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Rattle (No image available)

Culture/People:
Mississippi Choctaw  Search this
Collector:
William F. Stiles (WFS), Non-Indian, 1912-1980  Search this
Previous owner:
William F. Stiles (WFS), Non-Indian, 1912-1980  Search this
Seller:
William F. Stiles (WFS), Non-Indian, 1912-1980  Search this
Object Name:
Rattle (No image available)
Media/Materials:
Turtle shell/carapace
Techniques:
Perforated, tied
Dimensions:
14 x 9.5 x 6 cm
Object Type:
Music and Sound
Place:
Philadelphia; Neshoba County; Mississippi; USA
Catalog Number:
24/1526
Barcode:
241526.000
See related items:
Mississippi Choctaw
Music and Sound
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws629bf3a08-783e-4a47-8cfd-8cfd860c2514
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_257138

Drum, amplifier, and accessories

Culture/People:
Pan-Indian  Search this
Previous owner:
David Hill, Oklahoma Choctaw  Search this
Donor:
David Hill, Oklahoma Choctaw  Search this
Donor agent:
John D. O'Connell, Non-Indian  Search this
Object Name:
Drum, amplifier, and accessories
Media/Materials:
Wood, cowhide, cotton cloth, plastic-coated wire, rope
Techniques:
Carved, painted, aboriginally repaired
Dimensions:
63.9 x 69.2 x 45.8 cm
Object Type:
Music and Sound
Place:
USA
Date created:
1960-1970
Catalog Number:
26/5803
Barcode:
265803.000
See related items:
Pan-Indian
Music and Sound
On View:
National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, DC
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws68510cb9a-201e-4043-99d6-1ea5570f7fb2
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_282030
Online Media:

Desert Thunder

Culture/People:
Southeast  Search this
Artist/Maker:
120th Engineer Combat Battalion  Search this
Previous owner:
120th Engineer Combat Battalion  Search this
Donor:
Sergeant Debra K. Mooney, Choctaw Nation Of Oklahoma  Search this
120th Engineer Combat Battalion  Search this
Title:
Desert Thunder
Object Name:
Drum, stand, and drumsticks
Media/Materials:
Metal, canvas, wood, commercially tanned leather, plastic, nylon cord, adhesive tape, metal nails
Techniques:
Cut, cutout, stretched, nailed, wrapped
Dimensions:
61 x 62 x 45 cm
Object Type:
Music and Sound
Place:
Al Fallujah; Al Anbar Province; Iraq
Date created:
2004
Catalog Number:
26/5148
Barcode:
265148.000
See related items:
Southeast
Music and Sound
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6d19bf17e-55ee-4970-8b9c-de837a9f4d8f
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_281343
Online Media:

Drum and sticks used during the ball game (No image available)

Culture/People:
Mississippi Choctaw  Search this
Previous owner:
Calvin Isam, Mississippi Choctaw  Search this
Collector:
Mark Raymond Harrington (M. R. Harrington/MRH), Non-Indian, 1882-1971  Search this
Object Name:
Drum and sticks used during the ball game (No image available)
Media/Materials:
Wood, hide, rope, commercially tanned leather, paint
Techniques:
Carved, stretched, laced, drilled, painted
Object Type:
Music and Sound
Native Term:
aLe pa tci to
Place:
Neshoba County and Scott County; Mississippi; USA
Date created:
circa 1890
Catalog Number:
1/8893
Barcode:
018893.000
See related items:
Mississippi Choctaw
Music and Sound
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6a2422f4d-a760-49a5-be2c-e875c5419768
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_20042

Chikasha Poya: We Are Chickasaw - Injunuity 1

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2014-08-20T19:41:49Z
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
Youtube Category:
Education  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_9da5xpPmwK0

Three Generationz

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2013-01-25T00:30:11Z
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
Youtube Category:
Education  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_H2nvtlxTTBc

Family Storytelling with Grayhawk Perkins (Choctaw/Houma)

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2013-09-25T18:14:09Z
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
Youtube Category:
Education  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_yIPhA3gTY84

Negative Log Book Number 18, (86-5143 to 88-15270)

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution Archives Smithsonian Photographic Services  Search this
Physical description:
Ink on paper
Type:
Logs (records)
Collection descriptions
Date:
1986
1986-1988
Topic:
Photography--History  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 10-001 [SIA_10-001_NLB18]
Restrictions & Rights:
No restrictions. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution Archives. Contact SIA Reference Staff for further information (email photos@si.edu)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_367115
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
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Negative Log Book Number 21, (92-1 to 94-5200)

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution Archives Smithsonian Photographic Services  Search this
Physical description:
Ink on paper
Type:
Logs (records)
Collection descriptions
Date:
1992
1992-1994
Topic:
Photography--History  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 10-001 [SIA_10-001_NLB21]
Restrictions & Rights:
No restrictions. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution Archives. Contact SIA Reference Staff for further information (email photos@si.edu)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_367119
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Negative Log Book Number 21, (92-1 to 94-5200) digital asset number 1

