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Greenwich -- Rosita Trinca Garden

Landscape architect:
Oehme, Wolfgang  Search this
van Sweden, James  Search this
Oehme, van Sweden & Associates, Inc.  Search this
Architect:
Tubby, William B.  Search this
Former owner:
Tubby, William B.  Search this
Landscape designer:
Burnham, Cora  Search this
Groft, Eric  Search this
Provenance:
Hortulus Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Rosita Trinca Garden (Greenwich, Connecticut)
United States of America -- Connecticut -- Fairfield -- Greenwich
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets photocopies of articles relating to the garden, garden plans, and other information about the garden.
General:
Located on approximately two acres on a corner of a major north-south artery into Greenwich, this two and a half story Arts and Crafts home was designed by architect William B. Tubby in 1904. When the current owners purchased the home in 1992, there was considerable traffic noise from the road, a large driveway dominated the front yard which was flanked by mature American beech and Copper beach trees and a large vegetable garden was located off the kitchen at the rear of the house. In 1994, the owner hired landscape architect Wolfgang Oehme to redesign the garden. The new planting design resulted in what has been described as a "big swooping American gesture." Oehme transformed the front garden by reducing and redirecting the driveway and replacing the entire expanse of lawn with small flowering trees and shrubs, and mass plantings of grasses and perennials. A fountain by the front door now masks the sound of traffic and there are paths that lead to woodland areas. The circular gravel driveway has been redirected to the side street and is reduced in size by two-thirds. A broad walkway, composed of flagstone and decorative brickwork leads to the front door, is lined with large seasonal containers.
In the backyard, a large terrace runs across the back of the house. Grass steps lead down to the remaining bit of lawn on the property. This lawn is flanked on both sides by broad planting areas composed of birches, viburnums, ironweed, and other perennials which screen the pool from the house. The plantings also frame the "borrowed view" of the distant golf course.
The peak season of the garden is in the fall with the motion of the large ornamental grasses, Japanese anemones and other fall foliage. Spring showcases a bulb display and summer showcases the blue haze of nepeta and Russian sage. Peastone paths, flagstone walkways, stone planters, pergolas, and a lily pond combined with bare structural forms of historic and small trees ensures that winter displays the underlying structure of the garden.
Persons associated with the garden include: William B. and Clara J. Tubby (former owners, 1904-1950), Kenneth C. Towe (former owner, 1950-1943), Charles M. DuPuy, (former owner, 1953-196, William J. and Natalie W. Barron (former owners, 1960-1965), Ann S. Lanman(former owner, 1965-1988), Howard A. and Ruthann M. Silverman (former owner, 1988-1991), Arthur B. Duel (former owner, 1991-1992), William B. Tubby (architect, 1904), Cora Burnham (garden designer, 1995) James van Sweden (landscape architect, 1994), Wolfgang Oehme (landscape architect, 1994), Eric Groft (landscape designer, 1994) and Cora Burnham (landscape designer, 1995).
Related Materials:
Rosita Trinca Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (17 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Connecticut -- Greenwich  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File CT703
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Connecticut
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb65be4b170-0c94-4765-a3d5-1a298074894d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref21516

Greenwich -- Lavery Garden

Former owner:
Bercume, Ophelia  Search this
Edgar, Albert C.  Search this
Leddy, Ethel  Search this
Somers, Edwin H.  Search this
Somers, Patricia R.  Search this
Petersen, Harriet  Search this
Romanos, Constance J.  Search this
Mellick, O. Waring  Search this
Mellick, Susan  Search this
Edgar Company  Search this
Architect:
Johnson, Herbert T.  Search this
Landscape designer:
Burnham, Cora  Search this
Provenance:
Hortulus Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Lavery Garden (Greenwich, Connecticut)
United States of America -- Connecticut -- Fairfield -- Greenwich
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and photocopies of articles and historic images.
General:
The approximately two acre sloping property has a 1930's Tudor style house with a dovecote on the roof, natural rock formations, whimsical boxwood topiaries, a koi pond and a 24-square foot potager within owner-designed deer fencing: low stone walls topped with pierced wood panels. Beginning work in 1983 the current owners had to clear away rampant ivy and weeds to discover the rock ledges, three existing connecting pools, neglected shrubbery and gravel paths. Some of the benches placed around the property were built from stones found there. There is an expansive lawn between the house and street and many mature trees although some have been lost to storms in recent years. Antique stone containers are filled with seasonal flowers and tropical plants including bananas and hibiscus are grown in containers so they can be cut back and overwintered in the garage. The gardens have been grown organically for more than thirty years.
Within the fenced potager the owner grows vegetables, herbs, perennial flowers and roses with annual marigolds around the perimeter to discourage pests. Large clover-shaped and basket-shaped topiary boxwood are featured on the front side of the house, under planted with catmint, giant allium, daffodils, carpet roses and sedum. There are lantana standards in the pool garden and near the covered porch there is a white garden with David Austin rose standards, hydrangea, white bearded iris, and Casablanca lilies. Deer resistant scilla, vinca minor, fern and trillium are grown as understory in the woodland garden and combination plantings and sprays are used to discourage deer from the unfenced gardens around the house.
Persons associated with the garden include Ophelia Bercume (former owner, prior to 1929); the Edgar Company (former owners, 1929-1932); Albert C. Edgar (former owner, 1932-1936); Ethel Leddy (former owner, 1936-1944); Edwin H. and Patricia R. Somers (former owners, 1944-1948); Harriet Petersen (former owner, 1948-1951); Constance J. Romanos (former owner, 1951-1953); O. Waring and Susan Mellick (former owners, 1961-1983); Herbert T. Johnson (architect, circa 1932); Cora Burnham, Sanctuary Garden Design (landscape designer, 2009 and 2013).
Related Materials:
Lavery Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (27 digital images)
Additional materials also located in Greenwich Historical Society, Cos Cob, Connecticut.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Connecticut -- Greenwich  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File CT745
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Connecticut
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb625e5672b-5479-4c12-89b2-b3623facd317
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref21517

Cosmological constraints on light but massive relics

Author:
Xu, Weishuang Linda  Search this
Muñoz, Julian B.  Search this
Dvorkin, Cora  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Year:
2022
Citation:
Xu, Weishuang Linda, Muñoz, Julian B., and Dvorkin, Cora. 2022. "Cosmological constraints on light but massive relics." Physical Review D, 105 095029. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.105.095029.
Identifier:
167238
DOI:
https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.105.095029
ISSN:
1550-7998
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries and Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:slasro_167238

Racist Stereotypes and Cultural Appropriation in American Sports 1

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
Lectures
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2013-02-11T14:52:20.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_NWpy7ozOwTU

Racist Stereotypes and Cultural Appropriation in American Sports 1

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
Lectures
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2013-02-13T18:57:39.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt__gd0QmJDhcQ

Cora Lee Johnson

Artist:
Brian Lanker, 31 Aug 1947 - 13 Mar 2011  Search this
Sitter:
Cora Lee Johnson, 08 Jun 1925 - 02 Sep 2011  Search this
Medium:
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions:
Image: 71.3 × 89.5 cm (28 1/16 × 35 1/4")
Sheet/Mount: 75.2 × 99.1 cm (29 5/8 × 39")
Mat: 86.7 × 106.3 cm (34 1/8 × 41 7/8")
Frame: 90.2 × 109.5 × 4.4 cm (35 1/2 × 43 1/8 × 1 3/4")
Type:
Photograph
Date:
1988
Topic:
Costume\Jewelry\Earring  Search this
Exterior  Search this
Costume\Jewelry\Ring  Search this
Nature & Environment\Plant  Search this
Architecture\Wall  Search this
Cora Lee Johnson: Female  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; partial gift of Lynda Lanker and a museum purchase made possible with generous support from Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker, Agnes Gund, Kate Kelly and George Schweitzer, Lyndon J. Barrois Sr. and Janine Sherman Barrois, and Mark and Cindy Aron
Object number:
S/NPG.2021.117
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© Brian Lanker Archive
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4662e1180-825a-4762-aa6b-0e342a266890
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_S_NPG.2021.117

