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Nearer My God To Thee; Onward Christian Soldiers

Recording artist:
Conway's Band  Search this
Manufacturer:
Victor  Search this
Physical Description:
shellac (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 10 in; x 25.4 cm
Object Name:
Phonorecord
Place made:
United States: New Jersey, Camden
Recording date:
1915
Related Publication:
Discography of American Historical Recordings
Credit Line:
Gift of Sylvia J. Churgin
ID Number:
1984.0610.048
Accession number:
1984.0610
Maker number:
17848
Catalog number:
1984.0610.048
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Entertainment
Music & Musical Instruments
Popular Entertainment
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a4-f08d-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_679973

First Christian Church of Houston, TX, Facade Glazed Brick and Stained Glass (1956)

Collection Creator:
James Graham & Sons  Search this
Container:
Box 93, Folder 7
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1950s
Series Restrictions:
Artwork Files (Boxes 63-71, 94-95) and some photographic materials (Boxes 93 and 101) are ACCESS RESTRICTED; use requires written permission. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
James Graham & Sons records, 1815, 1821, circa 1896-2011, bulk 1950s-1980s. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
James Graham & Sons records
James Graham & Sons records / Series 10: Photographic Materials / Fogel, Seymour
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-jamegras-ref2188

Wittman E-Flat Natural Trumpet

Physical Description:
brass (overall material)
cord (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 4 9/16 in x 5 in x 26 3/4 in; 11.58875 cm x 12.7 cm x 67.945 cm
Object Name:
trumpet
Place made:
Germany: Bavaria, Nuremberg
Date made:
1781-1807
Credit Line:
Gift of Cooper Union Museum
ID Number:
MI.60.1409
Accession number:
227687
Catalog number:
60.1409
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Musical Instruments
Music & Musical Instruments
Trumpets
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a4-4149-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_606550
Online Media:

Christian Broadcasting Network, The

Series Collector:
Archives Center, NMAH, SI.  Search this
Series Donor:
Gay Officers Action League. GOAL  Search this
Becker, John M.  Search this
Gay Officers Action League. GOAL  Search this
Heritage of Pride (HOP)  Search this
Rohrbaugh, Richard  Search this
Series Creator:
Hirsch, Leonard  Search this
Guest, Barbara  Search this
Barna, Joseph T.  Search this
Guest, Michael E.  Search this
Container:
Box 89, Folder 2
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1993
Series Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use.

Researchers must handle unprotected photographs with gloves. Researchers must use reference copies of audio-visual materials. When no reference copy exists, the Archives Center staff will produce reference copies on an "as needed" basis, as resources allow.

Do not use original materials when available on reference video or audio tapes.
Series Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Series Citation:
Archives Center Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Archives Center Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Collection
Archives Center Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Collection / Series 2: Agencies, Associations, and Organizations
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-1146-ref1219

Smithsonian Inside Out

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Inside Out program of the 2010 Festival celebrated the culture of Smithsonian workers. The program explored the daily tasks of the Institution's approximately six thousand employees, as well as its thousands of volunteers, interns, and research fellows. The range of jobs at the nineteen museums and nine research centers of the Smithsonian, not to mention its central support offices, truly boggles the mind. Staff members maintain buildings, care for collections, conduct field and laboratory research, organize archives, present public programs, create exhibitions, feed animals, tend gardens, update Web sites, arrange travel, manage funds, and much, much more. All of these were turned inside out to allow Festival visitors to discover a different Smithsonian than they could otherwise encounter.

Producing a Folklife Festival program on the wide scope of Smithsonian staffers' expertise in the twenty-first century was a daunting task. But in the end it had to be approached like any other Smithsonian project—through months of research and fieldwork, careful planning, and collaborative consultation. Research for the Smithsonian Inside Out program was challenging and rewarding - but always compellingly fascinating. As with many Folklife Festival programs, curators felt privileged to spend even a brief period of time exploring the skills and discovering the stories of Smithsonian staff and then transforming them into Festival presentations The Institution is a truly remarkable place, and bringing just a sampling of its work to the Folklife Festival was worth all the hours of research and planning.

Betty J. Belanus was Curator; Nicole Harper was Program Coordinator; and James Deutsch and Marjorie Hunt were Researchers. The program was produced and made possible by the Smithsonian Institution.
Presenters:
James Deutsch, James Counts Early, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Jeff Place
Participants:
Participants

Anacostia Community Museum -- Alcione Amos, Anthony Gualtieri, Sheila Montague Parker, Tony Thomas, Roderick Turner

Archives of American Art -- Liza Kirwin

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage -- Toby Dodds, David Horgan, Mary Monseur, Jeff Place, Stephanie Smith, Atesh Sonneborn

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum -- Andrea Lipps, Caroline Payson

Freer and Sackler Galleries -- Regina Belard, Eric Breitung, Louise Cort, Janet Douglas, Stephen Eckerd, Xiang-mei Gu, Andrew Hare, Hisashi Higuchi, Emily Jacobson, Paul Jett, Blythe McCarthy, Claire Orologas, Evelyn Peng, Courtney Shimoda, Yumi Shintani

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden -- Kerry Brougher, Ryan Hill, Deborah Horowitz, Kevin Hull, Milena Kalinovska, Susan Lake, Scott Larson, Jennifer Leehey, Kristy Maruca, Al Masino, Larissa Radell, Gabriel Riera, Jennifer Rossi, Gwynne Ryan, Sam Scharf, Rebecca Withers