MS 4690 Manuscripts relating to the study of Seminole Music

Creator:
Densmore, Frances, 1867-1957  Search this
Drew, Frank  Search this
Moore-Willson, Minnie, 1859-1937  Search this
MacCauley, Clay, 1843-1925  Search this
Extent:
2 Boxes
Culture:
Seminole Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Newsclippings
Date:
1931-1942
Scope and Contents:
Contents include: ---- Correspondence with editor of Bureau of American Ethnology and list of illustrations used in Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 161. ---- "Seminole Music." 374 page carbon copy of manuscript and a few miscellaneous pages, roughs of music transcriptions, arranged music transcriptions of 243 songs as published. Submitted December 18, 1942. ---- "Seminole Music." Approximately 250 page manuscript. Incomplete manuscript submitted by Frances Densmore, May 16, 1940. This manuscript and the manuscript finally published in Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 161 are compilations of previous manuscripts submitted by the author, 1931-1933, 1936, 1941. (Old Number) 1787 "Seminole Hunting and Alligator Dance Songs." 22 page manuscript, 28 pages tabulated analyses of 13 songs. (Transcriptions and 10 illustrations mentioned on old catalog card are not present. See original prints file for illustrations in part.) Submitted February 1, 1932.
Submitted April 21, 1932. (Old Number) 3228 "Seminole Songs connected with Legends and Dances." 38 page manuscript including descriptive analysis of songs, tabulated analyses of 31 songs. (transcriptions of 31 songs, recorded on old catalog card, are not present.) Submitted September 30, 1932. (Old Number) 3259-a "Chitimacha, Choctaw and Seminole Music, with a comparative survey of Indian music in the Gulf States." 75 page manuscript, including descriptive analyses of 23 songs, tabulated analyses for 13 Seminole songs. (Tabulated analyses for Chitimacha and Choctaw songs, 20 pages transcriptions, 18 photos and 2 figures, recorded on old catalog card, are not present. See original print file for part of the illustrations.) Submitted main portion of the manuscript to the Bureau of American Ethnology June 17, 1933. The comparative survey part was a report submitted to the National Research Council, May 15, 1933. (Old Number) 3259-b (part) Seminole text from manuscript "Choctaw and Seminole Songs." 8 page manuscript Submitted June 14, 1939. The Choctaw material is separately filed under Choctaw, Bureau of American Ethnology Ms Number 3258 (Old Manuscript Number 3259-b, part.) (Old Number) 3260 "Dance Songs of the Seminole Indians." 19 page manuscript including descriptive analyses of 20 songs, tabulated analyses. (Transcriptions and 9 photos sent with this manuscript, recorded on old catalog card, are not present.)
(Old Number) 3197 "The Seminole Indians." 43 page manuscript including descriptive analyses of 7 songs, tabulated analyses of 8 songs. (8 transcriptions and 36 photos and 1 sketch illustration, recorded on old catalog card, are not present.) See original prints file for part of illustrations.) Submitted March 3, 1931. (Old Number) 3208 "Seminole Bird Dance and their Songs." 31 page manuscript including descriptive analyses of songs, tabulated analyses for 18 songs. (18 song transcriptions and 42 photo illustrations, recorded on old catalog card, are not present). Submitted January 18, 1932. (Old Number) 3209 "Buffalo Dance and Corn Dance." 30 page manuscript including descriptive analyses of 12 songs, 12 tabulated analyses. (12 transcriptions and 12 photo illustrations, recorded on old catalog card, are not present. See original print file for part of the photo illustrations.) Submitted December 12, 1931. (Old Number) 3211 "A comparison between the structure of Nootka and Quileute songs and that of songs previously analyzed, also a description of a Seminole flute and Seminole customs." 57 page manuscript, from which pages 4-10 were taken out by F. D. for incorporation in Nootka and Quileute Music. No Nootka and Quileute material remains in this manuscript. (17 photo illustrations, map and diagram, recorded on old catalog card, are not present. See original print file for some of the illustrations.)
Submitted November 30, 1932. (Old Number) 3262 "Caloosa and Seminole Corn Dance and Hunting Dance Songs." 28 page manuscript, including descriptive analyses of 25 songs, tabulated analyses of 25 songs. (11 pages transcriptions, 1 sketch, 13 photos, recorded on old catalog card, are not present. See original print file for some of the photos.) Submitted May 28, 1932. (Old Number) 3407 "Dance Songs of the Seminole Indians." 2 page list of Seminole transcriptions and cylinder records. (7 sheets transcriptions, recorded on old catalog card, are not present.) All these songs were recorded at Brighton, Florida, by Billie Stewart in February 1932. Submitted by F.D. March 16, 1936. (Old Number) 4083 "Songs of the Seminole in Florida." 28 page manuscript (71 transcriptions of songs, recorded on old catalog card, are not present.) Submitted by F.D. March 20, 1941.
The following Seminole material was received from the Densmore estate, ca. 1962. Three notebooks in F. Densmore's handwriting, dated: 1931, 1932 and 1933 (Brighten), and 1933. These notebooks contain material on Seminole songs and dances. Miscellaneous fieldnotes including "Last of Josie Billie" and "Discended from Osceola". Reading notes from Frank Drew, Minnie Moore-Willson, Clay McCauley, and others. 2 notebooks and several miscellaneous pages. "Annual Report, Narrative Section, 1935, Seminole Agency Dania, Fla." Prepared by J.L. Glenn, Officer in Charge. 18 page mimeo. Clippings: "Indian Buried Unmourned; Tribesmen at Paleface Rites," February 25, 1938, The Herald; photographs of Seminole Indians, page 10, April 25, 1937, The Herald, Miami, Florida, with typed note: "Do these scenes remind you of 'Days of (not so) long ago?' Chas." Various reprints re Seminole Indians: "Souvenir of the Original Musa Isle Seminole Indian Village, Miami, Fla." No date, 12 pages. Publishers announcement of Grant Forman's book, Indian Removal. "Musa Isle Seminoles and Alligators" by James Lowther Berkebile, 1929, Phoenix Printing Co., Augusta, Georgia. 35 pages and 23 illustrations of Seminole Indians.
"Seminole Indians: Survey of the Seminole Indians of Florida," presented by Mr. Fletcher, 71st Congress, 3rd Session, Doc. No. 314, GPO, 1931. 88 pages and map. Announcement of lectures W. Stanley Hanson, Secretary Seminole Indian Association, and article from The American Eagle, "Seminole Indian Association Reorganized", September, 1933.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4690
Other Title:
Seminole Music
Seminole Hunting and Alligator Dance Songs
The Seminole Indians
Seminole Bird Dance and their Songs
Buffalo Dance and Corn Dance
A comparison between the structure of Nootka and Quileute songs and that of songs previously analyzed, also a description of a Seminole flute and Seminole customs
Seminole Songs connected with Legends and Dances
Chitimacha, Choctaw and Seminole Music, with a comparative survey of Indian music in the Gulf States
Seminole text from manuscript "Choctaw and Seminole Songs"
Dance Songs of the Seminole Indians
Caloosa and Seminole Corn Dance and Hunting Dance Songs
Songs of the Seminole in Floria
Last of Josie Billie
Discended from Osceola
Annual Report, Narrative Section, 1935, Seminole Agency Dania, Fla.
Indian Buried Unmourned; Tribesmen at Paleface Rites
Souvenir of the Original Musa Isle Seminole Indian Village, Miami, Fla.
Musa Isle Seminoles and Alligators
Seminole Indians: Survey of the Seminole Indians of Florida
Topic:
Music -- Seminole  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Newsclippings
Citation:
Manuscript 4690, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4690
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4690