Portrait of Non-Native Man, Robert Kennicott, Alaskan Explorer, Wearing Leggings, Moccasins and with Animal Pelt

Collector:
Taylor, James E. (Artist)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Taylor, James E., 1839-1901 (artist and collector)  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print (002 in x 003 in mounted on 014 in x 018 in)
Container:
Volume 1, Page 71
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Photographs
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Based on a handwritten note from Cora Kennicott to Spencer Baird held at Smithsonian Institution Archives, the photo was likely taken in 1862 or 1863 in "Chicago Studio shortly after Kennicott returned from a Smithsonian sponsored collecting expedition through Canada and into Alaska; [he is] dressed in his exploring outfit." Information provided by Sandra Schlachtmeyer (10/17/2006).
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.01603504

NAA MS.MS 4605

OPPS NEG.56542
Local Note:
Black and white Photoprint on Paper Mount in Album
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Collection Citation:
MS 4605, James E. Taylor scrapbook of the American West, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
James E. Taylor scrapbook of the American West
James E. Taylor scrapbook of the American West / Page 71
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw324a61cde-395c-4d6a-8703-c482edb63b43
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms4605-ref1188

Zornia crinita (Mohlenbr.) Vanni

Biogeographical Region:
85 - Southern South America  Search this
Collector:
S. Ginzbarg  Search this
J. Davalos  Search this
I. Fox  Search this
F. Acosta  Search this
Place:
Pq. Nac. Cerro Cora, Cerro Tuya og, 2 km al SO de Ruta 5, Campo abierto con gramineas en planicie al E del cerro, Amambay, Paraguay, South America
Collection Date:
15 Feb 1987
Taxonomy:
Plantae Dicotyledonae Fabales Fabaceae Papilionoideae
Published Name:
Zornia crinita (Mohlenbr.) Vanni
Barcode:
02049364
USNM Number:
3233124
See more items in:
Botany
Flowering plants and ferns
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/32edc6b73-94c7-4371-a557-38bb71df20b0
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_13467363

Mimosa somnians Humb. & Bonpl. ex Willd. var. somnians

Biogeographical Region:
85 - Southern South America  Search this
Collector:
Elsa Matilde Zardini  Search this
M. Vera  Search this
Min. Elevation:
270  Search this
Place:
Parque Nacional Cerro Cora, Amambay, Paraguay, South America
Collection Date:
27 Feb 1997
Taxonomy:
Plantae Dicotyledonae Fabales Fabaceae Caesalpinioideae
Published Name:
Mimosa somnians Humb. & Bonpl. ex Willd. var. somnians
Barcode:
02207698
USNM Number:
3667218
See more items in:
Botany
Flowering plants and ferns
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/397026c44-13c6-4dfa-b230-02db60bac0a9
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_13164128

Cora inca

Biogeographical Region:
Neotropical  Search this
Collector:
William F. Mauffray  Search this
Prep Count:
1
Preparation:
Envelope
Sex:
Male
Stage:
Adult
Place:
Baeza, 4.8-5 Kilometers south, small clear stream, [Not stated], Napo, Ecuador
Collection Date:
20 Nov 1997
Taxonomy:
Animalia, Arthropoda, Insecta, Odonata, Zygoptera, Polythoridae
Published Name:
Cora inca Selys, 1873
Barcode:
00335591
USNM Number:
USNMENT335591
See more items in:
Specimen Inventory
Data Source:
NMNH - Entomology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/340fbbdfd-8997-46ed-b460-e3a253443a8c
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhentomology_9251301

Cora inca

Biogeographical Region:
Neotropical  Search this
Collector:
William F. Mauffray  Search this
Prep Count:
1
Preparation:
Envelope
Sex:
Male
Stage:
Adult
Place:
Baeza, 4.8-5 Kilometers south, small clear stream, [Not stated], Napo, Ecuador
Collection Date:
20 Nov 1997
Taxonomy:
Animalia, Arthropoda, Insecta, Odonata, Zygoptera, Polythoridae
Published Name:
Cora inca Selys, 1873
Barcode:
00335592
USNM Number:
USNMENT335592
See more items in:
Specimen Inventory
Data Source:
NMNH - Entomology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/36f59447c-5a10-4e0c-987c-3942fae81bf9
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhentomology_9251302

Funeral program of LeRoy Gibbs

Created by:
Princetta Newman, American, born 1943  Search this
Subject of:
Leroy Gibbs, American, 1910 - 1999  Search this
Vernon African Methodist Episcopal Church, American, founded 1905  Search this
Owned by:
Eddie Faye Gates, American, 1934 - 2021  Search this
Medium:
digital
Dimensions:
File size (overall): 686.42 MB
Type:
digital images
programs
digital media - born analog
Place collected:
Tulsa, Tulsa County, Oklahoma, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1999
Topic:
African American  Search this
African Methodist Episcopal  Search this
American South  Search this
American West  Search this
Communities  Search this
Families  Search this
Funeral customs and rites  Search this
Methodist  Search this
Religion  Search this
The Black Church  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Eddie Faye Gates, Tulsa OK, author, historian, community activist
Object number:
2014.117.67
Restrictions & Rights:
No Known Copyright Restrictions
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Collection title:
Eddie Faye Gates Collection, Tulsa, Oklahoma
Classification:
Memorabilia and Ephemera
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5b9b51667-8ba9-4819-a229-579429b8279d
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2014.117.67
2 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Funeral program of LeRoy Gibbs digital asset number 1
  • View Funeral program of LeRoy Gibbs digital asset number 2
Online Media:

Funeral program of Henry Clay Whitlow, Jr.

Printed by:
Unidentified  Search this
Subject of:
Henry Clay Whitlow Jr., American, 1909 - 1994  Search this
Vernon African Methodist Episcopal Church, American, founded 1905  Search this
Booker T. Washington High School, American, founded 1913  Search this
Owned by:
Eddie Faye Gates, American, 1934 - 2021  Search this
Medium:
digital
Dimensions:
File size (overall): 437.21 MB
Type:
digital images
programs
digital media - born analog
Place collected:
Tulsa, Tulsa County, Oklahoma, United States, North and Central America
Date:
April 19, 1994
Topic:
African American  Search this
African Methodist Episcopal  Search this
American South  Search this
American West  Search this
Communities  Search this
Education  Search this
Families  Search this
Funeral customs and rites  Search this
Methodist  Search this
Religion  Search this
The Black Church  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Eddie Faye Gates, Tulsa OK, author, historian, community activist
Object number:
2014.117.70
Restrictions & Rights:
No Known Copyright Restrictions
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Collection title:
Eddie Faye Gates Collection, Tulsa, Oklahoma
Classification:
Memorabilia and Ephemera
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5469651c0-6466-4628-9c24-c5d2ff013d3c
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2014.117.70
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Funeral program of Henry Clay Whitlow, Jr. digital asset number 1
Online Media:

Ramalina leptocarpha Tuck.

