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MS 4121 Comparative vocabularies of Southeastern and Gulf Languages

Creator:
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Extent:
90 Pages
57 Items (cards )
Culture:
Alibamu  Search this
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
American Indian -- Southeast  Search this
Atakapa  Search this
Choctaw  Search this
Comecrudo  Search this
Cotoname  Search this
Coushatta (Koasati)  Search this
Chitimacha  Search this
Tunica  Search this
Natchez  Search this
Tonkawa  Search this
Hitchiti Seminole  Search this
Timucua (archaeological)  Search this
Alabama Indians  Search this
Karankawa Indians  Search this
Coahuiltec  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1916-1917
Scope and Contents:
Contents: "Key to Comparative vocabularies," a numerical key to English equivalents of the Indian terms in the vocabularies. Typescript and autograph document. 2 pages. Comparative vocabulary of Natchez, Tunica, Chitimacha, and Attacapa. Autograph document. 22 pages. Comparative vocabulary of Creek, Choctaw, Alabama, and Hitchiti. Autograph document. 23 pages. Comparative vocabulary of Tonkawa, Comecrudo, Coahuilteco, Cotoname, and Karankawa. Autograph document. 22 pages. Comparative vocabulary of Koasati, Creek, Hitchiti, Alabama, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Natchez. Typescript and autograph document. 2 pages. Comparative vocabulary of Timucua and other Southeastern languages. Typescript and Autograph document. 19 pages. Comparison of Natchez vocabulary, phonology and structure with other Muskhogean languages. Typescript Document with A. notations. 57 cards.
Biographical / Historical:
According to Bureau of American Ethnology-AR 38, pages 5-6, Swanton worked on a comparative vocabulary of these languages in 1916-1917.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4121
Local Note:
typescript and autograph document
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Atakapa  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 4121, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4121
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw37145b542-5194-4106-9baa-3a77009e1d83
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4121
Online Media:

MS 2440 English-Comecrudo vocabulary

Collector:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Extent:
2,100 Items (ca. 2100 cards)
Culture:
Comecrudo  Search this
Coahuiltec  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2440
Local Note:
Original material in Number 297-a.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Mexico  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2440, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2440
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw30b356f5c-7516-4712-b87a-80dda0677354
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2440

MS 297 Comecrudo and Cotoname Vocabularies

Creator:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Culture:
Comecrudo  Search this
Cotoname  Search this
Coahuiltec  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Contents: Vocabularies of the Comecrudo and Cotoname Dialects of the Pakawa Linguistic Family... Autograph document. 1 volume. approximately 100 pages. 1886. Comecrudo and Cotoname. Autograph document. notebook. approximately 80 pages. December 6, 1886. (Copied 1900). Comecrudo and Cotoname, U.S. Geological and Geographic Survey Comparative Vocabulary printed schedule. Autograph document. 7 pages. December 1886.
Biographical / Historical:
These documents were collected and arranged by subject and alphabetically by Gatschet in 1886, at Las Prietas, between Camargo and Matamoros in the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 297-a-b-c
Local Note:
Both volumes and the printed schedule are stamped, "Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscript Vault. March, 1926."
General:
Previously titled "Vocabularies."
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Mexico  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 297-a-b-c, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS297
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a9d8d57d-0c15-44af-81f0-7fb11939aa6b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms297

MS 2016-a Daniel Little Chief drawings of Cheyenne ceremonial customs and implements, with explanations by Albert Gatschet