Oral history interview with Billie Ruth Sudduth, 2007 July 26-27

Interviewee:
Sudduth, Billie Ruth, 1945-  Search this
Interviewer:
Riedel, Mija, 1958-  Search this
Subject:
Bringle, Cynthia  Search this
Gingrass, Katie  Search this
Risatti, Howard  Search this
Ross, Caroline Sedestrom  Search this
Trapp, Kenneth R.  Search this
Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts  Search this
Huntingdon College (Montgomery, Ala.)  Search this
John Campbell Folk School  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Penland School of Crafts  Search this
University of Alabama  Search this
Smithsonian Craft Show  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
Basket makers -- North Carolina -- Interviews  Search this
Basket making -- Cherokee  Search this
Basket making -- Choctaw  Search this
Basket making -- Study and teaching  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Women artists -- North Carolina -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13623
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)271795
AAA_collcode_suddut07
Theme:
Craft
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_271795
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Billie Ruth Sudduth

Interviewee:
Sudduth, Billie Ruth  Search this
Interviewer:
Riedel, Mija, 1958-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts -- Faculty  Search this
Huntingdon College (Montgomery, Ala.) -- Students  Search this
John Campbell Folk School -- Faculty  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Penland School of Crafts -- Faculty  Search this
Smithsonian Craft Show  Search this
University of Alabama -- Students  Search this
Bringle, Cynthia, 1939-  Search this
Gingrass, Katie  Search this
Risatti, Howard, 1943-  Search this
Ross, Caroline Sedestrom  Search this
Trapp, Kenneth R.  Search this
Extent:
3 Sound discs (Sound recording (4 hr., 42 min.), digital, 2 5/8 in.)
81 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound discs
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2007 July 26-27
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Billie Ruth Sudduth conducted 2007 July 26-27, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at the artist's home and studio, in Bakersville, North Carolina.
Sudduth speaks of her childhood in Alabama; her adoptive family; growing up in a creative and musical environment; an early exposure to women working with their hands; buying a Cherokee basket at age 12; childhood piano lessons and later exploring rhythm in her baskets; attending Huntingdon College; a strained relationship with her mother; meeting her biological family; attending the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa and earning a Master's degree in social work; working as a social worker and psychologist for over 20 years; balancing a career with family; taking a basket-making class in an effort to relax and do something for herself; making baskets in spare time and teaching herself new techniques; her family's move to Las Vegas, Nevada; teaching basket-making classes to adults; developing Math in a Basket curriculum; an interest in Fibonacci and the inclusion of its ratio in her baskets; an interest in color and natural dyes; returning to North Carolina and focusing full time on basket making; receiving a North Carolina Arts Council Emerging Artists grant to photo-document her body of work; becoming interested in chaos theory and its application to her basketry; the popularity and success of Math in a Basket; teaching experiences at Penland School of Crafts, Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts, and John Campbell Folk School; receiving a North Carolina Arts Council Visual Artist grant to study Cherokee, Choctaw, and other Native American tribes' basketry; her extensive basket collection; the honor of being named a North Carolina Living Treasure; participating in juried shows, including exhibiting at the Smithsonian Craft Show for 12 years and the Philadelphia Museum of Art Craft Show for seven years; the evolution of her workspace and studio; making the Carolina snowflake, which was exhibited at the White House; her exhibition history; an increasing respect for and recognition of baskets as art objects; the advantages university-trained artists have over self-taught artists; learning the business side of art making through trial and error; living and working in an incredible community of artists and collectors in North Carolina; a growing interest and participation in donating her baskets for fundraisers; and looking forward to spending more time with her grandchildren. Sudduth also recalls Cynthia Bringle, Carol Sedestrom Ross, Kenneth Trapp, Howard Risatti, Katie Gingrass, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Billie Ruth Sudduth is a basketmaker from Bakersville, North Carolina. Mija Riedel (1958- ) is a curator and writer from San Francisco, California.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 15 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hr., 42 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Psychologists -- North Carolina  Search this
Social workers -- North Carolina  Search this
Topic:
Basket makers -- North Carolina -- Interviews  Search this
Basket making -- Cherokee  Search this
Basket making -- Choctaw  Search this
Basket making -- Study and teaching  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Women artists -- North Carolina -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.suddut07
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-suddut07