Biogeographical Region:
79 - Mexican Pacific Is.  Search this
Collector:
Ex herb. Cora H. Clarke  Search this
Place:
Guadelupe Isld., Baja California Norte, Mexico, North America
Taxonomy:
Fungi Ascomycota Lecanoromycetes Lecanorales Ramalinaceae
Published Name:
Ramalina leptocarpha Tuck.
Barcode:
04552534
See more items in:
Botany
Bryophytes and Lichens
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3dd98642a-f443-49bd-834c-977c07b0e756
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_16692757

Frederica de Laguna papers

Creator:
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Aberle, David F. (David Friend), 1918-2004  Search this
Arensberg, Conrad M. (Conrad Maynadier), 1910-1997  Search this
Baird, Melissa  Search this
Balzer, Marjorie  Search this
Bersch, Gretchen  Search this
Birket-Smith, Kaj  Search this
Black, Lydia  Search this
Boas, Franz, 1858-1942  Search this
Chowning, Ann  Search this
Clark, J. Desmond (John Desmond), 1916-2002  Search this
Codere, Helen F., 1917-2009  Search this
Collins, Henry B. (Henry Bascom), 1899-1987  Search this
Colton, Harold Sellers, 1881-1970  Search this
Conklin, Harold C., 1926-2016  Search this
Corbett, John M.  Search this
Darnell, Regna  Search this
Dauenhauer, Nora  Search this
Dauenhauer, Richard  Search this
Davenport, William  Search this
Dockstader, Frederick J.  Search this
Drucker, Philip, 1911-1982  Search this
Du Bois, Cora Alice, 1903-1991  Search this
Duff, Wilson, 1925-  Search this
Fair, Susan  Search this
Fitzhugh, William W., 1943-  Search this
Foster, George McClelland, 1913-  Search this
Garfield, Viola Edmundson, 1899-1983  Search this
Giddings, James Louis  Search this
Gjessing, Gutorm, 1906  Search this
Grinev, Andrei V.  Search this
Hanable, William S.  Search this
Hara, Hiroko, 1934-  Search this
Haury, Emil W. (Emil Walter), 1904-1992  Search this
Heizer, Robert F. (Robert Fleming), 1915-1979  Search this
Helm, June, 1924-  Search this
Herskovits, Melville J. (Melville Jean), 1895-1963  Search this
Holtved, Erik  Search this
Jenness, Diamond, 1886-1969  Search this
Kahn, Mimi  Search this
Kan, Sergei  Search this
Krauss, Michael E., 1934-  Search this
Kroeber, A. L. (Alfred Louis), 1876-1960  Search this
Larsen, Helge, 1905-1984  Search this
Leer, Jeff  Search this
Lindgren, E. J. (Ethel John), 1904-1988  Search this
Lomax, Alan, 1915-2002  Search this
Low, Jean  Search this
Mathiassen, Therkel, 1892-1967  Search this
Mead, Margaret, 1901-1978  Search this
Olson, Wallace  Search this
Rainey, Froelich G. (Froelich Gladstone), 1907-1992  Search this
Riddell, Francis A. (Francis Allen), 1921-2002  Search this
Ritchie, William A. (William Augustus), 1903-1995  Search this
Schneider, William  Search this
Schumacher, Paul J. F.  Search this
Shinkwin, Anne D.  Search this
Spier, Leslie, 1893-1961  Search this
Spiro, Melford E., 1920-2014  Search this
Underhill, Ruth, 1883-1984  Search this
VanStone, James W.  Search this
Weiner, Annette B., 1933-  Search this
Weitzner, Bella, 1891?-1988  Search this
White, Leslie A., 1900-1975  Search this
Woodbury, Natalie Ferris Sampson  Search this
Woodbury, Richard B. (Richard Benjamin), 1917-2009  Search this
Workman, Karen Wood  Search this
Workman, William B.  Search this
Names:
American Anthropological Association  Search this
Bryn Mawr College  Search this
Photographer:
Smith, Harlan Ingersoll, 1872-1940  Search this
Extent:
2 Map drawers
38 Linear feet (71 document boxes, 1 half document box, 2 manuscript folders, 4 card file boxes, 1 flat box, and 1 oversize box)
Culture:
Yakutat Tlingit  Search this
Tutchone  Search this
Tsimshian  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Tlingit  Search this
Tanana  Search this
Kawchodinne (Hare)  Search this
Ahtna (Ahtena)  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Northern Athabascan  Search this
Chugach  Search this
Kalaallit (Greenland Eskimo)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Eyak  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Degexit'an (Ingalik)  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Map drawers
Manuscripts
Maps
Field notes
Correspondence
Photographs
Sound recordings
Place:
Alaska -- Archaeology
Aishihik (Yukon)
Angoon (Alaska)
Alaska -- Ethnology
Chistochina (Alaska)
Greenland
Copper River (Alaska)
Klukshu (Yukon)
Hoonah (Alaska)
Kodiak Island (Alaska)
Klukwan (Alaska)
Saint Lawrence River Valley
New Brunswick -- Archaeology
Yukon Island (Alaska)
Date:
1890-2004
bulk 1923-2004
Summary:
These papers reflect the professional and personal life of Frederica de Laguna. The collection contains correspondence, field notes, writings, newspaper clippings, writings by others, subject files, sound recordings, photographs, and maps. A significant portion of the collection consists of de Laguna's correspondence with family, friends, colleagues, and students, as well as her informants from the field. Her correspondence covers a wide range of subjects such as family, health, preparations for field work, her publications and projects, the Northwest Coast, her opinions on the state of anthropology, and politics. The field notes in the collection mainly represent de Laguna and her assistants' work in the Northern Tlingit region of Alaska from 1949 to 1954. In addition, the collection contains materials related to her work in the St. Lawrence River Valley in Ontario in 1947 and Catherine McClellan's field journal for her research in Aishihik, Yukon Territory in 1968. Most of the audio reels in the collection are field recordings made by de Laguna, McClellan, and Marie-Françoise Guédon of vocabulary and songs and speeches at potlatches and other ceremonies from 1952 to 1969. Tlingit and several Athabaskan languages including Atna, Tutchone, Upper Tanana, and Tanacross are represented in the recordings. Also in the collection are copies of John R. Swanton's Tlingit recordings and Hiroko Hara Sue's recordings among the Hare Indians. Additional materials related to de Laguna's research on the Northwest Coast include her notes on clans and tribes in Series VI: Subject Files and her notes on Tlingit vocabulary and Yakutat names specimens in Series X: Card Files. Drafts and notes for Voyage to Greenland, Travels Among the Dena, and The Tlingit Indians can be found in the collection as well as her drawings for her dissertation and materials related to her work for the Handbook of North American Indians and other publications. There is little material related to Under Mount Saint Elias except for correspondence, photocopies and negatives of plates, and grant applications for the monograph. Of special interest among de Laguna's writings is a photocopy of her historical fiction novel, The Thousand March. Other materials of special interest are copies of her talks, including her AAA presidential address, and the dissertation of Regna Darnell, a former student of de Laguna's. In addition, materials on the history of anthropology are in the collection, most of which can found with her teaching materials. Although the bulk of the collection documents de Laguna's professional years, the collection also contains newspaper articles and letters regarding her exceptional performance as a student at Bryn Mawr College and her undergraduate and graduate report cards. Only a few photographs of de Laguna can be found in the collection along with photographs of her 1929 and 1979 trips to Greenland.
Scope and Contents:
These papers reflect the professional and personal life of Frederica de Laguna. The collection contains correspondence, field notes, writings, newspaper clippings, writings by others, subject files, sound recordings, photographs, and maps.

A significant portion of the collection consists of de Laguna's correspondence with family, friends, colleagues, and students, as well as her informants from the field. Her correspondence covers a wide range of subjects such as family, health, preparations for field work, her publications and projects, the Northwest Coast, her opinions on the state of anthropology, and politics. Among her notable correspondents are Kaj Birket-Smith, J. Desmond Clark, Henry Collins, George Foster, Viola Garfield, Marie-Françoise Guédon, Diamond Jenness, Michael Krauss, Therkel Mathiassen, Catharine McClellan, and Wallace Olson. She also corresponded with several eminent anthropologists including Franz Boas, William Fitzhugh, J. Louis Giddings, Emil Haury, June Helm, Melville Herskovitz, Alfred Kroeber, Helge Larsen, Alan Lomax, Margaret Mead, Froelich Rainey, Leslie Spier, Ruth Underhill, James VanStone, Annette Weiner, and Leslie White.