National Air and Space Museum -- Rose Aiello, Sarah Andre, Maria Banks, Elizabeth Borja, Erin Braswell, Barbara Brennan, Bruce Campbell, Jennifer Carlton, Lynn Carter, Ann Caspari, Paul Ceruzzi, Martin Collins, Tom Crouch, Jim David, David DeVorkin, Sharleen Eusebio, Mychalene Giampaoli, John Grant, Marilyn Graskowiak, Hunter Hollins, Ashley Hornish, Andrew Johnston, Diane Kidd, Tom Lassman, Roger Launius, Cathy Lewis, Ted Maxwell, Katie Moore, Beatrice Mowry, Valerie Neal, Alan Needell, Michael Neufeld, Sharon Purdy, Kelly Shockey, Margaret Weitekamp, Shelley Witte, Jim Zimbelman, Lise Zinck

National Museum of African American History and Culture -- Reneé Anderson, Dorey Butter, Rex Ellis, Tuliza Fleming, John Franklin, Paul Gardullo, Cori Howard, Michèle Gates Moresi, Elaine Nichols, Dwandalyn Reece, Paul Rosenthal, Jackie Serwer, Bryan Sieling

National Museum of African Art -- Curtis Beeler, Johnnetta B. Cole, Richard Collins, Keith Conway, Clarissa Fostel, Bryna Freyer, Julie Haifley, Christine Mullen Kreamer, Katherine McKee, Steve Mellor, Nailah Penic, Pier Penic, Nora Severson, Nicole Shivers, Amy Staples, Deborah Stokes, Laura Strombotne, Kevin Tervala

National Museum of American History -- Larry Bird, Joan Boudreau, Dwight Bowers, Michelle Delaney, Richard Doty, Tricia Edwards, Robyn Einhorn, John Fleckner, Petrina Foti, Tanya Garner, Lisa Kathleen Graddy, Rayna Green, David Haberstich, Wallace Harold, John Hasse, Cynthia Hoover, Paul Johnson, Paula Johnson, Cathy Keen, Peggy Kidwell, Karen Lee, Bonnie Campbell Lilienfeld, Melinda Machado, Steve Madewell, Amanda Murray, Craig Orr, Sue Ostroff, Alison Oswald, Shannon Perich, Kay Peterson, Deborra Richardson, Franklin Robinson, Harry Rubenstein, Fath Davis Ruffins, Noriko Sanefuji, Wendy Shay, Roger Sherman, Vanessa Broussard Simmons, Barbara Clark Smith, Megan Smith, Steve Velasquez, Deborah Warner, Jennifer Wei, Chris Wilson, Bill Yeingst

National Museum of Natural History -- Mary Jo Arnoldi, Elizabeth Ban, Debbie Bell, Bill Billeck, Dave Bohaska, Amy Bolton, Noel Broadbent, Lisa Burkoski, Cari Corrigan, Elizabeth Cottrell, Elio Cruz, Christine Deloff, Carla Dove, Richard Efthim, Nate Erwin, Bill Fitzhugh, Vicki Funk, Margery Gordon, Leslie Hale, Gary Hevel, Jake Homiak, Helen James, Igor Krupnik, Rob Leopold, Lauren Marr, Elizabeth Neville, John Ososky, Stefan Ososky, Sarah Perry, Colleen Popson, Jeff Post, Gale Robertson, Ruth Selig, Kristen Simmons, Barbara Stauffer, Catherine Sutera, Jackie Swift, Catherine Urban, Lorain Wang, Pam Wintle, Mike Wise, Rick Wunderman

National Museum of the American Indian -- José Barreiro, Howard Bass, Erin Beasley, Sharla Blanche, Sarah Block, Megan Byrnes, Suzanne Davis, Luba Dovgan-Nurse, Ann Drumheller, Cara Fama, Heather Farley, Carrie Feldman, Elizabeth Kennedy Gische, Angela Gonzales, Linda Greatorex, Susan Heald, Doug Herman, Mark Hirsch, Helen James, Marian Kaminitz, Emily Kaplan, Laura Krafsur, Beverly Lamberson, Hayes Lavis, Mary Jane Lenz, Leonda Levchuck, Ramero Matos, Kelly McHugh, Ann McMullen, Barb Mogel, Pat Nietfeld, Jennifer O'Neal, Vilma Ortiz-Sanchez, Carolyn Rapkievian, Jane Sledge, Wayne Smith, Terry Snowball, Rajshree Solanki, Lou Stancari, Kathy Suter, Jackie Swift, Gabrielle Tayac, Tanya Thrasher, Jennifer Tozer, Rebecca Head Trautmann, Shelly Uhlir, Amy Van Allen, Nancy Kenet Vickery, Erin Weinman

National Portrait Gallery -- Andrea Baer, Debbie Bartels, Amy Baskette, Bethany Bentley, Kiah Berkeley, Anne Goodyear, Amy Henderson, Dottie Herzer, Alli Jessing, Erica Joyce, Rebecca Kasemeyer, Milly Katchpole, Shirlee Lampkin, Andrea Lupton, Geri Lyons, Meradythe Moore, Warren Perry, Geri Provost, Patricia Raynor, Wendy Wick Reaves, Ann Shumard, Kristin Smith, Briana Zavadil White, Tameka Williams