James Henri Howard Papers

Correspondent:
Woolworth, Alan R.  Search this
Weslager, C.A.  Search this
Witthoft, John  Search this
Swauger, James Lee  Search this
Turnbull, Colin  Search this
Horn, Frances L.  Search this
Garcia, Louis  Search this
Fogelson, Raymond D.  Search this
Hodge, William  Search this
Hayink, J.  Search this
Feder, Norman  Search this
Ervin, Sam J. Jr  Search this
Feraca, Stephen E., 1934-  Search this
Feest, Christian F.  Search this
Cree, Charlie  Search this
Davis, Edward Mott  Search this
De Busk, Charles R.  Search this
Iadarola, Angelo  Search this
Brasser, Ted J.  Search this
Bunge, Gene  Search this
Cavendish, Richard  Search this
Clifton, James A.  Search this
DeMallie, Raymond  Search this
Blake, Leonard W.  Search this
Dean, Nora Thompson  Search this
Spier, Leslie, 1893-1961  Search this
Smith, John L.  Search this
Swanton, John Robert  Search this
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Peterson, John H.  Search this
Paredes, J. Anthony  Search this
Schleisser, Karl H.  Search this
Reed, Nelson A.  Search this
Medford, Claude W.  Search this
Lurie, Nancy Oestreich  Search this
Opler, Morris Edward  Search this
Nettl, Bruno, 1930-  Search this
Kraft, Herbert C.  Search this
Johnson, Michael G.  Search this
Lindsey-Levine, Victoria  Search this
Kurath, Gertrude  Search this
Adams, Richard N. (Richard Newbold), 1924-  Search this
Allen, James H.  Search this
Barksdale, Mary Lee  Search this
Battise, Jack  Search this
Creator:
Howard, James H., 1925-1982 (James Henri)  Search this
Names:
Lone Star Steel Company  Search this
Extent:
10.25 Linear feet
Culture:
Seminole Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Dakota Indians  Search this
Shawnee Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Creek Indians  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Ojibwa Indians  Search this
Cheyenne Indians  Search this
Chickasaw Indians  Search this
Choctaw Indians  Search this
Yanktonai Indians  Search this
Seneca Indians  Search this
Yuchee  Search this
Omaha Indians  Search this
Iroquois Indians  Search this
Cherokee Indians  Search this
Arikara Indians  Search this
Potawatomi Indians  Search this
Pawnee Indians  Search this
Ponca Indians  Search this
Micmac Indians  Search this
Kickapoo Indians  Search this
Sauk and Fox Nation  Search this
Menominee Indians  Search this
Delaware Indians  Search this
Oto Indians  Search this
Tonkawa Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Oklahoma -- Archeology
Date:
1824-1992
bulk 1950-1982
Summary:
To a considerable degree, the James H. Howard papers consist of manuscript copies of articles, book, speeches, and reviews that document his professional work in anthropology, ethnology, ethnohistory, archeology, linguistics, musicology, and folklore between 1950 and 1982. Among these are a few unpublished items. Notes are relatively scant, there being somewhat appreciable materials for the Chippewa, Choctaw, Creek, Dakota, Omaha, Ponca, Seminole, and Shawnee. The chief field materials represented in the collection are sound recordings and photographs, but many of the latter are yet to be unidentified. A series of color photographs of Indian artifacts in folders are mostly identified and represent the extensive American Indian Cultural collection of costumes and artifacts that Howard acquired and created. Other documents include copies of papers and other research materials of colleagues. There is very little original material related to archeological work in the collection and that which is present concerns contract work for the Lone State Steel Company.
Scope and Contents:
The James Henri Howard papers document his research and professional activities from 1949-1982 and primarily deal with his work as an anthropologist, archeologist, and ethnologist, studying Native American languages & cultures. The collection consists of Series 1 correspondence; Series 2 writings and research, which consists of subject files (language and culture research materials), manuscripts, research proposals, Indian claim case materials, Howard's publications, publications of others, and bibliographical materials; Series 3 sound recordings of Native American music and dance; Series 4 photographs; and Series 5 drawings and artwork.

Howard was also a linguist, musicologist, and folklorist, as well as an informed and able practitioner in the fields of dance and handicrafts. His notable books include Choctaw Music and Dance; Oklahoma Seminoles: Medicines, Magic, and Religion; and Shawnee! The Ceremonialism of a Native American Tribe and its Cultural Backround.

Some materials are oversize, specifcially these three Winter Count items: 1. a Dakota Winter Count made of cloth in 1953 at the request of James H. Howard, 2. a drawing of British Museum Winter Count on 4 sheets of paper, and 3. Photographs of a Winter Count.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 5 series: Series 1. Correspondence, 1960-1982, undated; Series 2. Writings and Research, 1824-1992; Series 3. Sound Recordings, 1960-1979; Series 4. Photographs, 1879-1985; Series 5. Drawings and Artwork, 1928-1982.
Chronology:
1925 -- James Henri Howard was born on September 10 in Redfield, South Dakota.

1949 -- Received his Bachelor of Arts from the University of Nebraska.