The field notes in the collection mainly represent de Laguna and her assistants' work in the Northern Tlingit region of Alaska from 1949 to 1954. In addition, the collection contains materials related to her work in the St. Lawrence River Valley in Ontario in 1947 and Catharine McClellan's field journal for her research in Aishihik, Yukon Territory in 1968. Most of the audio reels in the collection are field recordings made by de Laguna, McClellan, and Marie-Françoise Guédon of vocabulary and songs and speeches at potlatches and other ceremonies from 1952 to 1969. Tlingit and several Athapaskan languages including Atna, Tutochone, Upper Tanana, and Tanacross are represented in the recordings. Also in the collection are copies of John R. Swanton's Tlingit recordings and Hiroko Hara's recordings among the Hare Indians. Additional materials related to de Laguna's research on the Northwest Coast include her notes on clans and tribes in Series VI: Subject Files and her notes on Tlingit vocabulary and Yakutat names specimens in Series 10: Card Files.

Drafts and notes for Voyage to Greenland, Travels Among the Dena, and The Tlingit Indians can be found in the collection as well as her drawings for her dissertation and materials related to her work for the Handbook of North American Indians and other publications. There is little material related to Under Mount Saint Elias except for correspondence, photocopies and negatives of plates, and grant applications for the monograph. Of special interest among de Laguna's writings is a photocopy of her historical fiction novel, The Thousand March.

Other materials of special interest are copies of her talks, including her AAA presidential address, and the dissertation of Regna Darnell, a former student of de Laguna's. In addition, materials on the history of anthropology are in the collection, most of which can found with her teaching materials. The collection also contains copies of photographs from the Harriman Alaska Expedition of 1899. Although the bulk of the collection documents de Laguna's professional years, the collection also contains newspaper articles and letters regarding her exceptional performance as a student at Bryn Mawr College and her undergraduate and graduate report cards. Only a few photographs of de Laguna can be found in the collection along with photographs of her 1929 and 1979 trips to Greenland.
Arrangement:
Arranged in 12 series: (1) Correspondence, 1923-2004; (2) Field Research, 1947-1968; (3) Writings, 1926-2001; (4) Teaching, 1922-1988; (5) Professional Activities, 1939-2001; (6) Subject Files, 1890-2002; (7) Writings by Others, 1962-2000; (8) Personal, 1923-2000; (9) Photographs, 1929-1986; (10) Card Files; (11) Maps, 1928-1973; (12) Sound Recordings, 1904-1973
Biographical / Historical:
Frederica Annis Lopez de Leo de Laguna was a pioneering archaeologist and ethnographer of northwestern North America. Known as Freddy by her friends, she was one of the last students of Franz Boas. She served as first vice-president of the Society for American Archaeology (SAA) from 1949 to 1950 and as president of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) from 1966-1967. She also founded the anthropology department at Bryn Mawr College where she taught from 1938 to 1972. In 1975, she and Margaret Mead, a former classmate, were the first women to be elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

Born on October 3, 1906 in Ann Arbor, Michigan, de Laguna was the daughter of Theodore Lopez de Leo de Laguna and Grace Mead Andrus, both philosophy professors at Bryn Mawr College. Often sick as a child, de Laguna was home-schooled by her parents until she was 9. She excelled as a student at Bryn Mawr College, graduating summa cum laude with a degree in politics and economics in 1927. She was awarded the college's prestigious European fellowship, which upon the suggestion of her parents, she deferred for a year to study anthropology at Columbia University under Boas. Her parents had recently attended a lecture given by Boas and felt that anthropology would unite her interests in the social sciences and her love for the outdoors.

After a year studying at Columbia with Boas, Gladys Reichard, and Ruth Benedict, de Laguna was still uncertain whether anthropology was the field for her. Nevertheless, she followed Boas's advice to spend her year abroad studying the connection between Eskimo and Paleolithic art, which would later became the topic of her dissertation. In the summer of 1928, she gained fieldwork experience under George Grant MacCurdy visiting prehistoric sites in England, France, and Spain. In Paris, she attended lectures on prehistoric art by Abbe Breuil and received guidance from Paul Rivet and Marcelin Boule. Engaged to an Englishman she had met at Columbia University, de Laguna decided to also enroll at the London School of Economics in case she needed to earn her degree there. She took a seminar with Bronislaw Malinowski, an experience she found unpleasant and disappointing.

It was de Laguna's visit to the National Museum in Copenhagen to examine the archaeological collections from Central Eskimo that became the turning point in her life. During her visit, she met Therkel Mathiassen who invited her to be his assistant on what would be the first scientific archaeological excavation in Greenland. She sailed off with him in June 1929, intending to return early in August. Instead, she decided to stay until October to finish the excavation with Mathiassen, now convinced that her future lay in anthropology. When she returned from Greenland she broke off her engagement with her fiancé, deciding that she would not able to both fully pursue a career in anthropology and be the sort of wife she felt he deserved. Her experiences in Greenland became the subject of her 1977 memoir, Voyage to Greenland: A Personal Initiation into Anthropology.

The following year, Kaj Birket-Smith, whom de Laguna had also met in Copenhagen, agreed to let her accompany him as his research assistant on his summer expedition to Prince William Sound and Cook Inlet. When Birket-Smith fell ill and was unable to go, de Laguna was determined to continue on with the trip. She convinced the University of Pennsylvania Museum to fund her trip to Alaska to survey potential excavation sites and took as her assistant her 20 year old brother, Wallace, who became a geologist. A close family, de Laguna's brother and mother would later accompany her on other research trips.

In 1931, the University of Pennsylvania Museum hired de Laguna to catalogue Eskimo collections. They again financed her work in Cook Inlet that year as well as the following year. In 1933, she earned her PhD from Columbia and led an archaeological and ethnological expedition of the Prince William Sound with Birket-Smith. They coauthored "The Eyak Indians of the Copper River Delta, Alaska," published in 1938. In 1935, de Laguna led an archaeological and geological reconnaissance of middle and lower Yukon Valley, traveling down the Tanana River. Several decades later, the 1935 trip contributed to two of her books: Travels Among the Dena, published in 1994, and Tales From the Dena, published in 1997.

In 1935 and 1936, de Laguna worked briefly as an Associate Soil Conservationist, surveying economic and social conditions on the Pima Indian Reservation in Arizona. She later returned to Arizona during the summers to conduct research and in 1941, led a summer archaeological field school under the sponsorship of Bryn Mawr College and the Museum of Northern Arizona.

By this time, de Laguna had already published several academic articles and was also the author of three fiction books. Published in 1930, The Thousand March: Adventures of an American Boy with the Garibaldi was her historical fiction book for juveniles. She also wrote two detective novels: The Arrow Points to Murder (1937) and Fog on the Mountain (1938). The Arrow Points to Murder is set in a museum based on her experiences at the University of Pennsylvania Museum and the American Museum of National History. Fog on the Mountain is set in Cook Inlet and draws upon de Laguna's experiences in Alaska. Both detective novels helped to finance her research.

De Laguna began her long career at Bryn Mawr College in 1938 when she was hired as a lecturer in the sociology department to teach the first ever anthropology course at the college. By 1950, she was chairman of the joint department of Sociology and Anthropology, and in 1967, the chairman of the newly independent Anthropology Department. She was also a visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania (1947-1949; 1972-1976) and at the University of California, Berkeley (1959-1960; 1972-1973.)

During World War II, de Laguna took a leave of absence from Bryn Mawr College to serve in the naval reserve from 1942 to 1945. As a member of WAVES (Women Accepted for Voluntary Emergency Service), she taught naval history and codes and ciphers to women midshipmen at Smith College. She took great pride in her naval service and in her later years joined the local chapter of WAVES National, an organization for former and current members of WAVES.

