

691. Deham-St. Paul's Ch., St. George Window

692. Braintree-Library, 5 windows

693. Norfolk, VA.-Holy Trinity

694. Melrose-Rev. Smith's private chapel, 5 windows

695. Baltimore, MD.-Ch. Holy Nativity

696. Chevy Chase, MD-Methodist Church

697. Melrose-Congregational Church, 4 windows

698. Dedham-Ch. Good Shepherd, chapel window (Flight into Egypt, Nativity)

699. Cambridge-St. Peter's Ch., Ascension

700. Portland, OR-St. Mary Magdalene Ch.

701. West Columbia, TX-St. Mary's, rose

702. Cranston, RI-Bethany Lutheran, chancel and rose

703. Chappaqua, NY-Ch. St. Mary the Virgin, Rose

704. Alexandria, VA-Westminster Presby., Rose

705. Woodfords, ME.-(Irving and Casson) Trinity Church

706. Albany, NY-Westminster Presby. (Welles Mem.)

707. Wellesley-St. Andrew's Church

708. Cambridge, St. Mary's Church

709. Washington, GA-Ch. Mediator

710. Washington Cathedral-Rose and 6 lancets (1/2)

711. Grand Rapids, MI-South Congr. Church

712. Worcester-Central Congr. Church

713. Providence, RI-St. Martin's; St. Francis door panels

714. Belmont-All Saints Church

715. San Rafael, Calif.-St. Paul's Ch. 2 aisle, Mary and Martha; Christ Blessing Children

716. Southampton, NY-St. Andrew's Church

717. Washington, DC-St. David's Church, chancel

718. Washington Cathedral-Worcester, John Elliot lancet

719. Brighton-Temple Bnai Moshe

720. Spartanburg, SC-Ch. Advent

721. Holyoke-St. Paul's Church

722. Worcester-State Mutual Insurance Co.

723. Hartford, CT-Emanuel Evangel. Lutheran Church

724. Worcester-All Saints Ch, 3 Chapel

725. Albion, MI-Museum, Starr Commonwealth

726. Brookline-All Saints Church

727. Webster Groves, MO-Webster Hills Meth. Church

728. Newton-Newton Centre Methodist Ch, chancel

729. Bloomfield Hills, MI-Kirk-in-the-Hills

730. Dover, NH-St. Thomas' Church

731. Princeton, NH-Trinity Church

732. Portland, OR-Holy Redeemer Church

733. Jamaica Plain, MA-Pius Daughters Convent Chapel and New Chapel 1960

734. Huntingdon, PA-Abbey Evangel. and Reformed Church

735. Dayton, OH-St. Paul's Episcopal Church (not done)

736. Wash. DC-Sts. Constantine and St. Helen Gr. Orth

737. Cambridge-St. Peter's Catholic Church

738. Tulsa , OK-Trinity Church, 2 door panels

739. Randolph-Trinity Church, Rose-Christ the King

740. Clarksville, TN-Trinity Church, Nativity

741. Woods Hole-Ch. Messiah, 2 tower windows

742. Edgewood, RI-Ch. Transfiguration

743. Boston-Chapel, Children's Hospital

744. Melrose-Methodist Church

745. Houston, TX-St. Vincent de Paul

746. Watertown, MA-Union Church

747. Houston, TX-St. Stephen's Episcopal Church

748. Glendale, CA-Forest Lawn Memorial Park

749. Needham, MA-Christ Church

750. Marblehead-St. Andrew's Church

751. Tryon, NC-Tryon Presbyterian Church

752. New York City-Church of the Epiphany

753. Brighton-St. John's Seminary

754. Wilmington, DE-Calvary Church

755. Baltimore, MD-Cathedral of Mary Our Queen

756. Toledo, OH-St. Michael's in the Hill

757. New York, NY-South Wing, Riverside Church

758. Braintee-Congregational Church

759. Abilene, TX-Ch. Heavenly Rest

760. Milton-St. Michael's Church

761. Chattanooga, TN-First Presbyterian

762. Denver, CO-Epiphany Episcopal Church

763. Baltimore, MD-Cathedral Ch. Incarnation (Epis.)

764. The Plains, VA-Grace Episcopal Church

765. Honolulu, Hawaii-Central Union Church

766. Springfield-Christ Church Cathedral

767. Brookline-Levine Chapel

768. Hamburg, NY-Methodist Church

769. Melrose-Church of the Nazarene

770. Clearwater, FL-Ch. Ascension

771. Providence, RI-St. Pius Church

772. Transparency-WHBjr. angel, 1962

773. Chattanooga, TN-Cumberland Presby.

774. New Rochelle, NY-St. Paul's Episcopal

775. Washington, GA-First Meth. 8 Chapel

776. Brookline-McKenny Home

777. St. Joseph, MO-Mausoleum

778. Colorado Springs-Chapel Holy Spirit

779. Falmouth-St. Barnabas Memorial Church

780. Melrose-Public Library

781. Wakefield-Congregational Church

782. Staten Island, NY, Chapel Daughters of St. Paul Convent

783. Melrose, 1st Congregational Church

784. Appleton, Wisconsin, Aid Association for Lutherans, A=Chapel, B=Ornamental Windows

785. Worcester-Chestnut Street Congregational Church

786. S. Weymouth, Church of Holy Nativity

787. East Falmouth, MA, Grace Chapel

788. East Greenwich, RI, St. Lukes

789. Westford, MA, Hoffmire Residence

790. Bengtz, T? 61 Clifton Park, Melrose (Finland)

791. West Hartford, St, John's clerestory

792. Bell

793. [Quincy]