National Postal Museum -- Debbie Bartels, Kiah Berkeley, Lynn Heidelbaugh, Dottie Herzer, Patricia Raynor, Allison Wickens, Tanika Williams

National Zoological Park -- Mark Albaugh, Alfonso Alonso, Tony Barthel, Elise Bernardoni, Jeanette Boyd, Dottie Gwen Brannock, Ann Bratthauer, Meagan Brown, Lily Cheng, Frank Clements, Bob Cmarik, Dan Davies, Sara Eisler, Carolyn Emerick, Matt Evans, Jilian Fazio, Rob Fleischer, Mike Frick, David Frye, Ryan Garvin, Sue Garvin, Jennifer Graves-Herring, Mary Hagedorn, Frank Hailer, Matt Hancock, Travis Harper, Dean Harting, Heidi Hellmuth, Mike Henley, Larry Holloway, Willie Jackson, Mark Jordan, Kenton Kerns, Bob King, Laura Klopfer, Esther Langan, Erin Latimer, Matt Laudadio, Karen Lee, Rosalie Lewis, Justin Lock, Chuck Lydeard, Aprell Makle, Ellen Martinsen, Mike Maslanka, Bill McShea, Steve Miccione, Gary Miller, Tony Mills, Cathi Morrison, Richard Mowbray, Suzan Murray, Jennifer Nagashima, Stephanie Otto, Jeff Perry, Alan Peters, Budhan Pukazhenthi, Sarah Putman, Jerry Ramsey, Lauren Reiter, Bob Rice, Laura Richman, Pat Rizer, Nancy Rotzel, Jenny Shinn, Melissa Songer, Nucharin Songsasen, Donna Stockton, Erin Stromberg, Brian Swanson, Marcia Swanson, Kimberly Terrell, Tabitha Viner, Tim Walsh, Billy Ward, Amy Wilson, Darryl Wormley

Office of Exhibits Central -- Harry Adams, Mary Bird, Howard Clemenko, David Clements, Lora Collins, Leah Cooperson, Ricardo Deleon, Lori Dempsey, Ellen Dorn, Daniel Fielding, Natalie Gallelli, Richard Gould, Kate Hardy, Michael Headley, Peggy Hernandez, Chris Hollshwander, Alicia Jager, Paula Kaufman, Theresa Keefe, Evan Keeling, Michael Kelton, Chris Landingin, Tina Lynch, Rolando Mayen, Robert Perantoni, Janette Pitts, Stoyan Popovich, George Quist, Rosemary Regan, Betsy Burstein Robinson, Vince Rossi, Gregory Schaal, Scott Schmidt, Walter Skinner, Timothy Smith, Carolyn Thome, Kathleen Varnell, Seth Waite, Robert Wilcox, Jonathan Zastrow

Office of Facilities Engineering and Operations -- Wayne Aytch, George Baker, Amy Ballard, Jason Banister, Tony Barrett, James Bates, Thomas Batzer, Jim Belt, Tommy Benjamin, John Bixler, Diana Bramble, John Brenchley, Maria Bush, Lawrence Chatman, Erin Clark, Richard Clarke, Pedro Colon, Leroy Coward, Kelly Crawford, Joseph Cusick, Dan Davies, Carlos Davis, Graham Davis, Richard Day, Dennis DeBoy, Paul Decker, Maria DeIsasi, Bill Donnelly, Janet Draper, Rick A. Dulski, Mark Edney, Walt Ennaco, Willie Etheridge, Barbara Faust, Bob Fennimore, Kathleen Fleming, Rick Forman, Shelley Gaskins, Charles Gates, Jill Gonzalez, Christian Goodlander, Bill Griffiths, David Grimes, Steve Groh, David Hall, Robert Hardy, Michael Harris, Herman Hawkins, Paula Healy, Charles Herndon, Kimberly Holliday, Gary Johannsen, Fredrick Jones, Regie Jones, Jonathan Kavalier, Sylvia Kendra, Daren Kennedy, Frank Kerns, Melinda Kincaid, Curtis Kirkland, Sheryl Kolasinski, Dan Krowpman, John Lagundo, Veronica Lee, Joel Lemp, Christopher Lethbridge, Paul Lindell, Keith Lindsey, Scott Lipscomb, Wes Long, Nick Ludtke, Scott Lyons, Alonzo Mackall, Tyrone Marbley, Jud McIntyre, Wayne McMasters, Brett McNish, Richard Miller, Tom Mirenda, Thomas Morris, Tiffany Myers, Steven Netcott, Mitchell Norman, Sharon Park, Maverick Parker, Jane Passman, Johnny Peterson, Mark Proctor, Tarlisaer Randolph, Melvin Rhodes, Jeff Ridgeway, Mike Ronayne, Edgardo Rosario, Brenda Sanchez, Jason Sawyer, Jeffrey Schneider, Danny Schultz, Rick Shilling, Joe Smith, R.C. Smith, Michelle Spofford, Rick Stamm, Arthur Stribling, Derrick Tate, Charles Thomspon, Roland Tolliver, Nhan Truong, Nelson Turner, Lorraine Tyler, Ed Tyson, Denise Upson, Mark Verdi, Sheri Vucci, James Wenk, Paul Westerberg, William Whittington, Andy Wilson, Cathye Young, Ronald Young