1950 -- Received his Master of Arts from the University of Nebraska and began a prolific record of publishing.

1950-1953 -- Began his first professional employment as an archaeologist and preparator at the North Dakota State Historical Museum in Bismarck.

1955-1957 -- Was a museum lecturer at the Kansas City (Missouri) Museum.

1957 -- James H. Howard received his Ph.D. at the University of Michigan. Joined the staff of the Smithsonian's River Basin Surveys in the summer.

1957-1963 -- Taught anthropology at the University of North Dakota.

1962 -- Chief archeologist at the Fortress of Louisberg Archeological Project in Nova Scotia.

1963-1968 -- Taught anthropology at the University of South Dakota; State Archeologist of South Dakota; Director of the W. H. Over Dakota Museum.

1963-1966 -- Director of the Institute of Indian Studies, University of South Dakota.

1968-1982 -- Associate professor of anthropology at Oklahoma State University at Stillwater (became a full professor in 1971).

1979 -- Consulted for exhibitions at the Western Heritage Museum in Omaha, Nebraska.

1982 -- Died October 1 after a brief illness.
Biographical/Historical note:
James H. Howard was trained in anthropology at the University of Nebraska (B.A., 1949; M.A., 1950) and the University of Michigan (Ph.D., 1957). In 1950-1953, he served as archeologist and preparator at the North Dakota State Historical Museum; and, in 1955-1957, he was on the staff of the Kansas City (Missouri) Museum. During the summer of 1957, he joined the staff of the Smithsonian's River Basin Surveys. Between 1957 and 1963, he taught anthropology at the Universtity of North Dakota. Between 1963 and 1968, he served in several capacities with the University of South Dakota including assistant and associate professor, director of the Institute of Indian Studies (1963-1966), and Director of the W.H. Over Museum (1963-1968). In 1968, he joined the Department of Sociology at Oklahoma State University, where he achieved the rank of professor in 1970. In 1979, he was a consultant for exhibitions at the Western Heritage Museum in Omaha, Nebraska.

Howard's abiding interest were the people of North America, whom he studied both as an ethnologist and archeologist. Between 1949 and 1982, he worked with the Ponca, Omaha, Yankton and Yaktonai Dakota, Yamasee, Plains Ojibwa (or Bungi), Delaware, Seneca-Cayuga, Prairie Potatwatomi of Kansas, Mississipi and Oklahoma Choctaw, Oklahoma Seminole, and Pawnee. His interest in these people varied from group to group. With some he carried out general culture studies; with other, special studies of such phenomena as ceremonies, art, dance, and music. For some, he was interest in environmental adaptation and land use, the latter particularly for the Pawnee, Yankton Dakota, Plains Ojibwa, Turtle Mountain Chippewa, and Ponca, for which he served as consultant and expert witness in suits brought before the United Stated Indian Claims Commisssion. A long-time museum man, Howard was also interested in items of Indian dress, articles associated with ceremonies, and other artifacts. He was "a thoroughgoing participant-observer and was a member of the Ponca Hethuska Society, a sharer in ceremonial activities of many Plains tribes, and a first-rate 'powwow man'." (American Anthropologist 1986, 88:692).

As an archeologist, Howard worked at Like-a-Fishhook Village in North Dakota, Spawn Mound and other sites in South Dakota, Gavin Point in Nebraska and South Dakota, Weston and Hogshooter sites in Oklahoma, and the Fortess of Louisbourg in Nova Scotia. He also conducted surveys for the Lone Star Steel Company in Haskall, Latimer, Le Flore and Pittsburg counties in Oklahoma.
Related Materials:
Howard's American Indian Cultural Collection of Costumes and Artifacts, that he acquired and created during his lifetime, is currently located at the Milwaukee Public Museum. In Boxes 19-21 of the James Henri Howard Papers, there are photographs with accompanying captions and descriptions in binders of his American Indian Cultural Collection of Costumes and Artifacts that his widow, Elfriede Heinze Howard, created in order to sell the collection to a museum.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by James Henri Howard's wife, Elfriede Heinz Howard, in 1988-1990, 1992, & 1994.
Restrictions:
The James Henri Howard papers are open for research. Access to the James Henri Howard papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ethnology -- United States  Search this
Ethnomusicology  Search this
Folklore -- American Indian  Search this
Powwows  Search this
Citation:
James Henri Howard Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1994-30
See more items in:
James Henri Howard Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1994-30
Online Media:

Ethel Cutler Freeman papers

Creator:
Freeman, Ethel Cutler, 1886-1972  Search this
Names:
American Museum of Natural History  Search this
United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs  Search this
Extent:
61.03 Linear feet (114 boxes)
Culture:
Seminole Indians  Search this
Maasai (African people)  Search this
Culture  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Florida
Date:
1934-1972
Summary:
Ethel Cutler Freeman was an amateur Seminole specialist and research associate with the American Museum of Natural History. Her papers also reflect field work among the Arapaho, Shoshoni, Navaho, Pueblo, Hopi, Kickapoo, and people of the Virgin Islands, the Bahama Islands, and Haiti, and the music and chants of Africa, including those of the Maasai, Zulu, and Pygmies. A small amount of material relates to the Hoover Commission on Indian Affairs, of which Freeman was a member. Correspondents include several Seminole Indians and government officials, personal acquaintances, organizations, and associates of the American Museum of Natural History.
Scope and Contents:
These papers reflect the anthropological interests of Ethel Cutler Freeman. The papers in this collection include her notes and diaries, published articles, unfinished manuscripts, and source materials. The bulk of the collection is material relating to the Seminole Indians of Florida.