In 1950, de Laguna returned to Alaska to work in the Northern Tlingit region. Her ethnological and archaeological study of the Tlingit Indians brought her back several more times throughout the 1950s and led to the publication of Under Mount Saint Elias in 1972. Her comprehensive three-volume monograph is still considered the authoritative work on the Yakutat Tlingit. In 1954, de Laguna turned her focus to the Atna Indians of Copper River, returning to the area in 1958, 1960, and 1968.

De Laguna retired from Bryn Mawr College in 1972 under the college's mandatory retirement policy. Although she suffered from many ailments in her later years including macular degeneration, she remained professionally active. Five decades after her first visit to Greenland, de Laguna returned to Upernavik in 1979 to conduct ethnographic investigations. In 1985, she finished editing George Thornton Emmons' unpublished manuscript The Tlingit Indians. A project she had begun in 1955, the book was finally published in 1991. In 1986, she served as a volunteer consultant archaeologist and ethnologist for the U. S. Forest Service in Alaska. In 1994, she took part in "More than Words . . ." Laura Bliss Spann's documentary on the last Eyak speaker, Maggie Smith Jones. By 2001, de Laguna was legally blind. Nevertheless, she continued working on several projects and established the Frederica de Laguna Northern Books Press to reprint out-of-print literature and publish new scholarly works on Arctic cultures.

Over her lifetime, de Laguna received several honors including her election into the National Academy Sciences in 1976, the Distinguished Service Award from AAA in 1986, and the Lucy Wharton Drexel Medal from the University of Pennsylvania in 1999. De Laguna's work, however, was respected by not only her colleagues but also by the people she studied. In 1996, the people of Yakutat honored de Laguna with a potlatch. Her return to Yakutat was filmed by Laura Bliss Spann in her documentary Reunion at Mt St. Elias: The Return of Frederica de Laguna to Yakutat.

At the age of 98, Frederica de Laguna passed away on October 6, 2004.

Sources Consulted

Darnell, Regna. "Frederica de Laguna (1906-2004)." American Anthropologist 107.3 (2005): 554-556.

de Laguna, Frederica. Voyage to Greenland: A Personal Initiation into Anthropology. New York: W.W. Norton Co, 1977.

McClellan, Catharine. "Frederica de Laguna and the Pleasures of Anthropology." American Ethnologist 16.4 (1989): 766-785.

Olson, Wallace M. "Obituary: Frederica de Laguna (1906-2004)." Arctic 58.1 (2005): 89-90.
Related Materials:
Although this collection contains a great deal of correspondence associated with her service as president of AAA, most of her presidential records can be found in American Anthropological Association Records 1917-1972. Also at the National Anthropological Archives are her transcripts of songs sung by Yakutat Tlingit recorded in 1952 and 1954 located in MS 7056 and her notes and drawings of Dorset culture materials in the National Museum of Canada located in MS 7265. The Human Studies Film Archive has a video oral history of de Laguna conducted by Norman Markel (SC-89.10.4).

Related collections can also be found in other repositories. The University Museum of the University of Pennsylvania holds materials related to work that de Laguna carried out for the museum from the 1930s to the 1960s. Materials relating to her fieldwork in Angoon and Yakutat can be found in the Rasmuson Library of the University of Alaska, Fairbanks in the papers of Francis A. Riddell, a field assistant to de Laguna in the early 1950s. Original photographs taken in the field in Alaska were deposited in the Alaska State Library, Juneau. Both the Archive of Folk Culture at the Library of Congress and the American Philosophical Library have copies of her field recordings and notes. The American Museum of Natural History has materials related to her work editing George T. Emmons' manuscript. De Laguna's papers can also be found at the Bryn Mawr College Archives.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Frederica de Laguna.
Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Anthropology -- History  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Maps
Field notes
Correspondence
Photographs
Sound recordings
Citation:
Frederica de Laguna papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1998-89
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3363424fd-e665-498b-a37c-9f4a81302a35
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1998-89
Online Media:

Phaseolus lunatus var. silvester Baudet

Biogeographical Region:
79 - Mexico Southwest  Search this
Collector:
Oswaldo Téllez V.  Search this
Place:
Km 20-30 camino de terraceria a el Cuarenteño-Cora-Jalcocotan, en la serrania de San Juan., Tepic, Nayarit, Mexico, North America - Neotropics
Collection Date:
14 Jan 1988
Taxonomy:
Plantae Dicotyledonae Fabales Fabaceae Papilionoideae
Published Name:
Phaseolus lunatus var. silvester Baudet
Barcode:
01953537
USNM Number:
3707027
See more items in:
Botany
Flowering plants and ferns
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/391e0f239-7361-4a20-b360-d91945c3fda6
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_14315547

Moccasins

Collector:
Cora Hutchinson  Search this
Donor Name:
Stanley R. Brooks  Search this
Length - Object:
25 cm
Width - Object:
10 cm
Culture:
Sioux (Oceti Sakowin)  Search this
Object Type:
Moccasin
Place:
Not Given, Rosebud Reservation (not certain), South Dakota, United States, North America
Accession Date:
21 Apr 1982
Collection Date:
1880's
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Accession Number:
349797
USNM Number:
E422556-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3502152cf-3051-4e27-a9c5-21ebf50b8a6b
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8455469
Online Media:

Esther McCoy papers

Creator:
McCoy, Esther  Search this
Names:
Historic American Buildings Survey  Search this
Society of Architectural Historians  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles. School of Architecture and Urban Planning  Search this
Ain, Gregory, 1908-1988  Search this
Barragán, Luis, 1902-  Search this
Bradbury, Ray, 1920-2012  Search this
Davidson, Julius Ralph, b. 1889  Search this
Dreiser, Theodore, 1871-1945  Search this
Ellwood, Craig  Search this
Gill, Irving, 1870-1936  Search this
Grotz, Dorothy  Search this
Hollein, Hans, 1934-2014  Search this
Jones, A. Quincy (Archie Quincy), 1913-1979  Search this
Maybeck, Bernard R.  Search this
Neutra, Richard Joseph, 1892-1970  Search this
O'Gorman, Juan, 1905-  Search this
Rand, Marvin  Search this
Schindler, R. M. (Rudolph M.), 1887-1953  Search this
Shulman, Julius  Search this
Soriano, Rafael, 1920-  Search this
Watanabe, Makoto  Search this
Worlidge, T. (Thomas), 1700-1766  Search this
Extent:
44 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Diaries
Etchings
Photographs
Sound recordings
Interviews
Video recordings
Slides (photographs)
Transcripts
Drawings
Memoirs
Date:
circa 1876-1990
bulk 1938-1989
Summary:
The papers of Southern California architectural historian, critic, and writer Esther McCoy measure 44.0 linear feet and date from 1876 to 1990 (bulk 1938-1989). McCoy was interested in both Italian and Mexican architecture as well as the folk art and crafts of Mexico and South America. The collection documents McCoy's career, as well as her family and personal life through biographical material, extensive correspondence, personal and professional writings, project files, Southern California architects' files, clippings and other printed material, a large collection of photographs and slides, and taped interviews of Southern California modern architects.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of Southern California architectural historian, critic, and writer Esther McCoy measure 44.0 linear feet and date from 1876 to 1990 (bulk 1938-1989). McCoy was interested in both Italian and Mexican architecture as well as the folk art and crafts of Mexico and South America. The collection documents McCoy's career, as well as her family and personal life through biographical material, extensive correspondence, personal and professional writings, project files, Southern California architects' files, clippings and other printed material, a large collection of photographs and slides, and taped interviews of Southern California modern architects.

Biographical and family material consists of awards, resumes, identification documents, and other documentation of McCoy's personal life. Included are a transcript of a 1984 interview of McCoy by Makoto Watanabe and material relating to her friend, Theodore Dreiser.