Office of Protection Services -- Andre Bell, Tommy Benjamin, Larry Carpenter, Betty Gordon, Michael Harris, Stephen Hoska, David Jackson, William Johnson, Melinda Kincaid, Charles Smaw, Arthur Stribling, Lorraine Tyler

Office of the Chief Information Officer -- Adam Metallo

Smithsonian Affiliations -- Jennifer Brundage, Harold Closter, Alma Douglas

Smithsonian American Art Museum -- Katie Crooks, Laurel Fehrenbach, Christine Hennessey, Tom Irion, Martin Kotler, Jina Lee, Nona Martin, Jane Milosch, Hayley Plack, Scott Rosenfeld, Tierney Sneeringer

Smithsonian Archives -- Ellen Alers, Courtney Esposito, Pam Henson

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program -- Krista Aniel, Gina Inocencio

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory -- Jon Chappell, Chris Eagan, Heidi Gneiser, Aaron Watry, Marc Whitman

Smithsonian Enterprises -- Jeanny Kim, Amy Kotkin, MaryBeth Mullen, Beth Py-Lieberman, Ryan Reed, Brian Wolly

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center -- Bert Drake, Mark Haddon, Tuck Hines, Paige Roberts

Smithsonian Institution Libraries -- Polly Khater, Richard Naples, Liz O'Brien, Phuong Pham

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service -- Katherine Krile, Ed Liskey, Laurie Trippett

Smithsonian Latino Center -- Alex Benítez, Eduardo Diaz, Emily Key, Andy Rebatta, Ranald Woodaman

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute -- Edwin Cadena, Jackie Giacalone, Allen Herre, David Roubik, Sunshine Van Bael
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2010 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2010, Series 4
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2010 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2010-ref33

Christian Science Exhibit Halls

Collection Creator:
Taylor, Prentiss, 1907-1991  Search this
Container:
Box 6
Reel 5917, Frame 1411-1415
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1949-1950
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Prentiss Taylor papers, 1885-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Prentiss Taylor papers
Prentiss Taylor papers / Series 10: Subject Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-taylpren-ref422

Christian Science Exhibit Halls

Collection Creator:
Taylor, Prentiss, 1907-1991  Search this
Container:
Box 6
Reel 5918, Frame 13-62
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1949-1950
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Prentiss Taylor papers, 1885-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Prentiss Taylor papers
Prentiss Taylor papers / Series 10: Subject Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-taylpren-ref423

G; Gay, Edward 1837-1928; Gay, Walter 1856-1937; Geerarts, Marc; Glackens, William J.; Goodwin, Richard LaBarre 1840-1908; Graham, William; Gropper, William; Gullager, Christian 1759-1826

Collection Creator:
Richardson, Edgar Preston, 1902-1985  Search this
Richardson, Constance, 1905-  Search this
Container:
Box 20, Folder 31
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1934-1978
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Edgar P. Richardson papers, 1814-1996, bulk 1921-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
E.P. (Edgar Preston) and Constance Richardson papers
E.P. (Edgar Preston) and Constance Richardson papers / Series 6: Artist-Subject files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-richedga-ref818

M; McCloskey, William John; Madison, James; Malbone, Robert Bolton 1777-1807; Marsh, Reginald 1878-1954; Marshall, Ben; Mayr, Christian 1805-1850; Medals

Collection Creator:
Richardson, Edgar Preston, 1902-1985  Search this
Richardson, Constance, 1905-  Search this
Container:
Box 21, Folder 49
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1934-1978
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Edgar P. Richardson papers, 1814-1996, bulk 1921-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
E.P. (Edgar Preston) and Constance Richardson papers
E.P. (Edgar Preston) and Constance Richardson papers / Series 6: Artist-Subject files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-richedga-ref912

Nahl, Charles Christian

Collection Creator:
Richardson, Edgar Preston, 1902-1985  Search this
Richardson, Constance, 1905-  Search this
Container:
Box 22, Folder 6
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1944
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Edgar P. Richardson papers, 1814-1996, bulk 1921-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
E.P. (Edgar Preston) and Constance Richardson papers
E.P. (Edgar Preston) and Constance Richardson papers / Series 6: Artist-Subject files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-richedga-ref948

Stibel, Christian Gilbert

Collection Creator:
Perls Galleries  Search this
Container:
Box 37, Folder 56
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1951-1959
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Perls Galleries records, 1937-1997. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Perls Galleries records
Perls Galleries records / Series 1: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-perlgall-ref1911

The Christian Science Monitor

Collection Creator:
Perls Galleries  Search this
Container:
Box 8, Folder 12
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1938-1951, 1972, 1980-1989
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Perls Galleries records, 1937-1997. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Perls Galleries records
Perls Galleries records / Series 1: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-perlgall-ref376

Fayt, Christian

Collection Creator:
Perls Galleries  Search this
Container:
Box 13, Folder 20
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1978-1992
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Perls Galleries records, 1937-1997. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Perls Galleries records
Perls Galleries records / Series 1: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-perlgall-ref635

Holmes, Christian R.