794. Rot? Transparency

795. Temple Israel

796. Me? Cong.

797. [Masonic em?] (WHB)

798. Provincetown-Church of the Holy Virgin

799. Queen of Hearts

800. King of Hearts

801. Lantern

802?

803?

804. Peace Dale

805. St. Pauls, Cambridge, Relief medallion

806. Tivoli, NY

807. Zodiac symbols

808. Transparency-child and lamb

809. Transparency-child and lamb

810. Transparency-Madonna and child

811. Transparency-[Penguin]

812. Peace symbol-3 made

813. Pisces-2 made

814. Worcester-Higgins estate

815. 4 door lights-Winthrop

816. WHB

817. Newfoundland

818. Small Taurus

819. Small Capricorn

820. Houston

821. Worcester-?

822. Small Gemini

823. Small Aries

824. Small Virgo

825. ?

826. Sylvester Cape Cod

827. [Cut one]

828. ?

829. Hamilton-Christ Church

830. 4 Door ?

831. Sample with Bro? ?

832. Reading

833. [Haywood Wakefield] Samples

834. Sample with B? Christian

835. Haywood Wakefield, colonial 9x20.5

836. Haywood Wakefield, colonial 9x20.5

837. Haywood Wakefield, colonial 10x24.5

838. 9x9 samples Haywood Wakefield

839. Marlboro-First Congr. Church

840. Beverly-Hospital Chapel

841. Belmont P? Park Congr.

842. Heywood-6x26.5

843. {Cab door lights (4)]

844. Cleveland Church of the Saviour

845. Sample Mirror-Heywood, Wakefield-6x31.5

846. C? Wakefield

847. Flowers transparency

848. T? Repair

849. Calami? (2 doors)

850. F? 4 windows (house)

851. Arlington ?

852. Rounds-Wilmington

854. Alley

856. Providence-St. Stephens

857. Q?-Salem Lutheran

858. N. ? ? church

858R. N. ? ? church repair

859R. St. Steohen's Providence (repair)

860. B?

861. Newport

862. Temple Israel B?

864. McRuff?

865. Lancaster, PA-Reformed Church

866. Mr. Reese?

867. England

868. Daughter of St. Pauls

870. 12 Christian Angels

871. Rubiyat

872. St. Paul's School Seal

873. Lamp-?

874. Old N. Church

875. Old N. Church Silhouette

876. ?-Silhouette

878. England

879. Rudeman

880. [Hamilton-St. Pauls]

881. [Beth Shalom Peabody]

882. [Samples] Heyward Clear 9" x 38"

883. [Samples] Heyward Clear 8" x 38"

884. [Samples] Heyward Clear 13" x 38"

885. Breckenridge House

886. Concord, NH 4 chapel

887. St. Georges School-Newport RI

888. [Naffei]

889-835. Blue and ? white

890-837. Blue and ? white

891-835. Window glass

892-835. Window gladd

893-835. ?, blue, window glass

894-837. ?, blue, window glass

895. ? repair

896. Woods Hole repair

897. Charlotte, Providence ?

898. Bu???

899. Still River, [MA]

900. Belmont Payson Park

901. Woods Hole Chancel repair

902. ?

903. Rogers-Portrait

904. ?

905. Choate seal for stars

907. ? 6 doors

908. ? [tulips]

910R. St. ? ? window

911. [Stella court Co.]

912. Repair, Winchester Congr.

913. Chattanooga 7 ?

914. Milton Academy, seal

915R. [Ewing Peabody]

916R. Everett repair

917. M?

918R. Dr. Hard?

919R. Pelegrine?

920R. Schwartz repair

924. ? St. Pauls

925. Wakefield Baptist

926R. T? repair

927. ? St.