Creator:
Little Chief, Daniel, d. 1906.  Search this
Annotator:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (disbound volume (65 pages) of 29 drawings and 34 pages of typescript.)
Culture:
Northern Tsitsistas (Northern Cheyenne)  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Ledger drawings
Date:
1891 February
Scope and Contents:
29 drawings and 34 pages of typed explanatory text, formerly bound together, now disbound, plus an identifying title page handwritten by Albert Gatschet and one drawing on ruled paper. The explanatory text was transcribed from Gatschet's notebook, No. 2016-b, with corrections by Gatschet. T.p. inscribed: "Crayon Pictures of Cheyenne Ceremonial Customs and Implements. Drawn by Wuxpais or Daniel Littlechief, son of the present headchief of the Cheyenne Indians of South Dakota, at the Pine Ridge Agency. Explained by notes obtained from the same Indian by Albert S. Gatschet." The last drawing in the volume is signed "T.D. Little Chief," but cannot be identified as a drawing by Daniel Little Chief. Subjects include ceremonial items, name glyphs, painted tipis, and illustrations of Cheyenne customs. A nearly identical set of drawings by Daniel Little Chief is located at the Newberry Library in Chicago. Information provided by Candace Greene.
Biographical / Historical:
Daniel Little Chief, a.k.a. Wuxpais (?-1906), was a Northern Cheyenne warrior whose band of Cheyenne were sent south to the Cheyenne-Arapaho Reservation in Indian Territory after their surrender, traveling there between 1878-1879. In 1881 this band moved north to the Pine Ridge Agency in South Dakota. In 1891 Daniel Littlechief inherited the role of head chief from his father and remained in South Dakota until his death in 1906. For more information see "American Indian Painters: A Biographical Dictionary" by Jeanne Snodgrass 1968, New York: Museum of the American Indian.
Albert S. Gatschet (1832-1907) was educated in his native Switzerland and in Germany (University of Bern [Ph.D., 1892]); University of Berlin. Early in his career, he pursued antiquarian research in European museums and wrote scientific articles. Among his interests was the etymology of Swiss place names. After coming to the United States in 1869, he worked on the American Indian vocabularies collected by Oscar Loew, of the United States Geological Survey West of the 100th Meridian (Wheeler Survey). Eventually John Wesley Powell employed him as an ethnologist with the United States Geographical and Geological Survey of the Rocky Mountain Regions. When it was founded in 1879, he joined the staff of the Bureau of American Ethnology and continued there until he retired in 1905. For the Powell Survey, Gatschet researched the ethnography of the Klamath in Oregon and the Modoc in Oklahoma. He also collected Native American material objects and investigated special problems for Powell's classification of the American Indian languages north of Mexico, working on languages of the Southeast, including groups forcibly settled in the southern Plains. He not only visited well known tribes but also searched out small groups, including the Biloxi and Tunica. He also worked with the Natchez, Tonkawa, Chitimacha, and Atakapa in the United States and Comecrudo and several other small groups in northern Mexico. Through library research, he studied the Timucua, Karankara, and the Beothuk. During the later part of his career, Gatschet was assigned comparative work on all the Algonquian languages. Although the project was never completed, he collected much about many of the languages, especially Peoria, Miami, and Shawnee. In addition, he worked with members of diverse tribes of the eastern United States. For more information, see NAA finding aid located at http://www.nmnh.si.edu/naa/guide/_g1.htm#jrg575
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2016-a
Varying Form of Title:
Crayon pictures of Cheyenne ceremonial customs and implements / drawn by Wuxpais or Daniel Littlechief ... ; explained by notes from the same Indian by Albert S. Gatschet
Place:
United States South Dakota Pine Ridge Agency.
United States South Dakota Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.
Album Information:
MS 2016a 001
Topic:
Habitations -- Cheyenne  Search this
Sweatbaths -- Cheyenne  Search this
Music -- Cheyenne  Search this
Married people's tipi -- Cheyenne  Search this
Weapons -- Cheyenne  Search this
Pipe -- Cheyenne  Search this
Amulets and fetishes -- Cheyenne  Search this
Medicine -- Cheyenne  Search this
Mortuary customs -- Cheyenne  Search this
Names, Personal -- Cheyenne  Search this
Medicine tent -- Cheyenne  Search this
Sun Dance -- Cheyenne  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Ledger drawings
Citation:
Manuscript 2016-a, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2016A
See more items in:
MS 2016-a Daniel Little Chief drawings of Cheyenne ceremonial customs and implements, with explanations by Albert Gatschet
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw332099240-dc44-442c-9890-3771ef107586
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2016a
Online Media:

MS 2016-c Anonymous drawing, possibly Cheyenne, of mounted warrior

Collector:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (leaf , 13 x 15 cm.)
Culture:
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Ledger drawings
Date:
n.d.
Scope and Contents:
Single leaf drawing depicting a mounted warrior wearing feathered bonnet. Manuscript caption in red ink on front reads, "this Indian man not war because this man play Running Horse the man very nice play." Manuscript caption in same ink and handwriting on reverse reads, "... this man name Ark-wor-gar-ne."
Biographical / Historical:
Albert S. Gatschet (1832-1907) was educated in his native Switzerland and in Germany (University of Bern [Ph.D., 1892]); University of Berlin. Early in his career, he pursued antiquarian research in European museums and wrote scientific articles. Among his interests was the etymology of Swiss place names. After coming to the United States in 1869, he worked on the American Indian vocabularies collected by Oscar Loew, of the United States Geological Survey West of the 100th Meridian (Wheeler Survey). Eventually John Wesley Powell employed him as an ethnologist with the United States Geographical and Geological Survey of the Rocky Mountain Regions. When it was founded in 1879, he joined the staff of the Bureau of American Ethnology and continued there until he retired in 1905. For the Powell Survey, Gatschet researched the ethnography of the Klamath in Oregon and the Modoc in Oklahoma. He also collected Native American material objects and investigated special problems for Powell's classification of the American Indian languages north of Mexico, working on languages of the Southeast, including groups forcibly settled in the southern Plains. He not only visited well known tribes but also searched out small groups, including the Biloxi and Tunica. He also worked with the Natchez, Tonkawa, Chitimacha, and Atakapa in the United States and Comecrudo and several other small groups in northern Mexico. Through library research, he studied the Timucua, Karankara, and the Beothuk. During the later part of his career, Gatschet was assigned comparative work on all the Algonquian languages. Although the project was never completed, he collected much about many of the languages, especially Peoria, Miami, and Shawnee. In addition, he worked with members of diverse tribes of the eastern United States. For more information, see NAA finding aid located at http://www.nmnh.si.edu/naa/guide/_g1.htm#jrg575
Local Numbers:
NAA INV 08660200