Collection Creator:
Perls Galleries  Search this
Container:
Box 20, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1958-1961
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Perls Galleries records, 1937-1997. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Perls Galleries records
Perls Galleries records / Series 1: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-perlgall-ref979

Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers

Creator:
Parsons, Betty  Search this
Names:
Betty Parsons Gallery  Search this
Bess, Forrest, 1911-1977  Search this
Congdon, William, 1912-1998  Search this
Pollock, Jackson, 1912-1956  Search this
Reinhardt, Ad, 1913-1967  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Extent:
61.1 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Interviews
Video recordings
Drawings
Date:
1916-1991
bulk 1946-1983
Summary:
The Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers measure 61.1 linear feet and date from 1916 to 1991, with the bulk of the material dating from 1946-1983. Records provide extensive documentation of the gallery's operations from its inception in 1946 to its closing in 1983 and of the activities of Betty Parsons as one the leading art dealers of contemporary American Art in the latter half of the twentieth century, particularly the work of the Abstract Expressionists. Over one third of the of the collection is comprised of artists files containing correspondence, price lists, and printed materials. Additional correspondence is with galleries, dealers, art institutions, private collectors, and the media. Also found are exhibition files, exhibition catalogs and announcements, sales records, stock inventories, personal financial records, and photographs. Betty Parsons's personal papers consist of early curatorial files, pocket diaries, personal correspondence, and evidence of her own artwork, including sketchbooks, and files documenting her personal art collection.
Scope and Content Note:
The Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers measure 61.1 linear feet and date from 1916 to 1991, with the bulk of the material dating from 1946-1983. Records provide extensive documentation of the gallery's operations from its inception in 1946 to its closing in 1983 and of the activities of Betty Parsons as one the leading art dealers of contemporary American Art in the latter half of the twentieth century, particularly the work of the Abstract Expressionists. Over one third of the of the collection is comprised of artists files containing correspondence, price lists, and printed materials. Additional correspondence is with galleries, dealers, art institutions, private collectors, and the media. Also found are exhibition files, exhibition catalogs and announcements, sales records, stock inventories, personal financial records, and photographs. Betty Parsons's personal papers consist of early curatorial files, pocket diaries, personal correspondence, and evidence of her own artwork, including sketchbooks, and files documenting her personal art collection. Personal papers also include personal photographs.

Artists files, the largest and most extensive series, consist of a wide variety of documents, including biographical materials, correspondence with or related to the artist, exhibition catalogs and announcements, sales and expense invoices, clippings, price lists, and photographs of the artist, exhibitions, and artwork. The files reflect Parsons's close personal relationships with certain artists, particularly Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Clyfford Still, and Barnett Newman. Extensive documentation is also found for Forrest Bess, William Congdon, Paul Feeley, Thomas George, Alexander Liberman, Seymour Lipton, Richard Pousette-Dart, Jesse Reichek, and Jack Youngerman. Historians and researchers will find these files to be an invaluable resource both in tracing Betty Parsons's role in promoting Abstract Expressionism and researching individual artists.

Exhibition files primarily document the gallery's infrequent group or themed exhibitions. Of particular note are the files on The Ideographic Picture, which was organized by Barnett Newman and included his work, as well as that of Pietro Lazzari, Boris Margo, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, Theodoros Stamos, and Clyfford Still. Price lists, artist biographies and exhibition schedules are housed in the general exhibition files. Loan exhibition files provide documentation of artwork borrowed by other galleries or institutions for exhibitions, as well as shows outside of the gallery that were organized by Betty Parsons. Also found are gallery exhibition guest books, and announcements and catalogs.

Gallery correspondence is primarily with galleries and dealers, museums, arts organizations, and collectors. Scattered letters from artists are also found, although the bulk of the artists' correspondence is filed in the Artists Files. Also found here are memoranda and letters between Betty Parsons and her staff that contain detailed information concerning Parsons's schedule and gallery activities. Similar correspondence is found amongst the correspondence files within the series Betty Parsons papers.

Appraisal and conservation files include correspondence, appraisal invoices, forms, and appraisal requests and other information from the Art Dealers Association of America, and conservation invoices and reports. The majority of the appraisal records contain information about the specific works of art, including artist, title, date, current owner and the estimated value at the time of the request. Conservation records document conservation treatments undertaken by outside conservators to gallery stock.

Sales, purchases, stock and inventory are well documented in the sales and inventory records. The records provide detailed information about individual sales, prices of individual pieces of artwork, consignments, and loans. Most sales records also include detailed information about the buyer and are a valuable resource for provenance research. Files documenting the general administration, routine business operations, and financial transactions (not individual sales) of the gallery are housed in the general business and financial records. These records include ledgers, receipts, tax records, and banking records. There is some limited information about works of art scattered amongst the receipts and in the "in/out slips" files. Legal records house general legal documents and those concerning specific lawsuits. Of particular note is the file detailing the lawsuit between Betty Parsons and Sidney Janis over the fifth floor of 24 West 57th Street.

The remainder of the collection consists of Betty Parsons's personal papers which document her career prior to opening her own gallery, her work as an artist, and her personal art collection.

Some information about Parsons's work prior to opening her own gallery is found in the early curatorial files she retained from her curatorial and administrative work at the Wakefield Gallery and the Mortimer Brandt Gallery. Clippings, correspondence, announcements, exhibition lists and exhibition files are found. For both positions, she kept only the exhibition files for a small group of exhibitions organized around a specific theme, the most notable being the exhibition of Pre-Columbian Sculpture at the Wakefield Gallery.