Mrs. Freeman also made several trips to the Southwest and Mexico to study such tribes as the Arapaho, Shoshone, Navajo, Pueblo, and Hopi. There is substantial information from these studies included in this collection. She also made less extensive studies of various other cultures in the Virgin Islands, the Bahamas, and Haiti. In 1950, she studied tribal music and chants of several African tribes and the material from these studies forms the major portion of Series 7.

The collection also contains several sound recordings made by Freeman and numerous photographs, negatives, and slides. During rehousing, additional materials including index cards and notebooks from field trips were located and incorporated into the collection. A small amount of material relates to the Hoover Commission on Indian Affairs, of which Freeman was a member.

Correspondents include several Seminole Indians and government officials, personal acquaintances, organizations, and associates of the American Museum of Natural History as well as Dean Amadon, Richard Archbold, Conrad M. Arensberg, Dana W. Atchley, Jacques Barzun, Ruth Benedict, Leonard J. Brass, Louis Capron, Frances Densmore, Margery S. Douglas, John W. Griffin, A.J. Hanna, Ronald F. Lee, Margaret Mead, Robert Cushman Murphy, Kenneth W. Porter, Harry L. Shapiro, Howard Sharp, Frank Speck, Charlton W. Tebean, and Clark Wissler.

Although the majority of the collection spans the years 1934 to 1972, there are some items with dates that fall outside of this range. Some published materials are dated as early as 1822 and one note is dated 1975 and was added to the collection after Freeman's death in 1972. The folders containing these items have been dated accordingly, but these outlier dates have not affected the dates of the sub-series or series.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 15 series: (1) Biographical information and miscellaneous personal papers, 1939-1971; (2) Correspondence, 1936-1972; (3) Manuscripts, 1936-1971; (4) Source Material, 1934-1970; (5) Seminole Indians, 1934-1972; (6) North American Indians, 1936-1971; (7) Cultures other than North American Indian, 1943-1970; (8) Meetings, 1956-1968; (9) Printed materials, 1936-1972; (10) Pamphlets, 1935-1970; (11) Population and Material Culture, 1939, 1951-1963; (12) Sound recordings, 1940-1958, 1969-1970; (13) Lists of Photographs, 1939-1970; (14) Photographs, 1936-1971; (15) Index Cards, undated
Biographical Note:
Ethel Cutler Freeman was born in 1886 in Morristown, New Jersey. Freeman was the daughter of a prosperous family, which gave her the opportunity to study abroad in England at Mademoiselle Marie Souvestre's Academy for girls. After studying in England, Freeman returned to the United States and was married to Leon S. Freeman, a New York broker, in 1909.

By 1934, Freeman had become bored with the typical social activities available to her; while discussing the matter with a friend, Marcellus Hartley Dodge, she described herself as having a "brain full of cobwebs." Dodge, a former trustee at Columbia University, suggested that Freeman enroll in some courses at Columbia. Acting on Dodge's advice, Freeman started taking graduate courses in psychology and sociology at Columbia University, but soon became fascinated with anthropology. During her studies at Columbia, Freeman spent time in the western United States studying the Arapaho and Shoshone while her husband recuperated from a horse riding accident; it was at this point that she developed a taste for field work and an interest in Native American cultures. After completing her studies, Freeman decided that she wanted to study the Seminole people of Florida, near whom she and her family owned a winter home in Naples.

Back on the East Coast, Freeman met Dr. Clark Wissler, then Curator of the Indian Division of the American Museum of Natural History. Wissler was supportive of Freeman's aspirations to continue her anthropological studies, but balked at her expressed interest in the Seminole, whom at that time had a reputation for not being open to contact with outsiders. Undaunted, Freeman contacted W. Stanley Hansen, the man in charge of Seminole settlement; after repeated correspondence with Hansen convinced him she was no mere hobbyist, he agreed to help her make connections within the Seminole community.

Freeman made two visits to the Big Cypress Reservation for the American Museum of Natural History with a government representative before taking her 14-year-old daughter, Condict, and 12-year-old son, Leon Jr., for an extended stay with a group of Seminoles at the heart of the Everglades in February of 1940. After that first winter stay with the Seminoles, Freeman spent virtually every winter living within their remote communities and studying their culture. Over time, Dr. Wissler became impressed by Freeman's thorough and insightful reports and analysis of her findings among the Seminoles and got the American Museum of Natural History to back her winter field studies. Eventually Freeman's work gained her a reputation for being an expert on Seminole culture, which often placed her in the role of consultant to government agencies on issues dealing with Seminole and broader Native American concerns.

As a result of her long acquaintance with the Seminoles, Freeman also became interested in how different groups of Native Americans and other cultures adapted to changes brought about by contact with modern society. Freeman made several trips to the Southwestern United States and Mexico to study such tribes as the Arapaho, Shoshone, Navajo, Pueblo, Choctaw, and Hopi; she also made less extensive studies of various other cultures in the Virgin Islands, the Bahamas, and Haiti. In 1950, Freeman went to Africa to study tribal music and chants of several tribes. Much later, in 1968, the American Museum of Natural History sent Freeman to Portugal to study local costumes.