Correspondence focuses on her personal relationships with family, friends, and lovers, and general correspondence relating primarily to her work as a writer. McCoy's personal correspondence is valuable to researchers who are interested in her personal life, her struggles as a young writer, and the way in which her family, friends, lovers, mentors, and colleagues helped to shape her work and career. As documented in this correspondence, her life offers a glimpse into twentieth-century American social and political history, especially the radical leftist movements of the 1920s and 1930s. Researchers interested in the roots of feminism in the United States should also find these papers useful in documenting the life of a creative and productive woman who was successful in a field then almost entirely dominated by men. Correspondents of note include her husband Berkeley Tobey, lovers Geoffrey Eaton and Albert Robert, writers Ray Bradbury and Theodore Dreiser, and artists and architects, such as Dorothy Grotz, Craig Ellwood, A. Quincy Jones, Hans Hollein, and J. R. Davidson. General correspondence is primarily with researchers, professors, architects, publishers, and professional organizations.

Personal writings include McCoy's diaries, notebooks, and memoirs, and writings by others including friends, lovers, and colleagues. Also included are drafts of McCoy's fictional works, both published and unpublished, including short stories, teleplays, and novels.

The collection contains in-depth documentation of McCoy's pioneering study of the modernist work of twentieth-century architects in Southern California. The bulk of her papers consist of her writing files for books, exhibition catalogs, articles, and lectures on architecture. Because many of the architects about whom McCoy wrote were her contemporaries, she developed personal relationships with several of them through her research and writing. Her writing files include drafts, notes, research material, photographs, and correspondence. McCoy also traveled extensively, particularly in Italy and Mexico, and wrote about architecture, craft, and culture in those countries. Project files document McCoy's other activities related to architectural history, such preservation projects, juries, grants, the Dodge House Preservation Campaign and related film project, her work for the Society of Architectural Historians and the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS), and her work at the UCLA School of Architecture and Urban Planning, compiling a slide library and cataloging the Richard Neutra's papers. McCoy also maintained architect files which may contain correspondence, notes, photographs, research material, interview transcripts, about architects and their works. Among these extensive records, the files documenting the careers of R. M. Schindler, Irving Gill, Richard Neutra, and Juan O'Gorman are particularly rich.

Printed material in this collection documents McCoy's career as well as her personal interests. Included are books, clippings, magazines, newsletters, press releases, as well as publications arranged by subject such as architecture, art, Italy, and Mexico. McCoy also collected literary and leftist publications. The small amount of artwork in this collection consists of artwork sent to her by friends, including a drawing of her by Esther Rollo and etchings by various artists including Thomas Worlidge.

There are personal photographs of family and friends and of McCoy at different times in her life, as well as photographs gathered during the course of her research on architecture. Found here are photographs of architects and their works, including a large number depicting the work of Gregory Ain, Luis Barragan, J. R. Davidson, Irving Gill, Bernard Maybeck, Juan O'Gorman, R. M. Schindler, and Raphael Soriano. Many of these photographs were taken by notable architectural photographers Julius Shulman and Marvin Rand. Also found are photographs of architecture designed for the Case Study House program of Arts & Architecture magazine; exhibition photographs, primarily for the exhibition "Ten Italian Architects" in 1967; and other research photographs primarily documenting architecture and craft in other countries and the history of architecture in California. This series also includes approximately 3,600 slides of architecture.

Audio and video recordings include a videocassette of McCoy's 80th birthday party and 55 taped interviews with architects, people associated with architectural projects, and artists.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 10 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical and Family Material, 1881-1989 (boxes 1, 48; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1896-1989 (boxes 1-6, 4.9 linear feet)

Series 3: Personal Writings, 1919-1989 (boxes 6-14; 8.1 linear feet)

Series 4: Architectural Writings, 1908-1990 (boxes 14-24, 42, 49, 50; 10.2 linear feet)

Series 5: Projects, circa 1953-1988 (boxes 24-26, 47, FC 53-56; 2.5 linear feet)

Series 6: Architect Files, 1912-1990 (boxes 26-28, 42; 2.2 linear feet)

Series 7: Printed Material, circa 1885-1990 (boxes 28-31, 42; 2.9 linear feet)

Series 8: Artwork, 1924-1967, undated (box 31; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 9: Photographs and Slides, circa 1876-1989 (boxes 31-38, 41-46, 51; 8.3 linear feet)

Series 10: Audio and Video Recordings, 1930-1984 (boxes 38-40, 47; 2.5 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Esther McCoy (1904-1989) is remembered best for her pioneering work as an architectural historian, critic, and proponent of Southern California modern architecture of the early to mid-twentieth century. McCoy was interested in both Italian and Mexican architecture as well as the folk art and crafts of Mexico and South America. Although her professional interests ranged from writing fiction to studying the folk architecture and crafts of Mexico, McCoy achieved her most notable success for her numerous articles, books, and exhibitions about Southern California architecture and the architects associated with the modernist movement.

Born in Arkansas in 1904, Esther McCoy grew up in Kansas and attended various schools in the Midwest. In 1926 she left the University of Michigan to launch a writing career in New York, where she moved in avant-garde literary circles and conducted research for Theodore Dreiser. She began writing fiction in New York and continued to write after moving to Los Angeles in 1932, working on short stories, novels, and screenplays. She published numerous short stories between 1929 and 1962, with works appearing in the New Yorker, Harper's Bazaar, and university quarterlies. Her short story, "The Cape," was reprinted in Best Short Stories of 1950. Many of the novels that she wrote from the mid-1960s through the 1980s were related thematically to architects and architecture.

During the late 1920s and throughout the 1930s, McCoy participated in the politically radical movements of the period and wrote for leftist publications. Her interest in the lowcost housing projects of modern architects was prompted by one of her articles about slums for Epic News. During World War II she entered a training program for engineering draftsmen at Douglas Aircraft and in 1944 was hired as an architectural draftsman for the architect R.M. Schindler. As she became increasingly interested in modern architecture and design, she combined her two major career interests and began to focus her energies on architectural research, writing, and criticism. Her first article on architecture, "Schindler: Space Architect," was published in 1945 in the journal Direction.

McCoy began writing about architecture in earnest in 1950 as a free-lance contributor to the Los Angeles Times. From then until her death in 1989, she wrote prolifically for Arts & Architecture magazine, Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Herald Examiner, Architectural Record, L'Architectura, Zodiac (Italy), Progressive Architecture, Lotus (Italy), and Architectural Forum. In addition to her numerous articles, McCoy wrote several books on Southern California modern architecture and architects. Her first major work, Five California Architects, published in 1960, is now recognized as a classic work in modern architectural history. It promoted a serious study of modern architecture in Southern California and introduced to the world several leading California architects and their work: Bernard Maybeck, Irving Gill, Charles and Henry Greene, and R.M. Schindler. That same year, she published another important book focusing on the work of the California architect Richard Neutra. Other books by McCoy include Modern California Houses: Case Study Houses (1962), Craig Ellwood (1968), Vienna to Los Angeles: Two Journeys (1979), and The Second Generation (1984).

In addition to these books, McCoy organized and wrote catalogs for several significant exhibitions focusing on contemporary architects. Her first was the R.M. Schindler Retrospective, a 1954 exhibition at the Landau Art Gallery in Los Angeles. Her other exhibitions and accompanying catalogs include Roots of California Contemporary Architecture, 1956, Los Angeles Municipal Art Department; Felix Candela, 1957, University of Southern California, Los Angeles; Irving Gill, 1958, Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Juan O'Gorman, 1964, San Fernando Valley State College; and Ten Italian Architects, 1967, Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Moreover, McCoy contributed numerous essays to other exhibition catalogs and publications, lectured at the University of Southern California, participated in preservation projects, organized tours for the Society of Architectural Historians, and contributed to a number of documentary films. Her energy and interests also led her to catalog and transcribe Richard Neutra's papers at the University of California Los Angeles Archives.