Biographical materials include copies of her biography, family genealogies, photographs of Parsons, interviews with Colette Roberts and WYNC radio, memberships, photographs, and ephemera, including a collection of programs and invitations from events that she attended. Throughout her life Parsons gave generously of her time to various cultural and charitable institutions and was awarded for her contributions. There are also a number of files that document her speaking engagements, her participation as a juror in numerous juried exhibitions, charitable work, and awards that she received.

Parsons's personal correspondence files reflect how deeply Parsons's life was intertwined with the gallery. There are letters from museum directors, dealers, artists seeking representation, and personal letters from artists with whom she had close personal relationships, most notably Larry Bigelow, Alexander Calder, William Condon, and Ad Reinhardt. There are also letters from the English artist Adge Baker, with whom Parsons was romantically involved. Correspondence also includes several files of postcards and Christmas cards.

Pocket diaries and engagement calendars, spanning from 1933-1981, record social engagements, meetings, vacations, and telephone numbers. Also found are circa two linear feet of notebooks and sketchbooks, many of which are annotated with addresses, poetry, journal entries, and other observations of people, places, and travels. Writings by others include writings about Betty Parsons or the Betty Parsons Gallery, such as Lawrence Alloway's unpublished typescript titled "An American Gallery" and other topics.

Printed material consists of exhibition announcements and catalogs, art magazines, and newspaper and magazine clippings about Betty Parsons, her family and acquaintances, artists, and other art related topics, coupled with a miscellaneous selection of clippings, and a video recording, on topics that presumably captured Parsons's attention.

Personal art work records document Betty Parsons's career as an artist through inventories, group and solo exhibitions files, price lists, appraisals, sales and consignment invoices. Photographs are primarily reproductions of her works of art, although there are scattered photographs of exhibition installations.

Betty Parsons's private art collection files document her extensive personal collection of art that included works by Jackson Pollock, Agnes Martin, Romare Bearden, Barnett Newman, and Mark Rothko, in addition to Amlash sculpture from ancient Persia and primitive sculpture from New Hebrides. These files include inventories, lists, exhibition records, sales and purchase invoices, and photographs. There are also files for donations and loans from Parsons's personal collection to museums and fund raising auctions for several non-profit institutions.

Finally, the personal financial records provide information about the Parsons's family finances and her personal financial success as an art dealer. In addition to her own investments, Parsons inherited shares in family investments through the estates of her parents, J. Fred Pierson, Jr. and Suzanne Miles Pierson, and younger sister, Emily Rayner. Real estate files include correspondence, utility bills, receipts, area maps, and land plots for houses in Sheepscot, Maine and St. Maartens, Netherlands Antilles. Tax returns, ledger worksheets, receipts, banking statements, deposit slips, and cancelled checks are among the other financial records.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as seven series. Many of the series are further divided into subseries.

Series 1: Artists Files, 1935-1983 (19.4 linear feet; Boxes 1-18, 51, 55-56, OVs 53, 65)

Series 2: Exhibition Files, 1941-1983 (2.9 linear feet; Boxes 18-21, 51, 55, OVs 54, 66)

Series 3: Correspondence Files, 1941-1983 (3.9 linear feet; Boxes 21-24, 52, 56)

Series 4: Appraisal Files, 1954-1983 (0.7 linear feet; Box 24)

Series 5: Sales and Inventory Records, 1946-1983 (3.9 linear feet; Boxes 25-28, 51)

Series 6: General Business and Financial Records, 1946-1983 (9.3 linear feet; Boxes 28-38, 51, 56)

Series 7: Betty Parsons Personal Papers, 1916-1991 (21 linear feet; Boxes 38-51, 55-64, OVs 65-67)
Historical Note:
Betty Parsons (1900-1982) was one of the leading art dealers in New York City specializing in modern art, particularly the work of the Abstract Expressionists, and an abstract painter and sculptor in her own right. She opened Betty Parsons Gallery in 1946 at 15 E. 57th St., later moving to 24 W. 57th St.

The history of the Betty Parsons Gallery is inextricably bound to the life and experiences of its founder. Betty Parsons was born Betty Bierne Pierson on January 31, 1900 in New York City. She enjoyed a privileged childhood, which included vacation homes in Newport and Palm Beach. Her only formal education was a five-year stint at the prestigious Chapin School from 1910-1915, where she met many of the women who would become life-long friends and supporters. In the spring of 1920, she married Schuyler Livingston Parsons from one of New York's oldest families. The marriage ended after only three years and the couple traveled to Paris where they could obtain a divorce on the grounds of incompatibility. She retained her married surname and purchased a house on the rue Boulard in Paris, where she remained for ten years, pursuing studies in painting and sculpture.