In the 1940s, Freeman took part in publishing studies for the Department of Agriculture about the Seminoles and worked as an advocate for the Navajo, who at that time were in tense relations with the United States government over their living conditions. From 1947 to 1957, Freeman worked as a representative for the American Civil Liberties Union on the National Coordinating Committee for Indian Affairs; she also was a member of the Indian Rights Committee for the American Civil Liberties Union from 1946 to 1966. From 1948 to 1950, Freeman served as a member of the Hoover Commission for Reorganization of Government within the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Throughout her studies in the field and her activities as an advocate for Native American rights, Freeman published her work frequently and gave many talks at a variety of conferences and special events. In 1964, Freeman traveled to Moscow to deliver her paper, "The Correlation between Directed Culture Change and Self Determination," at the 7th International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences; she attended the same conference series the following year in Japan to deliver another paper, entitled "Lawlessness in an Indian Tribe as a Microcosm of a World Trend." Freeman continued visiting and studying the Seminoles in Florida late into her career, making her last visit the year before her death.

Ethel Cutler Freeman died on July 14th, 1972.

Sources Consulted

Letter to Mrs. Margaret Blaker, Archivist at the Smithsonian Institution's Anthropological Archives; Washington, D.C. from Ethel Cutler Freeman. Dated April 24, 1972. Located in vertical files, folders on Ethel Cutler Freeman, in the reading room of the National Anthropological Archives.

"Morristown Anthropologist; Mrs. Leon Freeman Likes Seminole Indians." Newark Sunday News, February 16, 1947.

"New Vernon Woman, Indian Authority." The Morris Observer, October 13, 1955.

"She's 'Hooked' On Seminole Indians: Leading Authority On That World." Daily Record, March 6, 1970.

"The Sentinel Visits--Indian Authority Mrs. Leon Freeman: Who Is Now Working To Rescue A Nation." Sunday Sentinel, February 2, 1947.

Chronology

1886 -- Born in Morristown, New Jersey.

1909 -- Married Leon S. Freeman.

1934 -- Began taking graduate courses at Columbia University in philosophy before changing to anthropology.

1936 -- Field work with the Arapaho and Shoshone.

1938 -- Joined American Anthropological Association. First became associated with American Museum of Natural History.

1939-1943 -- Winter field work with Florida Seminoles.

1940-1948 -- Special Field Assistant, American Museum of Natural History.

1943 -- Joined American Ethnological Society.

1944 -- Field work in Mexico searching for a lost tribe of Seminoles; studied the Mascogas, Papagos, and Kickapoo.

1945 -- Field work in New Mexico, studying the Pueblo and Navajo.

1946 -- Joined the Society of Women Geographers. Field work with the Navajo, Papago, and Hopi.

1946-1948 -- Winter field work with Florida Seminoles.

1947 -- Field work with the Navajo, Papago, and Pueblo.

1947-1957 -- Represented the American Civil Liberties Union on the National Coordinating Committee for Indian Affairs.

1947-1966 -- Member Indian Rights Committee, American Civil Liberties Union.

1948 -- Appointed first female trustee of the American Institute of Anthropology. Became Field Associate, American Museum of Natural History.

1948-1950 -- Member Hoover Commission for Reorganization of Government – Bureau of Indian Affairs.

1949 -- Field work in the Bahamas, studying native culture.

1950 -- Field work in Africa, studying the Zulu, Masai, and pygmy peoples.

1951 -- Winter field work with Florida Seminoles.

1952 -- Field work studying native cultures of the Virgin Islands and Haiti.

1953-1955 -- Winter field work with Florida Seminoles.

1955-1957 -- Acting Chairman, American Civil Liberties Union.

1957 -- Field work studying Mexican Seminoles.

1957-1958 -- Winter field work with Florida Seminoles.

1959 -- Attended annual meeting of American Anthropological Association in Mexico City.

1960-1965 -- Winter field work with Florida Seminoles.

1963 -- Field work in Oklahoma, studying Seminoles.

1964 -- Presented paper, "The Correlation between Directed Culture Change and Self Determination" VII International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences, Moscow.

1968 -- Studied costumes of Portugal for American Museum of Natural History.

1965 -- Presented paper, "Lawlessness in an Indian Tribe as a Microcosm of a World Trend" VIII International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences, Tokyo and Kyoto, Japan.

1970-1971 -- Winter field work with Florida Seminoles.

1972 -- Field work in Portugal and the Azores. Died, July 14.

Selected Bibliography

1942 -- Freeman, Ethel Cutler. "We Live with the Seminoles," Natural History 49, no. 4 (April 1942): 226-236.

1944 -- Freeman, Ethel Cutler. "The Seminole Woman of the Big Cypress and Her Influence in Modern Life," América Indígena 4, no. 2 (April 1944), 123-128.

1960 -- Freeman, Ethel Cutler. "Culture Stability and Change among the Seminoles of Florida." In Men and Cultures: Selected Papers of the Fifth International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences, Philadelphia, September 1-9, 1956, edited by Anthony F.C. Wallace, 249-254. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1960. Freeman, Ethel Cutler. "Directed Culture-Change and Selfdetermination in Superordinate and Subordinate Societies," Proceedings of the 7th International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences 4, Moscow (August 1964), 85-90.

1961 -- Freeman, Ethel Cutler. "The Happy Life in the City of Ghosts: An Analysis of a Mikasuki Myth," The Florida Anthropologist 14, nos. 1-2 (March-June 1961), 23-36.

1964 -- Freeman, Ethel Cutler. "Directed Culture-Change and Selfdetermination in Superordinate and Subordinate Societies," Proceedings of the 7th International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences 4, Moscow (August 1964), 85-90.