McCoy received national recognition from the American Institute of Architects for her seminal and prolific work in the field of Southern California modern architectural history and criticism. Her interests, however, were not exclusively bound to California. She traveled the world and was interested in both Italian and Mexican architecture as well as the folk art and crafts of Mexico and South America. She made five extended trips to Italy during the 1950s and 1960s, publishing regularly about the architecture there and curating the exhibition Ten Italian Architects. She was a contributing editor to two Italian journals, Zodiac and Lotus, and was awarded the Star of Order of Solidarity in 1960 by the Republic of Italy for her research and writing.

Esther McCoy died of emphysema on December 30, 1989, at the age of eighty-five. Her last contribution was an essay for the exhibition catalog Blueprints for Modern Living: History and Legacy of the Case Study House. The show opened at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles one month before her death.

Missing Title

1904 -- Born November 18 in Horatio, Arkansas. Raised in Kansas.

1920 -- Attended preparatory school at Central College for Women, Lexington, Missouri.

1922-1925 -- College education: Baker University, Baldwin City, Kansas; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville; Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri; University of Michigan.

1924 -- Visited Theodore Dreiser in Michigan.

1926-1938 -- Began writing in New York City.

1926-1938 -- Researched and read for Theodore Dreiser.

1926-1938 -- Worked for editorial offices and publishers.

1926-1938 -- Traveled to write in Paris (1928), Key West, Florida (1930), and Los Angeles, California (1932-1935).

1938 -- Moved to Santa Monica, California.

1941 -- Married Berkeley Greene Tobey.

1942-1944 -- Employed as engineering draftsman at Douglas Aircraft.

1944-1947 -- Worked as architectural draftsman for R.M. Schindler.

1945 -- Began architectural writing career.

1950 -- Wrote script for film Architecture West.

1950 -- Joined editorial board of Arts & Architecture.

1950-1968 -- Worked as free-lance writer for the Los Angeles Times.

1951-1955 -- Traveled to, researched, and wrote about Mexico and Mexican art and architecture.

1954 -- R.M. Schindler Retrospective exhibition at the Landau Art Gallery, Los Angeles.

1956 -- Roots of California Contemporary Architecture exhibition, Los Angeles Municipal Art Department.

1957 -- Felix Candela exhibition, University of Southern California, Los Angeles.

1958 -- Irving Gill exhibition, Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Traveled to Italy.

1959-1968 -- Contributing editor to Italian periodicals Zodiac and Lotus.

1960 -- Five California Architects (New York: Reinhold).

1960 -- Richard Neutra (New York: G. Braziller).

1960 -- Awarded Star of Order of Solidarity by the Republic of Italy for reporting on arts and crafts in Italy.

1962 -- Death of Berkeley Greene Tobey.

1962 -- Modern California Houses: Case Study Houses (New York: Reinhold) (reprinted as Case Study Houses, Los Angeles: Hennessey and Ingalls, 1978).

1963 -- Resident Fellow at Huntington Hartford Foundation.

1964 -- Juan O'Gorman exhibition, San Fernando Valley State College, Northridge, Calif.

1965 -- Consultant for the California Arts Commission.

1965-1966 -- Wrote and produced the film Dodge House.

1965-1968 -- Lecturer at University of California at Los Angeles, School of Architecture and Urban Planning.

1966 -- Resident Fellow at MacDowell Colony, New Hampshire.

1967 -- Ten Italian Architects exhibition, Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

1967 -- Honorary Associate of the Southern California Chapter of the American Institute of Architects.

1967 -- Regents' Lecturer at University of California, Santa Barbara.

1968 -- Craig Ellwood (New York: Walker).

1968 -- Distinguished Service Citation from the California Council of AIA.

1969-1970 -- Lecturer at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

1969-1989 -- Contributing editor of Progressive Architecture.

1971-1978 -- Graham Foundation Grants.

1974 -- Regents' Lecturer at the University of California,Santa Cruz.

1979 -- Vienna to Los Angeles: Two Journeys (Santa Monica, Calif.: Arts & Architecture Press).

1979 -- Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship.

1981 -- Los Angeles Chapter Women's Architectural League Honorary Member.

1982 -- Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Modern and Contemporary Art Council Award for Distinguished Achievement.

1983 -- Home Sweet Home: The California Ranch House exhibition at California State University.

1984 -- The Second Generation (Salt Lake City: Peregrine Smith Books).

1985 -- American Institute of Architects, Institute Honor.

1986 -- High Styles exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art.

1987 -- Vesta Award for outstanding scholarship.

1989 -- Award from the Historical Society of Southern California.

1989 -- Award from the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs.

1989 -- Blueprints for Modern Living: History and Legacy of the Case Study House exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Died in Santa Monica, California, December 30.
Related Material:
Also in the Archives of American Art are eight sound cassettes of a transcribed interview with Esther McCoy conducted by Joseph Giovannini, June 8-November 14, 1987.
Provenance:
The collection was given to the Archives of American Art by Esther McCoy in 1986. Before her death in 1989, McCoy assisted in the organization and identification of the papers. Original pre-print film elements for Dodge House 1916 were donated to the Archives of American Art by the Academy Film Archive in 2018.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of audiovisual recordings without access copies requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Architectural historians -- California  Search this
Art critics -- California  Search this
Topic:
Architecture, Modern -- 20th century -- Mexico  Search this
Architects -- Italy  Search this
Architecture, Domestic -- California  Search this
Authors -- California  Search this
Architecture, Modern -- 20th century -- California  Search this
Architecture, Modern -- 20th century -- Europe  Search this
Architects -- California  Search this
Feminism and art  Search this
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diaries
Etchings
Photographs
Sound recordings
Interviews
Video recordings
Slides (photographs)
Transcripts
Drawings
Memoirs
Citation:
Esther McCoy papers, circa 1876-1990, bulk 1938-1989. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.mccoesth
See more items in:
Esther McCoy papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw93ee58e3b-f2fc-4d98-acf9-de6f76bfed63
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mccoesth
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Online Media:

Laura Thompson papers

Creator:
Thompson, Laura, 1905-2000  Search this
Names:
Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project  Search this
Saint Mary's University (Halifax, N.S.). Institute of Human Values  Search this
United States. Office of Indian Affairs  Search this
Extent:
27 Linear feet (50 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Germany
Guam
Fiji
Iceland
Date:
1905-1997
Summary:
The papers of Laura Thompson reflect the professional and personal life of an active and pioneering anthropologist. In the 1930s, Thompson began her work in applied anthropology, producing studies of Fiji, Guam and Hawaii intended to aid administrators of economic, educational and political development and pioneering approaches now known as "administrative" and "educational" anthropology. In the 1940s, Thompson applied her skills to the Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, a study of eleven communities of five Native American tribes. From the 1950s until the end of her career, Thompson sought to formulate and demonstrate a theoretical anthropological synthesis of man and culture, while pursuing fieldwork in Iceland and Germany, teaching, and consulting for numerous institutions.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Laura Thompson reflect the professional and personal life of an active and pioneering anthropologist. In the 1930s, Thompson began her work in applied anthropology, producing studies of Fiji, Guam and Hawaii intended to aid administrators of economic, educational and political development and pioneering approaches now known as "administrative" and "educational" anthropology. In the 1940s, Thompson applied her skills to the Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, a study of eleven communities of five Native American tribes. From the 1950s until the end of her career, Thompson sought to formulate and demonstrate a theoretical anthropological synthesis of man and culture, while pursuing fieldwork in Iceland and Germany, teaching, and consulting for numerous institutions.

Included in this collection are field diaries, numerous manuscripts and lectures, research materials, correspondence, sound recordings and ethnographic photographs. Also included are various subject and index files maintained by Thompson for her many research projects. The collection is particularly rich in unpublished manuscripts that Thompson created from 1950 to the mid 1990s. Manuscript topics include particular field sites, such as Fiji and West Germany, as well as Thompson's critical and theoretical exposition regarding the future of applied anthropology, variously titled "Clinical" and "Holistic Anthropology."