Financial constraints forced Parsons to return to the United States in 1933. She first traveled west to California, but it was her return to New York in 1935 that marked the start of her career as an art dealer. Her first opportunity to connect with the New York art world came after a successful exhibition of her watercolors at the Midtown Galleries where the owner, Alan Gruskin, noted Parson's faithful and wealthy group of supporters and offered her work installing exhibitions and selling paintings on commission. Her work for the Midtown Galleries led to a second position in the Park Avenue gallery of Mary Sullivan, one of the founders of the Museum of Modern Art. Here, Parsons learned the business of running a gallery. By 1940 Parsons was ready to take on more independent responsibility and agreed to manage a gallery within the Wakefield Bookshop. In this job, she exercised full curatorial control by selecting artists and organizing exhibitions. She championed then unknown contemporary American artists and the gallery's roster soon included Saul Steinberg, Hedda Sterne, Alfonso Ossorio, Joseph Cornell, Walter Murch, and Theodore Stamos. Although the majority of the exhibitions were solo shows, there were a few group shows and themed exhibitions, such as Love in Art (1941) and Ballet in Art (1942). Under Parson's direction, the gallery hosted an important exhibition of Pre-Columbian sculpture, curated by Barnett Newman.

When the owners of the Wakefield Bookshop decided to close the gallery late in 1944, Mortimer Brandt, a dealer who specialized in Old Master paintings and drawings, offered her a position as head of the newly created contemporary section of his gallery. Many of the artists who had shown with Parsons at the Wakefield Gallery followed her to her new gallery, where they were joined by Ad Reinhardt, Boris Mango, and Hans Hofmann. While the exhibitions garnered attention from the press and the interest of contemporary artists, the contemporary section was not a financial success and Brandt opted to close his gallery in 1946.

Using $1000 of her own money and an additional borrowed $4000, Parsons sublet the space that previously housed Mortimer Brandt's contemporary section, on the fifth floor of 15 East 57th Street, and opened the Betty Parsons Gallery.

In many respects the early years of the Betty Parsons Gallery were the most vital, as it was during the period of 1947-1951 that the gallery became linked with the Abstract Expressionists and the history of post-WWII American Art. In an unpublished history of the gallery, noted art critic Lawrence Alloway stated that the significance of the gallery's early exhibitions ranks with Durand-Ruel's Impressionists exhibitions or Kahnweiler's shows of the Cubists. Betty Parsons Gallery quickly became one of the most prestigious galleries in New York City associated with new American Art of all styles. Her close friend Barnett Newman organized the gallery's inaugural exhibition of Northwest Coast Indian Art and he soon began to exhibit his own work at the gallery. When Peggy Guggenheim's Art of This Century Gallery closed, Jackson Pollock, Clyfford Still, and Mark Rothko joined Parsons' growing stable of artists. Although Parsons continued to promote and exhibit many of the artists whom she had previously discovered, these four artists dominated this period. Newman, Pollock, Still, and Rothko worked closely together, holding themselves apart from the other artists somewhat. They were actively involved in the curatorial process and often hung their own shows. For these artists, the exhibition itself was an artistic act of creation.

Parsons provided a supportive environment and allowed her artists enormous freedom in planning and designing their exhibitions. She was not, however, an aggressive salesperson. During this early period the gallery ledgers document sales to an impressive array of museums including the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Art Institute of Chicago, as well as important collectors such as Edward Root and Duncan Phillips. Nevertheless, the art that the gallery promoted was not yet widely accepted. Sales were few, prices were low and the business would not turn a profit for several years. Meanwhile, there was mounting pressure from Pollock, Newman, Still, and Rothko to drop some of the other artists from Parsons' stable and focus all resources on them. They wanted to be promoted to a larger audience and have their work sold at higher prices, but Parsons enjoyed discovering new artists and did not want to be restricted in this endeavor. The year 1951 marks the last time that Pollock's drip paintings or the monumental works of Newman, Rothko or Still were shown at the Betty Parsons Gallery.

In the following years the Betty Parsons Gallery continued to attract a diverse group of talented artists. Ellsworth Kelly, Richard Tuttle, Robert Rauschenberg, and Jack Youngerman had their first New York exhibitions at the Betty Parsons Gallery. Parsons opened Section Eleven in 1958, a short-lived annex to the main gallery, so that she could promote younger, less well-known artists. It closed in 1960 due to the administrative difficulties in running two essentially separate galleries.

In 1962, Sidney Janis, another prominent art dealer, started proceedings to evict Parsons from the floor that they shared on 15 East 57th Street. The Betty Parsons Gallery moved to 24 West 57th Street in 1963, where it remained until it closed in 1983, following Parsons' death the preceding year. Throughout the gallery's history, Parsons continued to promote faithful artists such as Hedda Sterne and Saul Steinberg, who had been with her from the beginning and to seek out new talent, both for her main gallery and for other venues, such as the short-lived Parsons-Truman Gallery, which she opened in 1974 with former Parsons Gallery director Jock Truman to show works on paper by emerging artists.

In addition to being an art dealer, Betty Parsons was a respected artist and collector. With her connoisseur's eye and connections, Parsons amassed an impressive private collection of art. She bought her first piece while an art student in Paris in the 1920s, a small gouache by Zadkine, but did not begin acquiring works in earnest until she was established as an art dealer. Partial inventories of her personal collection show that the majority of her collection contained works by artists associated with the gallery. Mark Rothko, Hans Hofmann, Ad Reinhardt, Agnes Martin, and Kenzo Okada were among the artists represented. Many were gifts from the artists, such as an ink drawing by Jackson Pollock, inscribed "For Betty." Selections from her collection appeared in small museums across the United States, including a traveling exhibition organized by Fitch College, New York, in 1968. In her role as a promoter of contemporary American art, Parsons lent generously from her collection, particularly to the federal Art in the Embassies Program. Throughout her life she also donated works to a variety of museums, most notably, the Whitney Museum of American Art, Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark.