928R. R? museum

929R. Wilmington
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Wilbur H. Burnham Studios records, circa 1901-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.wilbhbur, Series 6
See more items in:
Wilbur H. Burnham Studios records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9d9a433b2-7012-4a63-863e-39e08e09b1cb
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-wilbhbur-ref66

Cass Gilbert Collection

Creator:
Valentine, P. O. (33 Homestead, Park, Newark)  Search this
Gilbert, Cass, 1859-1934  Search this
Belden & Company (45 Clinton Street, Newark, N.J.)  Search this
Former owner:
National Museum of American History (U.S.). Division of Mechanical and Civil Engineering  Search this
Names:
New York Life Insurance Building.  Search this
Seaside Sanatorium (Waterford, Conn)  Search this
Supreme Court Building (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Woolworth Building (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Extent:
15 Cubic feet (71 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Business records
Clippings
Contracts
Personal papers
Photographs
Pastels (visual works)
Pencil works
Pamphlets
Booklets
Specifications
Correspondence
Statistics
Sketchbooks
Date:
1897-1963
bulk 1897-1936
Scope and Contents:
The contents of the collection date from 1897 to 1936. The bulk of the collection consists of loose-leaf binders of photo prints of forty-one Cass Gilbert buildings under construction between 1908 and 1936. (This represents less than half of his firm's total output.) The volumes are arranged alphabetically by name of building. A few additional photo prints of buildings under construction are found in the unbound materials.

The collection also includes correspondence (1919-1932), contracts, statistical data, news clippings, booklets, and other miscellaneous Gilbert papers. There are three volumes of correspondence, specifications and blueprints, 1932-1935, for the construction of the U.S. Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. Also included are twenty pencil and pastel sketch books of Gilbert's travels in Europe, 1897 to 1932, and miscellaneous loose sketches (including photo prints and negatives of his studies for the George Washington Bridge. The photographic prints are mostly mounted on cloth in loose-leaf binders. Some of the photographers are identified, although many are not. Photographers included P.O. Valentine of 33 Homestead Park, Newark, New Jersey.
Arrangement:
Collection arranged into six series.

Series 1: Correspondence, 1919-1932

Series 2: Personal Papers, 1914-1963

Series 3: New York Life Insurance Building Contracts, 1934-1935

Series 4: Woolworth Building, 1911-1913

Series 5: Sketches and Sketch Books, 1897-1932

Series 6: Photoprints, 1908-1936
Biographical / Historical:
Cass Gilbert, 1859-1934, was a prominent American architect best known for his commercial and public buildings. Gilbert was born in Zanesville, Ohio and educated in St. Paul, Minnesota. After only a year of study at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and subsequent travels in Europe, he began working for the New York firm of McKim, Mead, and White in 1880. In 1883 he returned to St. Paul where he practised briefly with James Knox Taylor, a classmate at M.I.T., designing private homes, churches, and commercial buildings. His first major commission was the Minnesota State Capitol (1895), which he modeled after the National Capitol and the dome of St. Peter's, Rome. Gilbert returned to New York in 1899 when he won the prized commission for the design of the U.S. Customs House. This was followed by many other major projects. The most famous of these was the Woolworth Building in New York (1913); with its fifty‑five stories and Gothic ornament it is considered Gilbert's greatest achievement. Firmly supportive of the European tradition and eastern academic architecture, Gilbert continued his numerous and successful designs until his death in 1934. Among his many familiar public buildings are the Treasury Annex and the Supreme Court in Washington, DC, the state capitol buildings of West Virginia and Arkansas, and the public libraries of St. Louis and Detroit.
Related Materials:
Materials at Other Organizations

Library of Congress

Cass Gilbert Archive, 1890-1939

Montana Historical Society

Cass Gilbert Papers, 1902-1910

Oberlin College Archives

Cass Gilbert Collection, 1903-1984, 2000

University of Minnesota, Archives and Special Collections

Cass Gilbert Collection, 1909-1910

United States Supreme Court, Office of the Curator
Provenance:
Gift of Emily Gilbert and Cass Gilbert, Jr. through Mr. Silvio Bedini, November 30, 1961, January 15, 1962, and later in 1962.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Engineering -- 1890-1940 -- U.S.  Search this
Bridges -- 1890-1940  Search this
Civil engineering -- 1890-1940 -- U.S.  Search this
Civil engineers  Search this
Commercial buildings -- 1890-1940 -- U.S.  Search this
Architects -- 1890-1940  Search this
Architecture -- 1890-1940 -- United States  Search this
Public architecture -- 1890-1940 -- U.S.  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings -- 1890-1940
Business records -- 1880-1950
Clippings -- 1900-1950
Contracts -- 1890-1940
Personal papers -- 1890-1940
Photographs -- Black-and-white photoprints -- 1900-1950
Pastels (visual works)
Pencil works
Pamphlets
Booklets
Specifications
Correspondence -- 1900-1950
Statistics
Sketchbooks -- 1890-1940
Citation:
Cass Gilbert Collection, 1897-1936, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0214
See more items in:
Cass Gilbert Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8476cd02d-1b0d-4583-a43f-663208d06e16
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0214
Online Media:

Kit Kat Club program for the 3rd Annual Artists' Masque Ball

Creator:
Kit Kat Club (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Subject:
Kit Kat Club (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Type:
Printed Materials
Date:
1909
Topic:
Costumes  Search this
Parties  Search this
Theater  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)15396
See more items in:
Walt Kuhn Family papers and Armory Show records, 1859-1984, bulk 1900-1949
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_15396

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