Numerous materials pertaining to Thompson's personal life are also located in the collection, including personal diaries and professional awards, correspondence with friends and family, and personal photographs of Thompson from infancy to old age. Located in Thompson's personal papers are her writings from late in life, in which she addressed aging through her anthropological sensibilities, recorded formative memories from her youth, and projected the future of a world rife with injustice and environmental destruction. A large portion of the Laura Thompson papers include documents from the Indian Personality, Education and Administration (IPEA) Project, initiated by the Office of Indian Affairs and the University of Chicago Committee on Human Development. This investigation of five Native American tribes includes the results of over 1000 psychological studies of native children. Materials included encompass the protocols for and implementation of the project, as well as field reports, psychological tests, correspondence, worker supervision reports and final analyses of findings. Included is a copy of the project's published final report, Personality and Government (1951). The bulk of the records date between 1941and 47; related material spans as late as 1992. Correspondents primarily include project members and consultants, particularly: John Collier, A. I. Hallowell, Maud Hallowell, Royal Hassrick, Robert Havinghurst, Alice Joseph, Bruno Klopfer, Clyde Kluckhohn, Dorothea Leighton, D'Arcy McNickle, Trude Schmidl-Waehner, Heinrich Schultz, Ruth Underhill, and W. Lloyd Warner. The papers of the IPEA Project are restricted in use.

Additional material in the NAA relating to the IPEA Research Project can be found in the following collections: Indian Personality and Administration Research Project Papers, donated by Robert J. Havighurst, and the Dorothea Cross Leighton papers. A list of publications resulting from findings of the project can be found in the Thompson collection accession folder.

Nearly absent from the collection are materials reflecting Thompson's fieldwork in Hawaii, her marriages to Bernhard Tüting and John Collier, and manuscripts of her early publications.

Correspondents in Thompson's papers include: Ruth BENEDICT, Charles W. COLLIER, John COLLIER, Malcolm COLLIER, Cora DUBOIS, Fred EGGAN, Alfred EMERSON, Kenneth EMORY, Frederick V. FIELD, Roland W. FORCE, Derek FREEMAN, Ann Pinson GILL, Peggy GOLDE, A. I. HALLOWELL, Maude HALLOWELL, Royal HASSRICK, Robert HAVINGHURST, Alice JOSEPH, Felix KEESING, Lawrence KELLY, Bruno KLOPFER, Clyde KLUCKHOHN, A. L. KROEBER, Harry S. LADD, Bruno LASKER, Dorothy LEE, Dorothea LEIGHTON, Charles F. LOOMIS, Katherine LOUMALA, Robert H. LOWIE, John R. MACCORMACK, Bronislaw MALINOWSKI, D'Arcy MCNICKLE, Margaret MEAD, Robert REDFIELD, Trude SCHMIDL-WAEHNER, Heinrich SCHULTZ, Leslie SPIER, George D. SPINDLER, Rebecca STEVENSON, Ratu J. L. V. SUKUNA (District Commissioner of Lau), Alfred TOZZER, W. Lloyd WARNER and Alvin WOLFE.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
Arranged in 11 series: (1) Fiji, 1933-1995; (2) Germany, 1934-1991; (3) Guam, 1938-1996; (4) Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, 1941-1992; (5) Iceland, 1952-1981; (6) Institute of Human Values, 1973-1982; (8) Manuscripts and research, 1935-1994; (9) Professional correspondence, 1943-1992; (10) Publications, 1932-1991; (11) Personal Papers, 1905-1997.
Biographical Note:
Laura Thompson (1905-2000) conducted fieldwork in Oceania, the Southwestern United States and Europe; she taught at numerous institutions and served as a consultant for many organizations, including the Naval Government of Guam and the Office of Indian Affairs, throughout her career. Thompson's papers reflect her involvement in each of these activities as well as her desire to formulate a unifying theory of applied anthropology that would address issues including environmentalism and overpopulation.

1905 -- Born in Honolulu, Hawaii on January 23.

1923 -- Graduated from Punahou Academy, Hawaii.

1927 -- Bachelor of Arts, Mills College, California.

1928 -- Graduate studies in anthropology, Radcliffe College and Harvard University, Massachusetts.

1929-33 -- Graduate studies in anthropology, University of California, Berkeley.

1929-34 -- Assistant Ethnologist, Bishop Museum, Hawaii.

1931-32 -- Fellow, Bishop Museum, Hawaii.

1933 -- Ph.D. in anthropology, University of California, Berkeley.

1933-34 -- Lau Islands, Fiji, fieldwork.

1934-37 -- Germany, travel and research.

1938-39 -- Guam, fieldwork under U.S. Naval Government and University of Hawaii.

1938-40 -- Consultant, U. S. Naval Government of Guam.

1940-41 -- Social Scientist, Community Survey of Education, Hawaii.

1941 -- Co-founder, Society for Applied Anthropology. Graduate work in Human Development, University of Chicago, Illinois.

1941-47 -- Coordinator, Indian Personality, Education, and Administration Research Project.

1941-43 -- Papago Indians, fieldwork. Pine Ridge Sioux Indians, fieldwork. Hopi Indians, fieldwork. Navaho Indians, fieldwork. Poston War Relocation Camp, fieldwork. Zuni Indians, fieldwork.

1942-44 -- Consultant, U. S. Office of Indian Affairs.

1946 -- Papago Indians, fieldwork.

1946-54 -- Research consultant, Institute of Ethnic Affairs (Washington DC and New York).

1952 -- Iceland, fieldwork.

1954-56 -- Professor of Anthropology, City College of New York.

1957-58 -- Visiting Professor of Anthropology, University of North Carolina.

1958-59 -- Research fellow, Laboratories of Anthropology, University of North Carolina.

1959-60 -- Visiting Professor, North Carolina State College.

1960 -- Iceland, fieldwork.

1961 -- Visiting professor, Utah State University (summer). Distinguished Visiting Professor, Pennsylvania State University.

1961-62 -- Professor of Anthropology, University of Southern Illinois.

1962 -- Visiting Professor, University of Hawaii (summer).

1962-63 -- Professor of Anthropology, San Francisco State College.

1964 -- Lecturer, Brooklyn College, CUNY.

1974 -- Honorary Ll.D., Mills College, CA.

1976 -- Board of Governors, Institute of Human Values, St. Mary's University, Halifax.

1977 -- Ancient Order of the Chammori (Honor for public service in Guam).

1979 -- Malinowski Award, Society for Applied Anthropology.

1985 -- Returned to Hawaii.

2000 -- Died January 29.
Related Materials:
Additional material in the NAA relating to the IPEA Research Project can be found in the following collections: Indian Personality and Administration Research Project Papers, donated by Robert J. Havighurst, and the Dorothea Cross Leighton papers. A list of publications resulting from findings of the project can be found in the Thompson collection accession folder.
Provenance:
Thompson's papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by the creator periodically over 25 years.
Restrictions:
Portions of the collection, in particular materials from the Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, are restricted in use.

Access to the Laura Thompson papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Citation:
Laura Thompson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1983-51
See more items in:
Laura Thompson papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw368b0c5ca-b0b1-4f61-b59e-b87cf0b0ff5b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1983-51

Cora A

Collection Creator:
United States. Works Progress Administration  Search this
Container:
Box 31, Sheet 14-45
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1889
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Historic American Merchant Marine Survey, 1936-1937, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Historic American Merchant Marine Survey Records
Historic American Merchant Marine Survey Records / Series 5: Drawings / 5.1: Drawings / 5.1.10: Volume 2 (Great Lakes), Part A
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep81f7a1327-8672-484d-a289-b23961a5bed7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0240-ref333

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