1965 -- Freeman, Ethel Cutler. "Two Types of Cultural Response to External Pressures Among the Florida Seminoles," Anthropological Quarterly 38, no. 2 (April 1965), 55-61.

1968 -- Freeman, Ethel Cutler. "Lawlessness in an Indian Tribe as a Microcosm of a World Trend," Proceedings of the VIIIth International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences, 1968, Tokyo and Kyoto (Tokyo: Science Council of Japan, 1968) 191-193.
Related Materials:
Photo lot 62, W. Stanley Hanson photographs of Seminole Indians in Florida, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

Objects donated by Ethel Cutler Freeman held in Department of Anthropology collections in accession 319549.

The Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum on the Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation also holds an Ethel Cutler Freeman collection.
Separated Materials:
Film materials were transfered to the Human Studies Film Archive under the accession numbers HSFA 1986.11.8 (African footage) and HSFA 1986.11.9 (Seminole footage).
Provenance:
The papers of Ethel Cutler Freeman were left to the National Anthropological Archives by the terms of her will. Her son, Leon Freeman, Jr., donated the collection to NAA in August 1972.
Restrictions:
By Ethel Freeman's instructions, the collection was restricted for ten years dating from the receipt and signing of the release forms on October 12, 1972. Literary property rights to the unpublished materials in the collection were donated to the National Anthropological Archives.

Access to the Ethel Cutler Freeman papers requires an appointment.
Seminole recordings cannot be accessed without the permission of the Seminole Tribe.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Navajo Indians  Search this
Language and languages  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Anthropology  Search this
Music  Search this
Citation:
Ethel Cutler Freeman papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.XXXX.0166
See more items in:
Ethel Cutler Freeman papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-xxxx-0166

Production Records

Topic:
Beautiful Beyond: Christian Songs in Native Languages (Sound recording : 2004)
Creator::
National Museum of the American Indian. Office of Public Programs  Search this
Extent:
1 cu. ft. (1 record storage box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Floppy disks
Electronic records
Digital versatile discs
Audiotapes
Compact discs
Place:
Mall, The (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1993-2005
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of production records created by Howard Bass, Cultural Arts Manager, in the planning and development of the recording, "Beautiful Beyond: Christian Songs in Native Languages." Produced in partnership with Smithsonian/Folkways Recordings, "Beautiful Beyond" is an anthology of hymns and songs from Native American communities throughout the United States. The recording demonstrates how music helped to preserve and perpetuate Native languages. Communities represented include: Cherokee, Cheyenne, Choctaw Indians, Comanche, Creek Indians, Hopi Indians, Kiowa Indians, Teton Indians (Lakota Indians), Mohawk Indians, Hawaiians, Navajo Indians, Ojibwa Indians, Oneida Indians, Seminole Indians, Tewa Indians, and Yupik Eskimos. Also included are records related to the festivities and performances planned for the opening of National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) building on The Mall in September 2004. Materials include correspondence, biographies, essays, bibliographies, liner notes, recording logs, and audio recordings. Some materials are in electronic format.
Rights:
Restricted for 15 years, until Jan-01-2021; Transferring office; 03/21/2011 memorandum, Toda to File; Contact reference staff for details.
Topic:
Hymns  Search this
Sacred songs  Search this
Indians of North America -- Social life and customs  Search this
Indians of North America -- Languages  Search this
Choctaw Indians  Search this
Creek Indians  Search this
Hopi Indians  Search this
Kiowa Indians  Search this
Teton Indians  Search this
Mohawk Indians  Search this
Hawaiians  Search this
Navajo Indians  Search this
Ojibwa Indians  Search this
Oneida Indians  Search this
Seminole Indians  Search this
Tewa Indians  Search this
Yupik Eskimos  Search this
Special events  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Floppy disks
Electronic records
Digital versatile discs
Audiotapes
Compact discs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-089, National Museum of the American Indian. Office of Public Programs, Production Records
Identifier:
Accession 11-089
See more items in:
Production Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa11-089

Vba anumpa Luk a na ponaklo holisso : A book of questions on the Gospel of Luke in the Choctaw language; for the use of Bible classes and Sabbath schools / By Rev. Alfred Wright ..

Author:
Wright, Alfred 1788-1853  Search this
Physical description:
92 p. ; 16 cm
Type:
Texts
Date:
1852
Topic:
Choctaw language  Search this
Call number:
BS345.C61 Luke 1852
BS345.C61Luke 1852
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_400871

Flute

Collector:
Miss Frances T. Densmore  Search this
Donor Name:
Miss Frances T. Densmore  Search this
Culture:
Choctaw  Search this
Object Type:
Flute
Place:
Philadelphia, Neshoba County, Mississippi, United States, North America
Accession Date:
16 Mar 1933
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Accession Number:
123461
USNM Number:
E365174-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3a548e098-76f0-46df-8165-6a79677e7992
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8410525
Online Media:

Tar River; Choctaw Roundup

Recording artist:
Ozark Hoedowners  Search this
Maker:
C & L  Search this
Physical Description:
shellac (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 10 cm; x 3 15/16 in
Object Name:
sound recording
Subject:
Music  Search this
ID Number:
1996.0320.22247
Accession number:
1996.0320
Catalog number:
1996.0320.22247
Maker number:
OH-108
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Entertainment
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746ac-6631-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1334272

Choctaw music

Author:
Densmore, Frances  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
1944
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_89823

Chikasha Poya: We Are Chickasaw - Injunuity 2

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2014-08-20T19:41:50.000Z
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
Youtube Category:
Education  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_y-5ZrA32h7g

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