NAA MS 2016-c
Local Note:
This drawing does not appear to be directly associated with works by Daniel Littlechief in Ms. 2016-a.
Ink on ruled paper.
Album Information:
MS 2016c 001
Topic:
Blackfeet  Search this
Genre/Form:
Ledger drawings
Citation:
Manuscript 2016-c, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2016C
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw358c12b2f-5f69-43e7-839f-ace4d0bf34c5
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2016c
Online Media:

MS 4279 Correspondences between the Three Dialects of Coahuiltecan: Cotoname, Comecrudo, and Coahuilteco

Creator:
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Names:
García, Bartholomé, active 18th century  Search this
Extent:
3 Pages
Culture:
Coahuiltec  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4279
Local Note:
typescript document with A. notations
Topic:
Mexico  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 4279, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4279
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw351c43bda-f6c5-40d9-813e-adf91130638a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4279

Albert Samuel Gatschet papers

Creator:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Extent:
11 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
North America
Date:
1828-1906
Scope and Contents:
The collection is composed mainly of corrected proofs of the dictionary and texts including in Gatschet's The Klamath Indians of Southwestern Oregon, 1890, and correct proof and copy of Ortsetymologische Forschungen als Beitrage zu einer Topopnomastik der Schweiz. Few of the corrections were incorporated in the final printing of these works. In addition, there is a copy of Powell's Introduction to the Study of Indian Lanaguages with the schedule partially completed with Tuscarora, Wyandot, Seneca, and Caughnawaga and a tapa-cloth-bound dictionary of Samoan, not in Gatschet's hand.

In addition there are several certificates and other such formal documents from Bern, visiting cards, and two letters. Most of these documents seem to pertain to members of Gatschet's family in Switzerland. Most are in German script.

A small photographic collection includes a portrait of Gatschet dated 1906. Most of the other images are of Apache, Arapaho, Cheyenne, Dakota, Kiowa, and Navaho Indians by J.N. Choate and C.C. Stotz. There are also prints from negatives in the archives' glass negative collection that includ Mandan, Miami, Osage, and Shoshoni. Some of the photographs are annotated by Gatschet and James Mooney.
Biographical / Historical:
Educated in his native Switzerland and in Germany (University of Bern; University of Berlin, Ph.D., 1892), early in his career Albert S. Gatschet pursued antiquarian research in European museums and wrote scientific articles. Among his projects was the study of the etymology of place names in Switzerland. After coming to the United States in 1869, he worked on the American Indian vocabularies collected by Oscar Loew of the United States Geographical Survey West of the 100th Meridian (Wheeler Survey). Eventually he was employed as an ethnologist with the United States Geographical and Geological Survey of the Rocky Mountain Regions (Powell Survey). He joined the staff of the Bureau of American Ethnology when it was founded in 1879 and continued there until he retired in 1905.

For the Powell Survey, Gatschet carried out research among the Klamath in Oregon and the Modoc in Oklahoma. He came to be used to collect material and investigate special problems for the classification of Indian languages of North America north of Mexico, working on languages of the Southeast, including groups settled in the southern Plains. In connection with this, he not only visited well known tribes but also searched out and studied small groups like, for example, the Biloxi and Tunica. He also worked with the Natchez, Tonkawa, Chitimacha, and Atakapa in the United States and the Comecrudo and several other small groups in northern Mexico. Through library research, he studied the Timucua, Karankara, and Beothuk. Duing the last part of his career, Gatschet was assigned the task of preparing a comparative work on all the Algonquian lanaguages. Although the project was never completed, he did collect considerable material in the field on many of the languages, including especially Peoria, Miami, and Shawnee. In addition, he worked with members of diverse tribes of the eastern United States.
Related Materials:
Most of Gatschet's scientific papers are among the collection of numbered manuscripts in the National Anthropological Archives.
Restrictions:
Access to the Albert S. Gatschet papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages  Search this
Citation:
Albert S. Gatschet papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2006-15
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3ecd84914-5869-41cc-92d7-c43d6cbf8bb1
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2006-15

Notes on the history and material culture of the Tonkawa Indians [by] William K. Jones

Author:
Jones, William Kirkland 1941-  Search this
Physical description:
v, 65-81 p. illus., maps. 30 cm
Type:
Electronic resources
Date:
1969
Call number:
E99.T75J79 1969
GN1.S66 vol. 2, no 5
E99.T75J79 1969
GN1.S66 vol. 2, no 5
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_3483

Linguistic material from the tribes of southern Texas and northeastern Mexico / by John R. Swanton

Title:
Linguistic material from southern Texas
Author:
Swanton, John Reed 1873-1958  Search this
Physical description:
v, 145 pages ; 23 cm
Type:
Glossaries, vocabularies, etc
Place:
Texas
Date:
1940
Topic:
Pakawan languages  Search this
Indians of North America--Languages  Search this
Indians of Mexico--Languages  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1038097

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