Parsons frequently claimed that her desire to pursue a career as an artist stemmed from a visit to the Armory Show when she was thirteen. In her late teens, after pressuring her father for art lessons, she studied with the sculptor Gutzon Burglum of Mount Rushmore fame. In Paris, she continued her studies first with Antoine Bourdelle, whose sculptures she had admired at the Armory Show, and later with Ossip Zadkine. The first exhibition of her work, figurative watercolors and sculptures, took place in Paris in 1927. As she matured as an artist, her art became more abstract. Her late works were painted wood sculptures that she pieced together from wood that she found near her studio in Long Island. Parsons's work was exhibited in more than thirty solo exhibitions, including, Betty Parsons; Paintings, Gouaches and Sculpture, 1955-1968, at the Whitechapel Gallery in London. During her lifetime, she would not allow her works to be shown in her own gallery. Shortly after she died of a stroke in 1982, In Memoriam, Betty Parsons: Late Sculptures, opened at the Betty Parsons Gallery.
Related Material:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are oral history interviews with Betty Parsons, June 4-9, 1969, by Paul Cummings, and June 11, 1981 by Gerald Silk.
Separated Material:
Some of the material originally loaned for microfilming in 1968 and 1969 was not included in later donations and can be viewed on microfilm reels N68/62-N68/74 and N69/105-N69/106. Loaned materials are not described in the container listing in this finding aid.
Provenance:
The gallery donated some records in 1974, many of which had been loaned earlier for microfilming. The bulk of the collection was donated in 1984 and 1986 by William Rayner and Christopher Schwabacher, executors of the Estate of Betty Parsons. Additional material was donated by William Rayner in 1998 and Christopher Schwabacher in 2017. Additional material was donated in 2018 by the Lee Hall estate via Carolyn Crozier and Deborah Jacobson, co-executors. Hall was Parsons's biographer and had the material in her possession at the time of Parsons's death. An additional photograph of Parons and Marie Carr Taylor by Henri Cartier-Bresson was donated in 2021 by Mary Carpenter, who inherited the photograph from her mother, Nan Thorton Jones, who received it as a gift from Taylor.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Gallery owners -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Women art dealers  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Abstract expressionist  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Interviews
Video recordings
Drawings
Citation:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers, 1916-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.parsbett
See more items in:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-parsbett
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  • View Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers digital asset number 1
Online Media:

C

Collection Creator:
Parsons, Betty  Search this
Container:
Box 24, Folder 12
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1966-1978
Scope and Contents note:
Canadian Art

Christian Science Monitor

City Woman

Collectors Press

Conde Nast

Connex Systems, Inc.
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers, 1916-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers / Series 3: Correspondence Files / 3.3: Publishers, Newspapers and Magazines
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-parsbett-ref1028

S

Collection Creator:
Parsons, Betty  Search this
Extent:
(2 folders)
Container:
Box 22, Folder 53-54
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1947-1978
Scope and Contents note:
St. Lawrence University

Saint Paul Gallery

Salem State College

Samuel Adams Green, Inc.

San Antonio Art League

San Bernadino Valley College

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

Santa Rose Junior College

Schuster and Wulf

Schwarz Galleria d'Arte

The Sculptor's Gallery

Seattle Art Museum

Sidney Janis Gallery

Skidmore College

Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture

The Skylight Gallery

Society for the Renewal of Christian Art

The Society of the Four Arts

South Bend Art Association

Southern Vermont Art Center

Spectrum Gallery

Springfield Art Museum

Stadtisches Museum Leverkusen

Stanford University

State College of Iowa

State University College at Potsdam, New York

State University of Iowa

State University of New York, State Teachers College

Stedelijk Museum

Stedelijk van Abbemuseum Eindhoven

Stout State University

Student Book Shop

Studio Gallery

Studio International

Studio Marconi

Suffolk Museum and Carriage House

Summit Art Center
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers, 1916-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers / Series 3: Correspondence Files / 3.1: Institutions and Dealers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-parsbett-ref900
Online Media:

Designing a Deep Dive into Mars: Design Review

Creator:
National Air and Space Museum  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2021-02-12T13:58:11.000Z
YouTube Category:
Science & Technology  Search this
Topic:
Aeronautics;Flight;Space Sciences  Search this
See more by:
airandspace
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
YouTube Channel:
airandspace
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_mERAQhP2BY0

Portrait in a Minute: Samuel Morse

Creator:
National Portrait Gallery  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2012-11-21T16:23:25.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Portraits  Search this
See more by:
NatlPortraitGallery
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
YouTube Channel:
NatlPortraitGallery
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_h2IAh3uIGcc

Christian, Susan

Collection Creator:
Greenberg, Clement, 1909-1994  Search this
Container:
Box 2, Folder 30
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1977-1978
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Some of the collection is ACCESS RESTRICTED: documents relating to the estate of David Smith; some correspondence with Peter Fuller, Nuala O'Faolain, and the Greenberg family; and sale and loan agreements. Contact the reference staff for more information about permission to use this portion of the collection.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
The Clement Greenberg papers, 1937-1983. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Clement Greenberg papers
Clement Greenberg papers / Series 3: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-greeclep-ref136

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